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LEMANN INSTITUTE

R E C IFE ( 7 )

FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES

SI T E S O F I L L IN O I S FAC U LT Y

RI O DE JANE I R O ( 9)

CO L L A B O R AT I O N IN BRAZIL

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S ÃO PAU LO ( 1 8 )

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MISSION Established in 2009 through a generous gift from Jorge Paulo Lemann and the Lemann family, the mission of the Lemann Institute is to promote research and teaching about Brazil by faculty and graduate students at the University of Illinois and their Brazilian counterparts, drawing on Illinois’s extensive resources for teaching and scholarship. The Lemann Institute builds on nearly a half-century of campus teaching and research in Brazilian Studies, as well as longstanding collaboration with Brazilian scholars in areas such as agricultural sciences and economics to expand knowledge and understanding of Brazil across disciplines and colleges. It does so by offering fellowships to Illinois and Brazilian students at the graduate and undergraduate levels, funding faculty research, organizing international conferences on Brazilian subjects, and supporting cultural activities.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 4

DIRECTOR’S REPORT

32 OUTREACH

6 SELF-STUDY

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37 BRASA

FACULTY LEADERSHIP

PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

14 RESEARCH

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ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE

22 EDUCATION

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FUTURE DIRECTION AND GOALS

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42 APPENDICIES

LEMANN BRAZIL LEADERSHIP FUND


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DIRECTOR’S REPORT

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THE 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR MARKED THE FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LEMANN INSTITUTE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. FROM ITS EARLY BEGINNINGS IN 2009, THE INSTITUTE HAS GROWN INTO A THRIVING HUB OF TEACHING, SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY, AND CULTURAL PROGRAMMING RELATED TO BRAZIL.

During 2014-2015, the Institute and the campus welcomed two new Brazilianist faculty members, adding to the existing community of scholars focusing on Brazil. Campus Brazil-related programs were also enriched by the presence of a literary theorist from UNICAMP who spent the fall semester in residence as the Lemann Distinguished Visiting Brazilian Scholar.

Love. The study, which included program reviews, participant surveys, and an external evaluation, was initiated during fall 2015, and a preliminary report has been produced. The following report describes the self-study, summarizes accomplishments of the Institute during its first five years, and highlights activities undertaken during the most recent academic year.

The Institute awarded a number of grants to faculty and graduate students through its Collaborative Research Grants, Lemann Research Fellowships, and Lemann Graduate Fellowships. As in the past, the Institute sponsored and cosponsored a variety of cultural and academic events, ranging from film festivals and artistic performances to lectures on education and the economy in Brazil. During 2014-2015, the Institute focused many of its events on issues related to education and inequality in Brazil.

2014-2015 also marked my first year as Director of the Lemann Institute. It was a privilege to assume leadership of the Institute and its programs, building on the accomplishments of the previous four years under the guidance of directors Mary Arends-Kuenning and Joe Love. I look forward to another productive year as we review the results of the self-study and begin the strategic planning process that will position the Institute for the future.

Through its continued participation in the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program, the University of Illinois welcomed 28 undergraduates and 48 master’s and doctoral students from Brazil. Also in 2014-2015, the Lemann Institute served as the headquarters for the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) for its final year. The Institute hosted its final BRASA conference at King’s College in London in 2014. It was the largest BRASA meeting to date. Institute staff also assisted with the transition of the organization to Brown University, which took place in July 2015. During the last academic year, Institute staff and board members laid the groundwork for a comprehensive review of its programs. The self-study is designed to review the initiatives of the Lemann Institute since its inception in 2009, as well as the broader environment of Brazil-focused research, teaching, and collaboration at the University of Illinois over the first five years of the Institute’s existence. The focus on both the Institute’s work and university-wide research, teaching, and collaboration is intended to present the landscape within which the Institute functions and to assess the impact of its work on campus and beyond. The self-study and planning committee includes Jerry Dávila, Mary Arends-Kuenning, Werner Baer, and Joseph

JERRY DÁVILA Director Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor of Brazilian History

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SELF-STUDY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES’ FIRST SELF-STUDY, EXTERNAL EVALUATION, AND STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS BEGAN DURING THE 2014-2015 ACADEMIC YEAR, AND THE STUDY ITSELF WAS INITIATED THIS PAST FALL. The process marks the transition from the creation and program-building of the Institute’s first years to its maturing engagement and long-term development goals. The self-study is designed to map the initiatives of the Institute, the work of Brazilian Studies at the University of Illinois, and Illinois’s engagement and collaboration in Brazil. The external evaluation and strategic planning processes will identify long-term opportunities for program development within the Lemann Institute’s distinctive profile, which supports and promotes the interdisciplinary field of Brazilian Studies on campus, as well as the university-wide footprint of engagement with Brazil through research collaboration and student training.

The Lemann Institute’s work is guided by the belief that Brazilian Studies and the networks of collaboration between University of Illinois faculty and their Brazilian peers together form a dynamic area of activity that advances core university missions of research, teaching, and global engagement. The Illinois model aims to both strengthen the traditional core of Brazilian Studies and promote campus-wide research, engagement, and collaboration in Brazil. The planning documents will be reviewed by the Board of Overseers at its 2016 meeting and the strategic plan will be submitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Office of International Programs and Studies.

Jerry Dávila

Mary Arends-Kuenning

Werner Baer

Joseph Love

Committe Chair, Director of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies and Lemann Professor of Brazilian History

Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, Past Director of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, 2011-2014

Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor of Economics

Emeritus Professor of History, Past Director of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, 2009-2011

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LEMANN INSTITUTE IMPACT THE SELF-STUDY ASSESSED THE IMPACT OF THE INSTITUTE’S ACTIVITIES AND APPROACH OVER ITS FIRST FIVE YEARS ON THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CAMPUS, AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL, AND IN BRAZIL.

CAMPUS IMPACT

NATIONAL IMPACT

The impact of the Lemann Institute at the University of Illinois can best be understood through its role as a catalyst. From the outset, one of its goals was to increase faculty capacity for teaching and research related to Brazil. One of the Institute’s most important achievements has been facilitating a substantial increase in recruitment of faculty engaged in Brazilian Studies, including the Jorge Paulo Lemann Chair in Brazilian History along with new hires in the Portuguese program, the Department of History, the School of Social Work, and the School of Music. The Institute’s support for faculty and student research, its extensive Brazil-related programming, and the community of scholars it fosters have been and will continue to be instrumental in the recruitment of faculty.

The self-study revealed that the impact of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies extends well beyond the University of Illinois campus. Indeed, the establishment of the Institute has made Illinois a visible and recognized national leader in Brazilian Studies. An additional gift from the Lemann family enabled the Institute to expand its leadership by hosting the Brazilian Studies Association from 2011 until 2015. But the Lemann Institute’s most significant impact has perhaps been on the field of Brazilian Studies itself.

Perhaps less expected is the significance of the Institute’s role in expanding engagement with research and collaboration in Brazil through the work of faculty not previously focused on Brazil-related topics. We anticipate that this role will continue, and stands to intensify given the interest among faculty generated by the collaborative research accord with FAPESP.

Brazilian Studies in the United States has traditionally been defined as an interdisciplinary field connecting Anthropology, Culture Studies, Economics, History, Music and Political Science. These have been and remain the disciplines that employ scholars who spend the majority of their teaching and research efforts on Brazil. They are also the disciplines that are the most active in undergraduate teaching on Brazil and in training graduate students with research specializations in Brazilian society and culture.

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The traditional model of Brazilian Studies is one that faces visible challenges: across the country, Brazilian Studies programs have struggled for many years to sustain student enrollments, particularly in Portuguese language instruction. As a result, many universities have severely cut back or even eliminated Portuguese language programs. Area studies programs overall are facing similar challenges as federal and institutional support for these efforts dwindles. The Lemann Institute at Illinois defines an alternative model for the future of Brazilian Studies and area studies more generally: while firmly grounded in the traditional core disciplines of literature, language, history, and the social sciences, these disciplines are part of a broader environment of scholarship, training, and collaboration. Since its inception, the Institute has sought to include faculty from colleges and schools across campus on its advisory board. It has also constituted review committees for grants and fellowships with faculty from across a broad set of disciplines and, as a result, has awarded research funding and graduate fellowships widely across campus. Portuguese language instruction has also pursued this broader model with positive results, employing an emphasis on “real world” Portuguese language training and course development intended to reach students in many different fields. Indeed, among the Institute’s 52 affiliated faculty, the majority are outside of the traditional definition of Brazilian Studies. (See Appendix 1.) The Institute is in a unique position to encourage, support and connect faculty engaging with Brazil across a range of disciplines. Key areas of focus for the Lemann Institute are: • SUPPORTING research and teaching in areas traditionally outside the core of Brazilian Studies • ENCOURAGING and supporting new areas of research and collaboration that expand the landscape of faculty engagement and student training connected to Brazil • PROMOTING the teaching of Portuguese by connecting with student interests across campus Conceptualizing Brazilian Studies as a much more extensive network of activities across the university is an intellectually dynamic approach that creates a denser and more sustainable critical mass of faculty and students and creates a university-wide awareness of how engagement with Brazil and Brazilian institutions contribute to the core missions of the university.

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IMPACT IN BRAZIL One important aspect of the university’s engagement with Brazil has been the training of outstanding Brazilian graduate students. This has resulted in a distinguished cohort of alumni, which includes the President of the Central Bank of Brazil, the President of the Bank of the Northeast, and numerous faculty in economics and history at the University of São Paulo and other leading universities in Brazil. The participation in the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program during the past four years has afforded opportunities to train more Brazilian graduate and undergraduate students. The CAPES Bolsa Sanduiche program enables Brazilian doctoral students to attend Illinois and supports postdoctoral faculty through a visiting scholars program The Lemann Institute has enabled the university to extend its impact in Brazil in other ways. During the past six years, 26 of the 136 publications by Lemann Institute affiliated faculty have been published in Brazil, significantly advancing scholarly engagement by Illinois faculty in the country. The Institute has likewise facilitated the dissemination of Brazilian scholarly work through a translation program in conjunction with the Brazilian National Library and the University of Illinois Press. Research collaboration is another important aspect of the Institute’s and the university’s engagement with and impact in Brazil. Each year, the Institute awards grants for collaborative research projects that engage University of Illinois researchers and scholars based in Brazil, and during the past five years, fifteen Brazilian faculty have been involved in such work. In 2015, the campus signed a five-year agreement with São Paulo Research Foundation, FAPESP, that supports research collaborations between Illinois faculty and faculty based in São Paulo. A map of ongoing university and faculty collaborations is shown on the map on page 21. Finally, the Lemann Institute has an impact in Brazil through its professional development and leadership training. The Lemann Brazil Leadership Program provides scholarship support to professionals at Brazil’s Central Bank to enable them to pursue a Master of Science in Policy Economics.


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ACTIVITIES OF THE JORGE PAULO LEMANN CHAIR IN BRAZILIAN HISTORY, JERRY DĂ VILA In 2014, I stepped into the Directorship of the Lemann Institute, a task made considerably easier by the excellent work of my predecessors, Mary Arends-Kuenning and Joe Love. This year also saw the publication of the 10th edition of the History of World Societies, a world history textbook that I co-author. The book, which is used in college and advanced high school courses, is an exciting opportunity to reach a broad student audience, bringing a Latin American perspective to the study of historical challenges. I had opportunities to present papers on race relations and educational inequality at the Lemann Dialogue as well as the Workshop on Education and Inequality in Brazil and the United States, held in Urbana. Over the year, I continued conducting research on a new project on the history of challenges to racial discrimination in Brazil, and delivered a lecture on the topic at Tel Aviv University. The growing cohort of doctoral students in Brazilian history is thriving, with the first of the students passing their qualifying exams and heading into the field to conduct dissertation research. John Marquez, working on slavery in colonial Rio de Janeiro, was awarded a prestigious and highly competitive Fulbright-Hays Fellowship in addition to a Lemann Graduate Fellowship. Marilia Correa continues to develop her dissertation topic on soldiers purged from the armed forces under military rule.

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT In addition to the recruitment of Jerry DĂĄvila as the Jorge Paulo Lemann Chair in Brazilian History, the campus has successfully recruited a number of other Brazilianist scholars during the past five years, thanks to the presence of the Lemann Institute. Marc Hertzman joined the faculty in the Department of History in fall 2013. Michael Silvers, an ethnomusicologist who studies musical cultures of northeastern Brazil as well as music and the environment, was recruited by the UI School of Music and joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 2013. More recently, anthropologist John Karam of DePaul University was recruited as Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, where he began teaching in 2015. Professor Karam, an award-winning specialist on Middle Eastern immigration and ethnicity in Brazil and the Southern Cone, deepens campus expertise on race and ethnicity in the second largest nation in the Americas. The department also recruited Glen Goodman, a historian of German immigration and ethnicity in Brazil, who joined the faculty in 2014. Another faculty recruitment during AY2014-2015 is Liliane Windsor, an assistant professor from Rutgers University who joined the faculty of the School of Social Work in fall 2015. Born and raised in Brazil, Professor Windsor conducts research on substance abuse and HIV risk in the United States and Brazil.

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LEMANN INSTITUTE DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLARS This program brings preeminent researchers from Brazil to the University of Illinois for a semester or academic year. It is open to scholars in any area. Visiting scholars teach one course each semester they are in residence. Through this program, the Institute has succeeded in recruiting highly distinguished scholars to campus, nearly all of whom have been founders or presidents of their professional associations in Brazil. The Lemann Distinguished Visiting Brazilian Scholars have proven to be dedicated teachers and have made themselves available, both during their tenure on campus and afterward, for student advising and ongoing dialogue with faculty. Below is a list of Lemann Distinguished Visiting Brazilian Scholars during the Institute’s first five years. Brief biographies and personal statements appear in Appendix 2.

2014-2015 LEMANN DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLAR

• ROBERTO DA MATTA, 2010, Professor of Anthropology, PUC-Rio, and Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame

He is associate editor of the journal Alea and has published essays in such journals as Critique, Cultural Critique, Latin American Music Review, Luso-Brazilian Review, The Brooklyn Rail, and Parallax. While at Illinois, Professor Durão completed work on Fragmentos Reunidos. He also taught a graduate seminar in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese entitled “Critical Theory: Made in Brazil.”

• EDUARDO COUTINHO, 2011, Professor of Comparative Literature, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro • CARLOS AZZONI, 2012, Professor of Economics, University of São Paulo • JULIO-CESAR BICCA-MARQUES, 2013, Professor of Primatology, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul • ANTONIO SERGIO GUIMARÃES, 2014, Professor of Sociology, University of São Paulo

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During academic year 2014-2015, the Lemann Institute hosted FABIO DURÃO, professor of literary theory at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and president of the Brazilian National Association for Research in Literature and Linguistics (ANPOLL). He holds a Ph.D. from Duke University (2003) and is the author of Modernism and Coherence (2008), Teoria (literária) americana (2011), and the forthcoming Fragmentos Reunidos (2015). His edited and coedited volumes include Modernism Group Dynamics: The Politics and Poetics of Friendship (2008) and Culture Industry Today (2010).

As part of the Lemann Lecture Series, Professor Durão gave a lecture entitled “Bispo do Rosário and the Ruse of Brazilian Art,” in which he talked about the role of the concept of art in Brazil and the artist Arthur Bispo do Rosário, who lived for 50 years at the Juliano Moreira Colony for the insane.


“THE INTERACTION AMONG PROFESSORS FROM DIFFERENT FIELDS PROVIDED AN ATMOSPHERE OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY DISCUSSION THAT IS RARE IN BRAZIL AND WHICH MAY WORK AS AN EXAMPLE FOR FUTURE INITIATIVES HERE AT UNICAMP.”

— FABIO DURÃO, LITERARY THEORY LEMANN DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLAR 2014

“I HAD AN OUTSTANDING AND UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE THAT CONTRIBUTED TO MY PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL GROWTH AND THAT I BELIEVE THAT ALSO WAS PRODUCTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMUNITY. THANK YOU FOR THIS OPPORTUNITY!” — JULIO-CESAR BICCA-MARQUES, PRIMATOLOGY LEMANN DISTINGUISHED BRAZILIAN SCHOLAR 2013

“MY RESEARCH AGENDA RECEIVED A NEW BOOST FROM THE WHOLE EXPERIENCE. THE INTERACTION WITH HIGHLYPREPARED AND MOTIVATED STUDENTS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD ALLOWED ME A BROADER UNDERSTANDING OF BRAZILIAN PROBLEMS I AM USED TO DEALING WITH.”

— CARLOS AZZONI, ECONOMICS LEMANN DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLAR 2012

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BEYOND NEW FACULTY RECRUITMENT, THE LEMANN INSTITUTE FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES HAS PLAYED A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN SUPPORTING UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS FACULTY IN DEVELOPING NEW RESEARCH INTERESTS AND COLLABORATIONS IN BRAZIL.

Signature research programs of the Institute during the past five years have been the Collaborative Research Grants program and the Lemann Faculty Research Fellows program. The first research awards were made in 2010. Since then, the Institute has funded 15 Research Fellowships and 13 Faculty Collaborative Research Grants. These awards have been made to faculty in 20 different departments or programs. The list of grant recipients appears in Appendices 3 and 4. As part of the self-study, a survey of Lemann Institute research grant recipients was conducted. Among the 30 recipients of Lemann Faculty Research Fellowships or Collaborative Grants, 15 (50 percent) indicated that it was their first funding specifically for research on or collaboration in Brazil. Two recipients indicated that it funded their first work as a primary investigator and lead author. In addition to Institute grants programs, the Jorge Paulo Lemann endowed chairs in Economics and in History constitute another source of research funding, providing support for the research of the chair holders.

LEMANN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH GRANTS The Lemann Collaborative Research Grants program has been successful in fostering new collaborations between University of Illinois faculty and counterparts in Brazil. Over the past five years, Lemann Collaborative Research Grants have supported joint research with 15 Brazilian faculty, five at the University of São Paulo and one each at the Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV), Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Universidade Federal de Paraíba (UFPB), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Universidade de Fortzleza (Unifor), USP São Carlos, and the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Paraná (PUC-Paraná). A list of recipients of Lemann Collaborative Research Grants, along with project titles, appears in Appendix 3.

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2014-2015 ACTIVITIES Two faculty projects were chosen to receive Collaborative Research Grants during the 2014-2015 academic year. The projects and research teams are listed below. Reports on recipients’ research will be available with the 2015-2016 annual report.

PROJECT 1 • PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS Cecilia Leal, Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Débora Gonçalves, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil • CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Mauro R. Sardela, Senior Research Scientist, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratories (FS-MRL), University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. • COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROJECT Natural biocides and heat treatment on Brazilian tropical woods: changes in crystallinity after fungal decay

PROJECT 2 • PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Bryan White, Institute for Genomic Biology, Department of Animal Sciences and Patrícia Emília Naves Givisiez, Associate Professor, Animal Sciences Department, Centro de Ciências Agrárias/Universidade Federal da Paraíba (CCA/UFPB). • COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROJECT Seeding a strategic collaboration with Illinois to build capacity in genomics at the Federal University of Paraiba: a metagenomic approach to understand Salmonella infections in poultry Appendix 5 contains reports for research undertaken during 2014-2015 by Lemann Faculty Research Fellow Karen Tabb and Lemann Collaborative Research Grant recipient Daniel Rock.

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LEMANN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS Fifteen Illinois faculty members have received Lemann Faculty Research Fellowships since the Institute was launched. A number of research projects undertaken with Institute support have led to publications and conference presentations.

2014-2015 LEMANN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS The Institute continued to support faculty research, building connections with faculty. During the 2014-15 academic year, the Institute provided Lemann Faculty Research Fellowship grants to the following recipients: • ANDREW MILLER: Affiliate, Department of Plant Biology Mycologist, Illinois Natural History Survey; Ecology, systematics, and functional diversity of Brazilian freshwater ascomycetes. • MICHAEL SILVERS: Assistant Professor of Musicology, School of Music; Voices of Drought: Forró Soundscapes in Northeastern Brazil • MATTHEW WINTERS: Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science; International Law and Brazil’s International Reputation

SCHOLARLY RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND PUBLICATIONS The University of Illinois has an extensive footprint of scholarship on Brazil and research collaboration between Illinois and Brazilian faculty. Since 2009, faculty affiliates have published 131 scholarly works on subjects related to Brazil, including 12 books, 3 edited volumes, 27 book chapters, 88 articles, and the translation of a novel. Of these titles, 26 were published in Brazil, and an additional 4 elsewhere in Latin America, reflecting the faculty’s engagement within Brazil and Latin America. Through its research grants, conferences, and lectures, the Lemann Institute has played a significant role in fostering an environment of research and collaboration that has generated this scholarship. Institute conferences have resulted in two edited volumes while the Lemann Lecture Series provides a forum for faculty to present works in progress.

