Page 1


APRIL 2017

Style

37 Shopping This month’s wish list features affordable treats and investment buys that #EDloves 41 News Cool shops, hot launches, the lowdown on Jesmonite and new interiors ranges from fashion greats 53 Decorating Dimore Studio share their guide to using fabrics. Plus, how to get the ideal front door 58 Design The history of Roche Bobois, the stirring story of the spoon, and why London’s Noho is the place to go 75 Big in Japan Visit the Barbican’s new architecture exhibition. Our readers get a 20% discount on tickets! 82 Technology Stylish speakers and brilliant labour-saving gadgets 87 Architecture Discover the London skyline that might have been, and the story of Venice’s Ca’ d’Oro 93 Desert island designs Industry insiders tell us what one object they would choose to be stranded with

COVER IMAGE: FABRIZIO CICCONI (PHOTOGRAPHY), FRANCESCA DAVOLI (STYLING)

41

ON THE COVER A Flexform sofa is joined by two antique leather armchairs designed in the 1940s in this Milanese apartment. Explore the house in A study in scarlet, p134

101

H OW TO DECOR ATE

Mix on-trend patterns and seasonal colours with confidence using our bumper fabric, paint and wallpaper sourcebook. Packed with inspirational room sets, beautiful moodboards and the very best new-season pieces, it’s a fast-track guide to your dream home. Plus, the top 12 paint brands to know


134 A study in scarlet The owners of this Milanese apartment tell us how to make rich Chinese red walls work 146 Terracotta takeover It’s a shade that’s never gone out of style 152 Green and pleasant Natural materials bring calm to this London house. Find out how to get the look 164 The new elegance Pair gorgeous velvets and strong colours for a decadent look that packs a punch 172 Spotlight on colour A Turin apartment that uses vibrant colour as an architectural device 182 Gilded treasure This Berlin home is decorated with accents of gold. Discover how to get the Midas touch

200 Cultured clash The colour palette in this Spanish home acts as the perfect foil to its owners’ art 208 Natural spirit Deep green walls and William Morris papers bring a botanical feel to this Swedish home 216 Adventures in pattern A guide to balancing colour and prints

164

208 Escape 227 News Hot hotels, designer coffee shops and top tips for a Moroccan holiday 237 Gardening How Charlotte Mendelson turned her urban plot into a veritable oasis 241 Getaway Explore Amsterdam’s coolest cultural quarter, Jordaan

Finally 28 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 245 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 258 The last word Projects and products that #TeamED have been tackling and testing this month

THE WORLD OF ELLE DECORATION Find even more interiors inspiration online at elledecoration.co.uk and sign up to our newsletter for the best of ELLE Decoration direct to your inbox

18 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

SU B SCRI B E A N D J O I N T H E EL L E D ECO R AT I O N VIP CLU B AT ELLED ECO R ATI O N.CO.U K @ELLEDecoUK

@elledecorationuk

ELLE Decoration

ELLE Decoration UK

CORRECTION: IN OUR FEBRUARY ISSUE A DIMORE STUDIO CHAIR AND LIGHT WERE ATTRIBUTED TO SIMONE FIORINI. TO CLARIFY, THESE ARE SOLELY THE WORK OF DIMORE STUDIO

192 Home couture Fendi’s new apartment in Rome is the epitome of modern-day luxury


HEART OF HEALTH The superhighway of wellbeing starts with your fuel, and it’s a lot easier to create wholesome food, and feel good about doing so, if your kitchen has adequate storage, easily accessible pots and pans, and the room itself is well arranged. This isn’t about creating showy look-at-me kitchens though. After all, eating is seldom about display, rather, it’s about recognising the importance of the kitchen at the heart of our health, as well as our homes, and working out what can be done to help both along. So, this month, I’m very excited to announce the first #EDkitchens digital takeover! For the whole of the month of March, ELLE Decoration is going kitchens and cookware crazy. We’ll be celebrating this vital home hub across our Instagram (@elledecorationuk), Facebook (ELLE Decoration), Pinterest (ELLE Decoration UK) and Twitter feeds (@ELLEDecoUK), as well as online (elledecoration.co.uk). We’ve planned a daily calendar full of exclusive #EDkitchens content, from answering your kitchen style queries to sharing the inside track on the hot, new culinary trends from our foodie friends and

‘The superhighway of wellbeing starts with your fuel, and it’s a lot easier to create wholesome food, and feel good about doing so, if your kitchen is well arranged’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

influencers; we’ll be posting our stories, news and kitchen moodboards and inviting you to send us your #EDkitchenshelfies! Be sure to check in every day to find out what’s going on, and join in the fun. And, if you picked this issue up on the UK newsstand, or you’re sensible enough to be a subscriber, then you’ll also already have in your hands our beautiful annual 100-page Kitchens book, packed with even more inspiration, new kit, big trends and hot tech (Note: we do a Bathrooms book too, next issue out in September; and you can buy the back issues, see below, via the ELLE Decoration magazine app for just £2.99. This month’s one will be available in a digital format from April). The thing is, kitchens don’t have to be complicated, but they do need to work. And be uncluttered. So step one: a ruthless audit. Have you fired up that ice-cream maker, ‘Nutribullet’ or spiraliser in the last six months? No. Then get rid. The path to wellbeing starts by surrounding yourself only with things you use, or love.

Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Instagram: @michelleogundehin

Twitter: @ELLEDecoMO

Visit elledecoration.co.uk APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 25


M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief Editor’s Assistant Rosie Cave (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Photography Director Flora Bathurst (020 7534 2503) Homes Director Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Decorating Editor Alex Kristal (020 7534 2527) Photography Editor James Williams (020 7534 2513) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan (020 7439 5343) Features Writer Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Junior Designer Jack Melrose (0207 534 2581) Editorial Intern Molly Hutchinson (020 7534 2526) Managing Editor Debbie Black (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Imogen Van Zaane (020 7534 1015) Contributing Editors Amy Bradford Eliza Honey Emma Love Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Contributing Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith-Corston Suzanne Stankus With thanks to Mark James Lowe

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG Group Publishing Director Jacqui Cave (020 7439 5273) Publisher’s Assistant Rosie Cave (020 7534 2522) Associate Publisher Christopher Daunt (020 7439 5175) Account Manager Octavia Thompson (020 7439 5462) Account Manager Marina Connolly (020 7297 3468) Classified Sales Executive Charlie Ollivier (020 7297 3482) Director of Hearst Magazines Direct Cameron Dunn (020 7927 4699) Regional Sales Lisa Rogers (01619 629254/07702 346037) Director of Commercial Strategy Dan Levitt (020 3640 2184) Creative Solutions Art Director Tanja Rusi (020 7439 5374) Creative Solutions Art Editor Leo Goddard (020 7439 5000) Partnerships Project Manager Romy Van Den Broeke (020 7439 5370) Project Manager Camilla Weston (020 7439 5376) PR Executive Alice Roberta Taylor (020 7439 5047)

MAY ISSUE ON SALE 6 APRIL 2017

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S I N T E R N AT ION A L

PRODUCT ION Production Director John Hughes (020 7439 5200) Production Manager Stephen Osborne (020 7439 5414) Production Coordinator Carl Latter (020 7439 5402)

CI RCU L AT ION Circulation and Marketing Director Reid Holland Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Group Customer Marketing Manager Karen Sharp (020 7439 5543) Junior Consumer Marketing Manager Vicky Chandler (020 3728 7688) Subscriptions Marketing Executive Kimberley Cooper (020 7439 5687) Customer Marketing Manager Georgina Pearson (020 7439 5145)

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Officer Anna Jones Managing Director, Brands Michael Rowley Chief Finance Officer Claire J Blunt Chief Revenue Officer Duncan Chater Chief Technical Officer Darren Goldsby Chief Operations Director Clare Gorman Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE

ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse and General Manager Simon Horne ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Senior Vice President/Director of Licensing Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to and Business Development upholding the highest standards of journalism. Gautam Ranji If you think that we have not met those standards Senior Vice President/International and want to make a complaint, contact Publishing Director complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ Jeannette Chang hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we Senior Vice President/Editorial Director are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would Kim St Clair Bodden like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk Executive Editor LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Eleonore Marchand Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Executive Creative Director Denis Olivennes Peter Yates CEO ELLE France & International Fashion and Entertainment Director Constance Benqué Kristen Ingersoll CEO ELLE International Media Licenses B ACK I S SU E S & François Coruzzi SU B S CR I P T IONS Brand Management of Hearst Magazines UK, Tower House, ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée Sovereign Park, Market Harborough, SVP/International Director of Leicestershire LE16 9EF ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero To order or renew a subscription, telephone SVP/Director of International Media 01858 438846 or fax 01858 461739 Licenses, Digital Development & For any other subscription enquiries, telephone Syndication Mickaël Berret 01858 438880 or email elledecoration@ Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration subscription.co.uk. Lines open Mon–Fri Linda Bergmark 8am–9pm; Sat 8am–4pm. Standard rates for 12 issues: UK £52.80; Eire & Europe Airmail Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration Flora Régibier £55; USA £65; Rest Of The World £75 PRINTED BY Wyndeham Roche Ltd, St Austell Syndication Coordinator Audrey Schneuwly COVER PRINTED BY Westdale, Cardiff Paper supplied by Burgo Group INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING DISTRIBUTION Comag, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, UB7 7QE CEO 01895 433600 (comag.co.uk) François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

T H I S MON T H ’ S CON T R I BU TOR S Instagram @elizahoney About Eliza is Team ED’s newest Contributing Editor Influences I’m most inspired by people who are passionate about what they do. When someone is excited about what they’ve created, that comes through whether it’s a carpet, a restaurant design, or ceramics Interiors style Colourful and cluttered. I have a thing for graphic, floral patterns on wallpaper and textiles, à la Josef Frank or William Morris Favourite design object The Eames ‘Hang It All’ rack. I love how important play was to their work

26 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

Mikkel Mortensen Profession Photographer Feature The 7 big decorating trends, p101 Home I live in a house from 1937 in Copenhagen and I will be renovating it for the next ten years, mostly because I love all handcraft and want to do everything myself. I think my wife sometimes hates me for that! Interiors style It’s very composed, with inherited furniture that I have restored. I also have way too many lamps, especially Italian designs Design hero Jean Prouvé Dream destination Alaska, for heliboarding

Charlotte Mendelson Twitter @CharlotteMende1 Profession Writer, novelist, keen gardener Feature Green in the city, p237 Likes Apples, novels, growing Asian vegetables Interiors style Maximalist. Mainly books Design hero Joy Larkcom, famous vegetable gardener, who first showed me that herbs and fruit and flowers can coexist and be beautiful Favourite colour For objects, clothes and shoes it’s red; for contemplation it’s Yves Klein blue Dream buy An orchard

INTERVIEWS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURE: CARLOS JASSI

Eliza Honey


SUBSCRIBE TO ELLE DECORATION

6 ISSUES FOR JUST £10*

SAVE 62% GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE Just £10 for your first six issues* Save 62% on the cover price Free delivery direct to your door every month Exclusive subscriber covers Plus, join the ELLE Decoration VIP Club TO SUBSCRIBE SECURELY ONLINE, VISIT OUR WEBSITE

hearstmagazines.co.uk/ec/apr17 OR CALL 0844 322 1769 QUOTING 1EC11231. LINES OPEN MON–FRI 8AM–9.30PM, SAT 8AM–4PM Terms and conditions Offer valid for new UK subscriptions by Direct Debit only. *After your first six issues, your subscription will continue at £17.50 every six issues, unless you are notified otherwise. All orders will be acknowledged and you will be advised of the start issue within 14 days. Subscriptions may be cancelled by providing 28 days’ notice. All savings are based on the basic cover price of £4.50. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packaged with the magazine. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other subscription offer and closes on 5 April 2017. For UK subscription enquiries, please call 01858 438 877. For overseas subscription rates and enquiries, please call +44 1858 438794 or visit hearstmagazines.co.uk. Calls to 0844 numbers from a UK landline cost 7p per minute plus your phone company’s access charge. Lines open weekdays, 8am-9.30pm; Saturdays, 8am- 4pm. All information is correct at time of going to press.For our data policy, visit hearst.co.uk/dp

28 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


ON SALE NOW THE MOST INSPIRING HOMES IN THE COUNTRY

@ELLEDecoCountry #EDCountry

PICTURE: ROBBIE LAWRENCE

WISH YOU WERE HERE?


A RT • A RCHITECTUR E • SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING

STYLE

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

SOFT SERVE This delightful collection of speckled stoneware in neutral shades is the latest release from online retailer Minor Goods. Made by hand in Portugal using traditional methods, the pieces are equal parts sturdy, stylish and affordable. Perfect for everyday use. From £10 for a dessert plate (minorgoods.com).


Style | S H O P P I N G

WISH LIST From affordable treats to investment buys, there’s so much that #EDLoves. Here’s this month’s pick of our favourite pieces… 3

2

5

1 4

8 7 6

12

11

COMPILED BY: MOLLY HUTCHINSON PICTURE: PETER KRASILNIKOFF

9

10

1 Add a metallic touch with the ‘Lantern’ ceiling pendant in duck egg and copper by Lyngard. £245, Heal’s (heals.com). 2 The ‘Acorn’ pendant light by Jason Rudbeck is charmingly on trend. From £64, Vita Copenhagen (vitacopenhagen.com). 3 Embrace warmth and colour with this ‘Ombre’ wallpaper mural in Rust. £25 per square metre, Murals Wallpaper (muralswallpaper.co.uk). 4 Introduce a splash of colour with the bold blue ‘Koppel’ wall clock. £240, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). 5 The hand-painted effect of this ‘Hustle’ wall art makes it look more expensive than it is. £55, Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com). 6 The ‘Paul’ sofa by Vincent van Duysen for Molteni & C is elegant and striking in rich red velvet. From £4,688 (molteni.it). 7 Available in four colours, this graphic ‘Angle Knit’ cushion is a geometric hit. £59.35, out 19 March, Ferm Living (fermliving.com). 8 The russet shade of this velvet cushion by Bloomingville is warm and inviting. £49, Ross & Brown (rossandbrownhome.co.uk). 9 We love this geometric ‘Chipo’ rug by Zaven for CC-Tapis, inspired by African masks. £6,335, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). 10 Display your reads in style with this ‘Flow’ magazine rack, a delicate storage solution. £30, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com). 11 The neutral tones of this ‘Zock’ occasional table by Christian Werner allow it to fit into any scheme. £400, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com). 12 This ‘Standard Ware’ vase in ‘Stone’ by Fort Standard for 1882 Ltd combines timeless materials with modern design. £40, SCP (scp.co.uk).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 39


Style | N E W S

CANDLESTICKS The hygge trend has spawned a renewed interest in natural flame. We love the new antiqueeffect ‘Coupled’ candleholder by Ferm Living. £68 (fermliving.com). GREEN AND PINK They may be opposites on the colour spectrum, but pink and green have been spotted together at this year’s design shows, from IMM Cologne to Maison & Objet. TERRAZZO 2.0 Our passion for Max Lamb’s ‘Marmoreal’ material lives on, with Garth Roberts ‘After Party’ rug for CC-Tapis reimagining its look. £1,021 per square metre (cc-tapis.com).

UP AND DOWN

RETRO REVOLUTION Innovative Italian design collective Miniforms is looking to the past with its brand new range of furnishings and accessories. From the ‘Sergia’ wooden armchair by Francesco Beghetto (£1,020), which takes inpiration from mid-century seating, to the subtle 70s charm of the ‘Juno’ glass display cabinet (£2,120) and Jetsons-style silhouette of the ‘Eclipse’ lamp (£395) – both by E-ggs – this collection makes retro style cutting edge (miniforms.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, AMY BRADFORD

A U S T R A L I A FA I R Aussie furniture brand Totem Road recently made its UK debut with a range of handcrafted, sustainable oak furniture including beds, tables and storage. Solid and simple in style, every piece is made according to the company’s ethical code, which connects customers to the origin of the materials used and the processes of manufacture. We particularly like the pared-down ‘Muse’ platform bed (from £1,339), ‘Totem’ stools, made from raw hardwood tree trunks (£239) and ‘Wynter’ dining table (left, from £1,705). Two and a half per cent from every sale is donated to your choice from a selection of charities that includes the Rainforest Alliance and ocean conservation organisations, among others (totemroad.com).

COPIOUS CACTI Cactus candles, ceramics, patterns, iPhone cases – cute as it was at first, this trend has spun way out of control. AMANDA HOLDEN DESIGNS We await Holden’s ‘Bundleberry’ range for QVC with trepidation. Being a celebrity doesn’t qualify anyone as an interiors expert. NOVELTY PET HOMES A ginger cat in The White House – need we say more? These pet landmarks from The Fowndry are a step too far.

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 41


Style | N E W S

BREAKING THE MOULD Explore the art of figurative sculpture at one of these brilliant new exhibitions

‘DISOBEDIENT BODIES’ The Hepworth Wakefield has recruited fashion designer JW Anderson to curate its show, ‘Disobedient Bodies’. There are figures by Jamie Hawkesworth (The Thinlies, above), as well as ceramics by potter Hans Coper, and clothes by the likes of Rei Kawakubo (18 March– 18 June; hepworthwakefield.org).

‘ANNE PURKISS: SCULPTORS’ In the open-air Yorkshire Sculpture Park, ‘Anne Purkiss: Sculptors’ showcases the photographer’s blackand-white shots of contemporary sculptors at work, including Antony Gormley and Sir Anthony Caro (above), and Sophie Ryder in Salisbury Cathedral (4 March–4 June; ysp.co.uk).

‘BECOMING HENRY MOORE’ The Henry Moore Institute is celebrating its 40th anniversary with an exhibition in the studios (above) and gardens at Moore’s former home in Perry Green. ‘Becoming Henry Moore’ charts the artist’s education, friendships and travels during his formative years (14 April–22 October; henry-moore.org).

SCENTS OF PLACE

M O D E R N L I F E ’ S R I C H TA P E S T RY

A treat for armchair explorers: thanks to two new travel-inspired collections, you can experience the world from home. French brand Lola James Harper has launched an eau de toilette collection to accompany candles and room sprays that founder Rami Mekdachi created himself. Each of the 18 scents evoke a different place: such as pungent amber summoning memories of the Bomboneria sweetshop in Barcelona. The fragrances come in understated medicinal-looking brown glass vessels (£34 each, Selfridges; selfridges.com). Also, design studio and letterpress expert 42 Pressed now sells candles to complement its collection of hand-printed and copper-foiled city maps. Notes of each city, from Paris and New York to Chicago, are infused in soy wax: we like the idea of London being channelled in black pepper and oak moss (£16 each; 42pressed.com).

Known for her brightly coloured cushions, throws and fabrics featuring eye-popping patterns, British designer Margo Selby has now unveiled these graphic woven artworks. Made in her Whitstable studio using a technique called lampas – often used to create densely woven fabrics like brocade – the designs have the impact of an abstract painting, but with an added dose of texture. From £460 each (margoselby.com).

42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD, CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: JAMIE HAWKESWORTH, ANNE PURKISS, THE HENRY MOORE FOUNDATION

Buy this Beau Han Xu’s glasses and decanters are sculpted to look like water droplets. Part of a talent initiative by the RCA and luxury retailer Mappin & Webb. Glasses from £350 each, from £850 for a decanter (mappinandwebb.com).


Style | N E W S

THE NEW CURIOSITY SHOP Inspired by LA’s new wave of general stores – where you might find a scented candle, a hand carved spoon and a perfect pair of jeans all in the same space – Florence Dixon (right, who happens to be design hero Tom Dixon’s daughter) and her mother Claudia Nella decided to bring that versatility to Brighton and set up shop in North Laine. At the Tidy Street General Store, they gather small-batch goods with an eye for craftsmanship and design. There are glasses from Morocco (above, from £1.95 for an espresso glass), speckled enamelware from Crow Canyon Home (top right, from £6 for a spoon), sweets from Fatties Bakery in London, handmade quilts from House of Quinn in Brighton, jackets from Vetra – the heritage French workwear brand that supplied the French Resistance during WWII – and more. It’s a one-stop shop for the home, pantry and wardrobe. And for those in need of pampering, Tidy Street is soon to open a treatment room for customers to experience the joys of the de Mamiel skincare range (tidystreetstore.com).

From left Vases, £15 each; bowl, £10, both Emma & Craft. Quilt, £200, House of Quinn. ‘Altitude Oil’, £28, de Mamiel

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: TAKANORI OKUWAKI, DAVID MYERS

T H R E E M O R E N E W WAV E G E N E R A L S T O R E S

MOMOSAN

SUMMERILL & BISHOP

MAUD & MABEL

Elegantly small and sparse, Momoko Mizutani’s hole-in-the-wall shop in Hackney is a source for home accessories by both British and Japanese designers, such as Jochen Holz’s colourful glassware and Yuta Segawa’s tiny porcelain pots – an exhibition of which will be in the store this month (momosanshop.com).

Holland Park’s secret spot for tabletop goods, Summerill & Bishop is popping up in Elizabeth Street in Belgravia throughout 2017. It will bring its range of in-house designed linen tablecloths, Astier de Villatte glazed ceramics, and serveware from Europe and further afield (summerillandbishop.com).

Karen Whiteley, the owner of this gallery and shop, has a knack for finding emerging talent in clay, cloth and wood. And her lovely space in Hampstead is perfect for giving them a platform. Find ceramics by Matthew Warner, porcelain by Akiko Hirai and furniture by Edward Collinson (maudandmabel.com).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 45


Style | N E W S

GO POTTY

Celebrate ceramics this month with a new selling show, exhibition and book B U Y Something from one of the 90 imaginative ceramicists returning to Kings Cross from all over the world for Central Saint Martins’ second Ceramic Art London buying fair, held in its Granary Square building. Pick up anything from an optical illusion by Ben Arnup (below) to one of German artist Fenella Elms’ bristling sculptures (right, 31 March–2 April; ceramics.org.uk).

HOT IN HOMEWARE More and more of our favourite companies are branching out into home accessories. Visit these three today for perfect pieces 1 & O T H E R S T O R I E S AT E L I E R H&M’s well-heeled sister shop sells cool-and-colourful clothes, an aesthetic that we are delighted to see translated into desk gadgets and gifts for the home. While the Paris and Stockholm flagships have their own collections, all stores worldwide now have an ‘atelier’ purveying elegant essentials. Top picks Leather portfolio carriers (£35), gold-clad stork scissors (£17) and brass desk tidies (£25; stories.com) 2 TAT E E D I T

S E E ‘The Studio and the Sea’, a pair of

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: MARC EGGIMAN

exhibitions put on to celebrate the reopening of Tate St Ives on Cornwall’s craggy coast this month: it has been closed for two years for major restructuring, overseen by Canadian practice Jamie Fobert Architects. Linking the ceramics studio with the salty sea, our pick of the pair is ‘That Continuous Thing’, which looks at 100 years of potters’ studios across the world, with works produced at wheels in places from Japan to California (31 March– 3 September; tate.org.uk). R E A D Clay: Contemporary Ceramic Artisans (Thames & Hudson, £24.95), a compendium cataloguing 50 diverse potters, their working processes and the final results. They range from Stockholmbased Anna Lerinder’s black stoneware teapots to Keiko Matsui’s white, bulbous pots made using kintsugi, the Japanese art of rebuilding broken ceramics using a lacquer laced with powdered gold.

Down in the basement of Tate Modern’s Boiler House, this terrific store proves museum shops aren’t just for postcards and books. The gallery’s very cool director, Frances Morris, has chosen objects for the home, along with other Tate staff members and Jasper Morrison, whose designs discreetly furnish the new Switch House. Top picks As well as Morrison’s ‘Rotary’ tray (£35) and ‘Cork Family’ stool for Vitra (£350), you can’t miss Damien Hirst’s ‘Pharmacy Gold’ wallpaper (£685 per ten-metre roll) or the subtler but charming ‘Sunnyside’ cushion, designed by Eleanor Pritchard and woven in Wales (£125; tate.org.uk/tateedit). 3 VITRA ‘HOME ACCESSORIES’ IN SELFRIDGES Remarkably, this is the Swiss design powerhouse’s first dedicated UK shop for its growing accessories line. Located on the fourth floor of the London department store, the space was designed by German firm Studio Besau Marguerre and is, as you might expect, immaculately ordered thanks to the Vitra retail shelving system ‘Kado’ (selfridges.com). Top picks The ‘Nuage’ vases by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec (below, from £109 each), jolly ‘Dot’ pillows (£79) and blankets (£169) by Hella Jongerius.

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


Style | N E W S

CATWALK COLLECTIONS E L E Y K I S H I M O T O X K I R K B Y D E S I G N For design duo Eley Kishimoto, a collaboration with interiors textile brand Kirkby Design has been on the cards ever since the two companies met in 2014. Fast forward to now and the bold prints that Mark Eley and Wakako Kishimoto are best known for have been developed into a range of woven textiles (a first for the pair), wallcoverings and cushions. ‘We wanted to make this different to the flat colour prints that we normally produce,’ explains Eley of the collection, which is launching at the Salone del Mobile design fair in Milan in April. ‘We asked Jordan Mould, the creative director at Kirkby Design, to push the technical boundaries of items that we can’t make in house: foils, jacquards, flocked wallpaper and cut velvets.’ All of the designs, apart from one – the ‘Peg Art Roses’ wallpaper (above, on screen), which is a re-worked archive print – are completely new. At first glance, some might seem reminiscent of the 1960s and 70s but for Eley, the collection is about looking forward rather than back. ‘We have used luxe silk-mix wools and high-pile velvets, so there’s perhaps an association of 1970s opulence with that. There’s always nostalgia in our work, but the designs themselves are contemporary.’ Indeed they are: pictured above is the opulent ‘Loopy Link’ as wallpaper and fabric; the bright crimson ‘Origami Rockets’; the Op-Art esque ‘Electro Maze’; and a fabulous chair upholstered in powder pink ‘Domino Pyramid’. Fabric from £75 per metre, wallpaper £95 per roll (kirkbydesign.com). H E N R Y H O L L A N D X H A B I TAT Holland’s second homeware collection for Habitat is all about the bedroom. From a hot pink velvet armchair (left) and patchwork bedding to tongue-in-cheek slogan cushions that reference the T-shirts he made his name with ten years ago, it’s a clear extension of his fashion aesthetic. Throughout March you can try before you buy too, as House of Holland is taking over a room at The Hoxton hotel in Holborn. ‘It’s a great way for people to see what the collection looks like in a real room,’ says Holland (habitat.co.uk/henry). 48 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

K A R L L A G E R F E L D The infamous designer once said that ‘black and white always looks modern, whatever that word means,’ which might go some way towards explaining why he’s picked a minimalist monochrome palette – along with contrasting soft, pastel-pink hues – as the basis for his first bedding collection. All six designs feature plush textures, high thread-counts and graphic prints that range from sharp geometrics to romantic florals. It’s Lagerfeld’s look to a tee: understated chic with a funky twist (ashleywildegroup.com).

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: LUCIA O’CONNOR-MCCARTHY, GETTY IMAGES, DAVID TITLOW

Discover three new homeware ranges by fashion maestros


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

DESIGNS FOR LIFE Discover fresh trends and exciting new launches at our exclusive ELLE Decoration Anthropologie event Since it first arrived in the UK, Anthropologie’s novel twists on everyday essentials and one-of-a-kind items handpicked from across the globe have offered a unique proposition for interiors fans. This season is no exception. Highlights include hand-painted ceramics and exclusive, deconstructed Moroccan prints on everything from dinnerware to bedding, alongside Anthropologie’s newly launched ‘Made to Order’ furniture collection. Bench-made in the south west of England, each piece in the range (including the ‘Losange’ chair and ‘Edlyn’ sofa, below) is handcrafted by a family-run second-generation furniture maker. Finished in your choice of fabric – from British velvets to Italian linens – look no further to bring eye-catching texture, colour and style to your home.

S AV E T H E D AT E Join us at an exclusive reader event from 6.30–8.30pm on 23 March 2017 at Anthropologie’s flagship store in Regent Street, London. Over complimentary drinks, ELLE Decoration will present the year’s key interiors trends, focusing on items from the 2017 Anthropologie range. With a special discount on the night it’s the perfect chance to update your interiors for the season ahead. The event is free to attend, but places are limited – to reserve yours, email your name and that of any plus-one to community@anthropologie.eu


Style | N E W S

SWEDISH GRACE Wallpaper brand Sandberg’s new ‘Signatur’ collection celebrates the work of four creative Swedish women from the 1950s. From abstract graphics to figurative illustrations, the range has something for everyone. The collection began to take shape when Sandberg’s creative director, Hanna Wendelbo-Hansson, discovered the work of Joy Zandén, a textile designer who was also known for decorating theatres and opera houses. Her hand-painted ‘Säro’ floral was recreated from an old photo, with help from the 94-year-old designer herself. Further research led Wendelbo-Hansson to the work of Dagmar Lodén, a painter and interior designer who also created textiles for Swedish brand Jobs Handtryck; and Ylva Källström-Eklund, a well-known illustrator of children’s books. Lodén’s 1949 design ‘Tistlar’ (left), a spiky floral in vibrant hues, is now a star of the ‘Signatur’ collection, as is Källström-Eklund’s whimsical ‘Våra Visor’ and subtle geometric ‘Hagalund’. The last name to be included is Lillo Wikstrand, an embroiderer and designer of church textiles. Wikstrand’s ‘Juniflora’ is the prettiest design in the collection and ideal for refreshing spring walls. £80 for a ten-metre roll (sandbergwallpaper.com).

Book this Join the ELLE Decoration team at Design Centre Chelsea Harbour for a ‘Discovery Trail’ as part of London Design Week on 17 March at 12pm. Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs will be giving a tour of our favourite showrooms at this design destination. Book at dcch.co.uk and quote ‘ED’ to get tickets for £7.50 (usually £10).

TREND ALERT JESMONITE

From left Bespoke dining table; ‘Stick’ surface, both by Olivia Aspinall. ‘Louvre’ and ‘Hex’ tiles, from £305 per square metre, Heliot & Co. ‘Herringbone’ blue vase, £225, Phil Cuttance. Stools by Maor Aharon.

50 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Made from a mixture of gypsum plaster powder and acrylic resin, Jesmonite was invented in 1984 by Peter Hawkins as a safer alternative to fibreglass, and a more lightweight option than cast concrete (which it closely resembles). Used initially in the building industry, it is now winning design plaudits. Labels that have begun working with the material include Heliot & Co, which has used it to make honeycomb-textured tiles (heliotandco.com); and new talent Olivia Aspinall (olivia-aspinall.com), who mixes fragments of pigmented Jesmonite into a white base to create terrazzo-style furniture and accessories. The material is highly versatile: Israelibased Maor Aharon uses centrifugal force to produce the patterns on her stools (maoraharon.com), while London-based Phil Cuttance (philcuttance.com) casts cabinets and vases with elaborate herringbone patterns, using handmade plastic moulds.


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

FOUR OF THE BEST PLACES TO BUY DOORS Best for traditional The London Door Company For over 30 years the brand has used both traditional methods and advanced technology to make its range of high-quality doors. 155 St John’s Hill, London SW11 (london door.co.uk) Best for modern Urban Front Founded in 2003, Urban Front crafts both hinged and extra-wide pivot doors, all with a reinforced steel core, highsecurity locks and stainless steel fittings. Chesham Business Park, Chesham HP5 (urbanfront. co.uk).

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

FRONT DOORS

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE

Kerb appeal is important, and fundamental to a good first impression is a handsome front door. Here’s how to ensure yours looks the part A smart and sturdy front door will add value to your home while also ensuring it’s secure and draught-free. ‘Ironically, improved central heating can cause original doors to warp, and many were constructed using bone glue, which over time can weaken’ says Kerry Walters at The London Door Company (londondoor.co.uk). ‘Decorative glass was often removed and locks repeatedly changed, all of which can render a door less secure or attractive. If this is the case then a replacement front door can make all the difference.’ If you live in a period property, an authentic style is always a good option, and many companies have comprehensive ranges or can create a bespoke design to suit your exact requirements. However, if you live in a newer property, or simply fancy something more modern, there are some key points to consider. ‘Think about the materials on the outside of the building, for example window frames, cladding, rendering, and any metals or stone, as well as the interior including the flooring, staircase and other visible doors,’ advises Elisabeth Assaf at Urban Front (urbanfront.com). ‘The front door should stand out, but it needs to work with the rest of the house.’ In terms of finishes, not only does solid wood or a wood veneer feel more pleasing, it can be stained or painted a different shade should you so desire, and a well-chosen door can also bridge the gap between a traditional façade and a contemporary interior. ‘The key is to choose a simple design in a timeless timber such as oak, or a classic dark colour’ says Assaf. ‘Go for a stainless steel knob or a lever handle rather than a long pull handle. Bronze door furniture is also a good option.’ Remember too, that there is strict legislation concerning replacement of external doors, so check local regulations.

Best for timber composite Jeld Wen This company provides a range of doors with a sustainable timber exterior and an insulating foam and aluminium strengthening core. Available in natural wood or any RAL colour. Retford Road, Woodhouse Mill, Sheffield S13 ( jeld-wen.co.uk) Best for salvage Lassco Three Pigeons Salvage doors can be hard to come by, but this is the place to find Victorian and Edwardian examples. A joiner should be able to adjust a slightly larger door to fit. London Road, Milton Common OX9 (lassco.co.uk)

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 53


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X D I M O R E S T U D I O

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their work and ask them for tips

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: PAOLA PANSINI, SIMONE FIORINI, STEFANO GALUZZI

Who are they? American Britt Moran and Italian Emiliano Salci, who first met 16 years ago. Moran was a graphic designer and Salci, a former furniture designer, was working in fashion. Both had a passion for design and interiors, so, in 2003, they set up Dimore Studio in a 17th-century palazzo in Milan. Two years later, they launched their first furniture collection at the Salone Del Mobile design fair. It was a pivotal moment: they soon became a firm favourite with the fashion world, collaborating with houses such as Hermès and Bottega Veneta, as well as renowned hoteliers Ian Schrager and Thierry Costes. What’s their style? The duo’s trademark, says Moran, is that their practice moves ‘between art, fashion, design and architecture that spans from the Art Deco to the 1970s’. They seamlessly combine ‘different materials and eras, maintaining a dialogue between the past and the contemporary’. This can be seen in their gallery showroom, where furniture by Giò Ponti sits alongside Venini glassware and their own furniture and fabrics (the duo launched their first textile collection last year). The pair also tend to plump for rich materials, such as silk and velvet, and unusual colours, from dusty tones to jewel-like hues. Take Dimore Studio’s interior for the Pomellato jewellery store in Milan, which was inspired by the ceiling of the Peacock room at the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, US. ‘We wanted to find a colour reminiscent of Japanese/Chinese lacquers so we came up with a shade for the shop’s wooden archway that’s not really a red or

‘We move between art, fashion, design and architecture that spans Art Deco to the 1970s’

an orange and has a touch of pink to it,’ says Moran. ‘We try to find unexpected colours, ones that no-one else is using.’ What are their recent projects? The new Aesop store in Milan (centre), which was partly inspired by the butler’s pantry in historic Milanese building-turnedmuseum Villa Necchi and features teal subway tiles on the ceiling. The duo have also completed the Hotel Saint-Marc in Paris, which has an Art Deco jazz club vibe; the Fendi Privè apartment in Rome (for a peek inside, head to p192) and a number of residential projects (Paris St Germain, left; Milan Solferino, top). What are they currently working on? New fashion boutiques in Tokyo and London and residential projects in New York, Vienna and Lugano. ‘The property in Lugano is a modern new-build for an art collector. We wanted to do something that’s opposite to the building’s exterior, so inside it feels like a 1940s Italian home,’ explains Moran. ‘We worked really closely with Italian carpenters on the craftsmanship, so it’s very detailed and bespoke.’ They say ‘Rich colours and textures are part of our design DNA.’ dimorestudio.eu Turn over for Dimore Studio’s expert advice on fabrics ➤ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 55


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E T H E D I M O R E S T U D I O G U I D E T O FA B R I C S

Britt Moran and Emiliano Salci share their top textile rules

How to pick colour and pattern At the moment, anything goes; there’s a real feeling of more is more. The key is to strike a balance between plain colours and patterns. If you’re using a pattern, you do have to think about the repeat, but sometimes it’s fun to break the rules. One of the ideas behind our new fabric collection was to have out-of-proportion, off-scale patterns that you can use without worrying where the repeat falls. How to use fabric on a wall Wallcoverings help to soften a room. Usually, we would back the fabric with batting (this is wadding, like you would use for a quilt) and then commission an upholsterer to build a thin wooden structure around the edge of the wall you want covered. Then you tack the fabric onto that frame and hang it, like a large picture. How to perfect curtains For curtains we always keep it simple, often just adding detail, such as pleating, to the header. It is important not to scrimp on the amount of fabric that you use so that, when the curtains are closed, you have proper side panels that look full and rich. From top Interior of Hotel Saint Marc, Paris, by Dimore Studio. Dimore Studio’s exhibition at Salone del Mobile Milan in 2016. ‘Divano 082’ sofa by Dimore Studio

56 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

B E T T E R I N L E AT H E R

For an instant upgrade, cover a wall or more in leather panelling. It’s the new way to bring opulence to any room Studioart This Italian company has massively updated its signature ‘Leatherwall’ collection to celebrate its 10th anniversary. Thanks to designers Elaine Yan Ling Ng, Giorgia Zanellato of Fabrick Lab, and Studioart’s own creative director Massimo Brancati, the brand has a bounty of new shapes, including circles, rhombus forms (above), and even the outline of a gingko leaf. From £1,000 (studioart.it). Bill Amberg Studio These north London artisans will cover anything in leather, whether it’s a hand rail, a wall, or a seat. They use traditional leatherworking techniques, but their ideas are always totally cutting-edge (billamberg.com). Helen Amy Murray This Shoreditchbased designer’s leather panels are sculptural works of art. Her flowers and birds have an elegant, Art Deco appeal, whether applied to a piece of furniture, or a wall (helen amymurray.com).

WORDS: EMMA LOVE, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: PAOLA PANSINI, PHILIPPE SERVENT

How to choose the right fabric There is a saying in Italy: if you buy once, you should buy well. We encourage our clients to invest in high quality fabrics that last. We mostly only work with natural fibres (we would never use something like polyester or vinyl), but we have also used amazing technical fabrics. For example, Kvadrat’s ‘Sudden’ polyurethane fabric (£90 per metre; kvadrat.dk) is incredible. It’s waterproof and, when it’s stretched taut and applied to surfaces, it looks like satin. In a home, it would work well as a headboard. In our projects we try to mix fabrics. There needs to be a marriage of materials, but it’s more interesting if they are different.


Style | D E S I G N

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D R O C H E B O B O I S

The French superbrand with playfulness at its core

Roche Bobois takes a pluralist approach to design, always allowing room for playfulness Initially, Roche sold Bauhaus-inspired furniture, modern appliances and fold-up wall beds. His sons Philippe and François soon joined the company. In 1960, they met brothers Patrick and Jean-Claude Chouchan by chance, and the four set up a new brand, Roche Bobois (Bobois being a shortened form of Beau Bois, the name of the Chouchan family’s Paris furniture store). In the 1970s, Roche Bobois began stocking Hans Hopfer’s innovative, floor-level modular sofas; inspired by communal Middle Eastern seating, they chimed with the increasingly laid-back lifestyles of the day. Overall, Roche Bobois – whose current CEO is (non-family member) Gilles Bonan – takes a pluralist approach to design, always allowing room for playfulness. A new addition is a collection by Christian Lacroix Maison, which includes cabinets featuring landscape scenes (left), and flamboyant chairs with curved backs resembling tailor’s mannequins. While ritzy, it remains true to the original Roche Bobois spirit (roche-bobois.com). From top ‘Odea’ sofa and chairs by Roberto Tapinassi & Maurizio Manzoni. Patrick Chouchan. Cabinet by Christian Lacroix Maison. ‘Cute Cut’ side table by Cédric Ragot

58 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

F I V E FA S C I N AT I N G FA C T S ABOUT ROCHE BOBOIS

1

Its Paris headquarters is in Faubourg St-Antoine – historically, the heart of France’s furniture-making industry – and its largest showroom is in a former theatre once owned by Alexandre Dumas, author of The Three Musketeers.

2

Hans Hopfer’s 1971 ‘Mah Jong’ sofa (below) is – and always has been – its bestselling design. Missoni Home and Kenzo have created versions.

3

Hopfer’s 1974 ‘Dromedary’ also played with classic sofa design – its backrest is a series of sections in various heights, inspired by a camel’s humps.

4

The Hopfer legacy doesn’t end there: Jacqueline Hopfer, his architect daughter, now designs all of the Roche Bobois stores. To date, the company has 250 showrooms in 45 countries.

5

Nicolas Roche, grandson of founder Jacques, is creative director, and oversees all new designs. Young names he has nurtured include Cédric Ragot, Daniel Rode and René Bouchara.

WORDS: DOMINIC LUTYENS PICTURE: MICHEL GIBERT

In 1950s France, there was a huge need to replace furniture lost during WWII. But manufacturers there lazily assumed that French customers only liked fussy, traditional styles – which were collectively nicknamed ‘le moustache’ (presumably an allusion to fusty old gentlemen). One exception was entrepreneur Jacques Roche, who founded forward-looking furniture firm Roche in 1950. The timing was right: Paris interiors fair the Salon des Arts Ménagers promoted innovative ideas and an emerging youthful style.


Style | D E S I G N 2

1

3

INSTANT INSPIRATION Instagram is great for pictures of food and cute animals, but is it a good source of interiors ideas? Amy Bradford finds out 4

5

6

7

8

9

Instagram offers up a deliciously modern mixture of visual inspiration and harmless voyeurism with a soupçon of something darker: lifestyle envy. I say this as a warning, for know that when you start searching Instagram for decorating ideas, you will experience all three with varying degrees of intensity. Instagram is vast: type ‘interiors ideas’ into the search box and it’s unlikely you’ll instantly find the inspiration you need to transform that outdated bathroom or tired study. Instead, you need a way in – a key to the secret door that unlocks the gems of Instagram. Seen a great interiors book or magazine shoot? Look up the author, photographer or stylist’s account and do a quick survey of the people they follow while you’re at it. Danish photographer Ditte Isager (14; @ditteisager) has an amazing eye.

Instagram is vast, so you need a way in – a key to the secret door that unlocks the interiors gems 10

11

13

14

FIVE OF THE BEST @PELLAHEDEBY (6) All things stylish and Scandi, as compiled by Swedish ELLE Decoration’s resident stylist and blogger with a love of black and white.

15

Through her you’ll encounter stylist Hans Blomquist (12, 13; @hansblomquist), whose feed is great for inspiration on colours and wall finishes; and H&M Home (7; hm_home), which puts up photos to die for. Your favourite retailers and brands are another hot tip. Toast (8; @toast) follows Hackney-based shop Botany (4; @botanyshope5) for ideas on indoor greenery, while Brighton homeware store Workshop Living (3; @workshopliving) connects you with Japanese photographer and food stylist Keiko Oikawa (1; @nordljus), whose pale, tranquil style inspires a flaring of the envy I mentioned earlier. Of course, while Instagram excels at offering bluesky ideas, it can’t really give you the practical advice you need to turn an image into reality. It’s invaluable for exploring possibilities and focusing your mind on how you might improve a space, but then you’ll need to find the tools, products and professionals that can help you to bring the dream to life. And that’s where magazines like the one you’re holding come in.

I N T E R I O R S I N S TA G R A M M E R S T O F O L L O W

@RYUKO.KIDA (10) Follow now for the fast track on the design world, as seen through the discerning eyes of the Editor-inChief of Japanese ELLE Decoration.

60 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

12

@_ROOMONFIRE (2, 9) Architecture and stunning interiors curated by interior designer and stylist Chloë McCarthy. Her eye for form and detail is remarkable.

@THEMODERN HOUSE (5) Showcasing some of Britain’s most exceptional homes. And all of those featured are available to rent or buy.