PUBLICATIONS The Lemann Faculty Research Fellows grants and Lemann Collaborative Research Grants have been particularly effective in stimulating scholarly publications on Brazil. During the past five years, affiliates of the Lemann Institute have produced 39 publications with support from the Institute (including the chairs in Economics and History). These included 2 volumes of papers presented at Lemann Institute-sponsored conferences, edited by Werner Baer, as well as single-author books by Werner Baer, Jerry Dávila, and Joseph Love. Beyond these books, 34 articles and book chapters, emerged from research financially supported by the Lemann Institute, and there are currently four books and two articles in process, also based on research supported by the Institute. A list of works published and works in progress by faculty supported by Lemann Institute grants and the Jorge Paulo Lemann Endowed Chairs appears in Appendices 6 and 7.

BOOKS IN TRANSLATION SERIES The Lemann translation series makes outstanding Brazilian essays and monographs available in English. The first book, Alfredo Bosi’s Brazil and the Dialectic of Colonization, was published by the University of Illinois Press in 2015. Bosi’s essay is widely recognized as perhaps the most important interpretation of Brazilian culture of the last 30 years. Lemann funds for its publication were supplemented by the Brazilian Ministry of Culture and National Library. A second book, Gilberto Hochman’s A Era do Saneamento is currently being translated into English. Hochman is a political scientist who directs the program in History of Science, Medicine and Public Health at the Casa Oswaldo Cruz in Rio de Janeiro. A Era do Saneamento examines the emergence of national public health planning in the aftermath of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The Lemann Translation Series complements the translation studies program at the University of Illinois established by Professor Elizabeth Lowe. Professor Lowe specializes in Portuguese-to-English translations, and published a new version of Euclides da Cunha’s classic Backlands: The Canudos Campaign with Penguin Press in 2010. Following Professor Lowe’s retirement in 2015, Wail Hassan, Professor of Comparative and World Literature, was named director of the program.

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2014-2015 PUBLICATIONS Lemann Institute faculty affiliates undertook a productive research agenda that yielded numerous publications on topics ranging from aging and health among older Brazilians, bioenergy policy, political corruption, and the Brazilian economy to Arab-Brazilian literature and Portuguese linguistics. A list of works published during 2014 and 2015 appears below.

Andrade, F.C.D., Corona, L., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2014). Life-expectancy with and without cognitive impairment among Brazilian older adults. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 58(2): 219225. Corona, L., Andrade, F. C. D., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2014). The association of hemoglobin concentration with disability and decreased mobility among older Brazilians. The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, 18(3): 336-341. Baer, Werner, The Brazilian Economy: Growth and Development, 7th edition, Lynne Rienner Press, 2014) Also published in Chinese in 2015 Merle Bowen and Ayesha Tillman, “Developing Culturally Responsive Surveys: Lessons in Development, Implementation and Analysis from Brazil’s African Descent Communities,” American Journal of Evaluation 36:1 (March 2015), p. 25-41. Mojica, L., González de Mejía, E. 2015. “Characterization and comparison of protein and peptide profiles and their biological activities of improved common bean cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mexico and Brazil.” Plant Foods Human Nutr. 70 (2), 105-112. Hassan, Waïl, “Arabic and the Paradigms of Comparison.” ACLA State of the Discipline Report, 2015. http://stateofthediscipline.acla.org/entry/arabic-and-paradigms-comparison-1 Hassan, Waïl, "Arab-Brazilian Literature: Alberto Mussa’s Mu‘allaqah and South-South Dialogue." In The Middle East and Brazil, edited by Paul Amar. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2014. 322-35. Ionin, T., Grolla, E., Montrul, S. and Santos, H. 2014. When articles have different meanings: acquiring the expression of genericity in English and Brazilian Portuguese. In P. Cabredo Hofherr & A. ZribiHertz (eds.), Crosslinguistic studies on Noun Phrase structure and reference, Syntax and Semantics vol. 19. Brill, pp. 367-397. Watkins, D.W., Moraes, M.M.G., Önal,H., and others (2015). “Bioenergy Development Policy and Practice Must Recognize Potential Hydrologic Impacts: Lessons from the Americas,” Environmental Management, doi:10.1007/s00267-015-0460-x. Sebastião, Schwingel, Chodzko-Zajko. “Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion.” Revista de Saúde Pública, 48(4):709-712, 2014 Benedetti, Schwingel, Chodzko-Zajko, Meurer, Brito, Almeida. RE-AIM: a proposal for evaluating physical activity programs.” Revista Kairós Gerontologia, 17(2), 295-314, 2014 Scazufca, M., Menezes, P., Tabb, K., Kester, R., Rossler, W., & Huang, H. (2015). Identification and treatment of depression of older adults in primary care: findings from the Sao Paulo Ageing and Health Study. Fam Pract. doi: 10.1093/fampra/cmv062 Tabb, K.M., Huang, H., Menezes, P., e Silva, G., Chan, Y., Faisal-Cury, A. (2014). Ethnic differences in antenatal smoking findings from a primary care sample in São Paulo, Brazil. Ethnicity & Health, 1 (9) DOI: 10.1080/13557858.2014.90739 Winters, Matthew, “Political Corruption and Partisan Engagement: Evidence from Brazil,” with Rebecca Wietz-Shapiro. 2015. Journal of Politics in Latin America 7:1: 445-81.

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RESEARCH COLLABORATIONS Since its inception, the Lemann Institute at the University of Illinois has pursued research and other collaborations with Brazilian universities. In addition to research collaborations fostered through the Lemann Collaborative Research Grants program, Werner Baer has sustained collaborative projects with the University of São Paulo and the Federal University of Pernambuco, both of which have resulted in the publication of edited volumes. A third collaborative research project is under way with the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The project focuses on histories of entrepreneurship in Brazil and involves the participation of Professor Baer, Jerry Dávila, Marc Hertzman, and Joseph Love. The map to the right depicts the sites in Brazil where University of Illinois faculty sustain collaborations. Collaborative sites listed by faculty in the survey completed by affiliates for the self-study report appears in Appendix 8.

FAPESP ACCORD (2015-2020) In April 2015, the University of Illinois and the São Paulo Research Foundation, FAPESP, signed a scientific cooperation accord that provides for joint funding of research collaborations between faculty at Illinois and faculty at universities in the State of São Paulo who have research lines supported by FAPESP. Two calls for collaborative research will be issued by FAPESP and the Lemann Institute during the five-year period, and each partner institution will receive a total of $120,000. The first call for proposals was issued in July 2015 with a deadline of October 26, 2015. FAPESP and the Lemann Institute anticipate funding up to three proposals in the first cycle. Funding for the University of Illinois’s participation is being provided through the Lemann Faculty Collaborative

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UNIVERSITY OF SÃO PAULO

Research Grant program and through a contribution of $10,000 from the UI Office of Corporate and International Relations. The agreement with FAPESP is particularly significant, because the University of São Paulo (USP) is ranked as the leading university in Latin America, and the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), also in São Paulo, is closely ranked with USP. Additionally, the FAPESP agreement may serve as a model for other Illinois/Brazil collaborations. In 2015, Jerry Dávila met with Dr. Luiz França, Director of the National Institute for Amazonian Research, during his visit to the University of Illinois and discussed the possibility of establishing a collaborative research agreement akin to the agreement established with FAPESP in São Paulo.


SITES OF ILLINOIS FACULTY COLLABORATION IN BRAZIL

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GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE

EDUCATION THE LEMANN INSTITUTE PROMOTES TEACHING RELATED TO BRAZIL ON CAMPUS, AS WELL AS OPPORTUNITIES IN BRAZIL FOR UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS STUDENTS, THROUGH GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES, AND SHORT-TERM COURSES.

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Additionally, the Institute promotes specialized training for Brazilian students participating in programs at Illinois, such as the Lemann Brazil Leadership Fund and the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program. Thanks to extensive faculty expertise related to Brazil, the campus is able to offer a robust curriculum in Brazilian Studies, with 16 courses across a variety of disciplines. A list of courses in Brazilian Studies appears in Appendix 9.

EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIA CAPES-FIPSE U.S.-BRAZIL HIGHER EDUCATION CONSORTIA (2008-2014) The University of Illinois served as the lead U.S. institution in two CAPES-FIPSE Consortia. These consortia funded student mobility and faculty collaboration between Brazilian and U.S. universities, financing scholarships for Illinois students to study at partner universities in Brazil and students from those universities to study at Illinois. U.S. government funding for new proposals was suspended in 2011. The two Illinois-led consortia were:

GLOBAL TALENT DEVELOPMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP The first Lemann Graduate Fellowships were awarded in 2011. Since then, the Institute has awarded 25 fellowships to students in 16 different programs. Lemann Graduate Fellowships provide a year of tuition and a stipend of $18,000 or a semester of tuition and a stipend of $9,000. In order to support graduate students who wish to conduct research in Brazil, the year-long Graduate Fellowship can also be applied to one semester along with a summer stipend and airfare to Brazil. A complete list of Lemann Graduate Fellows appears in Appendix 10. The self-study shows a correlation between disciplines in which the Institute has provided faculty research support and those of recipients of graduate fellowships. We interpret this pattern as an indication of the importance of faculty research support for sustaining the areas of study within which graduate students train: in other words, graduate students are less likely to conduct research on Brazil if their faculty are not doing so. Applicants for Lemann Graduate Fellowships over the past five years have come from the following departments: • Agricultural and Biological Engineering • Agricultural and Consumer Economics • Anthropology

• PROJECT DIRECTOR Peter Kuchinke, Education Policy and Leadership • PARTNER INSTITUTIONS University of Minnesota - Twin Cities University of São Paulo University of Brasília • YEARS 2008-2012

• Business Administration • Communications • Comparative and World Literature • Curriculum and Instruction • Ecology • Economics • Global Studies • History

BIOENERGY AND BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING: AN EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

• Human Development and Family Studies • Kinesiology • Latin American and Caribbean Studies • Law

PROJECT DIRECTOR Richard Gates, Agricultural and Biological Engineering • PARTNER INSTITUTIONS Purdue University - West Lafayette, Indiana Federal University of Viçosa University of São Paulo - Pirassununga • YEARS 2009-2014

• Linguistics • Music • Political Science • Recreation, Sports and Tourism • Social Work • Spanish and Portuguese • Urban and Regional Planning When the Institute had a surplus in its early years, it provided support for graduate students to attend conferences to present their research on subjects related to Brazil. As funding permits, this would be valuable to continue.

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LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS 2014-2015

HAPATSOU WANE Ph.D. Candidate, Program in Comparative and World Literatures

ANNIE CONTRACTOR M.A. Candidate, Department of Urban and Regional Planning

Research title: Decolonizing Autobiographies: Narratives of Detour by African Diasporic Women

Research Title: Greenwashing as a Justification for Housing Displacement in Fortaleza

Hapsatou's research centers on African diaspora literature, Anglophone and Francophone African literature, Afro-Brazilian literature, gender and women studies, postcolonial theory, genre theory and memory studies. Her dissertation presents fictional autobiographies written by women from Senegal, South Africa, Brazil and Guadeloupe as practices of life-writing de-routing/ de-rooting the postcolonial diasporic discourse of narratives of return. Hapsatou graduated with an M.A. in English Studies/African Civilization and Literature from the University Gaston Berger in Senegal. She also holds an M.A. in African Studies and an M.A. in Comparative World Literature from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. See Appendix 11 for institute-supported research reports.

Annie Contractor has worked in international development and applied research for 10 years, focusing on slowing deforestation and public health. She is currently working toward a Master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois, where her research is focused on housing displacement in the Brazilian city of Fortaleza. Her broader research interests include spatial social justice, gendered dynamics of urban planning, and meaningful stakeholder engagement in public decision-making. See Appendix 11 for institute-supported research reports.

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LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS 2015-2016

MAYARA BALHEGO DE LIMA M.A. Candidate, Department of Urban and Regional Planning Research Title: Haitian Presence in Southern Brazil: Its Present and Future Impacts on Immigration Policy Mayara Balhego de Lima's project examines the contemporary migration circuit between Haiti and Brazil. Her work examines the impacts and influence of migration as it interacts with national, state, and local government policy.

JOHN MARQUEZ Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History Research Title: Community, Culture and Conflict: The Lives of Enslaved and Free People of African Descent in Late-Colonial Rio de Janeiro John Marquez's project focuses on the vice-regal capital of colonial Brazil, examining social relationships in slave society in order to understand the tension between the social and cultural proximity between slaves and free people amid differences of social hierarchy and legal status.

LENORE MATTHEW Ph.D. Candidate, School of Social Work Research Title: Psychosocial Barriers to Formal Employment among Low-Income Women in Brazil Lenore Matthew is conducting research in Salvador, Bahia, examining economic, demographic, social and psychological factors that affect low-income women's inclusion in formal work, in a context in which nearly half of Brazil's working population is active in informal employment.

RENATO SCHWAMBACH VIEIRA Ph.D. Candidate, Agricultural and Consumer Economics Research Title: Efficiency and Distributive Effects of Transit Fare Subsidies in Brazilian Cities Renato Vieira's project applies methodologies used in U.S. and European cases to understand the role of transportation studies both as social welfare efforts and as efforts to relieve urban traffic, considering the complexity of transportation both in cost and congestion for job accessibility.

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TRAVEL GRANTS BRAZIL SCIENTIFIC MOBILITY-RELATED TRAVEL In conjunction with the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program, the Lemann Institute previously granted a number of Faculty Travel Awards to enable STEM faculty to travel to Brazil to enrich instructional materials, establish and maintain linkages with Brazilian institutions, explore new areas of research, and recruit BSMP students to come to Illinois. Recipients of these travel awards were: • Rod Mackie, Department of Animal Sciences • Glaucio Paulino, Department of Civil Engineering • M ary Grace Danao, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering • Phil Cardoso, Department of Animal Sciences • Joanna Shisler, Department of Microbiology Three of these faculty members subsequently submitted successful Faculty Collaborative Research grant applications, demonstrating the effectiveness of the travel awards. Professor Mackie partnered with a scientist at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica (PUC) - Paraná; Professor Danao collaborated with a counterpart at the University of São Paulo (USP); and Professor Shisler undertook a project with faculty at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). In addition, the Institute facilitated access to a similar program administered by the Fundação Lemann. Professor David Bullock of the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics and Professor Jack Juvik of the Department of Crop Sciences participated in the program. The travel grants constituted an effective means of expanding faculty engagement and collaboration in Brazil that could be applied across a broader set of disciplines should funding be available to resume the program.

LEMANN STUDY ABROAD SCHOLARSHIPS Since 2009, 654 University of Illinois students have participated in yearlong, semester, summer, or short-term programs in Brazil. To encourage undergraduate student study in Brazil, the Lemann Institute has funded 29 Lemann Study Abroad Scholarships, typically in the amount of $1,500, in particular to help defray students’ airfare. The scholarships are awarded through the Study Abroad Office.

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2014-2015 LEMANN STUDY ABROAD SCHOLARSHIPS During academic year 2014-2015, four scholarship recipients studied in Brazil. Reports on their experiences appear in Appendix 12. • Patricia Margis, Advertising, University of Vicosa, AY14-15 • Ashley Nagele, Animal Sciences, University of São Paulo Pirassununga, spring 2014 • Matthew Nolan, Agricultural and Consumer Economics, USP/ESALQ Piracicaba, spring and fall 2014 • Zachary Schneeweis, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Vicosa, spring 2014 Three students were selected to receive Lemann Study Abroad Scholarships during the 2014-2015 selection cycle. They completed their study abroad in 2015. • Homari Aoki, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, USP/ ESALQ Piracicaba, spring 2015 • Renee Pond, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, fall 2015 • Alejandra Reyes Pena, Journalism, CIEE Liberal Arts Program, Salvador, spring 2015 Reports from Homari Aoki and Salvador Reyes Pena are included in the appendix. Renee Pond’s report will be submitted this spring.


“MY TIME SPENT ABROAD WAS TRANSFORMATIVE on many levels, both personally and professionally. On the personal side, I rediscovered the value of friendship and the importance of understanding and appreciating cultural differences. On the professional end, I have gained deep insights into the social dynamics that affect communication and how to behave in a professional Brazilian environment.”

“THE LEMANN SCHOLARSHIP WAS INSTRUMENTAL in my trip to Brazil and has changed the direction of my life. I now hope to work at an engineering company with U.S.-Brazil relations. Although my study abroad experience has ended, my desire to be a part of the Brazilian culture has not . . . Since I’ve been back, I already have met students from UFV and am doing my best to return the favors that so many Brazilians did for me.”

“THIS SEMESTER HAS ONLY CONFIRMED MY LOVE FOR THE PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE, and I will continue to study it in the semesters to come. I know that this semester abroad has strengthened my writing, not only in English, but in Portuguese as well, which is very important in my line of work—journalism. I would also like to return to Brazil one day and do some research and reporting. I fell in love with the country, and I thank those who helped make this experience possible for me.”

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SHORT COURSES

BRAZIL SCIENTIFIC MOBILITY PROGRAM

Study abroad and courses that include a travel component in Brazil (typically during spring break or at the end of the spring semester) afford opportunities to address Brazilian topics across a much wider set of disciplines. The Lemann Institute has provided financial support to defray the costs of these courses, as well as assistance in preparing students by arranging guest lectures by affiliated faculty or the Institute Director.

The Brazil Scientific Mobility Program has been an effective means of increasing the flow of Brazilian students to the University of Illinois. Since the inception of the program, the Lemann Institute has played a leading role in planning and implementation of BSMP at Illinois. Institute staff, under the direction of former director Mary ArendsKuenning, served as liaisons among University of Illinois faculty, administrators, and staff, as well as representatives of Brazilian universities, government agencies, and foundations. Professor Arends-Kuenning traveled to Brazil to meet with officials at CAPES and CNPq, the agencies that administer the program. The University of Illinois signed a Memorandum of Understanding with CAPES in September 2012. Academic year 2013-2014 saw the highest number of BSMP students at Illinois, with 51 undergraduates, 3 Ph.D. students, 7 Ph.D. “sandwich” scholarship students, and 3 postdoctoral scholars. In 2013, the University of Illinois was featured as one of the main universities participating in the BSMP in publications by the Institute for International Education, which administers the BSMP.

One of the most successful short courses offered for the past five years is a program offered through the College of Business for students in the Business Honors program and the James Scholar Program. Pre-trip classes offered during the last eight weeks of the spring semester prepare students for travel to São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro through a study of the history, culture, and economy of Brazil. Professor Terry McCoy, an expert on Latin America, teaches the course and accompanies the students to Brazil, along with Dan Anderson, Associate Director of International Programs in the College of Business. While in Brazil, students attend lectures offered by faculty of the University of São Paulo, visit businesses and cultural/historical sites, and participate in a case competition. The student teams in the case competition are comprised of University of Illinois students working together with students from the University of São Paulo. Below is a list of the short courses taught in-country and campus courses that include a stay in Brazil offered during the past five years. • A CE 298 Sustainable International Agriculture, 2011, 2012 • B ADM 199 Business Administration James Scholars in Brazil, annually 2011-2015 • A BE 397 Destination Brazil: Bioinstrumentation for Engineering Research in Sub-Tropical Climates, 2011, 2012 • H DFS 379/499 The Brazilian Family, 2010, 2012 • A CE 398/299 Brazil Agribusiness Club • A CE/BADM 436 International Business Immersion Program, 2012, 2013 In addition, the College of Business MBA Program’s “Global Consulting Program” annually sends students to Brazil to work with clients on consulting projects. Since 2012, 135 MBA students have participated in the consulting projects, which are listed in Appendix 13.