@MICHELLE OGUNDEHIN (11, 15) Our Editorin-Chief is the person to follow for her stylish moodboards and trademark love of texture.


Style | D E S I G N

T H E S T O RY O F T H E S P O O N

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: V&A COLLECTION, FOREST + FOUND, GETTY IMAGES/DE AGOSTINI

For the next part of our series focusing on the history of household objects, we present the stirring story of the spoon As the world’s oldest eating iron, the spoon’s design has been shaped by every country, century and culture on the planet for both practical and pretentious reasons. For instance, the deep-bowl soup spoon was invented by the Elizabethans as a device to prevent splashing consommé on their fashionable ruff collars. Head to tabletalk.org for more gems from the author of The Art of the Table: A Complete Guide To Table Setting, Table Manners and Tableware. Here, we’ve scooped up just some of the highlights.

1 S T C E N T U RY SOUP SPOON, China The great Chinese porcelain canon produced this style of low-slung ladle, which continues to be used across southeast Asia for eating soup or porridge, and has become popular for serving oriental canapés on – with the flat base, it means it stands upright on a tray.

1 7 0 0 S CADDY SPOON, London Used to measure out tea leaves, its scalloped shape is believed to have derived from the sea shells that were packed into chests of tea imported into Georgian Britain. Later, a leaf shape became the caddy spoon silhouette of choice.

1 7 6 0 SPOON TRAY, Staffordshire Demand for spoon trays, the cook’s equivalent of a desk tidy, arose in the 18th century. Made of stoneware or soft-paste porcelain, they usually had fluted or ribbed edges to cup spoons and contain their drips. 1 8 0 0 – 1 8 3 0 BAPTISMAL SPOON, Jerusalem Resembling a platter more than a spoon, this beauty is carved with New Testament scenes and floral trimming. Traditionally given at a christening, the spoon’s material reflected the newborn’s social standing.

1 8 0 0 s SALT SPOON, London At a formal dinner, each guest would be provided with a portly individual salt cellar and delicate shovel, shell or ladle-shaped salt spoon, which were usually gold gilt on the interior to prevent salt from corroding the silver. 1 9 0 4 MOUSTACHE SPOON, Sheffield ‘This is a typical example of a piece of Victorian specialist cutlery,’ says the V&A Collection. ‘Many Victorian gentlemen followed the fashion of large moustaches which could be disfigured by food, and this invention prevented that.’ 1 9 5 7 DESSERT SPOON, Copenhagen Arne Jacobsen’s flatware for Georg Jensen is iconic. Its matte finish and linear design were considered so space-age that they were used in the 1968 movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. The fork and spoon are still sold at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. 2 0 1 7 WOODEN PORRIDGE SPOON, London Forest + Found won an ELLE Decoration British Design Award in 2016 for its modern take on the good old wooden spoon. To find out how to see these spoons and more, head to collection.vam.ac.uk APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 63


Style | D E S I G N

M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E JEROME DODD

We ask a tastemaker what they are reading, watching, listening to and downloading

My favourite piece of music has to be Police and Thieves by Junior Murvin, later covered by The Clash. This track always reminds me of youth, rebellion and my connection to Portobello, Golborne Road and the north Kensington area where I live and work. The song that makes me feel instantly happy is I Love My Dog by Cat Stevens (4), released in 1967. It reminds me of my new puppy Ziggy, but I also enjoy the irony that a cat could write a song about a dog. The music I return to time and time again is old-school 1970s reggae. Having 4 worked most of my adult life in a predominantly Afro-Caribbean area, the sounds of Max Romeo, John Holt, Ini Kamoze and other reggae artists remind me of how enriching different cultures are to one’s own life, and how wonderfully multicultural London is. The book that has influenced me the most has to be Candide by Voltaire (Penguin, £12.99). It never ceases to amaze me how a piece of 18th-century writing can be so current. The concept of trying to make the troubled world a better place by starting with making your own personal ‘garden’ the best it 6 can be is a principle I try not to forget. I’m currently reading the late AA Gill’s Pour Me: A Life (2; Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20). Legend is an overused term; however, in this instance, it feels

7

8

64 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

1

3

totally appropriate. Over the years I have enjoyed his writing, his irreverent attitude to the establishment and his acerbic reviews. He is a man who will be greatly missed, and this book in particular is a must-read. My favourite film is The Long Good Friday (3) starring the late Bob Hoskins. I never tire of watching this 1980 gangster thriller, which presents a fitting vision of Thatcher’s Britain. Hoskins delivers a stunning performance, and the one-liners are hilarious. But unprintable! 5 The podcast I download is American comedian Greg Proops’ The Smartest Man in the World. It’s always funny and thought provoking. The last theatre show I saw was the choreographer Wayne McGregor’s Chroma (6) at the Royal Opera House, featuring New York’s amazing Alvin Ailey dance theatre. Dinner at the Opera House followed by a show is always a treat, but this production was particularly powerful and inspiring. My favourite places in the world are Lamu (7), Kiwayu and the surrounding Kenyan wildernesses. Spending time in this magical place, which remains free from the trappings of modern life (and cars in particular), is a joy. Lamu is a cultural gem and its coastline feels like an Africa of times gone by. At the moment I am planning a trip to combine scuba diving in the Galapagos islands (1) with a visit to Ecuador. The only other South American country I have visited is Costa Rica, which was fantastic.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ALAMY, ANDREJ USPENSKI

Paris-born interiors maverick Jerome Dodd has masterminded the Christmas decorations for the White House, provided props for Roland Mouret’s fashion shoots, and has been selling decorative antiques and curious artefacts (see 5 and 8) for nearly 25 years. His two London shops are infamously christened ‘Les Couilles du Chien’ (the dog’s bollocks) and he has just opened a pop-up residence in Liberty, which will be open until July (@les_couilles_du_chien; lescouillesduchien.com). 2


Style | D E S I G N 1

THE PLACE TO KNOW: NOHO You’ve heard of Soho, but this month we’re going north to the design hub on the other side of Oxford Street. Here’s our pick of its top shops and showrooms

USE

G HO

RIDIN

ET

STRE

9 BER T

IELD

5

7 8

2

3

T

TREE

TLE S

ET

AS ASTC

E

D ST

N RTLA

STRE

11

T

TREE

ET S

GAR

MAR

CHF

O AT P

12 7 MINUTE WALK 6 12 MINUTE WALK

REET

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: PEER LINDGREE, GUY ARCHARD, TIM AINSWORTH

EE STR

AT TIT

10

ET

OXFORD

STREET

2

3 M AT E R I A L L A B 1 0 G R E AT T I T C H F I E L D S T R E E T A treasure trove for designers and home renovators alike, Material Lab is a sourcebook of surface materials including tiles, plastics, and even paper. Samples are free, as is advice from the on-site materials managers. Look out for its solid mix of design talks and events held at this showroom (material-lab.co.uk).

3

GRE

T

2 GF SMITH 27–28 EASTCASTLE STREET Paper purveyor to the design industry, GF Smith opened its artfully designed showroom in late 2016. As well as enjoying its temporary paper-led exhibitions and perusing its vast Collection Wall, look into creating a custom book of your own using countless combinations of paper. Look out for the new DIY framing service, Make Frame. You upload a digital image and then choose from 50 coloured mouldings (gfsmith.com).

TREE

NT S

REGE

1 MOOOI 2 3 G R E AT T I T C H F I E L D S T R E E T Known for its quirkiness, Dutch design giant Moooi offers the latest designs from the likes of co-founder Marcel Wanders and Jasper Morrison. Look out for its digitally printed rug service, contemporary spin on Delft ceramics, and the ‘Altdeutsche’ collection from Studio Job (moooi.com).

ST

RE

GRE

REET

4

LS

RS

EL

1

D ST

N RTLA

E PO LITTL

NE

W

REET

R ST

TIME MOR

4 V O L A 3 2 – 3 6 G R E AT PORTLAND STREET This classic bathroom accessories brand carries many designs by Danish wunderkind Arne Jacobsen. Look out for top taps, mixers and showerheads – which come in a rainbow of glossy hues (en.vola.com).

5 MINOTTI 77 MARGARET STREET Minotti is a great source for chic furniture and accessories in a classic, tempered palette. Soft finishes and luxury materials are the hallmarks of design director Stefano Dordoni’s style. Look out for the ‘Indiana’ and ‘Virginia’ collections: they bridge the gap between indoor and outdoor furniture (minotti.com). ➤

5

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 67


Style | D E S I G N

THE PLACE TO KNOW: NOHO 6

6 A R T E M I D E 1 0 6 G R E AT R U S S E L L S T R E E T Counting Michele de Lucci, Philippe Starck, David Chipperfield and Zaha Hadid as just a few of the big names on its star-studded list, Artemide produces many of the most iconic lamps today. What’s more, these are constantly updated with research in optics and electronics, straight from its innovation centre just outside Milan. Look out for Arik Levy’s new ‘Stab Light’ series, a set of three coloured glass vases-turned-lamps that are completely adjustable in terms of length and position. We love the colour and the endless possibilities (artemide.com).

8 DOMUS 25 EASTCASTLE STREET This surface design company has a strong hold on the London scene, with major projects such as Wembley stadium under its belt – but that doesn’t stop it from taking on smaller jobs. The portfolio of materials is as vast as you could imagine and under constant reinvention. Look out for the ‘Modello’ collection, which mixes porcelain in a set of new patterns and colourways (domustiles.co.uk).

8

68 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

9 L I G N E R O S E T 2 3 – 2 5 M O RT I M E R S T R E E T At French brand Ligne Roset’s London showroom, new and classic pieces (such as the ‘Togo’ and ‘Ploum’ chairs) are contextualised into home-like vignettes – scattered with lighting, vases, and throws. Look out for Pierre Charpin’s ‘Slice’ chair (above), which the brand has recently re-issued in new colours and patterns (ligne-roset.com). 10 REPUBLIC OF FRITZ HANSEN 13–14 MARGARET STREET With designers that span from Henning Larsen to Jaime Hayón, Fritz Hansen is crammed with pieces by design icons new and old. Look out for the accessories edit, which includes Aiayu cushions and trays from Wednesday Architecture (fritzhansen.com). 11

1 1 F O R Z A 1 4 3 –1 4 9 GRE AT P O RTL AN D STRE E T As the name suggests, Forza is indeed a force on the Noho design scene. 20 years strong, it works with design heavyweights like Walter Knoll, Hay and Gubi for both home and large-scale contracts. Look out for Italian brand Valcucine’s sleek kitchen collections (forza.co.uk).

12 HÄSTENS 66–68 MARGARET STREET This family-owned bedding company has made its handcrafted beds for generations, outfitting many a Swedish royal’s bedroom. Book a visit to try the beds first-hand, and accessorise with custom headboards and crisp cotton sheets and duvets. Look out for sheets and bedding, which come in a classic blue check with frequent new variations (hastens.com). E D

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: JON MEADE, PHILIP VILE, PHILIP DURRANT

7

7 HAND & LOCK 86 MARGARET STREET Servicing London’s fashion and couture houses, this historic embroidery studio also delves into interiors – embellishing everything from cushions to leather goods. The studio is open to any project. Look out for 2017 – it’s Hand & Lock’s 250th anniversary and the brand is celebrating with talks and workshops on the art of embroidery (handembroidery.com).

9


Poliform: Italian timeless elegance A family business, Poliform’s furniture collection is contributed to by some of the world’s best designers, yet its look is utterly coherent, representing as it does a considered philosophy of designer quality for people with taste, rather than chasing every trend. Encompassing the Varenna kitchen brand too, consider it your ultimate onestop homes superbrand

P

oliform’s designs exude subtle glamour. You won’t find any look-atme designs or unduly tricksy shapes in its collection, which majors on statement sofas, sexy coffee tables and some seriously aspirational wardrobe systems. Instead, expect a palette of rich neutrals – cream and grey upholstery, dark woods, black marble – with accent colours like olive green, oxblood red, chocolate brown and mustard. Of course if a customer wanted something a bit different, well then there’s 30 leathers, 23 lacquers and 300 other different textiles to choose from too; something to suit every style, age and budget. And Poliform is nothing if not all about its service. The brand prides itself on the high level of customer care it

provides, guiding clients every step of the way, whether they’re looking for a single stylish sofa or full space-planning for a major commercial development. Based in Brianza, north of Milan, where all its furniture is still made, Poliform was established in 1970, but its roots go back to 1942, when brothers Pietro and Giuseppe Spinelli and their cousin Luigi Anzani established an artisan cabinetmaking firm. Fast forward to the 1980s and the focus had shifted to wardrobe design, which remains a key speciality. In the 1990s, the brand commissioned architects like Carlo Colombo and Paolo Piva to design bedroom furniture and storage systems; in 1996, it acquired the kitchen brand Varenna, to which Colombo


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Products from left ‘Stanford’ chairs and ‘Mondrian’ sofa by Jean-Marie Massaud; ‘Ubik’ walk-in closet with ‘Home Hotel Collection’ bench and ‘Mad Chair’ armchair; ‘Kelly’ bed by Emmanuel Gallina; ‘Mad’ side tables by Marcel Wanders; ‘Mad Joker’ armchair by Marcel Wanders

and Piva also contribute. Surprisingly, it wasn’t until 2006 that Poliform unveiled its first collection of seating, but modular sofa systems are now a big strength. New this year are two designs by Frenchman JeanMarie Massaud: ‘Mondrian’, based on the linear artworks of the Dutch painter, and ‘Sydney’, a more angular system with graphic stitch details and pebble-shaped cushions. Poliform’s output is intended to address the idea and needs of a complete ‘Poliform house’, with versatile modular systems that work for all kinds of spaces. Among its hero pieces are the ‘Wall System’, created in 2006 by its in-house design studio, which can morph from a small-scale bookcase to a complete library solution; and the striking

Poliform prides itself on the level of service it can give, guiding clients every step of the way Corian ‘Web’ bookcase by architect Daniel Libeskind, who joined the fold in 2015. And since the launch of the upholstery collection a decade ago, more big names, such as Marcel Wanders and Rodolfo Dordoni, have come on board, too, with Wanders’ ‘Mad’ collection of chairs and coffee tables, initiated in 2013, adding a wonderfully curvaceous silhouette and a more playful element to Poliform’s signature clean-lined look.

Although it projects a slick, international image, Poliform remains a family-run business, with three cousins, the sons of the original founders, in charge: Giovanni Anzani, who heads marketing and communications; Alberto Spinelli, who runs the commercial and project divisions; and Aldo Spinelli, who leads production and finance. And as the trio near retirement, their children have joined the ranks – notably Simona Spinelli, Aldo’s daughter, who oversees visual identity. But, the line-up would not be complete without one more key player, the only non-family member, George Khachfe, CEO of Poliform UK, and the man responsible for the brand’s incredible success in this country. poliformuk.com ➤ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 71


Poliform designers to know A huge part of Poliform’s success is a result of its collaborations with talented and unique designers and architects. Here are four you need to know RODOLFO DORDONI Innumerable international brands have sought out Italian architect Dordoni for his slick, understated style. As co-founder of Milan studio Dordoni Architetti, his products for Poliform showcase his flair for streamlined shapes and refined details. Key pieces ‘Fitted’ wardrobe system (right; 2014) Poliform is known for its wardrobe designs – this one has a slender profile and sexy smoked-glass doors. From £5,000 ‘Rever’ bed (2016) This new design features an extra-wide, buttoned headboard inspired by an upturned collar. From £5,452 ‘Guest’ chair (right; 2014) This curved shape brings a sense of comfort to the dining table. It also has invisible castors. From £1,984 ‘Giò’ night table (2016) A wood-veneer design that offers ample bedside storage, with a glass top, lacquer shelf and handy drawer. From £1,424

Poliform’s designs exude subtle glamour. Its collection majors on statement sofas, sexy coffee tables and some seriously aspirational wardrobe systems

MARCEL WANDERS This exuberant Dutchman is known for his quirky baroque-meets-modern style. After shooting to fame in the early 1990s as a designer for experimental Dutch brand Droog, he co-founded furniture label Moooi in 2000. He’s also designed interiors for property developer Yoo and luxury hotels (such as the Mondrian South Beach in Miami). Key pieces ‘Mad King’ armchair (right; 2015) Part of a series named after playing cards, this armchair has Wanders’ signature curves and matelassé (quilted) upholstery. From £2,756 ‘Theca’ storage units (left; 2016) In practical mode, Wanders created this storage system with a useful combination of concealed and open elements. From £5,468 ‘Dream’ bed (2006) Wanders loves designs that can be personalised: this bed has a headboard made of modular panels that can be extended upwards or widthways. Its floating appearance shows the designer’s playful side. From £3,315


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

F I V E K E Y FA C T S ABOUT POLIFORM

1

Poliform furniture graces the public spaces, suites and wellness areas of the Hotel Café Royal in London and the William J Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas.

JEAN-MARIE MASSAUD French superstar Massaud has designed everything from high-profile buildings (such as the Volcano football stadium in Guadalajara, Mexico) to concept cars for Toyota – and he’s prolific in the field of furniture, too. He has 31 designs in Poliform’s catalogue, including statement sofas and lounge chairs. Key pieces ‘Mondrian’ sofa system (above; 2016) Not so much a sofa as a multipurpose lounging station, this system comes with an array of built-in side tables and shelves. Its lines are inspired by Mondrian artworks. From £4,600 ‘Bristol’ coffee table (2015) This design also has a touch of Mondrian about it, with aluminium supports slicing through its top and base. From £2,793 ‘Ventura’ chair (right; 2011) A curving shaped shell perched atop a striking walnut base, this design is contemporary lounging at its best. From £2,740

PAOLO PIVA Architect Paolo Piva was one of the first talents to collaborate with Poliform. He’s also known for his work on historical buildings: in 1986 he oversaw the restoration of Palazzo Remer in Venice. His designs for Poliform are influenced by Modernism. Key pieces: ‘Alea’ kitchen (left; 2003) With its mix of simple matt lacquer doors and open shelving, not to mention its sleek lines, this design is popular with architects. ‘Soho’ sofa system (left; 2009)The low, wide proportions of this design prioritise comfort and relaxation – especially if you add one of the chaise longue elements. From £4,562 ‘Edge’ coffee table (left; 2009) This elegant design has a light appearance thanks to the extreme slenderness of its metal base. From £1,678

2

A key element of the brand’s Brianza headquarters is the Poliform Lab, an eco-friendly building designed by Carlo Colombo. Inside the 13,000-square-metre space is an exhibition area displaying every single product, including Varenna’s luxurious kitchens (‘Trail’, above) and a concept showcase and staff training hub.

3

Poliform has five separate factories for different elements of its collection and 800 showrooms worldwide, the most recent being a two-floor space laid out like a real home on New York’s Madison Avenue, which opened last September.

4

The most famous of its coveted wardrobe systems is the ‘Senzafine’ (‘Endless’; above), which has been in the collection since 1997. This design lives up to its name with a huge range of configurations, enabling you to combine hidden storage, open shelves and drawer units in a completely bespoke solution.

5

Poliform’s best-selling design is the ‘Mad’ armchair by Marcel Wanders (right; 2015).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 73


Style | N E W S

BIG IN JAPAN WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: IWAN BAAN, MITSUTAKA KITAMURA, AKIHISA MASUDA

The Barbican is bringing the best examples of Japanese domestic architecture to London this season, and we can’t wait For architects, designers and pretty much anyone interested in aesthetics, Japan and its architectural output has long been held in high regard. So the fact that the Barbican is bringing the country’s best examples of domestic architecture to London is, needless to say, quite exciting. In ‘The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945’ film, photography, architectural plans and models demonstrate how several generations of Japan’s most innovative architects have created novel solutions for everything from overcrowded cities to the influx of technology. Want to fully immerse yourself in Japanese architecture? Head downstairs, where The Barbican’s lower galleries will be hosting a full-size recreation of Tokyo’s famous Moriyama House by architect Ryue Nishizawa of design studio SANAA. The museum worked with Nishizawa to cleverly weave the structure into the Barbican’s Brutalist interior, beautifully highlighting the interaction between the two spaces. Also check out the new commission by professor and architect Terunobu Fujimori, who collaborated with the students of Kingston University to complete his biggest ever tea house. Featuring a hand-charred timber frame and white plaster interior, it will be the venue for tea ceremonies, performed throughout the day. As the first major survey of Japanese domestic architecture, this is an enlightening show that’s not to be missed. Conceptual architect Kazuo’s Shinohara’s edict that ‘a house is a work of art,’ rings true throughout. 23 March–25 June (barbican.com).

Clockwise from left Sou Fujimoto’s House NA, Tokyo (2011). Hideyuki Nakayama’s O House, Kyoto (2009). Terunobu Fujimori’s Chashitsu Tetsu (Tetsu Teahouse; 2005) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 75


Style | N E W S

BIG IN JAPAN

SHOP THE SHOW Inspired by the exhibition? The Barbican Shop has an excellent souvenir selection (shop.barbican.org.uk)

‘Concrete Town’ desk accessories by Bergnerschmidt, £32 each

‘Shiho’ and ‘Miho’ kokeshi dolls from MIYA, from £40 each

E X C L U S I V E T O E L L E D E C O R AT I O N READERS 20% OFF TICKETS

Ceramic bowls and tea cups from Japan Centre, from £10 each

Decided to head to the Barbican and visit the ‘The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945’ exhibition? Well, you’re in luck, because ELLE Decoration readers get 20% off the full ticket price for bookings in April. Simply quote this code: 196017. When buying online, go to barbican.org.uk and select EDE Elle Decoration Offer at the checkout, then enter the code. Want to order from the Barbican box office? Take this issue of ELLE Decoration with you to present for your discount. TERMS AND CONDITIONS Offer is limited to two tickets maximum per person. Offer limited to tickets booked for the month of April. Offer closes 30 April 2017.

76 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

From top Antonin Raymond’s House and Studio (1951). Teronobu Fujimori’s Leek House (1997). Silver Hut by Taya Ito (1984). Moriyama House by Ryue Nishizawa (2005)

How to Make a Japanese House (NAi Publishers, £45)

PICTURES: TOMIO OHASHI, AKIHISA MASUDA, TAKASHI HOMMA, OSAMU MURAI, COURTESY KOICHI KITAZAWA

‘1N’ table lamp by Isamu Noguchi for Vitra, £195


DESIGN HEROES Start – or add to – your collection with a month-long series of exclusive design offers from Aram Store Zeev Aram opened his first showroom to great acclaim in 1964 and it remains a leading light of London’s design scene. Today, its flagship store in the heart of Covent Garden offers the UK’s most extensive range of contemporary furniture, lighting, rugs and accessories over four floors and 1,800 square metres. The brand continues to champion the work of some of the world’s most exciting young designers, alongside now-iconic names such as Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Castiglioni, Kuramata, Jasper Morrison and Eileen Gray, all of whom it introduced to the UK. How fitting, then, that Aram is celebrating the recent change in UK law that now extends a piece’s copyright to 70 years beyond its designer’s death with a month-long promotion featuring some of the world’s greatest contemporary designs. For more information visit aram.co.uk or phone 020 7557 7557

CASSINA The ‘Cassina Masters Collection’ was born in 1964 when Cassina acquired the rights to produce designs by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. It remains synonymous with the finest 20th century and contemporary design. Buy an ‘LC4’ chaise longue (1928) in leather and get an ‘LC9’ stool (1927) by Charlotte Perriand, worth up to £894, free*

EILEEN GRAY DESIGNS One of the first women admitted to London’s Slade School of Art and an exponent of new theories of design in the 1920s and 1930s, Eileen Gray was always a pioneer. She began working with Zeev Aram to bring her designs to market in 1973. Purchase a ‘Bibendum’ chair (1926) in leather and receive an ‘E1027’ adjustable table (1927), worth up to £694, in any finish for free*


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

CARL HANSEN & SØN

USM The possible combinations of USM’s modular furniture system are almost infinite – making it an ideal choice for both office and home spaces. First launched in 1965, it features tubular chromed frames with glass or metal sheets in 14 colours. Spend £2,500 or more on the range and get a USM trolley worth up to £572, free*

FREDERICIA As a producer of innovative design since its founding in 1911, and with a strong focus on sustainability, Fredericia exemplifies the craftsmanship and beauty for which Danish furniture is renowned. With every order of Børge Mogensen’s ‘Spanish Chair’ (1958) receive a free pair of ‘Piloti’ side tables (2016) by Hugo Passos, worth up to £717*

The Danish master cabinetmaker founded his company in 1908, producing furniture to order and in small runs before going on to work with the likes of Hans J Wegner, whose ‘CH24 Wishbone’ chair (1949) is a favourite in modern interiors. Buy six ‘CH24 Wishbone’ chairs in any colour for the price of four, saving £1,240*

FLOS Founded in Italy in 1962, Flos broke new ground by creating and using materials that had not previously been used in lighting production. Its reputation for boundary-pushing and working with leading design talent continues to this day. Buy an ‘Arco’ LED floor lamp (1962) by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni and receive their Flos ‘Snoopy’ lamp (1967), worth £610, free*

*OFFER IS AVAILABLE ON FULL-PRICE ITEMS ONLY IN STORE AND ONLINE. NOT AVAILABLE ON CLEARANCE OFFERS. CONDITIONS APPLY.

Aram champions the work of the world’s most exciting young designers, alongside now-iconic names such as Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe KNOLL Created in New York in 1938, the brand’s German founder, Hans Knoll, brought modernist design to the US. Knoll has since worked with some of the best modern designers of each generation – from Eero Saarinen to Piero Lissoni Buy a ‘Saarinen’ dining table (1957) by Eero Saarinen and receive a pair of matching side tables (1957) worth up to £2,744, free*

VITRA Founded by Willi and Erika Fehlbaum, Vitra acquired the licence to produce items by the likes of Charles and Ray Eames and George Nelson. Its roster also includes Isamu Noguchi, Verner Panton, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec and Barber & Osgerby. Buy an Eames ‘Lounge Chair’ (1956) and receive the matching ‘Ottoman’, worth up to £1,850, free*

FRITZ HANSEN The wood lamination that Fritz Hansen is best known for was most famously encapsulated in Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Ant’ chair in 1952. It was followed by other hugely successful products by the designer, including the ‘Drop’ chair, created for Copenhagen’s SAS Royal Hotel in 1958. Buy six ‘Drop’ plastic chairs – available in six colours – for the price of four, saving up to £598*

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 79


Style | D E S I G N

DESIGN HERO DIETER RAMS

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: ZEON LTD, ANDREAS SUETTERLIN, MICHAEL KRETZER, PHILIP SINDEN

The German legend whose crisp, clean and functional style has influenced a generation ‘Good design is as little design as possible,’ said German icon Dieter Rams (1932–) in his famous 1970s rubric ‘Ten Principles of Good Design’. It’s a maxim the 84-year-old designer lives by in every sense, not only in the functionality of his work but also in the simplicity of his career path: he is known for collaborating with just two companies, electronics giant Braun and furniture brand Vitsœ. Despite this low-key approach, it is impossible to overstate the impact and prescience of his work: Jonathan Ive has cited Rams’ ‘pure, perfectly proportioned, coherent and effortless’ style as a key influence on his designs for Apple, ensuring that Rams’ spirit is felt by a generation of gadget lovers. The idea that design should be practical was engendered in Rams from his childhood in the city of Wiesbaden, where he observed his carpenter grandfather at work. He studied architecture, but after a short stint in an architect’s office in Frankfurt, joined Braun in 1955, just as the post-war boom in consumer electronics signalled a rosy future for the company. Rams worked at Braun for 40 years and served as its head of design from 1961 to 1995. One of his key achievements there was the ‘SK4’ radio/record player (1956). At a time when most tech was housed in clunky wooden cabinets, Rams proposed a compact, industrial-looking white metal case. Rather than concealing the controls, he placed them on top and made them an important part

of his design. The pristine ‘SK4’ became known as ‘Snow White’s coffin’ and set the tone for Rams’ philosophy, in which all unnecessary details were banished and form and function became one. In 1959, Rams received permission from his bosses at Braun to design a shelving system for Vitsœ, on the grounds that it would serve as a display space and marketing for the company’s radios. The wall-mounted ‘Universal Shelving System’ – so-called because its metal components could be arranged in endless ways – has been in continuous production since 1959, and has become the template for countless other modular systems. He followed it up in 1962 with the ‘620 Chair Programme’, made from a boxy metal shell with leather upholstery. Designed for self assembly with one simple magnetic tool, its components are the same now as when they were launched; any chair, however old, can always be updated or enlarged to form a sofa. Since 1971, Rams has lived and worked in a bungalow on an estate in Kronberg, near Frankfurt, which he helped to design for Braun employees. With its white tiled floors and Japanese-inspired garden, the estate is filled with his designs and has recently been listed as a historical site (vitsoe.com; braun.com/uk).

In Rams’ famous design philosophy, form and function become one

Clockwise from top left Rams’ home in Kronberg. ‘620 Chair Programme’; ‘Universal Shelving System’; ‘740’ stacking system, all designed for Vitsœ. ‘SK4’ radio/record player; ‘AW50’ watch; ‘T3’ radio, all designed for Braun

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 81


Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

WIRED FOR BEAUTY Your television can be as sleek and slimline as you like, but if the look is ruined by a bulky, unsightly cable then what’s the use? Samsung’s new ‘QLED’ TV not only delivers an image with brighter, more lifelike colours, but it also has a transparent cable that will blend into its surroundings. Out Autumn (samsung.com).

HOW COOL ARE YOU? Bang & Olufsen’s ‘Cool Modern Collection’ includes 11 acoustic works of art from across the Danish brand’s 90 years of excellence, each updated with an on-trend brass finish. We love the ‘BeoLab 18’ wireless loudspeakers (above, £5,260 for a pair), inspired by the ‘Beolab 8000’ – designed in 1995 and fondly known as the ‘inverted pencil’ – and the ‘Beosound 1’ and ‘Beosound 2’ (right, £1,295 and £1,695). The new combination of brass, a black steel base and smoked oak ‘lamella’ (the vertical fins that fan out sound in a 180-degree arc) makes these a hit in any home (bang-olufsen.com).

WA S T E N O T The average family produces more than 18 kilograms of food waste per year, and now Whirlpool has come up with an elegant solution to this tricky issue. The ‘Zera Food Recycler’ can turn a week’s worth of scraps into fertiliser for your garden in just 24 hours. Not sold on the idea of an indoor compost heap? A carbon filter prevents pongs. £830, out May (zera.com).

SPEAK YOUR MIND

Excited by the futuristic idea of commanding your home with just your voice? Amazon’s ‘Alexa’ voice service allows you to do just that, from switching on your lights and adjusting your heating to selecting a playlist or checking the weather. And now it’s lending its skills to the Lenovo ‘Smart Assistant’, a super-stylish voice-controlled smart home hub with top-notch sound quality. Its woofer can be clad in a choice of five colours. £110, out summer (lenovo.com).

82 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: WETOUCH IMAGEWORK

Buy this Floor-to-ceiling windows are a dream for many, but they are also a nightmare to clean. The Vorwerk ‘Kobold VG100’ can help. With every swipe it wets the window, removes dirt and vacuums away soapy water, leaving no mess. £249 (kobold.vorwerk.co.uk).


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

ALTERNATIVE FUTURE The skylines of London and Moscow might have been very different. Two exhibitions in London look at what could have been. At the Royal Institute of British Architects, ‘Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square’ examines two proposals for the same site in the City: van der Rohe’s unrealised Mansion House Square skyscraper (above) and Stirling’s No. 1 Poultry (8 March–25 June; architecture.com). Meanwhile, at the Design Museum, ‘Imagine Moscow: Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution’ showcases plans, posters and magazines dating from the 1920s and 30s that imagine an idealised capital which was never realised (right, 15 March–June; designmuseum.org). THE NAME TO KNOW

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: NEW G5, ALAMY, PETER COX, JOHN DONAT/RIBA COLLECTIONS, WILL PRYCE

BUILDING THE DREAM Be inspired to rethink your home, with two new coffee-table tomes. Architects’ Homes (Images Publishing, £35) takes a rare glimpse into the abodes of the world’s most innovative architects. Among them are Domenic Alvaro’s Small House, a compact and elegant home on a tricky six-byseven-metre site and Manit and Sanali Rastogi’s New Delhi home, which brings the outside in with a bright exotic garden at its centre. The New Old House (Abrams, £40), showcases 18 extraordinary historic homes that have been beautifully revamped for modern living. A highlight is Astley Castle, a 12th-century fortified manor house once home to Lady Jane Grey, which has been transformed by Witherford Watson Mann Architects into an innovative blend of original brickwork and modern glass.

Dominic McKenzie has a passion for creating innovative residential buildings and set up his London practice in 2011. Our favourite of his projects is Eidolon House in Highgate, north London (below). Beautifully clad in mirror-polished stainless steel, the façade reflects its forest surroundings. More recently, the practice completed Pop on Top, a London apartment that features a sculptural steel staircase in eye-popping blue, pink and yellow (dominicmckenzie.co.uk).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 87


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

ARCHITECTURAL ICON C A’ D ’ O R O B Y G I O VA N N I B O N

The Ca’ d’Oro is one of the most beautiful residential buildings in all of Venice, a spectacular blend of Gothic, Byzantine, Moorish and Islamic architectural styles. Venetian architect Giovanni Bon and his sculptor son Bartolomeo were commissioned to design it by Marino Contarini, a wealthy political figure from an influential family (eight Contarinis served as elected Doges to the Republic of Venice, the highest office in the city’s government). Completed in 1430, the design of the house was inspired by the Palazzo Ducale, known as the Doges’ Palace, and was constructed around the same time. Bon’s smaller-scale version was built by the same stonemasons and sculptors, and borrowed many of the floral ornamentations, intricate carvings and decorative pinnacles. The house has three storeys, each one more elaborate than the last. To make the palace the standout showpiece on the Grand Canal, Contarini had parts of the façade adorned in shimmering ultramarine – the most prized pigment of the Renaissance, traditionally reserved by artists for depicting the Virgin’s robes because of its extreme costliness – and gold leaf (Ca’ d’Oro translates as house of gold). Over the course of the 16th century and after the fall of the Venetian Republic in 88 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

1797, the house changed owners several times. In 1846, Russian Prince Paolo Troubetzkoy bought the prized abode for famed Italian ballerina Marie Taglioni. Under her ownership, Bon’s creation suffered badly: the original Gothic stairway was destroyed, the carved wellhead by Bartolomeo that sat at the heart of the palazzo was sold, and much of the original interior stonework was removed. It is believed that during a visit to the city Victorian art critic John Ruskin mourned upon seeing the building’s original features being ripped out and discarded right in front of him. Finally, in 1894, with a new affluent owner, arts patron Baron Giorgio Franchetti, the house was restored to its former glory. Franchetti had the beautiful mosaic floors painstakingly restored and even managed to retrieve the long-lost sculptural wellhead. In 1916, the building was donated to the Italian State and was opened to the public in 1927 as the Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Ca’ d’Oro, which houses a wonderful array of Renaissance artworks, including the stunning Annunciation by Venetian artist Vittore Carpaccio and Sleeping Venus with Cupid by Paris Bordone. Cannaregio, 3933, 30121 Venice, Italy (cadoro.org).

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: ALAMY

The elaborate Gothic masterpiece on the bank of Venice’s Grand Canal


Desert island designs It’s the age-old conversation starter: if you were stranded on a desert island, what could you not live without? We asked some of our favourite design industry insiders and creatives what one object they would choose Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

SKYE GYNGELL, chef and founder of Spring restaurant

PICTURES: BEN ANDERS, ROLEX/CLAUDE BOSSEL

‘My desert island object is a pestle and mortar. It’s the one piece of equipment that I can’t live without, either at work or at home. I love the coarse ones you buy from Asian supermarkets that are cut from a granite-like stone. Marble ones look beautiful but I find them too smooth to be functional.’

STEPHEN BAYLEY, design critic ‘I am inseparable from my Rolex “Explorer II” which is, to me, much more than a mere watch. It’s impressive without being ostentatious and – in any and all circumstances – dignifies the wearer: a considerable act of promotion in my case. It’s also incredibly reliable, practically indestructible and unlikely to lose much value. A perfect machine as well as an elegant accessory.’ ➤ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 93


DESERT ISLAND DESIGNS

MATTHEW WILLIAMSON, fashion and product designer ‘Stranded on a desert island I would love to create a personal, cosy environment using all of the natural elements at hand. At night, I would transform the space into a magical oasis using Dan Flavin’s neon light sculptures. I imagine coloured neon light tubes hanging from the branches of a huge tree, like a futuristic wind chime.’

JASPER CONRAN, designer ‘As a child it was my dream to have a mobile telephone – it was very James Bond. I’ve never lost that wonder. Not only is the iPhone a beautiful object, I love it for what it can do. To be able to keep in touch with everything – watch films, look up recipes for how to cook coconuts – would keep me perfectly happy.’

SUE TIMNEY, interior designer

‘My desert island design has to be the “Capitello Corinzio” chair by Piero Fornasetti, designed in 1960. It was the first really expensive piece I ever bought. The year was 1986 and Paul Smith pointed out the common areas of graphic interest in Fornasetti’s work and my own. The chair is remarkably comfortable and my four children grew up with it moving with us from house to house.’


Style | D E S I G N

MARTIN BRUDNIZKI, interior designer

‘Rarely do I get the chance to stop, so I think I’d be rather thankful of finding myself on a desert island and would use the time to relax and reflect. A hammock is all I’d need: it would provide me with enough comfort to while away the time until I were rescued.’

KELLY WEARSTLER, designer

PICTURES: SUKI DHANDA, ALAMY, KELLY WEARSTLER

‘My Vitamix “G-Series” blender! I use it every day to make homemade almond milk. It would be perfect for tropical smoothies. I also wouldn’t want to be without my Lanvin parasol. It has fabric that offers UV protection – perfect for sunshine and rain.’ ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 95


DESERT ISLAND DESIGNS

‘At the practical end of the scale, I would settle for a solar-powered radio. One that is powerful enough to receive BBC Radio 4. But what I would really want, to frame the beautiful view of the sun and sea, and to make my new life of solitude as uplifting as possible, would be Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House.’

KELLY HOPPEN, interior designer

‘My desert island essential would have to be a Wurlitzer jukebox and an electric plug point, of course, so that I can have constant music. Music is one thing that I absolutely cannot live without.’

96 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

DAN PEARSON, landscape designer ‘I would take the “Hydra Hoe” by gardening store Implementations. It is the best hoe I have ever used, which is saying something after over 40 years of gardening. What makes it special is its double-edged and hinged blade, which means that it cuts on both the push and the pull, which makes light work of weeds. The copper used to make all of Implementations’ tools is also believed to magnetise the soil, making it more unattractive to snails and slugs.’

PICTURES: SUKI DHANDA, LUKE HAYES, JASON INGRAM, ALAMY

DEYAN SUDJIC, director of the Design Museum

BARNABA FORNASETTI, creative director of Fornasetti ‘I would take a recording of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” by Milan’s Silete Venti! orchestra – although I would also need a solar-powered device to listen to it. We recently designed the set for their production of it in Milan and Florence.’


Style | D E S I G N

LYN HARRIS, founder of Perfumer H ‘I go everywhere in the world with my silver tea caddy. It’s my sanity! Along with my beautiful teapot from a Kyoto market and tea strainer from Betty’s it enhances my tea ritual, which I must perform every day whether I’m on a plane or in the office.’ ➤


Style | D E S I G N DESERT ISLAND DESIGNS

CELIA BIRTWELL, textile designer ‘I have chosen a remnant of Suzanne Fontan’s “Fleur et Musique” design on cotton that has been with me for many years. I picked it up at Portobello Market in the 1970s, and have been inspired by it ever since. Fontan was a wonderful designer, I love the palette knife treatment she uses for the flowers and the exquisite colours.’

MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES, product designer ‘I did think of taking a sketchbook, but I can draw on other things. And if I ask for a pen, it’s probably going to run out at some point. I can be creative with the things I have around me, but swimming is something I’m passionate about. That’s what I’d want to be doing, so I’d take TYR’s “Socket Rocket” goggles.

‘Fishing, while an obvious means to catch food and survive, is also my passion. For me, the finest fly fishing rod in the world is designed by Henrik Mortensen for Salmologic. His “Serenity” rod gives both the beginner and the more senior fly fishermen (like me) a huge advantage. As with so many things that are designed to perform perfectly, it is not only functional but also very beautiful.’ 98 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

SHARLEEN SPITERI, singer and songwriter ‘I would take the Celine “Trio” handbag. It is a simple design with clean lines, minimal branding and it’s functional – I can wear it messenger-style, and keep my hands free!’ E D Find full details on all of the products mentioned at elledecoration.co.uk

PICTURES: SUKI DHANDA, GETTY IMAGES

JOHN ROCHA, fashion designer


GET THE LOOK

THE 7 BIG

D E C O R AT I N G

TRENDS SPRING/SUMMER 2017

We show you how to mix on-trend patterns and seasonal colours with confidence. Consider this your fast track guide to the new wallpapers and fabrics to choose right now!

‘BIG BANG’ BY WA L L & D E C O

Burst into spring with an explosion of colour. Designed by Bologna-born mural artist Gunilla Zamboni, these abstract floral wallpaper panels will instantly brighten any interior. £155 per square metre (wallanddeco.com) ➤

Styling ALEX KRISTAL Photography MIKKEL MORTENSEN Styling Assistants STEPHANIE ILES, CHLOE SCOTT, GEORGIA LOVERIDGE APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 101


‘Parchment’ wallpaper in ‘Polished Cement’, £45 per ten-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

‘Zulu Border’ wallpaper (border strip), £50 for a ten-metre roll; ‘Narina’ wallpaper (below border), £75 for a ten-metre roll, both Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com)

‘Deadly Night Shade’ emulsion, £80 for five litres, Bert & May (bertandmay.com)

‘Random’ linen-mix curtain, £145 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com)

‘Fiction’ Trevira curtain in ‘681’ by Doshi Levien for Kvadrat, £77 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com)

1

GRAPHIC BLUES

UPHOLSTERY, from left Window seat covered in ‘Strato’ splatter fabric, £65 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com). Cushions covered in ‘Reflex’ striped fabric by Raf Simons for Kvadrat, £206 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Reef’ royal blue fabric by Dominique Kieffer, £96 per metre, Rubelli/ Donghia (rubelli.com). ‘Corchal’ white fabric by Pollack, £195 per metre, Altfield (altfield.com). ‘Brick 06’ chair by Paola Navone upholstered in ‘Avio’ denim-blue fabric with cushion in ‘Rete Blu’, £1,239, Gervasoni (gervasoni1882.it) ACCESSORIES, from left ‘Nim’ side table, £4,850, Pinch (pinchdesign.com). ‘Unity’ trays, £40 each, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Incalmo’ glass jug by Jochen Holz, £155, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Lyngby’ vase by Lyngby Porcelæn, £169, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Ilios’ pendant light, £419, Atelier Areti (atelierareti.com). ‘Guate’ spotty blanket, £138, Barbara Osorio Fabrics (pedrosoeosorio.com) FLOORING ‘Hillstar’ parquet, £148 per square metre, Woodworks by Ted Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com)

SEAMSTRESS: MELANIE WILLIAMS

Blue is an enduring interiors favourite, always calm and considered, and updated this season in denim hues and bold prints. It also works fantastically well with on-trend powder pink


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

2

4

SWATCHES 1 ‘Alalpardo’ harlequin pattern fabric, £74 per metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 2 ‘Vogue’ diamond-print fabric, £67.10 per metre, Casamance (casamance.fr) 3 ‘Charvak’ colourwash fabric, £34 per metre, Olivia Bard (oliviabard.co.uk) 4 ‘Universo’ deep indigo fabric, £96.48 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com) 5 ‘Itza’ ikat-print fabric by Pollack, £170 per metre, Altfield (altfield.com) 6 ‘H29 Metropolitan’ emulsion, £36.50 for 2.5 litres, Eicó (eico.co.uk) 7 ‘Gray Dawn’ emulsion, £36.50 for 2.5 litres, Eicó (eico.co.uk) ➤

1

2

1

3 4 5

6

‘Puzzle’ tile by Barber & Osgerby for Mutina, £214 per square metre, Domus Tiles (domustiles.co.uk)

7

‘Dandelion’ tile by Claesson Koivisto Rune, £145 per square metre, Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se)

‘Wash Stop’ emulsion, £13.50 per litre, Edward Bulmer (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk)

‘Kurioza’ wallpaper in ‘Shibori’, £76 per ten-metre roll, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk)

‘Intermezzo’ cotton-mix fabric, £158 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com).