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BSMP participation at the University of Illinois is summarized in the table below. Students Participation 2012

55

2013

64

2014

76

2015

11*

*Reduction due to program budget cuts in Brazil

The BSMP also contributes to the broader circulation of Brazilian graduate students and faculty who come to Illinois as visiting scholars. Visiting faculty and doctoral students are often funded by “Bolsa Sanduiche” travel fellowships funded by the Brazilian federal agencies CAPES and CNPq, as well as state funding agencies such as FAPESP. While on campus, doctoral students and faculty from Brazil conduct research under the direction of a University of Illinois advisor. Currently, the major areas of activity among visiting scholars are in the Departments of Economics and History, though visiting scholars are housed in departments and programs across campus. Since arrangements for faculty supervision are conducted individually, it is difficult to know the precise number of visiting scholars from Brazil on campus each year. The Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) at the University of Illinois reports the following numbers of visiting Brazilian graduate students and faculty, some of whom are also counted as participants in the BSMP program because of their areas of study.


VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLARS Graduate Scholars

Faculty Visiting Scholars

Fall 2009

57

2009-2009

64

Fall 2010

55

2009-2010

63

Fall 2011

57

2010-2011

60

Fall 2012

58

2011-2012

75

Fall 2013

51

2012-2013

84

Fall 2014

60

2013-2014

91

Fall 2015

63

2014-2015

127

Since 2011, Mary Arends-Kuenning has participated in the Institute for International Education’s International Academic Partnership Program in Brazil. As a mentor, she gives an annual webinar about higher education in Brazil. She has also worked with U.S. higher education institutions to review their plans to engage with Brazil. The Brazilian government initiated a new scholarship program for Professional Science Master’s students, and the Institute coordinated the effort to enroll Illinois in the program, again under the leadership of Professor Arends-Kuenning.

2014-2015 BSMP ACTIVITIES The Lemann Institute continued to provide leadership for Illinois’s participation in the BSMP, and Illinois continues to be a leading U.S. campus participating in the program. In 2014-15, the university had 28 undergraduate students from Brazil participating in the program, 10 students in the Professional Science Master’s Program, and an additional 38 M.A. and doctoral students.

The Institute hosted several events for BSMP students throughout the academic year. In August 2014, the Institute hosted a welcome luncheon for new BSMP students entering in the fall semester. Program Coordinator Elis Artz and Adam Heinz presented an orientation session on cultural and social challenges that Brazilians might face at an American university. In May 2015, the Lemann Institute and the Study Abroad Office hosted an evening welcome reception for summer BSMP undergraduate students. The Institute worked closely with the Fundação Lemann to bring graduate students to the University of Illinois under the BSMP. The Fundação Lemann provides a stipend to Ph.D. students who study at six elite U.S. universities, including Illinois. This spring, the Institute hosted a visit from Tatiana Hochgreb-Hägle, Science without Borders Coordinator for the Fundação Lemann, who met with the BSMP graduate students sponsored by the Fundação. Lemann Institute staff continued to work with campus faculty and administrators to address the administrative and cultural challenges that BSMP presents. Institute staff organized meetings with Lilian Colsant, Education Cooperation Coordinator for the Brazilian Consulate in Chicago and BSMP students, along with university administrators, faculty, and study abroad staff. Illinois is fortunate to have a very strong team dedicated to BSMP, which includes Adam Heinz, campus Study Abroad Office, Meredith Blumthal, ACES Study Abroad, Teresa Finis, College of Engineering Study Abroad, and Professor Richard Gates, Agricultural and Biological Engineering. The departure of Adam Heinz this summer creates a significant administrative gap that will require even greater leadership of BSMP by Lemann Institute staff in the coming year.

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6

LEMANN BRAZIL

LEADERSHIP FUND

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The vision for the Lemann Brazil Leadership Fund was to broaden the reach of the Lemann Institute beyond students and faculty in order to contribute to the training of leaders in Brazil. In 2012, the Lemann Institute signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Master of Science in Policy Economics program and with the Central Bank of Brazil to formalize the participation of CBB employees in the MSPE program.

2014-2015 ACTIVITIES

The Institute provides tuition for up to three mid-level administrators from the Central Bank to pursue twoyear MSPE degrees at Illinois. The MSPE is a three-semester program that offers training in economic analysis and quantitative techniques directed at administrators in government and private institutions. Candidates are selected through a nomination process conducted by both the CBB and by the admissions committee of the MSPE Program. The selected candidates receive their salary from the CBB during their period of study, and the Lemann Institute provides scholarships covering tuition and fees.

In the summer of 2015, Director Jerry Dávila met with officials of the Central Bank of Brazil to discuss the program. Central Bank representatives, including Juliana Mozachi Sandri and Rafael Travassos Andrezzo, as well as the Consul-General of Brazil in Chicago, Ambassador Paulo Cesar de Camargo, have made it clear that there is considerable demand and potential for expanding the CBBMSPE program. The CBB is interested in training staff in areas beyond economics, such as law, psychology statistics, accounting, administration and information technology. Ms. Sandri and Mr. Andrezzo also believe that there is considerable demand for similar advanced studies in other federal ministries and agencies. This belief was confirmed by Ambassador Camargo, who indicated the likely interest of the Brazilian Foreign Ministry in exploring advanced training for diplomats at the University of Illinois.

The first participants from the Central Bank of Brazil arrived in 2012. Since the agreement with the Central Bank was established, nine students have studied or are studying in the program. Appendix 14 contains personal statements from program participants.

As shown in the list, four Central Bank professionals joined the MSPE program in 2014 and 2015. The Department of Economics, the Lemann Institute and the Central Bank streamlined the students’ coursework to a three-semester program to ensure participation by the largest number of students.

  Year

MSPE Students

2012

André Mueller Camila Maia

2013

Gabriel Heqab Claudio Coutinho Luis Vissoto

2014

Gustavo Isaac Martins

2015

José de Oliveira Filho Rafael Pressi Gustavo Santinoni Vera

“After completing my degree in 2016 and returning to Brazil, I will definitely be better prepared for my duties as a government employee.”

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7

LEMANN INSTITUTE

OUTREACH

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CONFERENCES AND LECTURES Fostering discussions of Brazil-related topics and disseminating the results of Brazil-focused research have been core elements of the Lemann Institute’s outreach. Since its inception, the Institute has sponsored or co-sponsored over 100 conferences and lectures that, together, have drawn hundreds of participants.

CONFERENCES Over the past five years, the Lemann Institute has sponsored or cosponsored 12 conferences. The Institute itself has typically organized one major conference per year. These conferences have had a broad multidisciplinary footprint, ranging across humanities, social sciences, crop sciences and engineering, social work, kinesiology and human development. The Institute has also held workshops in partnership with faculty at Brazilian Universities, including UFPE, USP and UFRJ, and has cosponsored other conferences on campus. Significant conferences have included two annual meetings of the Brazilian Studies Association (2012 and 2014) and the Third Lemann Dialogue (2013). A complete list of Lemann Institute-sponsored conferences appears in Appendix 15. The program for the Third Lemann Dialogue appears in Appendix 16.

LEMANN LECTURE SERIES The Lemann Lecture Series is a regular Institute activity that serves as the most common meeting point for affiliated faculty. The annual Lecture Series also serves as an opportunity for faculty and students to present work in progress and seek feedback. Finally, the Lecture Series provides students with an opportunity to meet leading Brazilianist scholars and public figures from Brazil. Between 2010 and 2015, the Institute has held or co-sponsored 95 lectures and presentations. A complete list of presentations in the Lemann Lecture Series appears in Appendix 17.

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS Each year the Institute hosts one or more distinguished speakers who are major figures in Brazilian public life and whose presence generates a broader campus dialogue around themes relevant to Brazil. Distinguished speakers have included the following: 2011

João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Author

2012

Alexandre Tombini, President, Central Bank of Brazil

2013

Denis Mizne, Director, Lemann Foundation

2013

Renato Villela, Secretary of Finance of Rio de Janeiro State (now Secretary of Finance of the State of São Paulo)

2014

Otaviano Canuto, Senior Advisor for BRICS, World Bank

2015

Gilberto Gil, musician, former Minister of Culture

2014-2015 ACTIVITIES The Institute welcomed several high-profile speakers and drew upon campus expertise to examine contemporary challenges in Brazil. The year’s programming highlight was the lecture and performance by renowned Brazilian artist and former Minister of Culture Gilberto Gil. The widely-advertised event drew an audience of over 850 to the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, including visitors traveling from Chicago, Indianapolis and Peoria. In addition, the Institute hosted several talks on the Brazilian economy. Otaviano Canuto, Senior Advisor for BRICS at the World Bank examined the trends shaping the stagnation of Brazil’s economy in the past year. Economics Professor Werner Baer spoke on infrastructure bottlenecks in Brazil’s economy. José Cheibub, Professor of Political Science at the University of Illinois examined patterns in the two-round 2014 national elections in Brazil. In all, the Institute organized ten campus visits in conjunction with lectures.

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During 2014-2015, both in its lecture series and in special events, the Lemann Institute deepened its focus on questions of education and inequality in Brazil. The Lemann lecture series included a talk by University of Texas Economist Leticia Marteleto on “Race and Education Inequality in Brazil.” In November 2014, Mary Arends-Kuenning organized the Workshop on Inequality in Education in Brazil and the United States, which included panelists from the University of São Paulo, the Federal University of Minas Gerais, the Fundação Lemann and different units of the University of Illinois, including the Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership, the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, the Department of History, and Illinois Promise, an access scholarship program. One of the outcomes of the Workshop on Inequality in Education was the selection of Eduardo Rios-Neto as the Lemann Distinguished Visiting Brazilian Scholar in 2015. The workshop program is attached as Appendix 18.

ANNUAL LEMANN DIALOGUE Each year, the Lemann Institute at the University of Illinois, along with Stanford University, Harvard University, and Columbia University jointly sponsor the annual Lemann Dialogue. The purpose of the Dialogue is to bring together U.S. and Brazilian scholars, along with policymakers and other experts from Brazil, to address contemporary economic, political, environmental, and social issues facing Brazil. The Lemann Institute at the University of Illinois hosted the Dialogue in fall 2013 and will once again serve as organizer in 2017. Institute faculty typically attend and present papers at each Dialogue. A list of Lemann Dialogues appears below. • Columbia University November 17-18, 2011 Educational Policy in Brazil • Harvard University October 25-26, 2012 Brazil and the Future of the Global City • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign November 7-8, 2013 Agricultural and Environmental Issues in Brazil • Stanford University November 20-21, 2014 Public Education in Brazil: Where is it headed and can technological innovation, entrepreneurship and policy research help it improve? • Columbia University November 19-20, 2015 Innovating in the Brazilian Public Sector: Institutional Challenges and Public Policies

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2014 AND 2015 LEMANN DIALOGUES

2014-2015 CULTURAL EVENTS

The Lemann Institute had several representatives at the 2014 Dialogue at Stanford and the 2015 Dialogue at Columbia, including three faculty members who served as presenters.

The Lemann Institute once again joined the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies to co-sponsor the Latin American Film Festival in September 2014 with the exhibition of the Brazilian film, “Wolf at the Door (O Lobo atrás da porta).” In November 2014, the Institute sponsored Mostra V on campus. The film “Blue Eyes (Olhos Azuis)” was screened at the Illini Union on November 10. Brazilian actress Cristina Lago attended the screening and answered questions from the audience. The public screening was followed by a reception. The Institute will host Mostra VI again this fall.

• 2014 Lemann Dialogue, Stanford University Werner Baer, panel presentation, “Institutional Obstacles to Brazil’s Economic Development”; Jerry Dávila, panel presentation, “Brazilian Quotas and Affirmative Action in Historical Perspective”; Mary Arends-Kuenning, panel presentation, “Quotas in Brazilian Public Universities” • 2015 Lemann Dialogue, Columbia University Werner Baer, panel presentation, “The Current Political and Economic Landscape”; Jerry Dávila, panel moderator, “Policies and Social Inclusion”; Mary Arends-Kuenning, panel presentation, “Innovating in Policy Making for Education”

CULTURAL EVENTS The Lemann Institute has since its inception offered a variety of events designed to promote Brazilian culture, including film screenings, art exhibits, and public conferences. The annual Latin American Film Festival and Mostra Brazilian Film Series offer the campus and community opportunities to view Brazilian films and hear presentations by Brazilian actors, directors, writers, and critics. Another annual event is the public conference on the Brazilian martial art and dance form, capoeira. A list of events sponsored and cosponsored by the Lemann Institute appears in Appendix 19.

The Institute sponsored cultural events aimed at local elementary school children during 2014-2015. In September 2014, Lemann Institute Program Coordinator Elis Artz began to visit elementary schools in order to provide presentations for classrooms and build relationships by attending their events. Elementary school students and teachers were encouraged to discover literature, enjoy reading, and, at the same time, learn about Brazil. An event called Portuguese Time in Schools brought teachers and students to the library for bilingual (Portuguese/ English) storytelling, music, and crafts. Since February 2015, Westview Elementary School in Champaign has offered a Portuguese language class to interested students twice a week and has started building a Brazilian Portuguese library. The goal of these outreach efforts is to increase the knowledge and awareness of Brazil in the educational community and the general public by promoting language and understanding of Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language.

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8

PORTUGUESE

LANGUAGE PROGRAM

PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION IS A KEY COMPONENT OF BRAZILIAN STUDIES, AND IT HAS BEEN AN AREA OF STRENGTH AT ILLINOIS, THANKS TO INVESTMENTS BY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE. SINCE ITS INCEPTION, THE INSTITUTE HAS SUPPORTED THE SALARY OF A PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE COORDINATOR AND HAS PROVIDED SUPPORT FOR PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING.

In recent years, Portuguese language instruction at Illinois has pursued the model of engagement across disciplines, with considerable success. This model emphasizes “real world” Portuguese language training and includes courses such as “Portuguese for Business” or “Brazilian Culture through Advertising.” Between 2009 and 2014, enrollment in Portuguese courses nearly doubled from 160 to 278 per year. The faculty in Portuguese is now expanding this approach by developing courses that connect with students in areas such as agriculture and engineering. A new course called “Hungering for Brazil,” for instance, connects food and agriculture to history, culture, development, and public policy. The Portuguese program fosters student engagement outside the classroom by conducting weekly “Bate Papos,” mentoring a registered student organization called Consulting Brazil, and organizing an annual Illinois Portuguese Language Connection Day together with Portuguese programs at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. Details on Portuguese language instruction and the growing program in Portuguese were compiled in the 2014 “Report on Undergraduate Portuguese Language and Brazilian Studies Program” prepared by Nola Senna, who held the position of Portuguese Language Coordinator from 2009 to 2015. A significant resource extending Portuguese language instruction is the CLACS Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship program, which provides academic year fellowships covering tuition and a stipend

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to graduate students and select undergraduate students who wish to study Portuguese. FLAS fellowships also provide summer support for graduate and undergraduate students to study Portuguese at language institutes in Brazil. For many students, this summer experience provides their first opportunity to have an in-country learning experience in Brazil. Since 2009, 81 students have held FLAS fellowships in Portuguese. A list of FLAS recipients is included in Appendix 20.

2014-2015 ACTIVITIES In 2014, the Director of the Portuguese Language Program, Nola Senna, announced her retirement. A national search for a new Teaching Assistant Professor was conducted by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese with the support of the Lemann Institute. The search resulted in the recruitment of DR. ANDREIA LISBOA DE SOUSA, who received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. During her time at UT Austin, Dr. De Sousa taught Portuguese and co-directed the Brazilian Studies Program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Her area of research is cultural studies in Education, with specializations in Gender and Women Studies and African Diaspora Studies. As mentioned above under Faculty Development, anthropologist John Karam was recruited from DePaul University as Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, further strengthening both the department and Brazilian Studies at Illinois.


9

BRASA

BRAZILIAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION

BRASA IS DEDICATED TO THE PROMOTION OF BRAZILIAN STUDIES AND CURRENTLY HAS MORE THAN 1000 MEMBERS IN THE UNITED STATES, EUROPE, AND LATIN AMERICA, INCLUDING BRAZIL. THE LEMANN INSTITUTE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ASSUMED RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE BRASA SECRETARIAT IN SUMMER 2011.

The 2014-2015 academic year represented BRASA’s final year at Illinois. Every two years, the association organizes an interdisciplinary conference for Brazilianist scholars. The biennial conference was held August 20-23, 2014 at King’s College, London. Organized by University of Illinois Lemann Institute staff, this was the largest BRASA conference to date, with nearly 200 panels and over 1000 participants. The last year was focused on the transition of the Secretariat from Illinois to Brown University, which took place in July 2015. Lemann Institute IT Coordinator Dan

Bacon took over as BRASA Executive Director from Mary Arends-Kuenning, and he has worked with counterparts at Brown University on the transition. Graduate Research Assistant Renato Vieira continued to put out the BRASA digest and collected materials for the annual Brazil Initiation Scholarship that BRASA awards each year. The BRASA website was re-developed and hosted at an external provider to enable future secretariats to manage the website without having to move it from location to location. Final steps in the transition were concluded at the BRASA Executive Committee meeting in May 2015. 

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10

LEMANN INSTITUTE

ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE

STRUCTURE AND RESOURCES AFFILIATES The Lemann Institute has 52 affiliated faculty who come from 29 departments located in eight colleges or schools across the university (Appendix 1). Two faculty members, Werner Baer and Jerry DĂĄvila, hold Lemann Chaired Professorships in Economics and in History.

RESOURCES The Institute’s activities and administration are funded from the annual net income generated from the endowment established with the Lemann family gift. Currently, income from the endowment supports a budget of $636,000. Matching funds from the Office of the Provost for the Lemann Graduate Fellowships increases the annual budget by $25,000 to $661,000. In addition to contributing to four administrative positions shared with CLACS, the budget provides full or partial support for a number of Institute staff members, including the Jorge Paulo Lemann Chair in Brazilian History, the Lemann Distinguished Visiting Brazilian Scholars, the Institute program coordinator, and the Portuguese language coordinator. Additional resources go toward faculty and student support and Institute programming. Faculty and student support includes the Lemann Faculty Research Fellowships, Lemann Collaborative Research Grants, Lemann Graduate Fellowships, Lemann Study Abroad Scholarships for Illinois undergraduates, CLACS/Tinker Pre-Dissertation Grants for research in Brazil, and

38

Lemann Brazil Leadership Scholarships. Programming support funds annual conferences, the Lemann Lecture Series, the Lemann Dialogue, cultural programming, Portuguese language programming, and co-sponsorship of Brazil-related events taking place on campus. Additional projects have been undertaken in past years as funding has permitted. These include the translation series with the University of Illinois Press that has resulted in two translations, one published and one in progress; course development grants for courses engaging with Brazilian subjects; travel grants for Illinois faculty working in STEM fields in conjunction with the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program; and graduate and undergraduate student grants to present conference papers on Brazil-related research.

CAMPUS RESOURCES The Lemann Institute benefits from resources available at the University of Illinois, most notably the University Library, whose holdings represent the second largest library collection among U.S. universities. Within this collection, works published in or about Brazil are among its most significant holdings. The University Library was a participant in the Farmington Plan, established in 1944 by the Library of Congress to promote collaboration in the acquisition of publications from countries outside of the United States. Because of the history of collaboration between faculty at the University of Illinois and at Brazilian institutions, particularly in agriculture, the University of Illinois Library became the acquisition and reference library for publications from Brazil in the United States. Currently, the library holds over 103,000 titles related to Brazil. A detailed discussion of the collection appears in Appendix 21.


EXTERNAL RESOURCES

BOARD OF OVERSEERS

Lemann Institute and other campus faculty have been entrepreneurial in pursuing external opportunities to support research and collaboration, through initiatives both in the United States and Brazil. These have included the CAPES-FIPSE U.S.-Brazil Higher Education Consortium Program and the new scientific cooperation accord with the São Paulo Research Foundation, FAPESP, described earlier in the section on Lemann Institute research. These funded initiatives have brought $533,900 to support research collaboration and student mobility designed to connect Illinois and Brazilian partners.

The Lemann Institute hosted a meeting of the Board of Overseers on April 20, 2015. Institute Director Jerry Dávila, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Barbara Wilson, and former director Mary ArendsKuenning, along with faculty members Werner Baer and Dara Goldman and Institute staff members Elis Artz and Gloria Ribble attended the meeting in person. Board members Edmund Amman, John Welch, Brazilian Consul General in Chicago Paulo Camargo, and Jorge Paulo Lemann attended the meeting via videoconference and phone call. The meeting provided an opportunity to review the Institute’s activities, examine the Institute’s financial health, and discuss program review and strategic planning.