3 5

‘Ocean Mist’ wallcovering, £25 per square metre, Murals Wallpaper (muralswallpaper.co.uk)

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 103


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

‘AMALFI’ BY ZIMMER + ROHDE

Subtly textured to evoke shimmering embroidery, this wallpaper depicts the rolling hills and trees of the Amalfi landscape at midnight. In this inky-blue, it’s an exquisite work of art. £110 per ten-metre roll (zimmer-rohde.com) ➤

104 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


‘Joanna’ emulsion, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com)

‘Alpha’ Trevira curtain, £100 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com)

‘Voila’ linen curtain in ‘Pistache’ by Dominique Kieffer, £125 per metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com)

‘Linen Wash’ emulsion, £38 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com)

‘Palme’ wall panels, £325 for the whole mural, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk)

2

SPRING GREENS

Nothing heralds the start of spring like leafy greens, and this season oversized prints and graphic patterns lead the way. Pair them with dark greys and pale wood flooring for maximum effect

UPHOLSTERY, from left Sofa covered in ‘Kaleido’ mottled fabric, £140 per metre, Black Edition (blackedition.com). Cushions covered in ‘Moire’ patterned fabric, £45.80 per metre, Camengo (camengo.fr). ‘Faded Grandeur’ cream linen by Duncan Neil, £69.60 per metre, Earthed by WM Clark (earthedbywmclark.co.uk) ACCESSORIES, from left 1980s coffee table by Paolo Piva, £1,400, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). Limoges porcelain water jug in ‘Wasabi’, £106, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘Teal Ash Faceted Jug’ by Nicola Tassie, £165, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Ruutu vase’ by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Iittala, £123, SCP (scp.co.uk). Limoges porcelain beaker cup in ‘Pistachio’, £32, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘Black Linen’ fabric lighting cable, £4.80 per metre, Urban Cottage Industries (urbancottageindustries.com). ‘Bubble Saucer’ pendant lamp by George Nelson for Herman Miller, £350, SCP (scp.co.uk) FLOORING ‘Hillstar’ parquet, £148 per square metre, Woodworks by Ted Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com)


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

‘ K A L A’ B Y M A N U E L C A N O VA S

Embroided on Panama linen, this leafy pattern recalls a garden in full bloom. Its vibrant colours and delicate finish make this fabric perfect for bringing a charming touch of nature indoors. £135 per metre, Colefax and Fowler (colefax.com) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 107


‘Chambers Gate’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk)

Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

1

3

2

4

SWATCHES 1 ‘Fuse’ grey striped fabric by Raf Simons for Kvadrat, £206 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com) 2 ‘Efrain’ geometric patterned linen, £74 per metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com) 3 ‘Great Cactus’ stitch patterned linen, £180 per metre, Bennison Fabrics (bennisonfabrics.com) 4 ‘Newport’ yellow striped linen, £95 per metre, Pepe Penalver (pepepenalver.com) 5 ‘Nusa’ pale grey ikat cotton, £15 per metre, Clarke & Clarke (clarke-clarke.com) 6 ‘Limehouse’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk) 7 ‘Cavendish Cream’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk)

5

5 4

3

1 ‘Dedale’ cotton-mix fabric in ‘Pollen’, £101 per metre, Camengo (camengo.fr)

‘Palace Road’ wallpaper, £71 per ten-metre roll, Little Greene (littlegreene.com)

‘Cabana Weave’ wallpaper in ‘Ivory’, £70 per metre, Phillip Jeffries (phillipjeffries.com)

2

6

7

‘Chocolate Oak’ wooden flooring, £150 per square metre, Bohemian Works (bohemianworks.com)

‘Elgin’ emulsion, £42 for 2.5 litres, Mylands (mylands.co.uk)

3

SUNNY YELLOWS

This is the ideal complement to our second big trend, leafy spring greens, but also a hot new look in its own right thanks to a fresh crop of contemporary graphics and some inventive textures

ACCESSORIES, from left ‘Oval Medium’ vase’ in ‘Ash’, £99; ‘Square Small’ platter in ‘Steel’, £25; ‘Tear’ vase in ‘Citrus’, £39, all Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). Foliage by Scarlet & Violet (scarletandviolet.com) ➤

108 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


‘Rock Pool’ cotton jacquard wallcovering, £305 per metre, Martyn Thompson Studio (martynthompsonstudio.com)

‘Slate 1’ emulsion, £42.40 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)

‘Slate IV’ emulsion, £42.40 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)

‘Floating’ divan base, from £199 for a single, Sueno (sueno.co.uk). Divan covered in ‘Sonoma’ silk by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa, £188 per metre, GP & J Bake r (gpjbaker.com)

4

O C E A N WA S H ES

Shades of the sea are instantly relaxing. No surprise then to see this trend explored by so many great brands – it’s the fast track to interiors bliss. And it needs nothing more than to be layered with more of the same

UPHOLSTERY, from left Mattresses covered in ‘Reef’ dusky blue cotton (top), £96 per metre; ‘Acquerello’ turquoise linen (middle), £102 per metre; ‘Lia’ pale blue fabric (bottom), £183 per metre, all by Dominique Kieffer, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com). Cushions covered in ‘Nordic’ raw edge fabric, £98 per metre, Jason D’Souza (jasondsouza.co.uk). ‘Reef’ light-grey cotton by Dominique Kieffer, £96 per metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com). ‘Charvak’ patterned fabric, £34 per metre, Olivia Bard (oliviabard.co.uk). ‘Mondo’ dark blue fabric by Dominique Kieffer, £102 per metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com) ACCESSORIES, from left ‘Bokeh II’ silk rug, £6,240, Tai Ping (houseoftaiping.com). ‘Isom Tall’ side table by Sebastian Scherer, £646, Neo/Craft (neocraft.com). ‘SV6’ lamp by Studio Vit for &Tradition, £179, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Gemma’ vase, from £22, AYTM (aytm.dk). ‘Lime’ vessel, £375, Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com). ‘Isom Square’ side table by Sebastian Scherer, £818, Neo/Craft (neocraft.com). ‘Patinated Bronze Oak Grain’ small vessel, £600, Wooden & Woven (woodwoven.com). ‘Lost Vessel’ object in Flamed Lime, £3,400, Nic Webb (nicwebb.com)


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

5

SWATCHES 1 ‘Tailor’ emerald green fabric, £99 per metre, Nobilis (nobilis.fr) 2 ‘Wave’ blue boucle fabric, £149 per metre, Pepe Penalver (pepepenalver.com) 3 ‘Connaught’ royal blue silk in ‘Meconopsis’, £57 per metre, James Hare (james-hare.com) 4 ‘Balian’ arrow fabric, £65 per metre, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 5 ‘Graffito’ deep teal fabric by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa, £95 per metre, GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com) 6‘Eucalyptus Leaf’ emulsion, £40 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) 7 ‘Moonlit Night’ emulsion, £40 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) ➤

3 1 2

3

2

4

1

5

6

7

‘Talamone’ wallpaper by Élitis, £214 per ten-metre roll, Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk)

‘Ototo CS’ Trevira fabric in ‘22 White’, £167 per metre, Nya Nordiska (nya.com)

‘Groussay’ wallpaper in ‘Aube’ by Christian Lacroix Maison, £69 per ten-metre roll, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

4

‘Winter Surf’ emulsion, £40 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) Burmese teak flooring, £133 per square metre, Urbane Living (urbaneliving.co.uk) ‘Cold Embers’ emulsion, £40 for 2.5 litres, Designers Guild (designersguild.com)

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 111


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

‘ E N G L I S H R O S E ’ B Y F E AT H R

The layered brushstrokes and painterly splatters on this most unique of floral wallpapers, designed by Finnish artist Reeta Ek, makes the perfect statement alongside deep watery blues. £119 per ten-metre roll (feathr.com) ➤

112 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


‘Mondo’ curtains in ‘Violet’ and ‘Rose’ (right) by Dominique Kieffer, £102 per metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com)

‘Orissa’ silk curtain in ‘Peach Blossom’, £34 per metre, James Hare (james-hare.com)

‘Galao I’ emulsion (on walls); ‘Dome’ emulsion (on woodwork), both £37.18 for 2.5 litres, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com)

‘Delicate Pink Dark Floral’ mural, £25 per square metre, Murals Wallpaper (muralswallpaper.co.uk)

5

DUSKY FLORALS

Florals in the home can sometimes feel too old-school chintzy, but the new season flowers are brilliant, blown up and blooming marvellous! And with such a statement, allow them to take centre stage

UPHOLSTERY, from left Cushions on bench covered in ‘Plain’ green fabric, £49 per metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). ‘Bartok’ deep purple linen by Sheila Coombes, £85 per metre, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk). ‘Espoir’ two-tone fabric, £92.60 per metre, Casamance (casamance.com). ‘Stucco’ dark grey fabric; ‘Stucco’ pale pink fabric, both by Élitis, both £179.80 per metre, Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk). ‘Alalpardo’ geometric fabric, £74 per metre, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). ‘Bartok’ pink linen by Sheila Coombes, £85 per metre, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk). Cushions on floor covered in ‘Tempest’ dark pink fabric by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa, £149 per metre, GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com). ‘Stucco’ cream fabric by Élitis, £180 per metre, Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk) ACCESSORIES, from left ‘Caravaggio Read’ floor light by Cecilie Manz for Lightyears, £380, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Bench One’ bench, £535, Another Country (anothercountry.com). Throw made from ‘Nordic’ fabric in ‘Nor/06 Steel’, £98 per metre, Jason D’Souza (jasondsouza.co.uk) FLOORING ‘Hillstar’ parquet, £148.14 per square metre, Woodworks by Ted Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com)


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

‘ H E R B A R I A’ B Y B L A C K E D I T I O N

Inspired by the still life paintings of the Dutch Masters, but with a contemporary twist, this printed velvet proves that florals can be opulent as well as pretty. Make a statement by using it to upholster a whole sofa. £140 per metre (blackedition.com) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 115


Headboard upholstered in ‘Backgammon’ cotton-mix fabric, £65 per metre, James Hare (james-hare.com)

‘Petal’ emulsion, £37.18 for 2.5 litres, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com)

‘Copper’ gilding wax (above skirting), £6.95 for 15 millilitres, Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com)

‘Dolebury’ emulsion, £37.18 for 2.5 litres, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com)

Divan upholstered in ‘Lino CS Heavy’ fabric, £130 per metre, Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com)

6

D E L I C AT E N E U T R A L S

The trick to making neutrals work is to lift them with subtle colour so that they don’t feel bland. Here, greys are given a pinch of spice with pale blue and the shade of the moment: terracotta (see p146)

UPHOLSTERY, from left Cushions covered in ‘Peacock’ plain white linen, £90 per metre, Christopher Farr (christopherfarrcloth.com). ‘Chalet Embroidery’ checked fabric by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa, £95 per metre, GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com) ACCESSORIES, from left ‘3D Wallhanging No.1’, £755, Fault Lines (faultlinesdesign.com). ‘Robot’ bedside table, £655, &New (andnew.co.uk). Vase, £99; carafe, £53, both Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘Incalmo’ glass by Jochen Holz, £500, The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com). ‘Beach Pebble’ pendant light, £2,024, Ochre (ochre.net). ‘Pocuno’ rug, £369, Urbanara (urbanara.co.uk). ‘Madera’ bed, from £149, Sueno (sueno.co.uk). Linen pillowcases, £48 each; duvet cover in ‘Salmon’, £297; ‘Marea’ blue fabric (as throw), £110 per metre, all Larusi (larusi.com). ‘Brava’ grey fabric (as throw), £142 per metre, Lizzo (lizzo.net). ‘Elements No. 01’ rug, £10,200, Knots Rugs (knotsrugs.co.uk) FLOORING ‘Hillstar’ parquet, £148 per square metre, Woodworks by Ted Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com)


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

1

3

1

SWATCHES 1 ‘Peacock’ feather pattern linen, £90 per metre, Christopher Farr (christopherfarrcloth.com) 2 ‘Reflex’ blue fabric by Raf Simons for Kvadrat, £206 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com) 3 ‘Fuse’ yellow fabric by Raf Simons for Kvadrat, £206 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com) 4 ‘Brumes/Source’ grey fabric, £180 per metre, Christian Liaigre (christian-liaigre.fr) 5 ‘Bartok’ pink linen by Sheila Coombes, £85 per metre, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk) 6 ‘House White’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) 7 ‘Pale Powder’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) ➤

4 2 5

3

4 5

2

Fine linen in ‘Reef’, £19.75 per metre, Tinsmiths (tinsmiths.co.uk)

‘Talamone’ wallpaper by Élitis, £214 per ten-metre roll, Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk)

‘Raffles’ linen-mix fabric in ‘Ash’, £144 per metre, De Le Cuona (delecuona.com)

‘Dimpse’ emulsion , £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com)

‘Scope’ wallpaper, £45 per metre, Arte (arte-international.com)

6

7

‘Shagreen’ porcelain tile in ‘Grey’, £179 per square metre, Lapicida (lapicida.com)

Velvet piping tape, £5.50 per metre, Kleins (kleins.uk)

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 117


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

1

3

2

4

SWATCHES 1 ‘Outcross’ checked fabric by Dominique Kieffer, £96 per metre, Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com) 2 ‘Bartok’ blue linen by Sheila Coombes, £85 per metre, Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk) 3 ‘Hansa’ pale green fabric by Manuel Canovas at Colefax and Fowler, £74 per metre, Manuel Canovas (manuelcanovas.com) 4 ‘Mazate’ coral and white fabric by Pollack, £195 per metre, Altfield (altfield.com) 5 ‘Stripe’ striped fabric, £139 per metre, Gainsborough Silk (gainsborough.co.uk) 6 ‘Ultramarine Ashes’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 7 ‘Opal Green’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com)

5

3 5 2

‘Amalfia’ linen-mix fabric by Élitis, £352 per metre, Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk).

‘Rocket’ Trevira fabric by Doshi Levien for Kvadrat, £53 per metre, Skandium (skandium.com)

‘Lime White’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com)

‘Flamingo Artist’ wallpaper in pale blue, £200 per ten-metre roll, 17 Patterns (17patterns.com)

1

6

7

‘Fresco’ wallpaper, £60 per ten-metre roll, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com)

‘Macadam’ tile, £125 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.it)

‘Grey Larch’ wooden flooring, £141.51 per square metre, Element 7 (element7.co.uk)

4

‘Platinum Pale’ emulsion, £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Fired Earth (firedearth.com)

7

TROPICAL CALM

Coral tones and celadon might at first seem unlikely bedfellows, but this combination is cropping up all over town. It works because the fire of the coral is balanced by the cool blue green

Accessories, from left ‘The Dots’ coat hooks (three pictured) by Lars Tornøe for Muuto, from £16 each, Utility Design (utilitydesign.co.uk). Coral fringing, £5.64 per metre, MacCulloch & Wallis (macculloch.london) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 119


Trends | D E C O R A T I N G

‘MAPPERTON’ BY SANDERSON

This understated but beautiful wallpaper has a fine filigree floral pattern that’s a muted nod to spring’s botanical trend. It looks especially glorious in this punchy coral colourway. £54 per ten-metre roll (sanderson-uk.com)

120 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

ED


Paint | D E C O R A T I N G

T H E 12 P A I N T B R A N D S YO U N E E D T O K N OW Baffled by the sheer number of options available? Here, we share the insider info on paint brands both big and small, and explain each one’s unique selling point

2 MYL ANDS

The professional’s favourite that’s still made in London

‘Kasbouri No.1’

1 EMERY & CIE

WORDS: SARAH SLADE, CHARLOTTE BROOK

The luxury brand beloved for its chalky, textural paints

Why should I choose it? This is the go-to brand for extraordinarily chalky-matt paints in potent shades. For emerald and botanical greens, Emery & Cie is top of the class. Each colour is taken from real life – whether the specific hue of 14th-century Chinese celadon pots, the appearance of the water in a canal or a Belgian pale winter sky. The brand has just withdrawn all gloss paints from its collection after discovering a new varnish which, when painted over its matt paints, produces a far more striking effect. What’s its story? The Belgian firm was founded over 20 years ago by architect and designer Agnés Emery, an interiors polymath whose achievements include time spent restoring Art Nouveau interiors and painting original murals. Emery remains the brand’s main designer, and describes her aesthetic as somewhere ‘between Baroque and minimalism’. Did you know? The Emery & Cie website sells hard-to-find tiles that are the perfect decorating foil to the powdery surface of the brand’s paints. £22 per litre (emeryetcie.com).

Why should I choose it? Since 1884, Mylands has been the go-to for London’s interior decorators and the film and theatre industry. It only opened its business to the consumer market in 2012, when it launched its ‘Colours of London’ palette. What’s its story? In 1884, ‘Honest’ John Myland opened his first shop in Lambeth, London, selling French polishes, distempers, varnishes, oils and pigments. He quickly drew praise for the quality of his materials and set up a factory to mix bespoke paints. Interior decorators brought along fabrics and wallpapers to be colour matched, while set designers for film and theatre relished in the highly pigmented formula of his paints. Due to the paint’s opacity, it was used to camouflage London’s landmark bridges and buildings during World War II. In 1985 the business was given a coveted Royal Warrant. Today it is one of the only paint brands to still use natural earth pigments. Did you know? All of its paints are inspired by the city of London and made in the capital. The colour palette features 120 shades including ‘Kensington Rose’, and ‘Circle Line’ (above, right). £42 for 2.5 litres (mylands.co.uk) ➤

‘Circle Line’

‘FTT-013’

‘Cadogan Stone’ and ‘Empire Grey’


Paint | D E C O R A T I N G

4 PA I N T & PA P E R L I B R A RY Known for its high-end colours that are easy to use. Bonus: fewer coats required!

Why should I choose it? This 20-year-old company gives more well-known brands a run for their money, with paints that are known for their ease of application. Initially recognised for whites and neutrals – now its ‘Architectural Colours’ range – today it is gaining a reputation for its other beautiful shades. Here are three things you need to know about this firm. It has a closely edited palette This is seen as a selling point, not a drawback. Each hue in the relatively ‘Deep Water modest range of Green’ 180 is carefully considered and always on trend. Its experts are available to help If you are suffering from what Paint & Paper Library term ‘paint analysis paralysis,’ for £180 its colour guru Lisa Mahony will visit your house and devise a scheme specific to your home. It’s just added new colours We love the four easy-on-the-eye neutrals of ‘Porcelain’ and the oriental crimson of ‘Geisha’. £42.40 for 2.5 litres (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Rhubarb’

‘River’

3 BAUWERK

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: PAUL RAESIDE, CHRISTOPHER DRAKE

Love the limewash look? This is the company to know Why should I choose it? If you’re dreaming of the unusual depth and texture of limewashed walls, this Australian brand is the expert. What is limewash? ‘Made from calcium carbonate, a naturally occurring mineral found in limestone and seashells, the beauty of limewash is in the structure of its calcite crystals, which refract light in a completely different way to other paints,’ says Bauwerk’s co-founder Bronwyn Riedel. The brand’s rich limewash pigments are available in colours ranging from smoky shades to opulent jewel tones. What are the benefits of limewash? No toxins or chemicals are required to produce limewash, which means it is the eco-friendly alternative to normal paint as it allows both a house’s walls and its inhabitants to breathe easily. ‘Limewash works with nature rather than against it,’ explains Riedel. What colours are available? Pick from a collection of paints dreamt up by interiors consultant, art director and author Hans Blomquist, including silvery green ‘Tucson’, inspired by the cacti of Arizona and ‘North’, an homage to the northern lights. How do I apply it? Limewash can be applied to rendered brick or plaster, but with the correct undercoat it can also be used on pre-painted walls. Bauwerk’s ‘Medium’ brush (£12) is the obvious tool for the task – it’s made from natural fibres that distribute the paint evenly. For masterclasses on applying limewash, watch Bauwerk’s how-to videos online. From £60 for four litres (bauwerkcolour.co.uk).

1

2

3

‘Plimsoll’, ‘Georgetown’ and ‘Wattle V’

‘Monfleur’, ‘Barcelona Orange’ and ‘Provence’

5 ANNIE SLOAN The chalk paint pioneer’s range is versatile and easy to use

Why should I choose it? Annie Sloan has been a household name in interior design since 1990, when she invented her versatile ‘Chalk Paint’. Originally a decorative paint designed for furniture, wood and metal, today there’s a wall range to match. What is ‘Chalk Paint’? Celebrated for its versatility, ‘Chalk Paint’ can be watered down to make a wash for a distressed look on floorboards, or thickened into a viscous impasto by leaving the lid off. Use it to give vintage furniture a speedy update – it doesn’t require any preparatory priming or sanding – and try mixing colours together (Sloan’s website says they won’t become ‘dead or muddy’). The wall paints leave a soft, velvety finish on surfaces. In May, six new colours will join the ten existing wall paints: most dramatic of the hues are the ‘Amsterdam Green’ and crimson ‘Emperor’s Silk’. Did you know? Sloan’s eponymous brand sells more than just paint. Expect to find everything a DIY decorative painter will need, from wax, lacquer, gilding materials and craqueleur ‘Graphite’ (which gives an antique-style cracked varnish finish), to brushes, stencils and more than 25 how-to books with tips and techniques. From £18.95 per litre (anniesloan.com). ➤ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 125


Paint | D E C O R A T I N G

7 DULUX

The smart and affordable choice for colour matching

‘Biron Gray’, bespoke shade for the Rodin Museum

6 FA R ROW & BA L L

WORDS: RACHEL WARD, CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: JAMES MERRELL, PATRICK TOUHNEBOEUF

The trend-setting company that’s perfected heritage shades Why should I choose it? For its rich hues made using traditional formulas. While other manufacturers found recognition creating modern acrylic paints, Farrow & Ball continued to use natural raw materials, establishing a sense of history. In the early 1990s, the company developed a range of shades for National Trust properties, and its paint has been used in productions of Pride and Prejudice and Bleak House. What’s its story? The company was founded in 1946 by John Farrow, an industrial chemist, and Richard Ball, an engineer, who met while working at a clay pit after World War II. They built the first Farrow & Ball factory in

Verwood, Dorset, fulfilling important contracts for the likes of Ford Motors, the Admiralty and the War Office. A factory fire, which forced a move to the current site at Uddens Estate near Wimborne in the 1970s, preceded an uneventful couple of decades that proved to be fundamental to the brand’s current success. Historical decorator Tom

Why should I choose it? Dulux can create a paint to match any hue your heart desires. It’s also one of the most digitally savvy companies: its website is incredibly user-friendly and its clever app, Dulux Visualiser, superimposes any paint shade onto a photo of the room you are planning to repaint, so that you get an idea of how it might look before you even think about picking up a brush. Here are four things that you might not know about this superbrand. The name Dulux is a hybrid of ‘DuPont’ (the US chemical manufacturer that first invented an enamel paint formula as a motor body parts varnish) and ‘Luxury’. The first ‘off-the-shelf’ colour Following the introduction of British Standard colours in the 1930s, the first shade Dulux sold was ‘Sky Blue’. The advertising campaigns Dulux was the first paint brand to advertise on TV. The story goes that the advert director’s Old English Sheepdog kept running onto set, and in the end they let it stay. The shaggy breed has become synonymous with Dulux. Gloss is back! ‘The new solvent-free formula makes it easier than ever to apply, and the mid-century modern look – where gloss was king – is re-entering the mainstream,’ says creative director Marianne Shillingford. From £19.99 for 2.5 litres (dulux.co.uk). ➤

1

2 3

4

‘Salon Drab’ and ‘Yeabridge Green’

‘Maritime Teal’

Helme and financier Martin Ephson took over in the 1990s, heralding the beginning of the aspirational brand we know today. Did you know? Farrow & Ball only ever has 132 colours in its palette at any time, archiving shades to make way for new collections, which they launch every two to three years. Its colours are mostly named after places, people or nature; for example, ‘Mizzle’, a green pigment, is inspired by the West Country word for mist and drizzle. £39.50 for 2.5 litres (farrow-ball.com).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 127


Paint | D E C O R A T I N G

‘Owen’s Teal’

9 C A PA RO L ICONS

New to the UK, this set of colours mixes modern and retro

8 CROWN

The professionals’ choice for hardwearing, pure white paint Why should I choose it? Head to Crown to find no-fuss, hardwearing and long-lasting emulsions. Its ‘Pure Brilliant White’ is the basic favoured by tradespeople for its great coverage and affordability. Here are four things you might not know about Crown. It first set up shop in 1777 At the beginning it was known as Dob Meadows Print Shop and was located in Lancashire, where its headquarters and paint production factory have remained ever since. During the 1800s the brand invented new wallpaper production techniques, including a calico paper printing machine that created the first papers for the likes of Anaglypta. Crown’s paints did National Service During World War I, it provided varnish for bullets, and in World War II it supplied blackout, reflective and camouflage paints for the British forces. Its product was also used to create the demarcation stripes on the planes involved in the D-Day landings. It’s made by Royal appointment Crown has held a coveted Royal Warrant as official paint supplier to the Queen since 1955. The colour trend to watch is navy blue ‘Dark colours are set to become ever more popular,’ says Crown’s colour consultant Judy Smith. ‘Charcoal or deep blue can give a room a feeling of sophistication, and work surprisingly well in a small area too, giving it a sense of grandeur.’ £22.50 for 2.5 litres (crownpaints.co.uk).

1

2 3

4

128 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

‘Ode To Joy’

10 V & A P A I N T

The way to bring a museum-quality palette into your home Why should I choose it? In an entrepreneurial first, the Victoria and Albert Museum is launching a luxury interior paint range available for the public to buy in shades inspired by the gallery’s own walls, and its exhibits. The collection has been produced by 120-year-old British manufacturer Master Paintmakers for the Museum. What are the paints like? The label launches with the ‘Classic Paint Collection’, consisting of 40 hues inspired by the V&A’s history, architecture and interior. An opulent stand-out is the deep sea-green ‘Owen’s Teal’, which echoes the decorative ‘Parchment’ flourishes put in the Museum’s early Indian, Chinese and Japanese Rooms by designer Owen Jones, who once quipped that ‘Form without colour is like a body without a soul’. We also like grey-white ‘Trajan’s Column’, named after the Museum’s supersized plaster cast of Rome’s 1st-century commemorative pillar. All colours are available in matt emulsion, eggshell, gloss and masonry. Where can I buy them? In the V&A’s museum shop or online. Want to see the paints in situ? Some have already been used on the gallery’s interiors – such as ‘Grand Entrance’, a soft welcoming white used in the magnificent domed lobby. £36 for 2.5 litres (vandapaint.com). ➤

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY

‘Lemon Squash’

Why should I choose it? Designed with young families in mind, the new Caparol Icons paints are 100 per cent child-safe, completely solvent free and odourless. In fact, they’ve been awarded the highest grade by Germany’s eco standards for paint. What’s its story? Caparol is one of Germany’s leading paint makers, and it has just created the Caparol Icons brand, a bijou collection of 120 colours developed specifically for a cool, design savvy crowd. The brand’s team of designers, trend forecasters and art historians delved into the history books to develop a colour palette that reflects the iconic moments, people and phenomena from the 1950s onwards. What this translates into is a set of slightly retro colour collections that are perfect for a modern setting. ‘Capacany’ Did you know? The quirky names given to each shade provide a sense of this paint giant’s new approach, which puts mood above tonal variation. There’s a sunny ‘Flower Power’ yellow, a rich ‘Tribute to Vinyl’ grey-black and a soothing ‘Surf’s Up’ blue. Where to buy You heard it here first: Caparol Icons has only just become available in the UK and is not stocked here as of yet, so get in touch directly with Caparol for paint samples and to arrange shipping (caparol.de).


Paint | D E C O R A T I N G

11 R E S S O U R C E PEINTURES The insiders’ secret, this firm still makes all of its paints in Provence

130 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

‘Celestial Blue’

12 L I T T L E GREENE The old favourite with cutting-edge green credentials Why should I choose it? Little Greene is known for its strong eco credentials. The company’s water-based paints carry the industry’s best eco rating; the tins are made from more than 50 per cent recycled steel; and for every tree used to make its wallpapers another four are planted. What’s its story? The earliest records of the Little Greene Dye Works on the outskirts of Manchester date back to 1720 – the Earl of Derby granted it rights as a ‘house producing colours’ later in the 18th century. It is believed that Little Greene’s ‘Chocolate’ shade was used for composer George Frideric Handel’s front door while ‘Invisible Green’ was popularised by Georgian gardener Humphry Repton, who recommended it to help fences blend into surrounding foliage. The original Little Greene paints used natural resins and pigments combined with clean Pennines water, and many of those early ingredients are still used in the company’s formulae today, having proven to be safer and better quality than their synthetic counterparts. Little Greene is still a family-run business – its paints and wallpapers are made in the UK near the original Collyhurst Wood site. Did you know? Little Greene’s ‘Flying Chips’ are the only colour cards printed without a white border, making it easier to compare shades against fabric, wallpaper and other paint samples. £38 for 2.5 litres (littlegreene.com). E D

‘Invisible Green’

WORDS: KATIE TREGGIDEN, CHARLOTTE BROOK

Why should I choose it? As well as having innovative in-house ‘colour archaeologist’ Patrick Baty, the firm collaborates with supercool French creatives with a special interest in colour. ‘Reine’ The ‘Itinéraires’ collection is the result of approaching four design folk living in different cities – such as Nantes and Marseille – to create a palette of shades for each cityscape. Interior designer Nathalie Rives conjours up Lyon with peaty ‘Brown Whisky’, ‘Bleu Velours’ and the plummy ‘Rouge Ébène’. What’s its story? One of the last independent paint manufacturers in France, Ressource Peintures is a direct descendant of the Société Provençale du Blanc Fixe Ocres et Couleurs, a paint brand created in 1946. Located near the ochre quarries of Roussillon in France, the company has long been using this natural material to make its paints. Did you know? The brand’s paints are made with pigments mined straight from the earth, which means they are more natural than most: all of Ressource Peinture’s tints contain less than half the maximum allowed amount of VOC (nasty solvents released into the air as a paint dries). Order colour cards from the Paris store. From £26.80 per litre (ressource-peintures.com).


The dramatic interior of this Milanese apartment is inspired by the on-trend lacquer-red inside a beloved Chinese cabinet

Words NELL CARD Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


Entrance Inspired by the red lacquer interior of their Chinese cabinet (opposite), the homeowners painted this space in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Radicchio’. A rug from Alberto Levi Gallery adds a shot of colour to the black floorboards. The sideboard is a Mongolian design Stockist details on p245 ➤


Dining room Painted Farrow & Ball’s ‘Down Pipe’, this space features a 1920s chandelier by Venini and director-style dining chairs from McGuire. The Chinese bamboo rug beneath the vintage dining table is from Alberto Levi Gallery in Milan Stockist details on p245


n the long, low-lit hallway of Simona Molinari and Gianluca Zammarchi’s apartment is a small alcove that has been hand-painted with black and white stripes. ‘We call it the circus wall,’ says Simona, a professional jazz singer. It displays a collection of photographs that depict the life of a Romanian circus troupe. ‘I wanted to devote a corner of the house to these nomadic artists.’ It is here that she’s placed the Chinese cabinet that once belonged to Gianluca’s mother. The deep red lacquer that decorates its interior provided the starting point for this home’s bold décor. The apartment is located in the Piazza Duse, a small historic square in central Milan. The owners, who have an 18-month-old daughter, Anita, bought the 200-square-metre property in 2014 and spent five months renovating it. They replaced both bathrooms, built a music studio in what was the main bedroom, and knocked through an internal wall to allow some light to pass into the hallway, which runs like a blood-red artery through the interior. ‘The house doesn’t get that much light, so we had the idea of creating this theatrical atmosphere,’ says Simona. Taking the Chinese red lacquer as inspiration, the walls and internal doors of the hallway are painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Radicchio’. ‘The colour is warm and relaxing. It reminds me of Parisian and Asian jazz clubs.’ The red continues through to the main bedroom. ‘We’ve taken it across the ceiling. It makes the room look like a womb. We are like babies when we go to bed,’ she adds. The rest of the apartment is painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Down Pipe’ – a dark grey that allows the couple’s unique collections to shine. ‘We love to mix up styles,’ says Gianluca. ‘We have Asian artefacts from the 17th-century, Eames chairs that were once my mother’s, Ikea cabinets and Art Deco rugs. Some things are affordable, some valuable – we just pull together all of the things we love.’ ➤

‘Chinese red reminds me of

Parisian and Asian jazz clubs’


This page The handpainted decorative panel was bought from an antiques dealer in Milan and covers a recessed cupboard containing glassware. The linen curtains are from Ikea Opposite Simona’s collection of vinyls and CDs are displayed on custom-built iron shelves Stockist details on p245 ➤


Dark grey walls allow the couple’s unique

collections to shine


‘We couldn’t paint

the entire house in such a vivid red – that would be mad’

Living room A Flexform sofa is joined by two antique leather armchairs designed in the 1940s. The Berber rug was bought in Morocco (try Yonder Living). A large gold Japanese picture depicting Mount Fuji hangs above the fireplace and the room also features a piece by Italian artist Turcato and an artwork by Canadian painter Graham Gillmore (opposite) Stockist details on p245 ➤


Kitchen Modern gloss-white cabinetry stands out against the wall and bookcase painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Down Pipe’ emulsion, which also features in the living room Stockist details on p245 ➤


‘The red makes the room look like a womb.

We are like babies

when we go to bed’


Bedroom The wall hanging behind the bed dates from the 18th century. The Chinese bedside tables (detail opposite) are also antiques. For a similar faux fur throw, try John Lewis Stockist details on p245 E D


T E R R AC O T TA TA K E OV E R Terracotta has been a design staple for 5,000 years, and now, mixed with powder pink, dove grey, metals and stone, it’s the new/old interiors material du jour Words KASSIA ST CLAIR Photography LACHAN MOORE Styling STUDIO MOORE

What is terracotta? The word terracotta is a conjoining of two Italian ones, literally translating as ‘baked earth’. And so it is: a generally unglazed porous ceramic so humdrum and established that it has long since lent its name to the colour it turns after firing. This shade, so familiar from roofs and plant pots, is a beautiful – if roomy – one, encompassing a plethora of tints between pinkish brown, burnt orange and washed-out brick red. The precise shade is determined during firing, when the iron content of the clay reacts with oxygen at high temperatures (generally between 600 and 1,000 degrees).


Opposite, from left ‘Neu 10’ chair by Hay, £265, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). Wire bin by Norm Architects for Menu, £79.95, Clippings (clippings.com). ‘Mason Marble’ pendant light, £248, Lightly (lightly.com.au). ‘Otway’ dining table by Archier, from £1,302, Handkrafted (handkrafted.com). Terracotta pitcher, £58, Another Country (anothercountry.com). ‘Stone’ candleholder, from £50, Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). Planter, from £55, Anchor Ceramics (anchorceramics.com). Copper ‘Mini Jack’ paperweight, £75, Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). Salad bowl, £54, The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com). ‘Thin Black Table’ side table (on table) by Nendo for Cappellini, £1,000, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Muffin’ table light by Brokis, £462.40, Nest (nest.co.uk) This page, from left Grey salad bowl, £54; ‘Pepperino Capestrelli’ wooden board by Arteveneta, from £33; long tasting spoon, £8.51, all The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com). ‘Cheese Paddle’ marble chopping board by Marble Basics, £55, Casetta Living (casettaliving.com). Wooden teaspoon, for similar try Forest & Found (forest-and-found.com). ‘Stone Fossil’ trivet, £36, Safari Living (safariliving.com). ‘Blackwood’ salad server, £23 for a set, The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com). Small plate in ‘Smoke’ by Norm Architects for Menu, £18, Really Well Made (reallywellmade.co.uk) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 147


TERRACOTTA TAKEOVER The history of terracotta Terracotta has long been a global material because it is so simple to make. Often it is a workhorse, used to cater to fundamental human needs – tiles for shelter, vessels for food and water – but it has also served as a medium for creativity and ingenuity. The earliest known examples of terracotta are some small figures from Greece dating from the early Bronze Age, around 3,000BC. Human statuettes made of the stuff were common all over the ancient world, cropping up in Cyprus, Minoan Crete, Greece, Asia Minor, Pakistan and China. And of course it was the material used to create the 8,000-strong Terracotta Army, that marvel of funerary art made for Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China in the late third century BC. From left ‘Cork Cone’ desk accessory by Daniel Emma for Hay, £19, Liberty (libertylondon.com). Terracotta planter, from £55, Anchor Ceramics (anchorceramics.com). Mug, for similar try Trouva (trouva.com). Jar, for similar try Hend Krichen (hendkrichen.com). ‘Stone Fossil’ trivet, £36, Safari Living (safariliving.com). Copper box, for similar try Tiipoi (tiipoi.com). Vase, for similar try Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk)

Terracotta paints to try ‘Terracotta Pot’ emulsion, £36 for two litres, Paint by Conran (paintbyconran.com)

• •

‘Tuscan Terracotta’ emulsion, £19.99 for 2.5 litres, Dulux (dulux.co.uk)

PRODUCT PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

‘Firenze’ emulsion, 19.50 for 0.94 litres, Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com)


From top ‘Phi’ scissors by Hay, £25, Trouva (trouva.com). Copper boxes, for similar try Tiipoi (tiipoi.com). ‘Gold Dot’ water glass by Scholten & Baijings for Hay, £11, Unique & Unity (uniqueandunity.co.uk). Small plate in ‘Smoke’ by Norm Architects for Menu, £18, Really Well Made (reallywellmade.co.uk). Hexagon trivet by Fort Standard, £88, Douglas and Bec (douglasandbec.com). Fork, £6, The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com). Ceramic bangle by Jujumade, from £56.28, Sword + Fern (swordandfern.com). Slate platter by Norm Architects for Menu, £16.50, Connox (connox.co.uk). ‘Chunk’ copper candleholder by Andreas Engesvik for Menu, £36.95, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Unstackable Lens Storage Box’ box and lid by Thomas Jenkins for Hay, from £49, Amara (amara.com). Small bangle, as before. ‘Cheese Paddle No.7’ round wooden board, £73, The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com). ‘One Stone’ grey salt cellar by Norman Says for Muuto, £24.50, Panik (panik-design.com). Plate by Shelley Panton, £36, The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 149


TERRACOTTA TAKEOVER HOT BUYS FROM BRITISH DESIGNERS

Hand & Eye Studio Terracotta pendant lights, from £215 each (handandeyestudio.co.uk)

Hend Krichen Ceramic and copper drinking container, £125 (hendkrichen.com)

Reiko Kaneko Glazed bowl, from £52; glazed plate, from £46 (reikokaneko.co.uk)

From left ‘Chariot’ bar cart by Gam Fratesi for Casamania, £1,895, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). Marble canister, for similar try Holly’s House (hollys-house.com). Storage box by Thomas Jenkins for Hay, from £49, Amara (amara.com). ‘Bottle’ grinder by Norm Architects for Menu, £45 for a pair, Heal’s (heals.com). Copper box, for similar try Tiipoi (tiipoi.com). Jug , for similar try Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). Tealight holder, for similar try Nordic House (nordichouse.co.uk). Brass mobile, for similar try Ladies And Gentlemen Studio (ladiesandgentlemenstudio.com)


How to work terracotta today Given its lineage, perhaps it’s only fair that terracotta is now being reconsidered after a generation of being passé. The material itself has warmth and humility, and is able to offset luxe fabrics and metallic flourishes; it is more flexible than brick and white tiles, and softer than concrete. Creatives using it in the UK include ceramicist Reiko Kaneko, lighting designers Hand & Eye Studio and fellow London brand Hend Krichen, which has fashioned it into minimal, modern objects, from tableware to lighting. The wealth of choice out there proves that even after 5,000 years, the only limit to its use is imagination. From left ‘Uncino Version B’ chair, £968; ‘Osso’ pink chair, £706, both by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, Nest (nest.co.uk). ‘Flip Around’ side table by Norm Architects for Menu, £150, Made In Design (madeindesign.co.uk). ‘Eclipse’ wall light, from £436, Inkster (inksterprojects.com). ‘Chariot’ bar cart by Gam Fratesi for Casamania, £1,895, Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk). Ceramic jug , for similar try Sue Pryke (suepryke.com). ‘Tela’ glass carafe by Silo Studio for Hay, £39, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Bottle’ stoppered carafe, £50; ‘Bottle’ grinder, £45 for a pair, both by Norm Architects for Menu, Heal’s (heals.com). Storage jar, for similar try Hend Krichen (hendkrichen.com). Marble canister, for similar try Holly’s House (hollys-house.com). Copper box, for similar try Tiipoi (tiipoi.com) E D

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 151


From sea greens to swathes of oak, natural colours and textures bring calm to hectic family life in this London home, inspired by its charming English country garden Words KERRYN FISCHER /FRANK FEATURES

Photography LUKE WHITE


UTILITY CHIC ‘From the outset I wanted to create a kitchen reminiscent of a dairy. It has a tactile oak kitchen counter, raw steel larder doors, waxed oak cabinetry and glazed green Mexican tiles.’ The kitchen was designed by Hubert Zandberg Interiors, and the wall tiles are from Milagros. Industrial lamps from Andrew Nebbett Antiques provide task lighting above the counter. The bar stools are from London’s Columbia Road market and the kitchen taps are from The Water Monopoly. Stockist details on p245


he home of British fashion editor Deborah Hubert created different ‘experiences’ within each of the rooms Brett and her film director husband Tom Edmunds of the house, to reflect their function, but they are all underpinned is warm, welcoming and effortlessly glamorous – by the palette of green and blue. The colour experience starts in the much like Deborah herself, who is a senior hallway, which is defined by soft French blue wallpaper and contributing editor at Red magazine and online title Wardrobe woodwork, and becomes more intense in the kitchen-living space, Icons, as well as a founding member of The Fashion Trust, where the predominant tone is forest green. The dining room is an a mentoring scheme for new British design talent. airy pause before the dark drama of the décor in The couple share their home with their three ‘I I’m ob bsesseed with the cinema and gym on the lower basement levels. children – Phineas (eight), Hermione (six) and accentuated the darkness by creating a sense reen n and d lo oveed the ‘We Ottilie (three) – and Beckett the cat. ‘Tom and gr of old-world charm – one of descending “below I lived in the house quite happily for ten years ide ea of usiingg co olour stairs” in a grand mansion.’ To this end, you’ll find before we became a family,’ Deborah says. ‘But wooden bars in the gym, a wall of threeo lin nk thee diff ffeerent vintage once the children came along we needed more of to dimensional rosewood panelling in the cinema, an open-plan flow. We wanted a fuss-free, homely sp pacees,, an nd to bring and a glass-backed cocktail bar. It all works space where we could entertain, but also one and allows for a sense of privacy in n th h e m agn nifi ficent wonderfully where the kids could jump on the sofas, build without compromising the family-friendly feel. cushion forts and play table tennis tournaments viiew w off th he garrden’ hzinteriors.com without inflicting too much damage.’ The plan to reorder the ground floor became a major project, and the couple has since extended the old basement level to the full footprint of the house and excavated a second basement level. ‘We now have a flat for our nanny, a guest toilet, a utility room, a gym and games room, as well as the most wonderful bar and wood-panelled cinema.’ London-based South African interior designer Hubert Zandberg was commissioned to bring their ideas for the décor to life. ‘We’ve long loved his irreverent, energetic and highly textural aesthetic,’ Deborah says. The vibrant greens used throughout were inspired by a fern-print fabric designed by fashion duo Clements Ribeiro. ‘They are dear friends of mine, and so they kindly agreed to print some extra fabric for us to upholster the armchair and footstool in the living room,’ Deborah says. This, together with the Fermoie cotton that Deborah wanted to use as curtains in the living areas, sets the tone. Hubert’s own signature style is betrayed in the mix of pieces taken from disparate design eras and genres: a 1960s Italian bamboo chair sits beside industrial shelving filled with Belgian, British and Moroccan ceramics. ‘There’s a slight retro feel to the space, but it’s held together by the predominance of natural materials,’ he says.