The Institute has submitted a proposal, in collaboration with PUC-Rio, to the Brazilian Ministry of Education CAPES Abdias do Nascimento Academic Development Program grant. If awarded, the three-year grant will fund scholarships for black and indigenous students from PUCRio to study at the University of Illinois. However, Brazilian government budget difficulties have delayed the proposal review process.

2014-2015 ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE In summer 2014, Mary Arends-Kuenning stepped down as Institute Director, and Jerry Dávila assumed the role. Professor Arends-Kuenning had served as director from 2011 until 2014, overseeing the growth of the Institute and full implementation of its programs. She will continue to contribute to the Lemann Institute by serving as a member of its advisory committee. Also during summer 2014, Program Coordinator Camila Diehl departed and Elis Artz was hired as interim Program Coordinator. In 2015, through an open search that included 30 candidates, Artz was selected for the permanent position of Program Coordinator.

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11

2015-16 FUTURE DIRECTION AND

GOALS THE LEMANN INSTITUTE HAS A NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS PLANNED FOR THE 20152016 ACADEMIC YEAR, MANY OF WHICH ARE ALREADY UNDER WAY. THE INSTITUTE IS HOSTING TWO LEMANN DISTINGUISHED BRAZILIAN VISITING SCHOLARS IN 2015-2016.

EDUARDO RIOS-NETO, Professor and Head of the Demography Department at the Center for Regional Planning and Development (CEDEPLAR) of the Federal University of Minas Gerais is spending the academic year on campus. Professor RiosNeto holds a Ph.D. in Demography from the University of California Berkeley. He has served as President of the Brazilian National Commission on Population Development, currently serves on the State of Minas Gerais Council on Economic and Social Development, and is a recipient of the National Order of Scientific Merit. Professor Rios-Neto is spending the 2015-2016 academic year at the University of Illinois, where is teaching in the Department of Sociology and the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics. The Institute has also welcomed as a visiting scholar for 2015-2016 ANTONIO CARLOS LESSA, Professor of History of Brazilian Foreign Policy at the National University in Brasília. Professor Lessa is editor of the Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional, Brazil’s leading international relations journal, and is Executive Secretary of the Brazilian Association of International Relations. Through its annual competitions, the Institute will select the 2016 recipients of Lemann Faculty Research Fellowships, Collaborative Research grants, and Lemann Graduate Fellowships. Two recipients of Lemann Study Abroad Scholarships were selected in fall 2015 for travel in spring 2016.

• HALLEY JUVIK, Anthropology, Portuguese Language and Brazilian Studies, Pontificia Universidade do Rio de Janeiro, spring 2016 • LOREN PIEDRASANTA, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, studying abroad in Piracicaba at USP/ ESALQ, spring 2016 The Institute hosted five lectures during the fall semester and plans an additional eight lectures for spring 2016. The Institute also planned a workshop on the history of entrepreneurship and industry in Brazil, which had been scheduled to take place on campus in November 2015 in collaboration with faculty in the Department of Economics of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). The workshop is expected to lead to the publication of a book of case studies of experiences of businesses and entrepreneurs in Brazil. Because of State of Rio de Janeiro budget difficulties, the participants from UFRJ, the workshop was held on the campus of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in November 2015. The Institute again co-sponsored the Latin American Film Festival in September and Mostra VI in November 2015. Other highlights of the 2015-2016 academic year include the Lemann Dialogue hosted by Columbia University in November 2015. As noted above, three Lemann Institute faculty members served on panels at the dialogue. The next Dialogue will take place at Harvard. The Lemann Institute has already begun exploring themes for the Dialogue to be hosted on the University of Illinois campus in 2017, provisionally focusing on the subject of water resources.

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12

APPENDICES

1

LEMANN INSTITUTE AFFILIATED FACULTY

12

2

LEMANN INSTITUTE DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLARS

2014-2015 LEMANN STUDY ABROAD SCHOLARSHIP REPORTS

13

MBA GLOBAL CONSULTING

3

LEMANN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS

14

LEMANN BRAZIL LEADERSHIP SCHOLARS PERSONAL STATEMENTS

4

LEMANN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS

15

5

FACULTY RESEARCH REPORTS

CONFERENCES ORGANIZED OR CO-ORGANIZED BY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE

6

SCHOLARSHIP PRODUCED WITH LEMANN INSTITUTE SUPPORT

16

PROGRAM OF THE THIRD LEMANN DIALOGUE

17

LECTURES PROMOTED AND SPONSORED BY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE

18

PROGRAM OF THE WORKSHOP ON INEQUALITY IN EDUCATION IN BRAZIL AND THE UNITED STATES

19

LEMANN INSTITUTE CULTURAL EVENTS

20

FLAS FUNDING FOR GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE STUDY, 2009-16

21

LIBRARY RESOURCES

7

WORKS IN PROGRESS THROUGH LEMANN INSTITUTE SUPPORT

8

SITES OF RESEARCH COLLABORATION

9

BRAZILIAN STUDIES CURRICULUM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

10

LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS

11

2014-2015 LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS RESEARCH REPORTS

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APPENDIX 1 Heitor Almeida, Associate Professor, Department of Finance Flávia Andrade, Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health Mary Arends-Kuenning, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics William Artz, Professor Emeritus, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition

LEMANN INSTITUTE AFFILIATED FACULTY Waïl Hassan, Associate Professor of Comparative and World Literature, Program in Comparative and World Literature Marc Hertzman, Assistant Professor, Department of History Geoffrey Hewings, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Department of Economics Tania Ionin, Associate Professor of Linguistics, Department of Linguistics

Werner Baer, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor of Economics, Department of Economics

Glen Goodman, Assistant Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Merle Bowen, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

John Tofik Karam, Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Melissa Bowles, Associate Professor of Spanish, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Marcela Raffaelli, Associate Professor, Department of Human and Community Development Jesse Ribot, Associate Professor of Geography Luis F. Rodrigues, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural Engineering Carla Santos, Associate Professor, Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism and Department of Anthropology Mauro Sardela, Materials Research Laboratory Markus Schulz, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

Patrick Keenan, Professor, College of Law

Andiara Schwingel, Assistant Professor, Kinesiology & Community Health

Marcelo Bucheli, Associate Professor, Business Administration/History

Peter Kuchinke, Education Policy, Organization and Leadership

Ryan Shosted, Associate Professor, Department of Linguistics

José Antonio Cheibub, Boeschenstein Professor of Public Policy and Political Economy, Department of Political Science

Eduardo Ledesma, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Michael Silvers, Assistant Professor, School of Music

Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko, Dean of the Graduate College and Khan Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health William Cope, Professor, Department of Education Policy, Organization & Leadership, College of Education Jerry Davila, Professor of History, Jorge Paulo Lemann Chair in Brazilian History Elvira De Mejia, Associate Professor of Food Chemistry and Food Toxicology Carlos Armando Duarte, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Andrea Lisboa, Portuguese Language Program Coordinator, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Joe Love, Professor Emeritus of History and Former Director of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies Elizabeth Lowe, Emeritus Professor, Center for Translation Studies, School of Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics Angela C. Lyons, Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural & Consumer Economics Faranak Miraftab, Associate Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning

Paul A. Garber, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology

Silvina Montrul, Head, Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Rich Gates, Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering in ACES

Rita Mumm, Professor Emerita, Department of Crop Sciences

Peter Goldsmith, Soybean Industry Endowed Professor in Agricultural Strategy, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics

Hayri Önal, Professor, Department of Agriculture, Consumer Economics

Douglas Cary Smith, Associate Professor, School of Social Work Gisela Sin, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science Gabriel Solis, Assistant Professor of Musicology, School of Music Karen M. Tabb, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work Robert Thompson, Professor Emeritus, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics Liv Thorstensson Davila, Clinical Assistant Professor, Curriculum & Instruction Liliane Windsor, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work Matthew Winters, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science David Wright, Associate Professor of English, Department of English

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APPENDIX 2

LEMANN INSTITUTE DISTINGUISHED VISITING BRAZILIAN SCHOLARS

ROBERTO DA MATTA, 2010

CARLOS AZZONI, 2012

Roberto da Matta is Professor of Anthropology at PUC-Rio and Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. He is widely recognized as the international leader of Brazilian social anthropology. Roberto Da Matta was a pioneer in studies of ritual and festivals in urban and industrialized societies, having investigated Brazil as a society and as a cultural system through the analysis of carnival, football, music, food, citizenship, women’s roles, death, and the numbers game (jogo do bicho). He was not able to spend the entire semester, but spent two weeks on campus and gave one workshop, one lecture, attended classes of the Latin American Studies Master’s degree, met with students, and gave an interview to WILL radio.

Carlos Azzoni is Professor of Economics at the University of São Paulo, with M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from that university. He was chairman of the Department of Economics, associate dean and dean of the School of Economics, Administration and Accounting of USP. His area of research is regional inequality. He has chaired the Regional Planning Division of the State of São Paulo Secretary of Planning for 7 years. He has published 7 books (Portuguese) and over 50 scientific papers, both in Brazilian and international refereed academic journals. He is one of the founders of the Brazilian Regional Science Association. He has been a member of the Lemann Institute Board of Overseers since its inauguration. Professor Azzoni taught a course to graduate students through the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

EDUARDO COUTINHO, 2011 Eduardo Coutinho is Professor of Comparative Literature at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he has served for four years as the Graduate Chairman in Literature. He has a PhD. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Berkeley (1983). He is a founding member and a former President of the Brazilian Comparative Literature Association (ABRALIC) and also served as Vice President of the International Comparative Literature Association (AILC/ ICLA). Personal Statement I had a great experience as a distinguished visiting professor at the Lemann Center at the University of Illinois during the academic year of 2011-2012. I taught two courses for graduate students, gave two lectures at the Lemann Center, developed a research project in Comparative Literature at the University of Illinois Library, and lectured at several different American universities. The courses I taught were “Poetic Constructions and the Formation of the Cultural Imaginary in Brazil” (Fall 2011) and “The Search for Cultural Identity in Brazilian and Spanish-American Essay Writing” (Spring 2012). I presented two lectures at the Lemann Institute: “Comparative Literature in Latin America” (Fall 2011) and “Multiculturalism and Miscegenation in Latin America’s Literary Production” (Spring 2012). I also gave lectures at a number of U.S. universities, including Brown, the University of Arizona, Penn State, Yale, Virginia, Northwestern, and Harvard.

Personal Statement The semester spent at U of I as a visiting professor was enriching in many ways. The interaction with highly-prepared and motivated students from all over the world allowed me a broader understanding of the Brazilian problems I am used to dealing with. The connections with Illinois faculty and researchers also provided many learning experiences. Living the day-to-day life of a first class American university was also enlightening. My research agenda received a new boost from the whole experience. I only regret I did not have availability to enjoy the experience for a whole academic year.

JULIO-CESAR BICCA-MARQUES, 2013 Julio-Cesar Bicca-Marques is Professor of Primatology at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul. He has a B.Sc. in Biology from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (1986), a M.Sc. in Ecology from the University of Brasília (1991) and a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign (2000). He is also a Research Fellow of the Brazilian National Research Council and member of the Primate Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature. He was President of the Brazilian Primatological Society (2003-2004) and has published almost 100 scientific papers and book chapters and edited two books. In 2012 he was awarded in the 3rd Ecofuturo Prize Education for Sustainability, Brazil. Professor BiccaMarques taught “Primate Conservation Biology and Ecosystem Health”, a graduate course in the Department of Anthropology. Personal Statement I am very happy to write these few lines reporting my excellent experience as Lemann Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from January to June 2013. I taught

44


the course “Primate Conservation Biology and Ecosystem Health” in the Graduate Program in Anthropology. I also gave two public lectures on the important role played by howler monkeys (Latin American primates) as sentinels of the circulation of the yellow fever virus (African infectious disease brought to the Americas in slave ships). In sum, I had an outstanding and unforgettable experience that contributed to my professional and personal growth and that I believe that also was productive and constructive for the University of Illinois community. Thank you very much for this opportunity!

ANTONIO SERGIO GUIMARÃES Antonio Sergio Guimarães is Professor of Sociology at the University of São Paulo. He has served as the Sergio Buarque de Holanda Chair in Brazilian Social Sciences at the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Senior Researcher at Centro de Estudos da Metrópole, supported by FAPESP, and Senior Researcher of CNPq. He holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1988). He was president of the Brazilian Sociological Society from 1996 to 1998. His research focuses on racial, national, and class identities, black social movements, affirmative action, and black intellectuals. He has published among others books: Preconceito Racial–Modos, Temas, Tempos, 2008; Classes, raças e democracia, 2002; Racismo e anti-racismo no Brasil, 1999; 2005. Personal Statement My sojourn at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies was memorable. Its core was the cross-listed course I offered in spring 2014 (Latin American Studies 490/Portuguese 404): “A Historical Sociology of Brazil: The International Emergence of a Nation in the XXI Century.” The course had 18 participants including 11 graduate and 7 undergraduate students. It was a really motivating experience. In addition, through formal and informal conversations at the seminars of both the Lemann Institute and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies I expanded my vision and comprehension of Latin America and Brazil.

FABIO DURÃO, Literary Theory, 2014 Fabio Durão is Professor of Literary Theory at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). He holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. He is the author of Modernism and Coherence, 2008, Teoria (literária) americana, 2011, and Fragmentos reunidos, 2015. His edited and co-edited volumes include Modernism Group Dynamics: The Politics and Poetics of Friendship, 2008, and Culture Industry Today, 2010. He is Associate Editor of the journal Alea and has published essays in journals such as Critique, Cultural Critique, Latin American Music Review, Luso-Brazilian Review,

Brooklyn Rail, and Parallax. He currently serves as President of ANPOLL, the Brazilian National Association of Graduate Studies in Letters and Linguistics. He taught a seminar in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese entitled “Critical Theory: Made in Brazil.” Personal Statement Regarding my stay as a distinguished visiting professor at the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, I can only say that it was an extremely positive experience. I would like to highlight the following points: 1. it offered an opportunity for students at Illinois to get in touch with up-to-date research being done in Brazil, which inevitably differs, to a greater or lesser extent, from what is carried out in the U.S.; 2. it was a unique opportunity for me to discuss Brazilian critical theory outside of Brazil; the perspective thus offered was stimulating; 3. the interaction among professors from different fields provided an atmosphere of multidisciplinary discussion that is rare in Brazil and which may work as an example for future initiatives here at UNICAMP; 4. The resources at the University of Illinois helped my research in this period.

EDUARDO RIOS-NETO Eduardo Rios-Neto is Professor and Head of the Demography Department at the Center for Regional Planning and Development (CEDEPLAR) of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), where he has taught since 1980. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees in Economics from UFMG and a Ph.D. in Demography from the University of California at Berkeley. Professor Rios-Neto has been President of the Brazilian National Commission on Population Development and currently serves on the State of Minas Gerais Council on Economic and Social Development. He is a recipient of the National Order of Scientific Merit. He served as a member of the advisory committee of the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq) for two years and has coordinated several education-related institutional research grants at CEDEPLAR. Personal Statement My experience at the Lemann Institute as visiting professor has involved teaching the course Sociology 474 (Population Trends and Patterns), presenting the Lemann Lecture in September, entitled “The Conclusion of the Demographic Transition in Brazil,” attending the Lemann lectures and seminars, and interacting with graduate students towards the development of their dissertations on Brazilian themes. The course Sociology 474 has a special focus on Brazilian issues. I have also been interacting with faculty members towards producing papers jointly. Next semester, I will teach Sociology 496, “Demographic and Socioeconomic Aspects of Education.” This course will also focus on Brazilian themes. I intend to intensify my work assisting graduate students doing research on Brazilian themes, with special emphasis on education.

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APPENDIX 3

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH GRANTS

José Antonio Cheibub

Political Science

Fernando Limongi

USP

2011

The Electoral Connection in OpenList Proportional Representation Systems: Elecotral Strategies & Legislative Behavior in Brazil

Tania Ionin

Linguistics

Elaine Grolla

USP

2011

Experimental Investigation of Second and Third Language Acquisition in Brazil

Elvira DeMejia

Food Sci. & Human Nutrition

Hércia Duarte

UFV

2012

Functional Properties of Beans Selected and Grown In Brazil

Andiara Schwingel

Kinesiology

Tania Benedetti

UFSC

2012

Project Via (Via Ativa): Active Living Everyday in Brazil

Hao Feng

Food Sci. & Human Nutrition

Samantha Pinho

USP

2013

Production of Nanoemulsions With Proteins Extracted from the Light Speckeled Kidney Bean

Roderick Mackie

Animal Sciences

Humberto França Moreira

PUCParaná

2013

Convergent Evolution in Foregut Fermenting Herbivorous Mammals in Brazil

Mary-Grace Danão

Agric. & Biological Engineering

Fernanda Vanin

USP

2014

Measurement of Resistant Starch in Bananas, Beans, and Chestnuts

Marcela Raffaelli

Human Development & Family Studies

Normanda de Morais & Juliana Santanna

Unifor, UFBA

2014

Building Collaborations to Study Vulnerable Brazilian Youth

Joanna Shisler

Microbiology

Flávio Fonseca & Erna Kroon

UFMG

2014

Identifying Pathogenic Elements of a Brazilian Virus that Infects Cattle and Humans

Daniel Rock

Pathobiology

Eduardo Furtado Flores

UFSM

2014

Development of a New Generation Vaccine to Control Livestock Rabies in Brazil

Cecilia Leal & Mauro Sardela

Materials Science & Engineering

Débora Gonçalves

USP São Carlos

2015

Natural Biocides and Heat Treatment on Brazilian Tropical Woods: Changes in Crystallinity After Fungal Decay

Bryan White

Inst. For Genomic Biology

Patrícia Naves Givisiez

UFPB

2015

Seeding Strategic Collaboration with Illinois to Build Capacity in Genomics at the Federal University of Paraíba

Matthew Winters

Political Science

Amâncio de Oliveira

USP

2015

International Law and Brazil's International Reputation

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APPENDIX 4

LEMANN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS

Flávia Andrade

2010

Kinesiology

Life Expectancy and Healthy Life Expectancy in Brazil

Merle Bowen

2010

Political Science

Economic Development and State Policies: Brazil’s Quilombo Communities

Waïl Hassan

2010

Comp & World Lit

Arab-Brazilian Literature and Culture

Carla Santos

2011

Recreation, Sport & Tourism

Tourism and Socioeconomic Realities in Brazil: A Framing Analysis

Ryan Shosted

2011

Linguistics

The Articulation of Nasalized Vowels in Brazil

Irene Small

2011

Art and Design

Situating Transmission: Hercule Florence and the Invention of Photography in Brazil

David Wright

2011

English

And the Ruined Houses, a novel

Hayri Onal

2012

Agricultural & Consumer Economics

An Economic Analysis of the Biofuel Mandates in the US and Brazil and Intensification of the Brazilian Livestock Sector

Matthew Winters

2012

Political Science

Rouba mas faz or not? Corruption, Information and Accountability in Brazil

Marcelo Bucheli

2012

Business Administration

National Elite, Multinational Corporations and Oil Policy in Brazil

Ruth Aguilera

2013

Business Administration

The Trojan Horse of Latin America: Multinational Expansion into Brazil as a Regional Launchingpad, 1990-2010

Gisela Sin

2013

Political Science

Veto Bargaining and the Legislative Process in Brazil

Karen Tabb Dina

2014

Social Work

Postpartum Suicidal Ideation in Brazil

Andrew Miller & Carol Ann Shearer

2015

Natural History Survey & Plant Biology

Ecology, Systematics, and Functional Diversity of Brazilian Freshwater Ascomycetes

Michael Silvers

2015

Music

Voices of Drought: Forró Soundscapes in Northeastern Brazil

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APPENDIX 5

FACULTY RESEARCH REPORTS

LEMANN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOWS, 2014-2015 Karen Margaret Tabb Dina, School of Social Work Project Title Postpartum Suicidal Ideation in Brazil Project Description During AY 2014-2015 the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies provided funding to conduct research on the topic of maternal health in Brazil. The funds were used to hire a graduate research assistant, to meet with collaborators in-person, and to present the preliminary research findings at an international conference. During the year my research team wrote grant proposals to compete for funding with Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the March of Dimes. We will apply to FAPESP directly during AY 2015-

2016 to continue our research. Here is the summary of products from the year of funding support: Publications Scazufca, M. Menezes, P., Tabb, K.M., da Silva, S., Huang, H. (in-press). Identification and treatment of depression of older adults with diabetes and depression in primary care in Brazil: results from the São Paulo Ageing & Health Study (SPAH). Family Practice – special issue. Faisal-Cury, A., Tabb, K.M., Niciunovas, G., Cunningham, C., Menezes, P., Huang, H. (revised and resubmitted). Lower education among low-income Brazilian adolescent females is associated with planned pregnancies. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.