FAMILY TIME An aged oak herringbone floor by Walking on Wood flows throughout the openplan living area. The armchair and footstool are upholstered in fern fabric by Clements Ribeiro. The shelving was sourced from Clignancourt flea market, Paris, while the high-backed bamboo chair was unearthed at a market in Belgium. At the window hangs a length of pale green ‘Barmillion’ fabric by Fermoie. The green Moroccan vases on the shelving unit were picked up at Habibi Interiors. Stockist details on p245 ➤


‘H Hubeert’’s déccor has made our ho ouse intiimatte an nd ho omely. It’s enhan nced d thee wa ay tha at we liive. This is a placce wheree we shut the doorr and d esccape’

EASY ENTERTAINING The galvanised zinc dining table from Andrew Nebbett Antiques is overlooked by a large industrialstyle ceiling light from Clignancourt market in Paris. The fabric used for the blind is ‘York Stripe’ by Fermoie, and the scatter cushions are a mix of Fermoie’s ‘Contrast Piped’ linen; ‘Mekong’ fabric by Studio Four NYC; and Paolo Moschino’s ‘Twig Fence’ (available in the UK from Nicholas Haslam). Stockist details on p245 ➤


‘We wanted a fuss-free space where we could entertain, but also one where the kids could jump on the sofas and build cushion forts’


STAR ROLE ‘We viewed the basement like a film set, a place where we could create a glorious, magical place.’ An entire wall of the cinema is clad in rosewood panelling that was inspired by Brazilian Modernism. ‘The ceiling wallpaper resembles carved Modernist plasterwork – of course it’s not, but when you are in the room it’s extremely convincing,’ says Hubert. In fact it is covered in a three-dimensional ‘Geo’ wallpaper by Ella Doran, which creates a carved plaster effect. Stockist details on p245 ➤ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 159


1

3

THE PALETTE The paints and patterns in this home’s main living space are inspired by a single fern-print fabric. Here’s everything you need to know to get the look

2

12

11

Detail Chair and footstool covered in ‘Fern Print’ by Clements Ribeiro Guest bathroom The multi-coloured wall tiles are by Fired Earth and the wall lights are by Habibi Interiors Stockist details on p245


4

5

6

8

7

9

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS STYLING: MOLLY HUTCHINSON

10

1 ‘Ifran’ tiles, £450 per square metre, Habibi Interiors (habibi-interiors.com) 2 ‘Special Green’ brick tiles, 70p each, Milagros (milagros.co.uk) 3 ‘Mogador’ fabric in ‘Agave’, £130 per metre, Lelievre (lelievre.eu) 4 ‘Barmillion’ fabric in ‘L-057’, £96 per metre, Fermoie (fermoie.com) 5 ‘Paris Cabaret’ tiles in Opal and Sage, £792 per square metre, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 6 ‘Fern Print’ fabric, £78 per metre, Clements Ribeiro (clementsribeiro.com) 7 ‘Fame’ fabric, £123 per metre, Lizzo (lizzo.net) 8 ‘Mekong Stripe’ fabric in Emerald, £243 per metre, Studio Four NYC (studiofournyc.com) 9 ‘Windsor’ fabric,£158 per metre, Lizzo (lizzo.net) 10 Oak flooring, from £222 per square metre, Walking on Wood (walkingonwood.co.uk) 11 ‘New York State of Mind’ paint, £19.50 for 0.94 litres, Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoorepaint.com) 12 ‘Dix Blue’ paint, £43.50 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 161


‘We accentuated the darkness by creating a sense of old-world charm – one of descending “below stairs” in a grand mansion’


CLASSIC CHARM The dÊcor in the gym has old-school appeal and offers an experience rather than a purely functional room. Where possible, the designer used wood and leather, and sourced vintage sporting equipment from a Brussels ea market (1st Dibs has various pieces). The oak mirrors, weight racks and wooden gym bars were custom-designed by Hubert Zandberg Interiors, and are offset to perfection by the petrol blue wall colour, a custom-mixed shade. Stockist details on p245 E D


It’s time to embrace rich textures and shiny metallics for a decadent look that packs a punch. Think sumptuous velvet upholstery, statement rugs and strong colours

STYLING ASSISTANT: ALICE FOLEY

Photography BEN ANDERS Styling AMANDA SMITH-CORSTON


Opposite, from left 1950s mirror, £960, Fiona McDonald (fionamcdonald.com). Green velvet stool by Roberto Lazzeroni for the ‘Mood’ collection by Flexform, £1,357, Staffan Tollgård (tollgard.co.uk). Console table, £987, Handvärk (handvark.com). ‘Dim’ blue and brass vase by Dimore Studio, £860, Bitossi Ceramiche (bitossihome.it). Vintage glass dish and vase, £30 each, Absolute Flowers (absoluteflowersandhome.com). Artwork, £450, Liza Giles (lizagiles.com). ‘Crowd’ candleholders by David Taylor, from £48 each, New Works (newworks.dk). Clay sculpture by Martin Pearce, £550, 12 Thirteen Store (12-thirteenstore.com) This page, from left ‘Penta’ silk rug, £12,480, Vanderhurd (vanderhurd.com). ‘TS’ coffee table by Gam Fratesi for Gubi, £579, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Boccia’ jug by Atipico, £112, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Light Colore’ tumbler by Mist-o for Ichendorf Milano, £13.50, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). Brass and chrome trolley, £1,200, Absolute Flowers (absoluteflowersandhome.com). ‘Gear’ gold candleholders, from £35 each, New Works (newworks.dk). Vintage vases (three pictured), from £30 each, Absolute Flowers (absoluteflowersandhome.com). Serving tray by Hay, £25; ‘Angolo’ green tumblers by Atipico, £19 each, all Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Newman’ sofa, £3,400, Munna (munnadesign.com). Cushions covered in ‘Alexander’ velvet, £200 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) ➤


THE NEW ELEGANCE Opposite, from left ‘Enoki’ side table by Philipp Mainzer for E15, £2,850, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Lady’ vintage chair by Marco Zanuso, £1,650, Clerkenwell London (clerkenwell-london.com); find a new version at Cassina (cassina.com). ‘Forma’ woven cushion by AYTM, £89, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). Artwork, £1,500, Liza Giles (lizagiles.com). ‘Mategot’ trolley by Mathieu Matégot for Gubi, £637, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). On trolley, from top ‘Bolo’ black and blue vase by Ettore Sottsass, £257, Bitossi Ceramiche (bitossiceramiche.it). ‘Strike’ matchbox by Hay, £3, SCP (scp.co.uk). Vintage tray, £40; decanter and glasses, £45, all Absolute Flowers (absoluteflowersandhome.com). Salt and pepper shakers by House Doctor, £30, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Boccia’ jug, £112; ‘Angolo’ carafe, £99, both by Atipico, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Light Colore’ tumblers by Mist-o for Ichendorf Milano, £13.50 each, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Perspective’ rug, £804 per square metre, Vanderhurd (vanderhurd.com) This page, from left ‘Laurent 05’ pendant light by Lambert & Fils, from £1,575, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). Trolley and tableware, as above ➤


THE NEW ELEGANCE Opposite, from left Velvet curtains, £1,150, Nest (nestdesign.co.uk). ‘Giudecca’ rug by Zanellato & Bortotto for CC Tapis, £4,150, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Beetle’ chairs by Gam Fratesi for Gubi, £758 each, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Tulip’ table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, £4,198, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Curve’ cup and saucer, £46, Custhom (custhom.co.uk). Carafe, £99; tumblers, £19 each, both by Atipico; tray by Hay, £25, all Monologue (monologuelondon.com). Plate, £36.50, Custhom (custhom.co.uk). ‘Beehive’ pendant light by Alvar Aalto for Artek, £808, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) Detail, from left Curtain, tableware and chair, as above. ‘Gear’ candleholder by Rikke Frost, £34, New Works (newworks.dk). Bowl by &Klevering, £111, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). Napkin, £7.50, The Linen Works (thelinenworks.co.uk). Salt and pepper shakers by House Doctor, £30, Monologue (monologuelondon.com) ➤


THE NEW ELEGANCE Opposite, from left Vintage 1960s sideboard, £425, Førest (forestlondon.com). ‘Guadeloupe’ green vase by Bethan Laura Wood for Bitossi Ceramiche, £498, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Silje’ rug, £496, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Tanis’ desk by Pierre Paulin, £1,617, Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com). ‘Bestlite BL2’ table light by Robert Dudley Best for Gubi, £475, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘The Golden Rule’ ruler, £15, Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net). ‘Tumbler’ brass alarm clock by Norm Architects for Menu, £119, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Series 430’ velvet chair by Verner Panton for Verpan, £642, Aram Store (aram.co.uk) This page, from left Artwork, £850, Liza Giles (lizagiles.com). ‘Mod 118’ velvet chair by Thayer Coggin, £1,714, Staffan Tollgård (tollgard.co.uk). ‘VV Cinquanta’ floor light by Vittoriano Viganò for Astep, £715, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk) E D


Dining area Jean Prouvé’s ‘EM’ table for Vitra is teamed with chairs by Komplot Design for Gubi. A ‘Cetra’ pendant light by Vico Magistretti for Artemide hangs above. The alcove’s floors and walls are covered in yellow vinyl by Bolon Stockist details on p245 ➤


SPOTLIGHT ON COLOUR The vibrant yellow in this Turin apartment helps to highlight its unique layout. Here, its architect owners inspire us to be bold

Words KARINE MONIÉ Photography SERENA ELLER/VEGA MG


, TION A R O DEC ELPS ME’ O S A H R D TH NDE OL THA S IN OU E T IN E UST URAL TO E SPAC J T E NO CHITECT TLINE TH R A S R U OUR E AN A ARLY O L O R C E ‘THE THEY A S TO CL U


T

he apartment of SCEG Architects’ Eirini Giannakopoulou and Stefano Carera is testament to what two rising stars of architecture can achieve with space and colour. Located in the Lingotto district of Turin, this 90-square-metre home is shared with the couple’s one-year-old son, Nicola. The block was built in 1913 on the old industrial site that once housed the Fiat car factory; more recently, Italian architect Renzo Piano has transformed the area into a shopping mall and exhibition centre. It is the couple’s close proximity to this urban bustle that inspired the circular layout of the apartment. ‘We have direct views of the street from three windows and from two balconies, so this became a reference for the design,’ says Stefano. The entrance leads directly into communal areas – the studio, kitchen and living room – while the bedrooms are cocooned at the heart of the property. ‘Our home is unpredictable! When you first walk around it, you discover one room after another in the most unexpected way,’ Eirini says. The home’s colourful palette conveys a 1960s/70s vibe. ‘We used colour and materials to create different atmospheres within each space,’ says Stefano. In the living room, the mood is set by a steely tone – ‘Lamp Room Gray’ by Farrow & Ball – that is evocative of its city location. It is broken up by bold hits of vibrant colour, such as the bright yellow which highlights the dining area’s spot within the open-plan living space. In the bedrooms, blues and purples are accompanied by a mustard yellow floor – it’s made of an innovative vinyl, designed by Annica and Marie Eklund for Bolon, that has the look and feel of a textile. ‘The colours are not just intended as decoration, they’re an architectural tool that helps us to clearly outline specific areas,’ says Eirini. The couple also mixed furnishings from the 1970s (the ‘Parentesi’ light by Achille Castiglioni, for example) with classics from the 1950s and 60s (such as the ‘EM’ table by Jean Prouvé), and added some of their own custom-made pieces. ‘We consider furniture to be an integrated part of the project,’ says Stefano. ‘It should express the same design language and complete a home.’ sceg.it

Portrait Homeowners Eirini Giannakopoulou and Stefano Carera Living room The TV unit, benches and sofa were designed by the homeowners. They sit beside classic pieces, from the ‘Gräshoppa’ floor lamp by Greta Grossman for Gubi to the orange plastic coffee table by Giotto Stoppino for Kartell Stockist details on p245 ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 175


Kitchen Blocks of orange break up the linear cabinetry, while a white glass worktop and glossy handleless cupboard doors reflect light into the narrow space. The ‘M68’ ceiling lamp by Miguel Milá for Santa & Cole continues this home’s retro look Studio A wall of bespoke storage with a built-in desk is teamed with ‘Masculo’ chairs by Gam Fratesi for Gubi. Task lighting is provided by Artemide’s ‘Nesso’ table lamp Stockist details on p245 ➤


‘O

UR

HO DI YOU ME SC O FI IS U IN VER RST NP TH O WA RED E M NE LK IC OS RO AR TAB T U OM OU LE! NE A ND W H XP FTE EC R A IT, Y EN O TE D NO U W TH AY ER ’ APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 177


‘YELLOW IS OUR FAVOURITE COLOUR BECAUSE IT’S SUNNY AND CREATES AN UPBEAT MOOD. IT WAS AN OBVIOUS CHOICE FOR US’

Bedroom The bed is a bespoke design, dressed with simple Muji cushions. A ‘Dalù’ lamp by Vico Magistretti sits beside it, and an ‘Aggregato Saliscendi’ pendant light by Enzo Mari and Giancarlo Fassina hangs above – both designed for Artemide. The yellow vinyl floor, which also covers the wall of the desk area, is by Bolon Stockist details on p245 ➤


APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 179


Bathroom A sink by Flaminia is set into a custom-designed unit by the homeowners. The wall light above the mirror is by Onefortythree Main bedroom A statement wall painted ‘Hague Blue’ by Farrow & Ball frames the bed and a ‘St Germain’ pendant lamp by Onefortythree hangs alongside. An en suite is tucked in the corner behind transparent screens Stockist details on p245 E D


R WARME SY, D N A S TE A CO OLOUR A C E R R E C G O N T OOMS WHERE ED STRO ‘WE US S IN THE BEDR E THE SPACES Y’ TONE ESE AR URSELF FREEL H T . L E E YO TE F INTIMA CAN EXPRESS YOU


‘GOLDEN TONES ADD A PING TO MY HOME. THEY ARE THE

JEWELLERY THAT DRESSES EACH ROOM’

Flashes of brass and gold bring order and opulence to the Berlin home of collector and interior designer Hubert Zandberg The Berlin apartment of London-based interior architect Hubert Zandberg is an eye-catching space. He is a maximalist at heart (see his Holland Park project on p146), and his view on design is simple: ‘The most beautiful brushstroke is the one that comes from instinct.’ He is a compulsive collector, and his two-bedroom apartment in the creative neighbourhood of Mitte is a veritable curiosity cabinet of the exotic and elegant, all underpinned by luxurious touches of brass and gold. ‘I have always seen myself as more of a collector than a designer,’ says Hubert, whose genius lies in an irreverent style that mixes anything from Modernist design to macabre taxidermy and religious iconography. His collections are so extensive that they fill more than one property (he also has homes in London and Paris), but he continues to add to his treasure trove because new finds create a dialogue with existing pieces. Consequently, his Berlin home brims with South African artworks and cowhides, German lighting and influences from Brazilian architects such as Sérgio Rodrigues and Joaquim Tenreiro. ‘It may seem devilmay-care to mix such disparate elements. But it works,’ he says. Here, Hubert tells us why he has used metallic accents to create focal points in each room, and how they tie his scheme together. hzinteriors.com

Words KERRYN FISCHER/FRANK FEATURES Photography SIMON UPTON


MAKE AN ENTRANCE Set the tone for your scheme in the hallway. Here, a cloakroom door clad in raffia introduces the golden hue that underpins the look of this home. ‘I sourced the raffia from Madwa, a company that is based in Cape Town but manufactures its designs in Madagascar,’ says Hubert. The hallway also features a Jean Prouvé bench (available from 1st Dibs) and an artwork by German artist Dirk Stewen. The 1920s industrial light fitting is a vintage find from a French market. Stockist details on p245 ➤


L AY E R L I G H T I N G Mix vintage and contemporary brass lighting, hung at different heights to create drama. ‘I chose classic designs with counterweight mechanisms that allowed me to alter their height. Table and floor lamps would have been obtrusive in certain areas and the wiring tricky to manage, but pendant lights become sculptures in their own right and echo the brass pieces elsewhere,’ Hubert says. The vintage light that zigzags across the ceiling from the dining area is the ‘Double Posa’ by Florian Schulz (try 1st Dibs). Lukas Peet’s contemporary ‘Rudi Loop’ light for Roll & Hill hangs above the dining table. The leather ‘Fardos’ sofa is by Brazilian Ricardo Fasanello (try 1st Dibs). Much of the other furniture is by fellow Brazilian designer Sérgio Rodrigues. Stockist details on p245 ➤

Hubert’s Berlin home is a curiosity cabinet of the exotic and elegant, all underpinned by luxurious touches of brass and gold

184 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


GO FOR GLAMOUR Think ‘luxe’ when designing a kitchen – the cabinetry should be as beautiful as the rest of the furniture in your home, especially in an open-plan space. In Hubert’s apartment, elegant touches elevate the simple kitchen design. ‘I carved a cubist pattern into the wood of the upper cabinets, which were then covered in gold leaf. The addition brings warmth into the space and references the tribal traditions of African adornment: from brass rings and armbands to the detailing on tribal masks,’ he says. A marble-topped table further enhances the opulent feel.


D E S I G N D E TA I L S GILDED TREASURES

We tell you how to add luxury to your home using gold leaf The material Gold leaf is made of pieces of gold that have been hammered into a thin foil (silver and other metals are also available). It can be bought as transfer sheets within a book or on a roll. Pure gold can be very expensive, especially if you are applying it to large areas, but artificial gold is more affordable and, as it tends to be sold in thicker sheets, can be easier to apply.

‘I have always seen myself more as a collector than a designer. It may seem devil-may-care to mix such disparate elements in my home. But it works’

The preparation Lightly sand the surface that you want to gild. Use a gilders primer as an undercoat – it’s important that the surface is non-porous – in a colour that will act as an undertone for the leaf. Red will create warmth beneath gold, while grey or blue will complement the cooler tones of silver leaf. The application The adhesive used to apply the gold leaf to a surface is called size. It will dry to a tacky consistency within a few hours and, importantly, will stay that way long enough for you to apply the delicate leaf. If you are using transfer leaf, take a sheet out of the booklet and place it face down onto the ‘sized’ area. Gently rub the backing paper to release the gold onto the surface. As you continue gilding, overlap each leaf by about two millimetres. Loose leaf is trickier to handle and requires practice to apply – use a gilders knife to lift each leaf and blow on it to encourage it to lay flat. The trade trick If you are gilding a small area, cut each leaf into small mosaic squares. Dab some Vaseline on to your hand to lift each square and apply with a cotton bud. The finish Leave the gold leaf for a few hours before brushing lightly with a soft gilders brush to produce a burnished finish. 22-carat leaf does not oxidise and, therefore, does not need to be sealed, but a lower quality or artificial foil should be sealed with an acrylic topcoat to prevent tarnishing (try Gold Leaf Supplies). ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 187


ADD SOME POLISH A glint of brass lifts collections of wood and ceramics and can be used to pick out the golden tones in fabrics and upholstery. ‘At first I introduced metallics instinctively, but then it became deliberate as it allowed me to layer the space without everything descending into chaos,’ says Hubert. Here, the gold tones within the upholstery of this 1960s sofa complement the brass ‘Onos 55’ pendant light by Florian Schulz above. The picture on the rear wall is by Puerto Rican artist Gamaliel Rodriguez. ➤

‘At first I introduced metallic touches instinctively, but then it became deliberate as it allowed me to layer the space without everything descending into chaos’

188 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


C O N S I D E R D ETA I L S ‘Brass and golden finishes give each room a ping. They are the jewellery of the house,’ says Hubert. ‘It’s all to do with the glint they create in the eye – the same as you get from the flicker of a candle or the reflection in a mirror. It brings a room to life.’ The jewel in this dark, dramatic library is a brass wall sculpture by Curtis Jeré, which is teamed with a 1970s French coffee table and a sculpture by Brazilian artist Barrão. The sofa and rug are designs by Hubert Zandberg Interiors. E D


HOME COUTURE

Divinely decadent yet utterly ontrend, the Dimore Studio-designed Fendi apartment is the epitome of modern-day luxury Words JACKIE DALY Photography ANDREA FERRARI


T

he aptly named Fendi Privè apartment, reserved only for the most exclusive clients, is the jewel in the crown of the newly remodelled Palazzo Fendi, the Rome headquarters of the Italian luxury fashion house. Designed by Dimore Studio, it resides on the second floor of the grand five-storey, 17th-century building that now also houses Fendi’s largest store, which spans almost 1,003 square metres; its very first boutique hotel, named the ‘Fendi Private Suites’; and, on the rooftop, a new branch of celebrated Japanese restaurant and bar Zuma. American Britt Moran and Italian Emiliano Salci of Dimore Studio were personally selected to design the apartment by Fendi CEO Pietro Beccari and Silvia Venturini Fendi, creative director of accessories and menswear, who wanted to ‘add colour’ to the striking stucco-adorned ‘ We wanted to building. Britt and Emiliano’s response to the brief is sublime: elegantly dressed in sage green preserve and with accents of Dedar fabric framed by the protect the building’s original detailing, the interior is set off by glinting jewels of Murano glass and brass- heritage of accented lighting. ‘We wanted to preserve and the apartment protect the heritage of the apartment, while adding a modern touch,’ the designers say. ‘The while adding metallic accents further embellish the space.’ a modern touch’ At the heart of the apartment is a floor-toceiling iron shelving system inset with colourful slices of mirrored glass. ‘We designed it specifically for Fendi and first presented it at Miami’s design fair in December 2014 as part of a small collection of furnishings. The inspiration for the mirrored glass came from vintage Fendi scarves, folded into triangles.’ Intended to showcase masterpieces of Italian design old and new, the apartment also features scatterings of Venini lights, which are displayed like functional sculptures. Everywhere, design classics are mixed with Dimore Studio’s own custom-made pieces: the brass details, touches of velvet, gold fringing and Fendi mink add to the air of decadence. ‘The aesthetic is luxurious, cosy and intimate,’ say Britt and Emiliano. dimorestudio.eu; fendi.com