Tabb, K.M., Huang, H., Valdovinos, M., Toor, R., Hageman, E., Ostler, T., Menezes, P., Faisal-Cury, A. (under review) Association between Suicidal Ideation and Intimate Partner Violence among LowIncome Postpartum Women in São Paulo, Brazil. PLoS One. Presentations Tabb, K.M., Faisal-Cury, A., Toor, R., Valdovinos, M., Hageman, E., Menezes, P., Huang, H. (2014, October) Association between Suicidal Ideation and Intimate Partner Violence among LowIncome Postpartum Women in São Paulo, Brazil. Paper presented at the 3rd annual Pregnancy Summit in London, England, UK.

LEMANN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH GRANTS, 2014-2015 Daniel L. Rock, Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Diego G. Diel, Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, South Dakota State University Eduardo F. Flores, Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Santa Maria Project Title Development of a New Generation Vaccine to Control Livestock Rabies in Brazil Project Description Livestock rabies – transmitted by hematophagous bats – is endemic in Brazil and causes significant economic losses to the livestock industry. The goal of our study was to devel-

48

op a novel anti-rabies vaccine based on the parapoxvirus Orf virus (ORFV) that would induce long-lasting immunity against rabies in livestock species. Specific aims of the study were: Specific aim 1: To Construct ORFV vectored anti-rabies vaccine candidates expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein G (gG) (ORFV/RABV-G). Specific aim 2: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of ORFV/RABV-G vaccine candidates in livestock species (cattle, sheep and horses). Phase one of the project (Specific aim 1) involving construction and characterization of ORFV-based rabies vaccine candidates was initiated at Dr. Rock’s laboratory at Illinois and completed at SDSU after Dr. Diel joined the institution in August 2014. Two recombinant ORFV/RabV-G viruses expressing the RabV-G were

obtained and characterized in vitro. Replication characteristics of both viruses were assessed in cells derived from target animal species. Phase two of the project (Specific aim 2) involving evaluation of the immunogenicity of ORFV/RabV-G candidates is currently being conducted by Dr. Flores’ team at the Federal University of Santa Maria. Preliminary results from initial studies indicate that both recombinants are immunogenic in target animal species. The initial immunogenicity studies in vivo demonstrate a good potential for the ORFV/RabV-G vaccine candidates. Presentations We plan to present our findings in national and international meetings in 2016 targeting the scientific research community with interest in infectious diseases and vaccinology.


APPENDIX 6

SCHOLARSHIP PRODUCED WITH LEMANN INSTITUTE SUPPORT

Andrade, F.C.D., Corona, L., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2014). Life-expectancy with and without cognitive impairment among Brazilian older adults. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 58(2): 219-225. Corona, L., Andrade, F. C. D., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2014). The association of hemoglobin concentration with disability and decreased mobility among older Brazilians. The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging, 18(3): 336-341. Beltrán-Sánchez, H., Andrade, F. C. D. (2013). Educational and sex differentials in life expectancies and disability-free life expectancies in São Paulo, Brazil, and urban areas in Mexico. Journal of Aging and Health, 25(5): 815–838. Andrade, F. C. D., Nazan, A. I. N. M., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2013). Impact of body mass index and weight changes on disability and mortality in Brazilian older adults. Journal of Aging and Research. Article ID 905094, 11 pages. Claro, H.G., Andrade, F. C. D., Oliveira, M.A.F., Cazerta, M. (2012). Assessing the impact of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs on miscarriage among pregnant women in São Paulo, Brazil. Revista de Terapia Ocupacional da Universidade de São Paulo, 23(3): 223-229. Andrade, F. C. D., Guevara, P. E., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y. A. O. (2012). Correlates of incidence of disability and mortality among older adult Brazilians with and without diabetes mellitus and stroke. BMC Public Health, 12: 361 (10 pages). Andrade, F. C. D., Guevara, P. E., Lebrão, M. L., Duarte, Y.A., Santos, J. L. F. (2011). Gender differences in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy among older adults in São Paulo, Brazil. Women’s Health Issues, 21(1): 64-70. Baer, Werner, ed. The Economies of Argentina and Brazil, (co-edited with David Fleischer) Edward Elgar Pub, 2011 Baer, Werner, ed. The Regional Impact of National Policies in Brazil (co-edited with David Fleischer) Edward Elgar Pub, 2012. Baer, Werner, The Brazilian Economy: Growth and Development, 7th edition, Lynne Rienner Press, (2014) Also published in Chinese in 2015. Bowen, Merle and Tillman, Ayesha, “Developing Culturally Responsive Surveys: Lessons in Development, Implementation and Analysis from Brazil’s African Descent Communities,” American Journal of Evaluation 36:1 (March 2015), p. 25-41. Bowen, Merle, guest editor, Special Issue of African and Black Diaspora “Afro-Brazilian Citizenship and the Politics of History,” October 2015.

Bowen, Merle, “Who Owns Paradise? Afro-Brazilians and Ethno-Tourism in Brazil’s Quilombos,” African and Black Diaspora, October 2015, forthcoming. Bowen, Merle, “Quilombos in Brazil: Ethnic Land Titling, Citizenship, and the Politics of Identity,” in Interrogating the Study of the African Diaspora: a Preliminary Interdisciplinary Exploration, edited by Glenn A. Chambers and Tama Hamilton-Wray. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press, December, 2015. Cheibub, José Antonio, “The Electoral Impact of Redistributive Policies in Latin America: Conditional Cash Transfer Programs and Electoral Behavior of Beneficiaries and Non-Beneficiaries.” With Diego Correa. Forthcoming (2015) in Latin American Politics and Society. Dávila, Jerry, Dictatorship in South America. WileyBlackwell, 2013. Dávila, Jerry, “Brazilian Race Relations in the Shadow of Apartheid,” Radical History Review, 119 (Spring 2014), 122-145. Dávila, Jerry, “Ditadura, Redemocratização e Apartheid,” Revista História: Questões e Debates. Forthcoming. Mojica, L., González de Mejía, E. 2015. “Characterization and comparison of protein and peptide profiles and their biological activities of improved common bean cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mexico and Brazil.” Plant Foods Human Nutr. 70 (2), 105-112. Hassan, Waïl, "Carioca Orientalism: Morocco in the Imaginary of a Brazilian Telenovela." The Global South Atlantic. Eds. Kerry Bystrom and Joseph Slaughter. Forthcoming. Hassan, Waïl, “Arabic and the Paradigms of Comparison.” ACLA State of the Discipline Report, 2015. http://stateofthediscipline.acla.org/entry/arabic-and-paradigms-comparison-1. Hassan, Waïl, "Arab-Brazilian Literature: Alberto Mussa’s Mu‘allaqah and South-South Dialogue." In The Middle East and Brazil, edited by Paul Amar. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2014. 322-35. Hassan, Waïl, ”Which Languages?" Comparative Literature 65:1 (Winter 2013): 5-14. Hassan, Waïl, “Jorge Ahmad." Special issue on Jorge Amado. Comparative Literature Studies 49:3 (2012): 395404.

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APPENDIX 6

SCHOLARSHIP PRODUCED WITH LEMANN INSTITUTE SUPPORT

Ionin, T., Grolla, E., Montrul, S. and Santos, H. 2014. When articles have different meanings: acquiring the expression of genericity in English and Brazilian Portuguese. In P. Cabredo Hofherr & A. Zribi-Hertz (eds.), Crosslinguistic studies on Noun Phrase structure and reference, Syntax and Semantics vol. 19. Brill, pp. 367-397. Ionin, T., Grolla, E., Santos, H. and Montrul, S. In press. “Bare NP interpretation in the acquisition of Brazilian Portuguese as a third language.” Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism.

Benedetti, Schwingel, Chodzko-Zajko, Meurer, Brito, Almeida. RE-AIM: a proposal for evaluating physical activity programs.” Revista Kairós Gerontologia, 17(2), 295-314, 2014. Shosted, Ryan, Nasal vowels are not [+NASAL] oral vowels. In J. Smith and T. Ihsane (eds.), Romance Linguistics 2012: Selected Papers from the 42nd Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages (LSRL), 63–76. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Love, Joseph. The Revolt of the Whip. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford U. Press, 2012, xvi + 176 pp.

Sin, Gisela, “Item Vetoes and Attempts to Override Them in Multiparty Legislatures.” 2013. Journal of Politics in Latin America 5, 1 (May): 37-66. (with Valeria Palanza).

Watkins, D.W., Moraes, M.M.G., Önal,H., and others (2015). “Bioenergy Development Policy and Practice Must Recognize Potential Hydrologic Impacts: Lessons from the Americas,” Environmental Management, doi:10.1007/ s00267-015-0460-x.

Scazufca, M., Menezes, P., Tabb, K., Kester, R., Rossler, W., & Huang, H. (2015). Identification and treatment of depression of older adults in primary care: findings from the São Paulo Ageing and Health Study. Fam Pract. doi: 10.1093/fampra/cmv062.

Nuñez, H.M.& H. Önal. (2013). “Land Use and Economic Effects of Alternative Biofuel Policies in Brazil and the U.S.,” Agricultural Economics, 44:487–499.

Tabb, K.M., Huang, H., Menezes, P., e Silva, G., Chan, Y., Faisal-Cury, A. (2014). Ethnic differences in antenatal smoking findings from a primary care sample in São Paulo, Brazil. Ethnicity & Health, 1 (9) DOI: 10.1080/13557858.2014.90739.

Sebastião, Gobbi, Chodzko-Zajko, Schwingel. “Program "VAMOS" (Active Living, Enhancing Health): From Conception to Initial Findings.” Rev. Bras. Cineantropom. Desempenho Hum, 14, 6: 723-737, 2012. Sebastiao, Chodzko-Zajko, Schwingel, Gobbi, Papini, Nakamura, Valdanha-Netto,Kokubun, Gobbi. “Perceived barriers to leisure time physical activity: what Brazilians have to say?” Open Journal of Preventive Medicine; 3(8):491-499, 2013. Sebastião, Schwingel, Chodzko-Zajko. “Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion.” Revista de Saúde Pública, 48(4):709-712, 2014.

APPENDIX 7

Winters, Matthew, “Lacking Information or Condoning Corruption: When Do Voters Support Corrupt Politicians?” With Rebecca Weitz-Shapiro. 2013. Comparative Politics 45.4 (July): 418-36. Winters, Matthew, “Partisan Protesters and Non-Partisan Protests in Brazil.” With Rebecca Weitz-Shapiro. 2014. Journal of Politics in Latin America 6.1 (April): 137-50.

WORKS IN PROGRESS THROUGH LEMANN INSTITUTE SUPPORT

Dávila, Jerry, Challenging Racial Discrimination in Brazil, book in progress Hassan, Wail, Arab Brazil: Orientalism and Racial Democracy, book in progress Carneiro, A.C.G., Nuñez, H.M., Önal, H., Moraes, M.M.G.A. (2014). An Economic Analysis of Transportation Fuel Policies in Brazil: Fuel Choice, Land Use, and Environmental Impacts, Energy Economics, conditionally accepted, revision in progress.

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Winters, Matthew, "Political Corruption and Partisan Engagement: Evidence from Brazil," with Rebecca WietzShapiro. 2015. Journal of Politics in Latin America 7:1: 445-81.

Scazufca, M. Menezes, P., Tabb, K.M., da Silva, S., Huang, H. (under review). Identification and treatment of depression of older adults with diabetes and depression in primary care in Brazil: results from the São Paulo Ageing & Health Study (SPAH). Family Practice – special issue. Wright, David, What is Hidden Cannot Be Loved, book in progress.


APPENDIX 8

SITES OF RESEARCH COLLABORATION

UNIVERSITY

CITY

STATE

RESPONSES

Universidade de São Paulo

São Paulo

São Paulo

16

Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP

Campinas

São Paulo

7

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Belo Horizonte

Minas Gerais

6

Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

Recife

Pernambuco

6

ESALQ - USP Piracicaba

Piracicaba

São Paulo

5

Universidade Federal de Viçosa

Viçosa

Minas Gerais

4

PUC-Rio Grande do Sul

Porto Alegre

Rio Grande do Sul

3

Universidade Federal da Bahia

Salvador

Bahia

3

Universidade Federal de Pelotas

Capão do Leão

Rio Grande do Sul

3

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

3

Universidade Federal Fluminense

Niteroi

Rio de Janeiro

3

Fundação Getulio Vargas, São Paulo

São Paulo

São Paulo

2

PUC-Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

2

Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

2

Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul

Porto Alegre

Rio Grande do Sul

2

Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP

Guarulhos

São Paulo

2

Universidade Federal do Ceará

Fortaleza

Ceará

2

UNISINOS

São Leopoldo

Rio Grande do Sul

1

Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

Vitória

Espírito Santo

1

Universidade do Estado de São Paulo - Tupã

Tupã

São Paulo

1

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

1

Insper-São Paulo

São Paulo

São Paulo

1

Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

1

Museu Emílio Goeldi

Belem

Pará

1

PUC-Minas Gerais

Belo Horizonte

Minas Gerais

1

Universidade de Fortaleza

Fortaleza

Ceará

1

Universidade de São Paulo - Pirassununga

Pirassununga

São Paulo

1

Universidade de São Paulo - Riberão Preto

Ribeirão Preto

São Paulo

1

Universidade Estadual do Mato Grosso do Sul

Aquidauana

Mato Grosso do Sul

1

Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora

Juiz de Fora

Minas Gerais

1

Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso

Cuiabá

Mato Grosso

1

Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul

Campo Grande

Mato Grosso do Sul

1

Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Florianópolis

Santa Catarina

1

Universidade Federal do ABC

Santo André

São Paulo

1

Universidade Federal do Cariri

Juazeiro do Norte

Ceará

1

Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco

Recife

Pernambuco

1

Universidade Nacional de Brasília

Brasília

DF

1

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APPENDIX 9

COURSES WITH SUBSTANTIAL CONTENT ON BRAZIL

LIST OF COURSES Instructor

Course Number and Title

Baer, Werner

ECON 452 - The economies of Latin America

Cheibub, José Antonio

POLS 549 - Brazil in a Comparative Perspective

Dávila, Jerry

HIST 405 - History of Brazil

Dávila, Jerry

HIST 498 - Slavery and Freedom in Latin America

Goldsmith, Peter

ACE 436/BADM 436 - International Business Immersion

Goodman, Glen

PORT 404 - 20th Century Brazilian Social Thought

Goodman, Glen

PORT 320 - Brazilian Regionalisms

Goodman, Glen

PORT 406 - Brazilian Film

Goodman, Glen

PORT 404 - Hungering for Brazil: Food, Agriculture, and Hunger in Brazilian Society

Goodman, Glen

PORT 404 - Brazil's Diasporas

Hassan, Wail

CWL 502 - Arabs in the Americas

Karam, John Tofik

PORT 404 - Luso-Brazilian Culture: The Telenovela

Karam, John Tofik

PORT 320 - Readings in Portuguese: Understanding Contemporary Brazil

Schwingel, Andiara

CHLH 415 - International Health

Senna, Nola

PORT 404 - Doing Business in Brazil

Senna, Nola

PORT 404 - Brazilian Culture through Advertising

DEPARTMENT ABBREVIATIONS ECON

Economics

POLS

Political Science

HIST

History

ACE

Agricultural and Consumer Economics

CWL

Comparative and World Liberatures

CHLH

Community Health

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APPENDIX 10

LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS

Marcelo Kuyumjian

2011

Music

Elis Regina's Quartet and Its Interpretation of Samba: Issues in the Process of Innovation of Popular Music in Brazil

Vivian Felicio

2011

Curriculum & Instruction

Linguistically and Culturally Relevant Literacy Practices for Speakers of Brazilian Portuguese Language

Diego Correa

2011

Political Science

Switching Sides: Income Redistribution and Realignment of the PT's Electoral Bases

Narlan Teixeira

2011

Span., It. & Portuguese

The Genesis of Post-Modernity in Brazil: Notes on Industrial Design, Tropicalia and Counterculture

Carla da Silva

2011

Span., It. & Portuguese

The Journey Within: Travel Narratives in Brazilian Cinema

Euler de Mello

2011

Economics

Extending the Maternity Leave in Brazil: An Assessment

Pamela Cappas-Toro

2012

Span., It. & Portuguese

Race and Dictatorship

Laura Chinhilla

2012

Span., It. & Portuguese

Detecting the Americas: Travel, Crime and Conspiracy

Rejane Dias

2012

Curriculum & Instruction

Teachers' Perception of Bilingualism and Biculturalism: The Case of Brazilian Borderlands

Vivian Felicio

2012

Curriculum & Instruction

Linguistically and Culturally Relevant Literacy Practices for Speakers of Brazilian Portuguese Language

Erin McKenna

2012

Rec., Sports & Tourism

Converging Cosmopolitanism in Salvador's Alternative Tourism Sector

Bradley Skousen

2012

Business Administration

Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazil

Paulo Vaz

2012

Economics

Brazil Long-Term Economic Growth: Investigating the Puzzle from a Firm-Level Perspective

Rafael Ribas

2013

Economics

Direct and Indirect Effects of Cash Transfer on Labor Supply and Entrepreneurship: The Case of Bolsa Familia in Brazil

Marcelo Kuyumjian

2013

Music

Na Cozinha de Elis: Cesar Camargo Mariano's Arrangements of Samba for Piano Trio

Krystal Montesdeoca

2013

Ag. & Consumer Economics

The Economics of Safrinha Succession Cropping System

John-Ben Soileau

2013

Anthropology

Tensions of Practice: Aรงai and the Commodification of Subsistence Agriculture in Brazil's Lower Amazon

Isabel Peres

2013

Law

Engaging the Brazilian Diaspora in Development: A Proposal for Brazilian Diaspora Bonds

Chris Wilhelm

2013

Ag. & Biological Engineering

Preventing Post-Harvest Losses in Brazil

Annie Contractor

2014

Urban & Regional Planning

Greenwashing as a Justification for Housing Displacement in Fortaleza, Brazil

Hapsatou Wane

2014

Comp. & World Literature

Decolonizing Autobiographies: Narratives of Detour by African Diasporic Women

Mayara de Lima

2015

Urban & Regional Planning

Haitian Presence in Southern Brazil: Its Present and Future Impacts on Environmental Policy

John Marquez

2015

History

Community, Culture and Conflict: The Lives of Enslaved and Free People of African Descent in Late-Colonial Rio de Janeiro

Lenore Matthew

2015

Social Work

Psychosocial Barriers to Formal Employment Among LowIncome Women in Brazil

Renato Vieira

2015

Ag. & Consumer Economics

Efficiency and Distributive Effects of Transit Fare Subsidies in Brazilian Cities

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APPENDIX 11

2014-2015 LEMANN GRADUATE FELLOWS RESEARCH REPORTS

ANNIE CONTRACTOR MA CANDIDATE, DEPARTMENT OF URBANA AND REGIONAL PLANNING GREENWASHING AS A JUSTIFICATION FOR HOUSING DISPLACEMENT IN FORTALEZA

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES The Lemann fellowship granted to me during the 2014-15 academic year allowed me to focus my energy as an urban planner on the issue of housing justice in a northern Brazilian city, Fortaleza. Fortaleza is a unique context to study housing justice; although it is a major metropolis with over 3.5 million people, it is often overlooked for study and activism in favor of the better-known cities of the south. However, the housing rights violations are no less present or urgent; over 1/3 of the city’s population lives in informal settlements, indicating that informal housing and housing justice is a problem that consumes the poor and creeps significantly into the middle class. Within the population of people facing housing injustice, women, ethnic minorities and the most poor are further marginalized in the processes and decisionmaking that perpetuate the existence of informal housing. The Lemann fellowship, along with other funding, enabled me to conduct independent research in three Fortaleza informal settlements to learn about the lived experience of housing injustice, specifically the injustice of facing removal from one’s home.

54

My research findings confirmed that some infrastructure projects underway in Fortaleza, fueled by global fervor for environmentalism, disproportionately impact the poor who accurately feel the sting of class discrimination. Findings revealed that the urban poor have differentiated access to channels of political power and influence and often are thwarted in their efforts to “play by the rules.” The urban poor experience a devaluation of the concept of “home” which provides a significant security net outside of the economic sense; through dense social networks and specialized location, food security, child care, emotional support, and other social reproduction needs are protected outside of the market economy. The government is failing to recognize and value these assets, even though federal law requires it. OUTCOMES My research was presented at five conferences and events and was produced into two publications. This publicity brings international attention to the rights violations being endured by Fortaleza residents, a task which local activists view as crucial to building their credibility to make claims against the forces and officials marginalizing them. Further, the

relationships I was able to build with local activists during field work for the research are sustained through continued solidarity efforts and networking for grassroots activism to support those who face losing their homes or who have already lost their homes. The outcomes of the research, in addition to the publications and presentations mentioned above, include a community engagement index tool which aims to assist grassroots organizers in finding examples of success from other communities. Additionally, this research provides recognition for effective and committed grassroots organizers who have worked tirelessly for citizens’ rights in Fortaleza, providing incentive for continued effort as well as lessons for new activists. Thanks to Lemann Institute funding, I have been able to not only better understand housing rights issues of marginalized people in a marginalized city of Brazil; this fellowship has prepared me to continue engaging with marginalized groups in solidarity for housing justice.


HAPSATOU WANE PH.D. CANDIDATE, PROGRAM IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE DECOLONIZING AUTOBIOGRAPHIES: NARRATIVES OF DETOUR BY AFRICAN DIASPORC WOMEN

My dissertation is a comparative study of autobiographical fictions by women writers from Brazil, South Africa, Senegal, and Guadeloupe. Theorizing the narrative of detour as a literary category that combines local and global literary features with elements of the European model of autobiography, I argue that diaspora, as a metaphor, describes the process of mixing multiple literary forms. Each chapter illustrates a practice of literary blending corresponding to a specific diasporic praxis. One substantial part of my work situates the articulations of an Afro-Brazilian diasporic identity in a transglocal literary space mixing some features of the literatura de cordel with other literary forms including confessional and epistolary narratives. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES Before being awarded the 20142015 Lemann Graduate Fellowship for Brazilian Studies, I was completing the draft of my first chapter. The Fellowship allowed me to complete the drafts of two other chapters including my chapter on Afro-Brazilian literature. By taking some time off from teaching, I had enough time to do my research at the library and focus on writing the chapters. In addition to the Dr. Joseph L. Love, Sr. and Virginia

Ellis Love Fellowship granted by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Lemann Fellowship made it possible for me to travel to Rio de Janeiro to conduct my research at the Pontificia Universidade Católica de Rio de Janeiro from November 17, 2014 to January 9, 2015. During those weeks, I visited the university library, the Biblioteca Nacional and the Núcleo Interdisciplinar de Reflexão e Memória Afrodescendente on a regular basis. I was particularly interested in collecting data on the Afro-Brazilian literary tradition and its connection with postcolonial studies.

the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) from March 31 to April 2, 2016 at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. I will also defend my dissertation by May 2016. The support of the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies has been instrumental not only in the timely completion of my doctoral work but also in my future research on Afro-Brazilian literature. The Institute also gave me the opportunity to meet with Lemann Distinguished visitors who have influenced my work such as Professor Eduardo Countinho and Professor Antônio Sérgio Alfredo Guimarães.

OUTCOMES Thanks to the Lemann Graduate Fellowship, I was able to complete the drafts of two chapters by the end of the academic year. I presented parts of my dissertation and future research on AfroBrazilian literature at the 2015 Latin American Studies Association annual convention and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies lecture series. I submitted a forthcoming article to the international journal Glocal Colloquies on a comparative study between South African and Brazilian literatures. I am also presenting at the 13th International Congress of

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APPENDIX 12

2014-2015 LEMANN STUDY ABROAD SCHOLARSHIP REPORTS

PATRICIA MARGIS UNIVERSITY OF VIÇOSA 2014-2015

OI, TUDO BEM? THAT’S HOW WE SAY “HELLO” AND “HOW’S IT GOING” IN BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE. I’VE RECENTLY JUST GOT BACK FROM THE MOST INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME. AS CLICHÉ AS IT SOUNDS, THESE PAST 12 MONTHS THAT I HAVE SPENT STUDYING IN VIÇOSA, BRAZIL THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES HAVE BEEN AN ABSOLUTELY LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE. I HAVE NOT ONLY GROWN AS A PERSON AND BECOME A MORE CONFIDENT ADULT, BUT ALSO REALIZED THAT NO MATTER WHERE YOU GO IN THE WORLD, FRIENDS AND RELATIONSHIPS THAT CAN LAST A LIFETIME CAN BE MADE WITH THE KIND-HEARTED PEOPLE WHO INHABIT THIS EARTH.

56


When I first arrived in Brazil in August of 2014, I must admit that it was quite a culture shock. Being a first generation American, I am used to having a mixture of languages and cultures around me at home, but this was a new culture and a new language that I was excited to become a part of. I studied for two semesters at the Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV) where I participated in a variety of courses. Some of my classes were in history while others were in the business/marketing field. It was tough at first, since all my classes were taught in Portuguese and almost no one spoke English fluently enough to help me (this turned out to be a blessing in disguise), but this was the beginning of my orientation to Brazil and its culture! Even though it was difficult throughout the first semester, I gradually began to gain my footing and pushed myself to read every article and book assigned as well as write every report, even if I sometimes wrote things in the wrong tense. Some professors at the university were patient, while others weren’t, but either way, I put my best foot forward. After all, I was in Brazil because I wanted to become fluent in Portuguese and to truly understand what makes Brazil uniquely Brazil. Aside from classes, I had an internship during my second semester where I worked with a local marketing organization. Since they had recently rebranded themselves with a new logo and image, I was responsible for creating a new marketing business plan for their company as well as creating various advertisements. I am an advertising major at the College of Media at Illinois, so this was a perfect opportunity to hone my skills in strategy and planning, but from a unique perspective abroad. The fact that I was able

to successfully integrate myself with my Brazilian coworkers and that we were able to exchange ideas all the while doing so in Portuguese, made me feel accomplished and proud of how much I had improved in just 5 months in Brazil. I was lucky to have met professors who helped me get connected with the local marketing organization, and due to my openness and willingness to put myself out of my comfort zone, I was able to gain so much experience in both a professional and social context. Spending a year in Brazil allowed me to understand the country as a whole, which is imperative for my goal of being able to move back to Brazil to work at an international advertising agency in Rio de Janeiro. This year-long program gave me insight in understanding not only the language, but the history, culture, successes, and failures in Brazil, which is one of the strongest emerging economies and a key country in the world of international advertising. This experience abroad has better prepared me for my career in advertising, because now I can use the knowledge of how advertising is done in Brazil and make unique comparisons to the way the United States does its advertising. Maybe these two very different cultures can learn a thing or two from one another! The Lemann scholarship allowed me to live the way I wanted when I was in Brazil. My program was quite independent; I had to find my own apartment and roommates, and do almost everything on my own. The Lemann scholarship helped me live like the local students without having to worry about financial stress. I can’t thank the Lemann Institute enough for selecting me to receive the scholarship, as it improved my experience abroad ex-

ponentially. Just because I have already come back to the United States, it doesn’t mean that my education and experiences in Brazil have come to an end. I will take all these amazing memories with me and continue the friendships I have made abroad for a lifetime. The photo I have attached was taken when I visited a farm in Tocantins, Minas Gerais with a group of friends one weekend. It is a small city located in the rolling valleys in the state of Minas Gerais, roughly a two-hour bus ride away from Viçosa. It sounds simple, but here is where I discovered that around the world, the idea of what belongs on a farm is purely subjective. Growing up in Chicago, I knew that there was a lot of corn and soybeans around in Illinois, but in Tocantins, I realized that farms can also have beautiful tall mango trees, star fruit trees, and even amazing tropical cherry trees! Also, the squirrels and pigeons that we have in Illinois were replaced with energetic little monkeys and soaring toucans. I find this picture to be very representative of the Brazilian culture where people are just happy to socialize and spend time together without the distraction of cell phones. Of course, all the high tech gadgets are popularly used in Brazil, but people value social occasions and personal conversations over technology any day. It is a simple picture, but it brings me a lot of joy and I hope it can inspire other people to want to see what Brazil is all about! I hope this report has been able to inspire others to step out of their comfort zones and take the leap into the unknown. It is the best decision of my college career, and I know it could be an amazing opportunity for other future students interested in studying abroad.

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APPENDIX 12

MATTHEW J. NOLAN USP/ESALQ PIRACICABA SPRING AND FALL 2014

THE LEMANN SCHOLARSHIP FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES WAS A KEY FACTOR IN MY SUCCESS DURING MY YEAR-LONG STUDY ABROAD IN BRAZIL. I WOULD HAVE BEEN UNABLE TO STUDY ABROAD WITHOUT SUCH FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AND I AM VERY THANKFUL FOR THE GOOD FAITH THAT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, THE UNIVERSITY OF SÃO PAULO, AND THE LEMANN FAMILY PLACED IN ME.

IF I HADN’T STUDIED ABROAD, I WOULD NEVER HAVE REALIZED THE IMPORTANCE OF

BECOMING FLUENT IN ANOTHER LANGUAGE, NOR WOULD I HAVE BUILT STRONG FRIENDSHIPS.

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My time spent abroad was transformative on many levels, both personally and professionally. On the personal side, I rediscovered the value of friendship and the importance of understanding and appreciating cultural differences. On the professional end, I have gained deep insights into the social dynamics that affect communication and how to behave in a professional Brazilian environment. Moving forward, I hope to take this knowledge gleaned through cultural immersion to develop a business that allows me to work with Brazilians on an entrepreneurial project in the near future. While this paper will focus more on my personal development and the experiences I have shared with my Brazilian friends, I must say that I have returned as a believer in the opportunities that exist within this dynamic and growing market. I came to Brazil at the beginning of February 2014 to begin my two-semester-long cultural and academic immersion. I studied at the University of São Paulo at the University’s ESALQ campus, which stands for Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. While the school is renowned for its work in agriculture and related sciences, it also boasts a strong economics and business program—the program in which I was enrolled. I took coursework in farm economics and management, finance, organizational behavior, human resource management, and marketing, just to name a few. I loved going to class every day, not only because of the material being taught, but the way in which it was taught: through the mouth of a Portuguese language speaker. Every day was a language lesson, from asking for a pão de queijo and a café at the corner paderia for my breakfast on my way to campus to engaging in vibrant discussions in class and at home in my

republica (analogous to a fraternity). I wish I could tell you that I loved every minute of living in a world that ran on Portuguese, but in truth, there were times when my insufficiency in the Portuguese language became downright maddening. Although I believed that I was a good Portuguese speaker prior to my arrival, I quickly discovered how different the Portuguese I learned in my formal Portuguese language courses was from the colloquial language that is used. One of the biggest challenges was to be able to quickly decipher the rapid amount of information that was being thrown at me. Soon, however, my ability to discern words I knew from the unfamiliar words became much easier. While I didn’t understand everything that was said to me in lectures or in day-to-day conversations, I was able to derive meaning from context clues and participate more in classes and social settings. My friends deserve some credit for their patience and insistence on helping me continually improve my Portuguese grammar, diction, and pronunciation. Their efforts to help me have made such a difference in my ability to present myself as a fluent Portuguese speaker instead of a robotic-sounding foreigner. What a difference this makes in the way strangers treat you. Aside from my progress in the Portuguese language, Brazil offered me new experiences in new places. Prior to studying abroad in Brazil, I hadn’t been to the ocean in years. Within my first month, my friends and I scheduled a weekend excursion to São Paulo’s north coast to Riviera São Lourenco. We stayed up all night on Friday to see the sun rise on Saturday morning. It was the most beautiful sunrise I had ever seen in my life. The photo accompanying this report is a photo

that I took that day. It was in that moment that I reflected on all that I had accomplished to get to that point. My thoughts drifted to my friends and family back home. When I told my family and friends that I wanted to study abroad in Brazil instead of graduating in May 2014, many of them looked at me as if I were a lunatic. I looked around me to see the waves crashing on the beach, the sun slowly rising over the horizon, and my friends smiling back at me. It was in that moment that I knew that the decision I made was the right one. The course of my life had been forever altered, and I was determined to make the most of my short time in Brazil. After realizing that I had made perhaps the best decision of my life, I began to seek more opportunities to get to know new people and become involved in my community. I became a research assistant for the organizational behavior professor, gave several lectures for a student organization that discussed current events in English, got involved in Muay Thai and Jiu Jitsu at my local gym, and began exploring new places in Brazil with my friends. On my last day, one of my best friends, Gabriel, took me to the airport. We were sitting in the car reminiscing on all of the things we had done. We laughed, we cried, and we made plans for the next time we would see each other. You may think I was feeling sad during this time, but that was not the case. I was happy about all of the experiences I had while I was abroad and I knew that this would not be the last time that I would see my friends or spend an extended period of time in Brazil. I know I will go back, and perhaps I will return as an entrepreneur. Brazil taught me one very important lesson: life is too short not to explore.

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APPENDIX 12

ZACH SCHNEEWEIS UNIVERSITY OF VICOSA SPRING 2014

IT IS DIFFICULT TO PUT MY STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE INTO WORDS, BUT MY TIME IN BRAZIL WAS ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE. I ATTENDED THE UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DE VIÇOSA (UFV) LOCATED IN THE STATE OF MINAS GERAIS. I STUDIED THERE FOR THE SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS AND WAS ABROAD FOR A LITTLE MORE THAN SIX MONTHS. LOOKING BACK, I WAS EXCITED TO STUDY AT UFV SINCE IT WAS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE BEST ENGINEERING SCHOOLS IN ALL OF SOUTH AMERICA. I TOOK COURSES IN VEGETABLE BREEDING, METEOROLOGY IN ENGINEERING, PORTUGUESE, AND HISTORY OF ART.

60


Aside from my vegetable breeding course, which was taught by a professor from Texas A&M, all my classes and research were in Portuguese. It was very important to me that I immersed myself in the language. I was living with one American and a Brazilian during the first month of my stay but I actually ended up moving out because of the desire to try and master Portuguese. Although there were days when I didn’t retain as much information in lecture as my classmates, I thoroughly enjoyed my classes. I had built good relationships with my teaching assistants and my professors. However, my colleagues deserve the most credit for helping me along, whether it was notes or answering questions about things I didn’t quite catch in class. My classmates were so open and receptive toward me. There was this special camaraderie of diving into the material and tackling the obstacles of homework, study guides, and eventually the tests—together. My History of Art class proved to be extremely difficult because we talked about abstract ideas, and it was a lecture-heavy course. My professor, Karla Martins, would actually speak in English for me, abruptly stopping the entire class just to put emphasis on a particular fact or idea. She had broken English but she tried so hard to have me understand. She told me it was her duty as a teacher to do that, and that will stick with me for a long time. On the last day of class, I delivered a short speech thanking everyone for their support and patience. I am forever indebted to all the classmates who helped me throughout my courses at UFV. I passed every single class I took. Outside of class, I took part in a research project sponsored by the giant Brazilian energy company Petrobras. My research focused on a

single step of the production of biofuel from microalgae, and the objective was to find the speed of sedimentation of the microalgae Scenedesmus S.P. in differing environments. This was my first-ever research experience, and it proved to be very challenging. Everyone in the lab spoke Portuguese, and I soon learned Portuguese words for very specific tools and glassware in the lab, along with good habits for practice in the lab. I had much autonomy for my project, which made my accomplishments that much sweeter, and I was introduced to the world of research. This experience was extremely tough; working with microalgae sometimes meant I had to stay in the lab for fifteen hours straight to conduct experiments. Through it all, I stuck to my project and felt very satisfied upon finishing my work for Petrobras. Upon arriving in Brazil, I wanted to get a feel for the community. In the first month, I started asking friends about volunteer opportunities and I eventually found one. I worked with a nonprofit organization called A Rebusca, an after school program for teenagers from low-income neighborhoods in the area. The program took place at the city’s Presbyterian Church and we would also rent out a basketball/futsal (soccer on pavement) court for the kids. Participating in this program was one of the best decisions of my time in Brazil. I went there everyday during the week for about two hours for a period of four months. My official job was planning sports activities. I borrowed a basketball from a friend and taught many of the kids to play basketball. The majority of the teens had never dribbled a basketball before, and I took great pride in teaching the sport. There was one day I was especially proud of. The courts we shared are open to the public and are next

to the male dormitories on campus. College students often play in our court because there really aren’t that many other places to play. One day William, another volunteer counselor, and I were coaching one of our teenagers, Fabricio, on the court. Fabricio generally plays futsal with his friends and is one of the better players. William convinced him to try basketball for the first time. We were showing him the fundamentals of the sport when a group of college students arrived. We played them three on three and Fabricio did extremely well. In fact, our team from the Rebusca went on to win four straight games against the college students. I not only have many fond memories of working with the Rebusca, but the program taught me so much about Brazil and its people. Volunteering there showed me the difference in economics between the U.S. and Brazil. In the kids’ public schools, some rooms don’t have enough desks for everyone. Before I joined the Rebusca program, there was one ball for roughly 60 kids. I myself brought three more. Our teens had very authentic relationships and were especially generous. There was one day we had a field trip to the local theater because the owner was screening Captain America 2 for free for everyone in the program. I was meeting some of my favorite teenagers at the town square, and when I arrived, one of the kids came with a bag of gum-like candy called bala. These kids come from very poor backgrounds, but nevertheless he gave the bag of candy to his friend on the right, and his friend passed the bag along for everyone to share. It was a simple yet beautiful thing to see. On the way to the movie theater, I was again touched by the gener-

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APPENDIX 12

osity of my kids. I was walking with one friend in particular, a middle school student named Jackson. We were talking about an upcoming holiday break, and I asked him if he was going to visit any family or do anything special. He told me he has family in Belo Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro, but he couldn’t visit his family in Rio due to the violent neighborhood they live in. How is it fair that a boy in middle school has to deal with this? This was Jackson’s background. On our walk to the theater, Jackson stopped at a shop to buy a drink. He had what was the equivalent of one dollar and was going through the shop’s refrigerator. I was joking with Jackson that Captain America wasn’t going to wait for us and after waiting out-

side the shop I saw him run out with two sodas – one for him and one for me. Jackson comes from nothing, yet he decided to buy me a soda. I argued with him trying to return the drink yet he would have none of it and pushed me out of the store while shoving the can of soda into my hands. I became emotional that a boy with so little was so willing to buy his counselor a soda. The Lemann Scholarship was instrumental in my trip to Brazil and has changed the direction of my life. I now hope to work at an engineering company with U.S.-Brazil relations. Although my study abroad experience has ended, my desire to be a part of the Brazilian culture has not. I am keeping up with my conver-

HOMARI AOKI LEMANN SCHOLARSHIP FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES FALL SEMESTER 2014

62

sational Portuguese, and I am continuing to keep up with my friends in Viçosa. The Lemann Scholarship made my study abroad program possible and I cannot thank Mr. and Mrs. Lemann enough. I know they don’t know who I am, but words cannot express how grateful I am for their help. They helped introduce me to another culture, a whole new world that is Brazil. Since I’ve been back, I already have met students from UFV and am doing my best to return the favors that so many Brazilians did for me. The Lemann Scholarship truly has changed my life, and I don’t think I will be able to thank the Lemann family enough for this opportunity.


DURING THE FALL SEMESTER OF 2014, I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO STUDY AT THE PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF RIO DE JANEIRO IN BRAZIL WITH THE HELP OF THE LEMANN SCHOLARSHIP FOR BRAZILIAN STUDIES.

I focused on taking courses on Brazil such as Brazilian history, Portuguese and Special Topics on Brazilian Culture, as well as a class on Customer Relationship Management. During my spare time I worked at Discovery Hostel, named by Hostelworld as one of the best hostels in Latin America. There I was able to meet people from all over the world, hear about their travel experiences, and learn more about different cultures. I was also able to communicate with my co-workers in Portuguese and act as their translator when a guest could not speak the language. My Brazilian co-workers taught me how to make different Brazilian dishes such as moqueca, a northeastern fish stew, and coxinha, a fried dough filled with chicken. I also took Capoeira classes to get a better cultural experience and for exercise. The beginning of Capoeira dates back to the colonial times in Brazil, and while learning the martial art, I was able to learn the history of the sport as well. I have made connections with people all across the world while learning more about Brazil. I gained more knowledge of Brazilian culture and language, not just textbook Portuguese but colloquial Portuguese as well. Being able to actually experience what is it like to live in Brazil was a great experience, something that could not be fully conveyed by a textbook or a film. During this program, I was also able to visit many other cities within Brazil, including Florianopolis, Paraty, and Salvador. It was a great

opportunity to see the differences in culture within the country. I felt that Salvador was very different from Rio de Janeiro due to the prevalence of African culture brought by the African slaves up until the late 19th century. It was interesting to see that though both the United States and Brazil were colonized at about the same time, there are marked differences in the cultures and the way that the people behave in the different countries. This experience has helped me further my knowledge of the Portuguese language which will help me with my Portuguese major. I wanted to learn Portuguese because many people speak Portuguese, but it is still a language that most people who are not native speakers don’t take the time to learn. This will give me a competitive edge when entering the job market. Once I graduate, I would like to join the Peace Corps and volunteer in Mozambique, and it would be beneficial to already speak Portuguese, the national language of the country. After the Peace Corps, I hope to continue to utilize my Portuguese language skills. Not only have I been able to learn another language, but I have also been able to learn about a different culture. Many employers are looking to hire people who can adapt to new situations and be able to understand different cultures. Having gone to Brazil shows that I am able to adapt to new situations, which will make me more desirable to companies.

The following picture is of myself and some people I met while working at the hostel. This picture was taken by the Michael Jackson statue in the favela Santa Marta. The statue was placed there as a tribute to Michael Jackson who filmed his music video for the song, “They don’t care about us” there. Everyone in this picture is from a different country, which really sums up my experience in Brazil. I was fortunate to meet new people every day while still being able to make a connection with them. Every week, I was able to learn something new about Brazil and explore more of the city to gain an understanding of the culture. We went to see this statue because none of us had been to this particular favela, and we thought that it was interesting that Michael Jackson would choose to shoot his video at this location. The community is able to attract many tourists because of the statue, and some businesses thrive because of it. I was happy to see that the community was able to grow economically thanks to a celebrity who was there many years ago.

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APPENDIX 12

ALEJANDRA REYES PEÑA CIEE LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAM, CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF SALVADOR SPRING 2015

FOR FIVE AND A HALF MONTHS, I STUDIED ABROAD AS PART OF CIEE’S LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES PROGRAM IN SALVADOR, BAHIA, BRAZIL. DURING MY TIME ABROAD, I ATTENDED THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF SALVADOR AND TOOK A VARIETY OF CLASSES, BROADENING MY HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE OF BRAZIL AS A WHOLE WHILE ALSO STUDYING THE LANGUAGE.

64


My first month abroad, I took 90 hours of Portuguese instruction, Monday through Friday, in conjunction with a series of cultural classes or activities. One of the activities was participating in a Capoeira class, a regional and popular activity that can be classified as a style of dance, fight, and way of life, popular among people living in Bahia. Capoeira roots stem from a few places in Africa. It was brought over during the slave trade and has continued to have a large presence. My group participated in Capoeira Angola. We also participated in an African-style percussion class at Arte Consciente, an organization formed in 2003 in the developing community of Saramandaia in Salvador. This organization was formed by a group of friends who wanted to bring arts to the disadvantaged youth in their community to raise their spirits and keep them out of trouble. One of my favorite activities during the first month included a weekend trip to Praia do Forte where I visited Projeto Tamar, a group devoted to the conservation of turtles, and watched as a group of day old turtles were released into the ocean. My academic semester began after my first month. At UCSAL, I completed five classes: Portuguese, History of Bahia and of Brazil, History of Brazilian Art, which included visual and other art forms such as literature, Regional Spaces of Brazil, and Culture, Art and Education. Outside of classes, I visited CAASAH a few times. CAASAH is a support house for children in Salvador who are HIV positive. While there, I would put together puzzles and play soccer and card games with the children. I volunteered regularly at the Calabar community school

teaching English with two other students in my study abroad program. We taught one class of about five to eight students between the ages of eight and ten and a class of twenty-five students ages five to seven. Calabar is a developing community or what outsiders would call a “favela� in Salvador, like the community of Saramandaia. While abroad, I also did online work as a Gilman Scholar Reach the World Correspondent. As a correspondent, I wrote blog posts, uploaded photo albums, maintained a logbook of the weather or activities I did for students. The blog post topics were assigned, and I wrote on a variety of experiences such as my experience living with a Brazilian family, differences between typical American and Brazilian cultures, and sightseeing and traveling within Brazil, among other topics. As a RTW correspondent, I was assigned a class of fourth grade students at a New York City public school that I Skyped with four times during the semester to talk more about my experiences. For these sessions, I prepared mini lessons to pass on whatever knowledge I could to them. Writing for Reach the World definitely helped me reflect on my semester as time went on.

amount of time. I am so grateful to have been awarded the Lemann Scholarship for Brazilian Studies; without it, I am not sure how I could have afforded to cover some of my program costs. This semester has only confirmed my love for the Portuguese language, and I will continue to study it in the semesters to come. I know that this semester abroad has strengthened my writing, not only in English, but in Portuguese as well, which is very important in my line of work—journalism. I would also like to return to Brazil one day and do some research and reporting. I fell in love with the country, and I thank those who helped make this experience possible for me.

Some of the activities that I enjoyed the most were hiking up mountains in Chapada, visiting Christ the Redeemer, and spending three nights in the Amazon. I could never have imagined doing these things before I was accepted into my program. Spending a semester in Brazil challenged me both physically and mentally and I would not trade my experience for anything. Overall, I feel stronger as a person all around and I have learned how to communicate my feelings and ideas much better, all of this in such a short

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APPENDIX 13

MBA GLOBAL CONSULTING PROGRAM

YEAR

CLIENT

INDUSTRY

PROJECT SUMMARY

LOCATION

2015

Imaginarium

Retail, gift products

Help the company reduce lead time and stock and increase cash flow by developing a new supply chain for specific product lines

Florianopolis

2015

Fortune 200 company based in Chicago area

Healthcare, pharmaceutical

Develop a strategy to support and improve leadership opportunities for women employees

Chicago, São Paulo

2015

Meta Florestas

Lumber, construction

Identify go-to-market strategy and create an operational strategy for a producer of African Mahogany wood

Belo Horizonte

2015

Vision Sistemas

Energy, consulting

Help an engineering consulting firm expand into new markets outside of Brazil.

Belo Horizonte

2015

Campus Brasil

Educational tourism

Create a market expansion strategy that will help the company continue to expand and gain more clients

São Paulo

2015

Attitude Group

Branding, marketing, communications

Provide market feedback on features to be included on a new product it plans to launch in the U.S.

São Paulo, Chicago

2013

Instituto Brasileiro da Cachaça

Food & Beverage

Create a market entry strategy to enter the US

Brasilia

2013

Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento

Government, Agriculture

Evaluate the current organizational structure of the Food & Livestock Agricultural ministry

São Paulo

2013

KSS Brasil Ltda.

Electronics, Construction parts

Create a business plan for a Brazilian agent company representative of the KSS from Taiwan that deals with accessories for wiring and cable management for electric and electric-electronic components

São Paulo

2013

Kagari Ltd

Jewelry

Review the contract manufacturing and supply chain for high-end jewelry in the Brazilian market

São Paulo

2013

XP Financial

Financial services

Develop a US entry strategy

Rio De Janeiro

2012

Braskem S.A.

Petrochemical, chemistry

Re-design the innovation process in order to accelerate the launch of development projects in the market

São Paulo

2012

Objective Solutions

Software

Evaluate growth strategies for the company and create an implementation plan

São Paulo

2012

Sementes

Software

Evaluate growth strategies for the company and create an implementation plan

São Paulo

2012

Santa Fé

Agriculture

Through a valuation methodology, find out if the company can financially sustain an aggressive growth strategy and what value will be created from this

Goiania

2012

Vertex Seguros

Insurance, financial

Develop a Customer Relationship Management Plan by understanding the company’s market profile and business areas that need to be improved

Belo Horizonte

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APPENDIX 14

LEMANN BRAZIL LEADERSHIP SCHOLARS PERSONAL STATEMENTS

GUSTAVO ISAAC MARTINS The opportunity to study in another country is always very rich, and my experience at the University of Illinois is no different. The courses offered by the Master of Science with a specialization in Policy Economics approach many areas of economics, allowing the graduate student to more deeply explore the most interesting ones. After completing my degree in 2016 and returning to Brazil, I will definitely be better prepared for my duties as a government employee.

ANDRÉ MUELLER The decision to obtain a Master’s Degree in Economics at the age of 50, after 20 years in the Central Bank of Brazil working in the strategic planning area, is a serious challenge. It means leaving one´s comfort zone in order to participate in one of the best programs in economics at the University of Illinois. The two years dedicated to this mission were hard, challenging and well worth it. The task was made simpler with the support offered by the Lemann Institute, contributing to the success of my efforts. From offering directions in order to respond to the various demands of the university, to help resolving eventual problems, such as payments of fees, the Institute always acted professionally making my experience easier and permitting me to focus on my studies.

LUIS OTAVIO VISSOTTO VARGUES I was one of the MSPE students supported by the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, from Aug, 2013 through Jun, 2015. During my studies at the University of Illinois, I had the opportunity to acquire knowledge regarding economics, statistics and finance, as well as develop a strong academic background. I currently work at the Central Bank of Brazil where I apply, on a daily basis, a great part of the content covered in classes and some of the topics of my research. However, the best experience that I had during my time at ChampaignUrbana was not only the technical and academic background, but also meeting very special people, from classmates through the faculty.

JOSÉ DEODORO DE OLIVEIRA FILHO I am an official from the Central Bank of Brazil, currently attending the MSPE program (Master Degree with specialization in Policy Economics) at the University of Illinois. I must praise the Institute for giving us the opportunity of enriching our skill sets at such a high-level institution, and I’m positive this investment is an important step in enabling more efficiency at the Central Bank of Brazil, and consequently a better Brazil.

These people helped me out during my journey in the U.S., and some of them became very close friends for life. Today I have no doubt that this was one of the best experiences I have ever had in my life. I definitely grew as a person and learned things from the American culture that I will apply here in Brazil and will teach to my future kids. I am very grateful and deeply appreciative of Mr. Jorge Paulo Lemann and the Lemann Institute staff for providing me such an amazing experience. I also thank Professor Werner Baer, who is one of the best professors that I ever had. He showed me some specifics of the Brazilian economy and history that I did not know until then. Thank you all for everything!

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APPENDIX 15

LIST OF CONFERENCES ORGANIZED OR CO-ORGANIZED BY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE

YEAR

CONFERENCE

2009

Brazilian Writers and their U.S. Translators, cosponsored with the Center for Translation Studies

2010

A Comparative Analysis of Growth and Development: Argentina and Brazil • Resulted in 2013 Edited Volume

2010

The Regional Impacts of National Policies in Brazil, co-sponsored with the University of São Paulo and the Federal University of Pernambuco • Resulted in 2013 Edited Volume

2011

Brazil as a Player in South-South Cooperation to Promote Sustainable Development in the Drylands of Latin America, Africa and Asia, cosponsored with the University of Illinois Beckman Institute

2012

BRASA XI International Congress – Urbana-Champaign • Resulted in 2013 Edited Volume

2013

Roundtable “Physical Activity, Health and Wellbeing in Brazil” co-sponsored with the Center on Health, Aging and Disability

2013

Lemann Dialogue at UIUC – “Agriculture and Environmental Issues in Brazil”

2013

Symposium on Infrastructure in Brazil, co-sponsored with the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of São Paulo

2014

BRASA XII International Congress – London • Included 1,000 participants

2014

Workshop on Education and Inequality in Brazil and the United States

2015

Workshop on Histories of Business and Entrepreneurship in Brazil, co-sponsored with the Department of Economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

2016

Conference on Regionalism in Brazilian History, Recognizing 50 Years of Scholarship by Joseph Love at the University of Illinois (In Planning)

68


APPENDIX 16

PROGRAM OF THE THIRD LEMANN DIALOGUE

THIRD LEMANN DIALOGUE AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN BRAZIL NOVEMBER 7-8, 2013 • ALICE B. CAMPBELL ALUMNI CENTER • UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013

10:00-10:15 AM: BREAK

2:00-3:00 PM: REGISTRATION

10:15-11:45 AM: PANEL 3. IMPACT OF BIOFUELS PRODUCTION ON LABOR AND LAND USE Moderator: Jody Endres, Assistant Professor, Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, University of Illinois • Tom Rogers, Associate Professor of History, Emory University • Marcia Azanha Ferraz Dias de Moraes, Professor, Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”, Department of Economics, Sociology and Administration, USP/ESALQ • Hayri Onal, Professor of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois

3:00-3:30 PM: OPENING PANEL: WELCOMING REMARKS • Ambassador Paulo Camargo, Consul General, Consulate General of Brazil in Chicago • Mary Arends-Kuenning, Interim Director, Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • Frances Hagopian, Jorge Paulo Lemann Visiting Associate Professor for Brazil Studies, Brazil Studies Program, Harvard University • Gustavo Azenha, Director of Graduate Studies, MARSLAC, Associate Director, Center for Brazilian Studies, Institute for Latin American Studies, Columbia University • Tassia Cruz, Fellow, Lemann Center for Educational Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazil, Stanford University • Phyllis Wise, Chancellor, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign 3:30-5 PM: PANEL 1. AGRIBUSINESS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND CHALLENGES Moderator: Thomas J. Trebat, Director, Columbia Global Center in Rio de Janeiro • Geraldo Bueno Martha, Coordinador do Sistema Agropensa, EMBRAPA • Peter Goldsmith, Associate Professor and Interim Director of the Food and Agribusiness Management Program (FAM), Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois • Rachael Garrett, Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University (and recent Stanford Ph.D.)

11:45 AM-1:15 PM: LUNCH 1:15-2:45 PM: PANEL 4. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF DEVELOPMENT Moderator: Paulo Sotero, Director of the Brazil Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars • Fabiano Toni, Professor and Coordinator of the Graduate Program in Sustainable Development, Universidade de Brasília • atiana Deane de Abreu Sá, Researcher, Embrapa Amazonia Oriental • Carlos Azzoni, Director of the Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade da USP

5:15-6:15 PM: KEYNOTE ADDRESS • Guilherme Lacerda, Director of Social Infrastructure, Environment, Agriculture and Social Inclusion, Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento - BNDES

2:45-4:15 PM: PANEL 5. CLIMATE CHANGE Moderator: Jesse Ribot, Professor of Geography and Director of the Social Dimensions of Environmental Policy Initiative, University of Illinois • Walter Baethgen, Director, Regional and Sectorial Research Program and Leader, Latin America and Caribbean, International Research Institute for Climate and Society, The Earth Institute, Columbia University • Clovis Cavalcanti, Professor, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Researcher, Fundação Joaquim Nabuco and President of Honors of the Sociedade Brasileira de Economia Ecológica (EcoEco) • David Gustafson, Environmental and Agriculture Policy Modeling Lead, Monsanto

6:15-8:00 PM: RECEPTION, ALICE B. CAMPBELL HALL ATRIUM

4:15-4:30 PM: BREAK

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

4:30-5:30 PM: PANEL 6. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: WOOD AND WATER Moderator: Jerry Dávila, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor of Brazilian History, University of Illinois • Francisco Assis de Souza Filho, Head of Ph.D. and Master’s Program in Water Resources and Environmental Hydraulics and Environmental Department, Federal University of Ceará • Ariaster Chimeli, Associate Professor of Economics, Ohio University

5:00-5:15 PM: BREAK

8:30-10:00 AM: PANEL 2. LAND DISTRIBUTION Moderator: Werner Baer, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois • Bernardo Mueller, Professor of Economics, Universidade de Brasilia • Lee Alston, Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies, University of Colorado • Cynthia Simmons, Associate Professor of Geography, Michigan State University

5:30-5:45 PM: CLOSING REMARKS

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APPENDIX 17

LECTURES PROMOTED AND SPONSORED BY THE LEMANN INSTITUTE

NAME

INSTITUTION

TITLE

DATE

Tony Spanakos

Political Science and Law, Montclair State University

Still Reforming Brazil: Police not Politics

16-Sep-10

Roberto Damatta

University of Notre Dame / PUC do Rio de Janeiro

On the Cultural Meaning of Animals in Brazil and the United States: From the Animal Lottery to Mickey Mouse

14-Oct-10

Linda Lewin

Department of History at University of California Berkeley

The Genesis of the Brazilian Cangaço: Antonio Silvino, the Pernambuco Backlands, and the Reinvention of Banditry in the Early Republic, 18801914

15-Oct-10

Roberto Damatta

University of Notre Dame / PUC do Rio de Janeiro

Workshop: On Damatta’s Anthropological Trajectories

19-Oct-10

Alamir Aquino Correa

Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil

Elegiac Temper in Eden: A Portrait of Sadness and Cordiality in Brazil

28-Oct-10

Thomas Trebat

Center for Latin American Studies, Columbia University

The Changing Role of The State in the Brazilian Economy

29-Oct-10

Diana Toneto

University of Ribeirão Preto ( UNAERP -Brasil)

The instinct of nationality: Some considerations on Brazilian literature and culture

30-Nov-10

Rudinei Toneto

Faculdade de Economia, Administracao e Contabilidade de Ribeirao Preto - FEA-RP/USP

The Recent Evolution of Sanitation Services in Brazil

1-Dec-10

James Green

Brown University

Rethinking Youth Culture, Politics, and the Armed Struggle During the Brazilian Military Dictatorship (1964-85)

7-Feb-11

Jerry Davila

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Race Mixture in The Land of Future

10-Feb-11

Tania Ionin, Silvina Montrul and Helade Santos

UIUC

The Acquisition of Generic Reference in Brazilian Portuguese as a Third Language

10-Feb-11

Jeffrey Needell

University of Florida

The Brazilian Abolitionist Movement, 1879-1888: A Discussion of the Narrative, Contemporary Sources, and the Challenge of the Historiography

21-Feb-11

Claudio Paiva

California State University at Channel Islands

Economic Policies in Brazil: Inflation Targeting, External Adjustment and a Very Strong Real

25-Feb-11

Antonio Rocha Magalhaes and Jesse Ribot

Center for Management and Strategic Studies, Brasilia; UIUC

Drylands and Global Change: from ICID to Rio and Beyond

2-Mar-11

Somnath Baidya Roy, Peter Goldsmith, and Antonio Rocha Magalhaes

UIUC, UIUC, and Center for Management and Strategic Studies, Brasilia

Brazil as a Player in South-South Cooperation to Promote Sustainable Development in Drylands of Latin America, Africa and Asia

4-Mar-11

Cristina Campolina

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Politica Brasileira em Relação ao Franquismo (19361945)

8-Mar-11

John Tofik Karam

De Paul University

Anti-Semitism from the Standpoint of its Muslims Arab Victims in a South American Border Zone

10-Mar-11

70


NAME

INSTITUTION

TITLE

DATE

Zephyr Frank

Stanford University

Workshop: The Use of GIS Models for Historical Research

10-Mar-11

Zephyr Frank

Stanford University

19th-Century Rio de Janeiro: Slaves, Machado de Assis and Geographic Information Systems

11-Mar-11

Marcus Carvalho

Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

The master of the slave ship, the neighbor's wife and the English whip

13-Apr-11

Marcus Carvalho

Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

Malunguinho yesterday and today

14-Apr-11

Marcio Goldman

Museu Nacional / UFRJ

From Religion to Politics and Back: an Afro-Brazilian Reflection

18-Apr-11

Richard Marin

Université de Toulouse II

Reflections of a French Historian on the Evolution of Brazilian Catholicism

19-Apr-11

Moacir Miranda

School of Business (FEA), University of Sao Paulo

Cultural Difference and Management Styles: The Experience of Brazilian Corporations Abroad

8-Sep-11

John Collins

Queens College

Futures Entombed: Properly Historical Subjects, Living Human Treasure, and the Materialization of Heritage in a Brazilian World Heritage Zone

15-Sep-11

David Jackson

Yale University

Concrete Poetry: 'Augusto Fingers': dacto, grypho, grama, clip

29-Sep-11

Waïl Hassan

University of Illinois

Alberto Mussa and the Translation of Arabic Poetry in Brazil

6-Oct-11

Claudia Roquette Pinto

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Beyond the Shadow Zone: A Bilingual Reading with Brazilian Poet Claudia Roquette-Pinto

10-Oct-11

Marcelo Kuyumjian

University of Illinois

The Impact of American Cultural Influence in Samba

20-Oct-11

Tomas Serebrisky

World Bank

Infrastructure Performance and PPPs in Brazil

25-Oct-11

Eduardo Coutinho

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Comparative Literature in Brazil: Aspects and Problems

10-Nov-11

Irene Small

University of Illinois

Passion of the Same: Cacique de Ramos and the Multitud

2-Feb-12

Júlio Emílio DinizPereira

Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG)

The Impact of the Landless Workers Movement on the Development of Brazilian Activist Educators' Identities

21-Feb-12

Eduardo Coutinho

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Multiculturalism and Miscegenation in the Construction of Latin America`s Cultural Identity

23-Feb-12

Teresa Caldeira

University of California, Berkeley

Peripheral Urbanization

2-Mar-12

João Ubaldo Ribeiro

Member of the Academia Brasileira de Letras

Four or Five Myths about Brazil and Latin America

27-Mar-12

João Ubaldo Ribeiro and Cliff Landers

Member of the Academia Brasileira de Letras

A Conversation with João Ubaldo Ribeiro: The Writer as Translator, the Translator as Writer

28-Mar-12

João Ubaldo Ribeiro

Member of the Academia Brasileira de Letras

My views of Brazil Today: A Talk with Brazilian Writer João Ubaldo Ribeiro

30-Mar-12

Donald Sawyer

Visiting Lemann Professor at Harvard

Saving South America's Ecosystem Functions

27-Apr-12

Herbert Klein

Columbia University

The Free Afro-Brazilians in a Slave Society

11-Sept-12

Jerry Davila

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

White Skin, Black Masks: Brazilian Performing Africanness in the South Atlantic

4-Oct-12

71


72

NAME

INSTITUTION

TITLE

DATE

Cesar Braga Pinto

Northwestern University

Othelo's Pathologies-Adolfo Caminha and Cesare Lombroso

8-Oct-12

Argelina Figueiredo

Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro

Minority Government in Latin American Presidentialism: Political and Institutional Determinants

9-Oct-12

Carlos Azzoni

Universidade São Paulo

Regional Disparities in Brazil: Evolution, Consequences, and Policy Alternatives

16-Oct-12

Joseph Love

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Revolt of the Whip

23-Oct-13

Pamela CappasToro

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

El Corte, Afoxé and Carnaval: Re (imagining) Afro descendant Music under Dominican and Brazilian Dictatorships

6-Nov-12

George Reid Andrews

University of Pittsburgh

Racial Inequality in Brazil and the United States, 1990-2010

29-Nov-12

Marly Cardoso

Universidade São Paulo

Home Fortification of Complementary Foods with Multiple Micronutrient Powders: Planning a New Strategy to Prevent Anemia in Brazilian Children

6-Dec-12

Wendy Hunter

University of Texas at Austin

Shifting Orientations in Brazilian Social Policy

25-Jan-13

Luciano Tosta

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

O Sublime Sertão: Miragens do Brasil em O Sertanejo, Os Sertões e Grande Sertão: Veredas

5-Feb-13

Antonio Sergio Guimarães

Universidade São Paulo

Racial Democracy: The Sociological History of a Concept

15-Feb-13

Charles A. Perrone

University of Florida

Bossa Nova On Balance: Vetting Versions and Values

19-Feb-13

Alexandre Antônio Tombini

Central Bank of Brazil

Brazil: The Current Economic Situation

21-Feb-13

Celi Scalon

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Development, Inequality and the Rising of a "New Class"

26-Feb-13

Terrie Groth

Universidade de Brasília

Kids & Politics: Civic Engagement and Service Learning in Brazil

5-Mar-13

Tania Benedetti

Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

“VAMOS”: Active Living, Enhancing Health

12-Mar-13

Júlio Cesar BiccaMarques

Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul

"Monkeys, humans and yellow fever: a case of lethal and costly misinformation in southern Brazil"

26-Mar-13

Denis Mizne

Fundação Lemann

The state of education in Brazil today: challenges and innovations

27-Mar-13

Leonardo Bursztyn

UCLA Anderson School of Management

Poverty and the Political Economy of Public Education Spending: Evidence from Brazil

2-Apr-13

Jeffrey Lesser

Emory University

What’s So New about the New Multicultural Brazil?

4-Apr-13

David William Foster

Arizona State University

The Photographer Madalena Schwartz, the Dance Troupe Dzi Croquettes and Cultural Resistance during the Brazilian Dictatorship

22-Apr-13

Paulo Roberto de Almeida

Itamaraty

Brazilian Foreign Policy: The Economic Consequences of Mister Lula

1-May-13

Tania Ionin Elaine Grolla

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Experimental Investigation of Second and Third Language Acquisition in Brazil

27-Aug-13

Peter Beattie

Michigan State University

Human Rights and Brazil’s Intractable Poor: Flogging, the Death Penalty, and Slavery’s Abolition in Comparative Perspective

26-Sept-13


NAME

INSTITUTION

TITLE

DATE

Philippe Faucher

University of Montreal

Understanding the Failure of the Brazilian Developmental State

22-Oct-13

Antônio Sérgio Alfredo Guimarães

University of São Paulo

Postcolonial Studies and Afro-Brazilian Studies

4-Feb-14

Matthew S. Winters

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Credibility and Specificity: When Do Brazilian Voters Act on Information about Corruption

11-Feb-14

Nadya Araújo Guimarães

University of São Paulo

Labor Flexibility in a Flexible Market – Intermediaries and Its Workers in Brazil

18-Feb-14

Renato Villela

Secretary of Finance of State of Rio de Janeiro

Current Issues on Fiscal Federalism in Brazil and Their Macroeconomic Implications

7-Mar-14

Carlos Araújo

Mackenzie Agribusiness, Brazil

Overview of Brazil Agribusiness – Brazil: World’s Supermarket

11-Mar-14

Brodwyn Fischer

University of Chicago

Unequal Ties: The Everyday Politics of Survival in Recife, 1870-1900

18-Mar-14

Cold War Politics and the Arts in Brazil: Reappraising Guerra-Peixe’s Empirical Research on Northeastern Traditional Music (1950-1952)

19-Mar-14

Samuel Araújo

Francisco H. G. Ferreira

The World Bank, African Region

Economic Mobility and the Rise of the Latin American Middle Class

1-Apr-14

Marcelo Cavalcanti

University of Cambridge

(Mis) Allocation Effect of an Overpaid Public Sector

9-Apr-14

Juliana Guimarães Cavalcanti

University of Cambridge

Less Inequality, More Welfare: A Structural Analysis for Brazil

10-Apr-14

Ana Lúcia Kassouf

ESALQ – University of São Paulo

Child Labor: The Brazilian Experiences and Challenges

11-Apr-14

Raul Silveira

Federal University of Pernambuco

Pro Poor Economic Growth in Brazilian Northeast: the Evidence for the Periods 1991-2000 and 20002010

14-Apr-14

Rogério de Souza Farias

University of Brazilia

Industrialists, Economists, Diplomats and Congressmen: Brazil and the Rise of Postwar Trade Negotiations (1946-1967)

22-Apr-14

Wendy Wolford

Cornell University

Rediscovering Africa? The Role of Brazilian Experts and Expertise in Mozambican Agriculture

29-Apr-14

Dain Borges

Department of History, University of Chicago

"Novels of Upward Mobility in a Post-Emancipation Metropolis: Lima Barreto and Machado de Assis.”

3-Sept-14

Raul Gouvea

Anderson School of Management, University of New Mexico

Defense Initiatives in Latin America: A Brazilian Perspective

26-Sept-14

Marcos Alvito

Department of History, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Big Business As Usual: the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

8-Oct-14

Eduardo Amaral Haddad

Department of Economics, University of São Paulo

"Mobility, Accessibility and Productivity in Metropolitan Systems: The Case of São Paulo, Brazil"

14-Oct-14

Otaviano Canuto

Senior Adviser on BRICS Economies, World Bank

China, Brazil: Two Tales of a Growth Slowdown

22-Oct-14

Letícia Marteleto

Department of Sociology and Population Research Center. University of Texas at Austin

Race and Educational Inequality in Brazil

27-Oct-14

73


74

NAME

INSTITUTION

TITLE

DATE

José Antonio Cheibub

Department of Political Science, University of Illinois

The 2014 Brazilian Elections

30-Oct-14

Fabio Durão

Unicamp

Bispo do Rosário and the Ruse of Brazilian Art

November 5th, 2014

Werner Baer

Department of Economics University of Illinois

Institutional Obstacles to Brazil's Economic Development

February 3rd, 2015

Gustavo Rossi

University of São Paulo (USP)/Princeton University

Race as a category of experience in the intellectual trajectory of Edison Carneiro

February 24th, 2015

Ian Read

Soka University of America

Brazil’s Era of Epidemics: How Disease Shaped a Nation

March 10th, 2015

Gilberto Gil

Musician and Former Minister of Culture, Brazil

Music and Brazilian Culture

April 1st, 2015

Jennifer Cabrelli Amaro

University of Illinois at Chicago

Looking Both Ways: Examining Bi-Directional Transfer in Third Language Acquisition of Brazilian Portuguese

2-Apr-15

Ana Clotilde Thome-Williams

Northwestern University

Soccer narration and Brazilian Identity

April 7th, 2015

Glen Goodman

Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Illinois

Germans in the Land of the Gaúchos: Ethnic and Regional Identities in Brazil’s South

16-Apr-15

Lenore Matthew

WGGP Goodman Fellow, University of Illinois

Informally Employed: Women’s Decisions to Participate in Technical Training Programs in Brazil

22-Apr-15

Hapsatou Wane

Lemann Graduate Fellow, University of Illinois

The Nervous Condition of Hyphenated Diasporas: Postcolonial Perspectives on Afro-Brazilian Writings

23-Apr-15


APPENDIX 18

WORKSHOP PROGRAM

PROGRAM OF THE WORKSHOP ON INEQUALITY IN EDUCATION IN BRAZIL AND THE UNITED STATES UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN ALICE B. CAMPBELL ALUMNI CENTER, 601 S. LINCOLN AVENUE, URBANA, IL, BOARD ROOM FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2014

Sponsored by the College of Education, Women and Gender in Global Perspectives (WGGP), the Campus Inequality Initiative, and the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies

8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks

Professor Lorenzo Baber, College of Education, University of Illinois

Professor Jerry Dávila, Director, Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies and Lemann Professor Department of History, University of Illinois

9:20 a.m.

Setting the Scene—Educational Inequality in Brazil and the United States

Professor Mary Arends-Kuenning, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois

10:00 a.m.

Racial Thought and Public Education in Early Twentieth Century Brazil

Professor Jerry Dávila, Director, Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies and Lemann Professor Department of History, University of Illinois

10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m.

Demographic Projections of the Structure and the Labor Force Participation Rate for Brazil and its Regions Until 2030

Professor Eduardo Rios-Neto, CEDEPLAR, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

11:15 a.m.

Inequality in K-12 Brazilian Schools

Ms. Mila Molina, Project Manager, Fundação Lemann

11:45 a.m.

Multiculturalism in the ‘Post-Racial’ Era: Examining Hegemony and (Re)Construction of Otherness in US Higher Education

Professor Lorenzo Baber, Department of Education Policy, Organization, and Leadership, University of Illinois

12:15 – 2:00 p.m. Lunch 2:00 p.m.

Public vs Private: Issues Involving the Recent Expansion of Higher Education in Brazil

Professor Carlos Azzoni, Department of Economics, Universidade de São Paulo

2:30 p.m.

Illinois Promise Program: An Overview with Research Results

Ms. Susan Gershenfeld, Director, Illinois Promise, University of Illinois

3:00 p.m. Break 3:15 p.m.

Higher Education in Brazilian Portraits: Reframing Concepts

Professor Walkyria Monte Mor, Departamento de Letras Modernas, Universidade de São Paulo

3:45 p.m.

Wrap-up Panel

75


APPENDIX 19

LEMANN INSTITUTE CULTURAL EVENTS

FILMS 2011

Mostra - 5 vezes favela, with talk by director Cacau Amaral

2012

CLACS Film Festival – Cadeira do Pai

2012

Mostra - Xingú, with talk by artistic director Cassio Amarante

2012

International Week – Central do Brasil

2013

CLACS Film Festival – O som ao redor

2013

Mostra – Corações Sujos, with talk by writer and critic Franthiesco Ballerini

2013

International Week – Divã

2013

Mostra – Olhos azúis, with talk by actor Cristina Lago

2014

CLACS Film Festival – O lobo atrás da porta

ART EXHIBITS 2012

Blind Field curated by Tumelo Mosaka and Irene Small

PUBLIC CONFERENCES 2012

10th Annual Conference on Capoeira cosponsored with the UI Capoeira Club

2013

11th Annual Conference on Capoeira cosponsored with UI Capoeira Club

2014

12th Annual Conference on Capoeira cosponsored with UI Capoeira Club

2015

13th Annual Conference on Capoeira cosponsored with UI Capoeira Club

76


APPENDIX 20

FLAS FUNDING FOR GRAD AND UNDERGRAD PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE STUDY, 2009-16

2009-10 ACADEMIC YEAR #

Last Name

First Name

Department

Grad Year

1

Bean

Ryan

History

2nd

2

Deely

Katrina

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

1st

3

Shahid

Hasan

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

2nd

4

Scarpace

Daniel

Linguistics

1st

5

Woller

Alexander

Musicology

1st

2009 SUMMER 1

Bean

Ryan

History

3rd

2

Cappas

Pamela

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

2nd

3

Ragsdale

Katherine

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

2nd

2010-11 ACADEMIC YEAR 1

Deely

Katrina

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

MA

2

Lara

Isabel

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Undergrad

3

Collette

April

Geography

PhD

4

Bean

Ryan

History

PhD

5

Chrin

Julia

Library & Information Science

MA

6

Le

Huyen

Mechanical Engineering

Undergrad

7

Reynolds

Evangeline

Political Science

PhD

8

McKenna

Erin

Recreation, Sport &Tourism

PhD

9

Pritchett

Regina

Urban & Regional Planning

MUP

2010 SUMMER 1

Cruz

Aaron

Accountancy

Undergrad

2

Johnson

Tiffany

Human Resources & Industrial Rel.

Grad

3

McKenna

Erin

Recreation, Sport &Tourism

Grad

2011-12 ACADEMIC YEAR 1

Soileau

John-Ben

Anthropology

G/PhD

2

Mendez-Johnson

Veronica

History

G/PhD

3

Le

Huyen

Mechanical Engineering

U

4

Fennig

Douglas

Musicology

G/ MS

5

Matthew

Lenore

Political Science

G/PhD

6

McKenna

Erin

Recreation, Sport &Tourism

G/PhD

7

Chaidez

Cornelio

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

G/PhD

Douglas

Musicology

MS

2011 SUMMER 1

Fenning

77


APPENDIX 20 2012-13 ACADEMIC YEAR #

Last Name

First Name

Department

Grad Year

1

Soileau

John-Ben

Anthropology

PhD

2

Owen

Ashley

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

MA

3

Cardenas

Manuel

GS

Undergrad

4

Henson

Bryce

Institute of Communications Research

PhD

5

Matthew

Lenore

Political Science

PhD

2012 SUMMER 1

Soileau

John-Ben

Anthropology

PhD

2

Mendez-Johnson

Veronica

History

PhD

3

Henson

Bryce

Institute of Communications Research

PhD

4

Matthew

Lenore

Political Science

PhD

2013-14 ACADEMIC YEAR 1

Gordon

Carrie

Art History

MA

2

Ridley

Jazmin

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

MA

3

Sauls

James

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

MA

4

Milian

Jesus

Engineering

UG

5

Galva

Genesis

General Studies

UG

6

Marquez

John

History

PhD

7

Kanjee

Sabrina

Political Science

MA

8

Long

Christopher

Political Science

PhD

9

Wasiniewska

Karolina

Political Science

MA

10

Gierhart

Annie

Urban & Regional Planning

MUP

2014-15 ACADEMIC YEAR 1

Stablein

Michael

Agricultural & Biological Engineering

Grad

2

Nagele

Ashley

Animal Science

Grad

3

Burns

Dexter

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Grad

4

Sauls

James

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Grad

5

Madarieta

Ethan

Comparative Literature

Grad

6

Ahlenius

Jason

English

Grad

7

Spenser

Katrina

Library & Information Science

Grad

8

Long

Christopher

Political Science

Grad

9

Evensen

Krista

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

Grad

10

Aoki

Homari

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese/ACES

Grad

78


2014 SUMMER #

Last Name

First Name

Department

Grad Year

1

Ridley

Jazmin

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Grad

2

Spenser

Katrina

Library and Information Science

Grad

3

Marquez

John

History

Grad

4

Senters

Kelly

Political Science

Grad

5

Evensen

Krista

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

Grad

6

Rector

Amanda

Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

Grad

7

Contractor

Annie

Urban & Regional Planning

Grad

2010-11 ACADEMIC YEAR 1

Stablein

Michael

Agricultural & Biological Engineering

Grad

2

Burns

Dexter

Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Grad

3

Dyck

David

Crop Sciences

Grad

4

Jones

John

Education Policy

Grad

5

Osei

Cassandra

History

Grad

6

Niece

Blair

Political Science

Grad

7

Plutowski

Luke

Political Science

Grad

8

Rundlett

Ashlea

Political Science

Grad

9

Senters

Kelly

Political Science

Grad

10

Garguilo

Megan

Spanish & Portuguese

Grad

11

Rector

Amanda

Spanish & Portuguese

Grad

12

Horton

Erica

Urban & Regional Planning

Grad

13

Urban

Angela

Urban & Regional Planning

Grad

14

Juvik

Halley

Anthropology

Grad

15

Nagele

Ashley

ACES Animal Sciences

Grad

16

Pond

Renee

Molecular & Cellular Biology

Undergrad

John

Education Policy

Grad

2015 SUMMER 1

Jones

79


APPENDIX 21

LIBRARY RESOURCES

BRAZIL AND LATIN AMERICA AT THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN ANTONIO SOTOMAYOR, PHD, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR LIBRARIAN OF LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES

The University Library at Illinois is the largest public academic research library in the U.S., with nearly 14 million volumes and 24 million items and materials in all formats. Illinois’s Latin American and Caribbean collection is one of the nation’s largest, holding some 971,000 volumes (in multiple languages), 29,750 catalogued maps, and 5,680 films, 23,000 microforms, and 1,030 newspapers. We are notable for our Brazilian collection, but other strengths include Argentinean and Andean materials, as well as publications in Creole and Andean-Amazonian languages. More than 10,000 cultural artifacts at the Krannert and Spurlock Museums complement these rich holdings. The Latin American Collection is overseen by Assistant Professor and Librarian of Latin American and Caribbean Studies Antonio Sotomayor. Professor Sotomayor holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Chicago, and specializes in the cultural and political history of Spanish Caribbean sport, holding appointments in the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese, and Recreation, Sport, and Tourism. Dr. Sotomayor keeps close collaboration with the Lemann Institute of Brazilian Studies and the Brazilian Studies program to support research and teaching. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and up to the present, Illinois’s acquisitions program of Latin American material has produced a robust collection in most of the forty countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean. However, traditional strengths have been Brazil, Argentina, and the Andes (especially Peru and Ecuador). By 1916, the Library had some 2,500 volumes from Latin America, with bigger holdings for Brazil and Argentina. During the 1950s and 1970s the University of Illinois Library was responsible for Brazil under the Farmington Plan, a federal program designed to acquire in mass literature and documentation from different parts of the world. Presently, the Library holds more than 103,000 volumes in Portuguese. The Library continues to make Brazil a top priority in acquiring and supporting research and teaching. Dr. Sotomayor is committed to fostering the study of Brazil through prioritizing acquisitions, developing specialized research guides, and designing programming about or including Brazil. Brazil is the largest account of all the other Latin American country profiles. Illinois was one of the first academic libraries to acquire the Luso Brazilian History and Culture: Oliveira Lima Library Pamphlets electronic database. Other special holdings include the Collecção das leis do Brazil, 1808-1891, the Jornal do Brasil’s Suplemento Dominical (1956-1966), the Eugene Davenport Papers 1857-78, 1889, 1891-1941, 194849, 1954, a video collection of 25 Brazilian telenovelas (1970-2013), and the complete run of the sports magazine Placar (1970-2015).

80


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