194 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


The Dimore Studio-designed oor-to-ceiling iron shelves are inset with coloured mirrored glass in a pattern inspired by folded Fendi scarves ➤


Elegantly dressed in sage green and framed by the building’s original detailing, the interior is set off by glinting jewels of Murano glass and brass


Dimore Studio designed the Pergamena leather-and-brass chandeliers that hang over the table; the stucco walls are punctuated by accents of Dedar’s ‘Dedaedro’ fabric Stockist details on p245 ➤


Intended to showcase masterpieces of Italian design old and new, the apartment is decorated with scatterings of Venini lights and luxurious fabrics by Dedar


The colourful screen behind the sofa is a bespoke creation by Dimore Studio. The walls in this room are lined with deep midnight blue fabric Stockist details on p245 E D


CULTURED CLASH


The Barcelona home of interior designer Damián Sánchez is an inspiring mix of contrasting colours and old cleverly mixed with new Words AMY BRADFORD Photography MONTSE GARRIGA GRAU/PHOTOFOYER

Entrance A table from Spanish design store En Linea (Porro’s ‘Fractal’ is similar) displays a collection of coffee-table books and a ‘Rock’ vase by French ceramicist Gilles Caffier. The chairs are 18th-century Louis XVI pieces and the pendant light is the ‘PH Artichoke’ by Poul Henningsen for Louis Poulsen (available at Skandium). The large fashion shot is by Spanish photographer Nico Bustos and the abstract painting by fellow Spaniard José Guerrero Stockist details on p245 ➤


O

ne day just over ten years ago, while wandering through the medieval Catalan village of Cardedeu, Damián Sánchez spotted a beautiful old house in a state of near ruin, surrounded by ancient magnolia trees. It was love at first sight. Undeterred by its condition, he bought the six-bedroom property and set about restoring its palatial 1,000-square-metre interior. ‘It was built in 1910, and when I first saw it, it hadn’t been lived in for 30 years,’ Damián explains. ‘I have tried to respect its original features as well as its spirit.’ The most spectacular feature, and the one that shaped much of the new interior, is a Renaissancestyle carved and painted ceiling. Its floral design was painstakingly repaired, as were the original floor tiles. Clearly, this charismatic house demanded a strong colour palette, and in Damián it found its ideal owner. A former creative director of fashion label Mango, he founded his Barcelona-based interior design studio and home store A Casa Bianca in 2013, and also co-owns Alfons & Damián, a gallery selling vintage and modern design, with fellow decorator Alfons Tost. At Mango, Damián was in charge of store layouts and window dressing, and he drew on his flair for dramatic set design in his new home. From the start, Damián had a clear idea of the colours he wanted to use on the walls. ‘They reflect my experiences, my travels and my vision of the countryside,’ he says. All of the paints in the house were custom-made, including the aubergine hue that links the marble-floored hallway and gentleman’s club-style games room (dominated by a huge antique snooker table). The azure blue in the dining room and the earthy khaki in the living space are inspired by the local landscape – just 40 kilometres north of Barcelona, Cardedeu is nestled between the mountains and the sea. The colour palette is also a foil for Damián’s extensive collections of art and antiques, which transform rooms that could feel cavernous into intimate zones. Contrast is Damián’s style: he will team a set of 18th-century Swedish chairs with a modern table by Italian label Porro, or place a set of Eames aluminium chairs and a ‘Segmented’ table – more commonly spotted in slick conference rooms – directly beneath the dining room’s oh-so-romantic ceiling. ‘I love to see how well antiques work with modern design objects,’ he says. As you move to the private spaces upstairs, a different mood evolves. The main bedroom and adjoining bathroom are as serene as the dining room is exuberant. A peachy-toned ivory shade on the bedroom walls adds warmth to the otherwise monochrome furniture; in the bathroom, black is used to clever effect, covering just half of the space. ‘This house is my refuge,’ says Damián. ‘It inspires me to create.’ acasabianca.com; alfonsdamian.com

This house’s bold colour palette is a foil for its owner’s extensive collections of art and antiques, which help to transform rooms that could feel cavernous into intimate zones

Living room The walls are a bespoke shade of khaki (Fired Earth’s ‘Amber Gris’ is similar). Chesterfield sofas, a pair of ‘LC2’ chairs by Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret for Cassina, and a vintage sofa covered in an acid-yellow fabric by Kvadrat create a cosy seating area. The canvas is by German artist Günther FÖrg Games room Homeowner Damián (far right) and his business partner Alfons Tost relax by the antique snooker table. For a similar paint colour try Paint & Paper Library’s ‘Plum Brandy’ Stockist details on p245 ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 203


The azure blue and khaki walls reect the colours of the local landscape, nestled between mountains and the sea


Dining room The bold blue of the walls (try ‘Cornish Ware No48’ by Designers Guild for similar) is paired with curtains made from vibrant orange velvet by Kvadrat. The Eames ‘Segmented’ table is surrounded by ‘EA117’ chairs for Vitra. Above the table hangs a ‘Taraxacum 88’ pendant light by Achille Castiglioni for Flos Stockist details on p245 ➤


Bathroom Behind the bathtub by Zuchetti Kos stands a ‘Brick’ screen by Eileen Gray, reissued by Aram Store. The metal ‘Lotus’ stool is by German brand Creativ Light Bedroom Homeowner Damián designed the bed himself. The painting above it is by Barcelona-based artist Eduard ArbÓs Stockist details on p245 E D


The design of this peachy-toned ivory bedroom is as serene as the downstairs dining room is exuberant


NAT U R A L SPIRIT

With its deep green walls and botanical William Morris prints, this Swedish apartment shows you how to bring nature’s bounty indoors

Words AMY BRADFORD Photography ANDREA PAPINI/HOUSE OF PICTURES Styling ALEXANDRA YDHOLM


T

his 1920s apartment in Gothenburg is a perfect example of how high-street designs can conjure up a luxurious look. Its owner Cajsa Berndtsdotter and her partner Torbjörn Olsson both work for the Swedish giant, Ikea – she as a visual merchandiser, he as a product quality specialist – so they know a thing or two about making its designs look good. But it’s their combination of the brand’s affordable furniture with unexpected colours and patterns that transforms their home from simple to stunning. The couple, who share the two-bedroom home with their two cats, Juni and August, were attracted to the apartment because it needed renovation. They kept the original floorboards, simply whitewashing them, and knocked down a wall between the kitchen and living room to create an open-plan space. Cajsa had fallen in love with two William Morris wallpapers – ‘Chrysanthemum’ and ‘Pimpernel’ – in delicate green shades, but she knew they would be too dominant in the main living area. She used them in the hallway and the couple’s bedroom instead, and they have inspired

‘WE PAINTED THE LIVING ROOM GREEN – IT’S MY FAVOURITE COLOUR – BUT CHOSE A DARK GREY-GREEN SHADE SO THAT IT DOESN’T POP TOO MUCH. IT WORKS WITH EVERYTHING’ the rest of the décor. ‘That’s why we painted the living room green,’ she explains. ‘We picked a very dark grey-green shade so it doesn’t pop too much – it has a dull tone that works with everything.’ Cajsa employed two clever tricks to prevent the dark colour from feeling claustrophobic. The first is to have different zones. ‘The green living room is one and the dining room is another. For the latter we used an almost pure white paint on the walls,’ she says. The same white on the ceilings helps to open up the space. The second trick is to use furniture in neutral shades. Cajsa avoided adding extra colours, creating warmth and texture with wood instead. Tan leather seating and brass details complete the picture, uniting nature-inspired beauty with modern, minimal style. Cajsa found further inspiration using Pinterest, and before creating the art wall in the living room, she tested out ideas on her floor. ‘That’s a really good tip – it means you can decide everything before you start making holes in the wall.’ ‘If we’re meeting up with friends, it’s common to be in someone’s home rather than going out,’ says Cajsa. ‘That’s why we like to have a stylish, well-organised, social space.’ Somehow, we expect gatherings here are always popular. Follow Cajsa Berndsdotter on Instagram at @c.berndtsdotter Living room Tan leather, warm woods and splashes of white bring the dark grey-green walls to life. The sofas are both from Ikea but Cajsa (right) has customised them with new legs from Pretty Pegs. The slanted shelves on the ‘String’ wire storage system (available in the UK at Nest) display favourite images and ornaments Stockist details on p245 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L S S TAT E M E N T C O L O U R

Homeowner Cajsa shares her decorating tips Consider your colour choices before you commit. Cajsa amassed several different samples on paper, which she compared for a long time before deciding on the dark grey-green shade for the walls (the exact hue is ‘Balance’ by Jotun; jotun.com). ‘Green was always the colour on my mind as it is a favourite, but I spent a long time choosing this particular shade.’ Keep floors, ceilings and furniture light to make a bolder colour pop out. ‘If you want to use dark colours, it also helps if there is plenty of natural light coming into the space,’ advises Cajsa. Make sure that your accessories complement the colour on the walls – especially if you have a lot of them. ‘I like to have plenty of things around me; if you keep the palette simple, you can add all of the detail you like without it looking a mess,’ says Cajsa. Warm woods, brass and monochrome colours dominate Cajsa’s collection of art and accessories.

‘WE USED THE FLOOR AS A STARTING POINT AND PICKED FURNITURE TO MATCH. I LIKE WARMER WOODS WITH WHITE, SO WE ALSO ADDED WALNUT FINISHES’ Kitchen/dining area The Ikea ‘Voxtorp’ walnut cabinetry has an acrylic top and a white tap by Nivito that blends into the splashback. The birch ‘Norråker’ table, also from Ikea, has been whitewashed. The dark walnut contrasts with the bright ‘Pimpernel’ William Morris paper in the hallway Stockist details on p245

212 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

Dark colours don’t have to be matt, but the finish should be chosen according to the space. ‘In a living room, I think matt looks better, but in a bathroom, for example, it has to be shiny; we have a glossy dark grey,’ says Cajsa. Use social media for inspiration. ‘I use Instagram and Pinterest for ideas,’ says Cajsa. The herringbonestyle tiles on the kitchen splashback were inspired by a bathroom image spotted online. Think of the various zones in your home as ‘bubbles’. ‘I use this word a lot – it’s my way of thinking about areas as separate, even if they’re not,’ says Cajsa. ‘It’s important not to have just one big, cold room. Creating “bubbles” makes our home feel snuggly.’ ➤


CAJSA KNEW THAT HER FAVOURITE WILLIAM MORRIS WALLPAPER WOULD BE TOO DOMINANT IN THE LIVING AREA, SO USED IT IN THE BEDROOM INSTEAD

Bedroom Morris & Co’s ‘Chrysanthemum’ wallpaper creates a restful, botanical feel (find it at John Lewis). The wall-hung bedside table is a secondhand find and the shelves (opposite) are hung from House Doctor brackets. Instead of artworks, which would take away from the wallpaper, Cajsa has hung abstract pieces such as an empty frame and a rattan coat rack Stockist details on p245 E D


Clashing wallpaper prints abound in this London home, yet the interior remains stylish and balanced. Interior designer Hassan Abdullah shares the styling secrets that make it work Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography JAMES MERRELL/LIVING INSIDE Styling MARIANNE COTTERILL


rom opulent wallpapers to a gold-leaf clad living room, nothing about this north London family home is half-hearted. Patterns are layered on top of patterns and design studio Les Trois Garçons has mixed different styles, countries and periods. ‘The starting point was the clients themselves,’ says the studio’s Hassan Abdullah of homeowners Alistair Graham and Yen Sum. ‘Al is English/ Australian and his wife Yen is Malaysian/Chinese via Australia, so we wanted to convey their mixed heritage in the interior of the house.’ The couple share the four-storey property with their son Hugo (four), and another baby is on the way. Key to the look of this home is fearlessness. Instead of adding the odd statement wall, the designers have created rooms that are enveloped in 360-degree pattern and colour. The hallway is clad in striking Cole & Son wallpaper – a damask with metallic blue peacocks – and rather than complement these grandiose walls with more pared-back accessories, Hassan has thrown caution to the wind. There are carved Chinese dragon chairs, two vintage Italian chandeliers, a classical bust, and a sunburst mirror. ‘Strong wallpaper needs dark and bold furnishings to anchor it,’ he explains. The most imposing space is the palatial living room, where the walls and ceiling are clad in cork wallpaper that has been coated in gold leaf. ‘The down-to-earth cork gives the gilding a rather lovely sheen,’ says Hassan. The room’s look was inspired by a house the Dalai Lama once stayed in when visiting west London. The accompanying furnishings are arranged symmetrically: a button-back wing chair and a modern armchair are mirrored by the same designs at the other end of the room. ‘We wanted to instil some order, otherwise it could have been too busy,’ says Hassan.

‘The combination of antique and modern pieces also restores a sense of balance – they don’t fight each other.’ This blend of old and new is reflected elsewhere in the house. In the kitchen, alongside burnished wallpaper that resembles antiqued mirror panels sits a strikingly industrial addition: a wooden sign salvaged from a cinema in Newcastle. All of the vintage pieces were sourced by Les Trois Garçons on special buying trips to France, Brussels, Italy and England, while the duo designed the majority of the contemporary furniture themselves. Each room is designed to have a different ambience. ‘It’s boring when the whole house looks the same,’ says Hassan. ‘A home should reflect the character of its owners and cater for different moods. Al and Yen love strong pattern and design; our job was to make everything work beautifully.’ lestroisgarcons.com

PRINTS CHARMING

We take a closer look at the wallpaper patterns that give this house its stand-out style ‘Byron’ wallpaper by Cole & Son This pattern is used in the hallway to set the dramatic tone for the entire house. The design is an opulent damask depicting gilded peacocks and is aptly named after the romantic poet, Lord Byron. It is part of the ‘Albemarle’ collection, named after the famous bohemian members club. £99 per ten-metre roll (cole-and-son.com). ‘Nature Précieuse, RM631’ wallpaper by Élitis Beneath the gold leaf in the living room is this textured wallcovering made of cork set on to paper by élitis. Founded in 1988, the French brand is known for its cutting-edge use of materials, from leather to glass, bamboo and silk. £435 per ten-metre roll (elitis.fr). ‘Antique Mirror’ wallpaper by Cole & Son This gilt-edged reflective pattern catches the eye in the kitchen and filters natural light across the room. Printed using foil and transparent ink, it replicates the appearance of vintage foxed mirror. £85 per ten-metre roll (cole-and-son.com). ‘Boheme’ wallpaper in ‘Glacier’ by Black Edition The aesthetic is calmer in the main bedroom thanks to this elegantly patterned damask print, part of the ‘Xanthina’ collection. Its delicate grey-green shade adds subtle luxury to the interior. £75 per ten-metre roll (blackedition.com).

218 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


Living room The sofa, coffee table and armchair are all by Les Trois Garรงons. The wall lights, 18th-century mirror and 1940s cocktail cabinet are vintage pieces (try Lassco and 1st Dibs) Stockist details on p245 โžค


THE UNIQUE COMBINATION OF OLD AND NEW IS REFLECTED IN THE KITCHEN, WHERE A VINTAGE CHANDELIER AND ORNATE FURNITURE SIT ALONGSIDE A MODERN WOODEN CINEMA SIGN


Kitchen The French 1940s dining table, made from ebonised wood with a top inlaid with lapis lazuli, is teamed with Queen Anne-style dining chairs. The wallpaper is Cole & Son’s ‘Antique Mirror’ design Stockist details on p245 ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 221


‘GO ALL OUT IN A ROOM WITH NO WINDOWS, SUCH AS A BASEMENT. DARK WALLS WILL CREATE A CINEMA-STYLE SPACE’

Family room A textural wallpaper by élitis and a ceiling painted in Little Greene’s ‘Chocolate’ create a cosy atmosphere. The cushions are by Kristjana S Williams and Klaus Haapaniemi. For similar mirrors, try Habitat Hallway The eye-catching light is a French vintage design (try Ruby in the Dust for similar) Stockist details on p245


D E S I G N D E TA I L S MAXIMALISM

Hassan Abdullah from Les Trois Garçons shares his design mantra Be bold in a hallway. A strong pattern used here creates a lasting impression without being overpowering – people pass through this space rather than linger. Strong wallpapers need strong accessories. Think statement artworks, statues, mirrors and lighting. If you love bold pattern, create rooms with symmetry. It ensures order and calms things down a little. Use different wallpapers in different rooms. In this house a selection of patterns reflect the mood of a room and the purpose of that space. Don’t fear pattern in a bedroom. But do stick to muted colours to create calm. Use accessories to add contrast. A strong wallpaper such as a Victorian damask evokes that design period, so add contemporary pieces to mix it up. ➤

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 223


Bathroom The shower cubicle features mosaic tiles from Sicis. The ‘Onyx Willow’ wall tiles are from Topps Tiles and the bath is Victoria & Albert Bedroom Black Edition’s ‘Boheme’ wallpaper in a soft green-grey creates a restful aesthetic. Try Lassco for similar bedside tables Stockist details on p245 E D


‘DON’T FEAR USING PATTERN IN THE BEDROOM, BUT DO STICK TO A MUTED COLOUR PALETTE TO CREATE CALM’


HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

ESCAPE

CATALAN COOL

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

In the heart of Barcelona’s Gothic quarter lies palm-tree-populated Plaça del Duc de Medinaceli, a splendid square that is now home to the new outpost of Soho House. Every nook and cranny of the 19th-century building is rendered comfy and colourful and a thread of Catalan design runs throughout, with high vaulted ceilings, Spanish textiles and glossy locally made tiles. Make the most of the glorious facilities, which include a Cowshed spa, a rooftop pool and Cecconi’s restaurant– an offshoot of the London original. From £190 per night (sohohousebarcelona.com).


Escape | N E W S

DESIGNER COFFEE Every fashion house worth its salt is opening a cafe – sadly this one (left), located in Fendi’s headquarters in Rome and graced with a botanical installation by contemporary flower artist Makoto Azuma, is only open to Fendi employees (fendi.com). Not to worry, though. There are plenty of places to get a fashion fix and a caffeine pick-me-up in London. Here, we share our three favourites. 1

1

T H O M A S ’ S , B U R B E R RY

The heritage British brand, beloved for its always-fashionable trench coats, has extended its regal Regent Street flagship store to create Thomas’s, a dining room, gifting emporium and monogramming station. Its monochrome marble flooring makes it one of the most elegant places to enjoy a delightful afternoon tea, including teacakes and crumpets ‘fresh from the Aga’. 5 Vigo Street, London W1S (burberry.com).

2

R O S E B A K E RY, D O V E R S T R E E T M A R K E T

Take a break from perusing directional garments from the likes of Proenza Schouler, Balenciaga and other emerging London labels at Dover Street Market by pulling up a chair in the pared-back surroundings of Rose Bakery, on the top floor. We recommend a bowl of fennel soup followed by oat and maple scones with cream. Like the staff’s striped aprons? You can buy one! 18–22 Haymarket, London SW1 (doverstreetmarket.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

3

2

3

RALPH’S COFFEE & BAR, RALPH LAUREN

Mayfair’s answer to the famed Polo Bar in Manhattan, Ralph Lauren’s newly opened café evokes the glamorous world of horseracing and the gentlemen’s clubs of yesteryear. Its dark wood panelling, banquettes made from saddle leather and walls clad in racing green billiard-table cloth – all festooned with a plethora of equestrian pictures – are classy and cosy. 173 Regent Street, London W1B (ralphlauren.co.uk).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 229


Escape | N E W S

FA S H I O N H O U S E Gucci in the Peak District? Yes, really. Chatsworth House, one of England’s grandest family homes, is ramping up its style status with ‘House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth’, a blockbuster exhibition sponsored by the Italian brand. American Vogue’s Hamish Bowles will delve into the Devonshire archive and tell the sartorial stories that have unfolded under the house’s roof over the last 500 years. Diversity reigns supreme: a Givenchy bolero that the current Duchess wore on her wedding day and the last Duke’s tapestry slippers will be displayed alongside garbs by Christopher Kane, Dior and Vivienne Westwood. And, of course, visitors can also enjoy Chatsworth’s gilt Baroque architecture, dazzling state rooms and spectactular art collection. 25 March–22 October (chatsworth.org).

P R E PA R E F O R L A N D I N G

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: EZRA STOLLER-ESTO

New book The Art of the Airport: The World’s Most Beautiful Terminals (Frances Lincoln, £25) takes the reader on a journey through the most weird, wonderful and windswept airports. As well as the famous beauties – such as Eero Saarinen’s extraordinary TWA Terminal at New York’s JFK (pictured) – there are less familiar ones such as Madrid’s Barajas airport’s undulating roof, completed in the 1930s.

DREAM DESTINATION: MOROCCO Whatever you are looking for from your next trip, this year all roads lead to the North African country S A N C T U A RY L’Hôtel Marrakech (above), a 19th-century riad bought, restored and opened as a hotel by Jasper Conran, is the perfect retreat from Marrakech’s riotous medina. For his first ‘guesthouse’, Conran has seamlessly mixed the Moorish architecture with a 1930s Art Deco aesthetic, antique furniture, banana trees and artworks from his own private collection. From £292 per night (l-hotelmarrakech.com). L E I S U R E Perfect for surfers, Surf Maroc’s first hotel

(right) near Agadir is affordable yet boasts an in-house yoga teacher, library and outdoor cinema in the garden. The décor is simple but chic – whitewashed walls, polished concrete floors, and souk-bought tiles. From £32 per night (surfmaroc.com). S T Y L E This autumn, Yves Saint Laurent opens a museum opposite the Jardin Marjorelle botanical gardens in Marrakech, which the designer bought with Pierre Bergé in 1980 to protect the site. Haute couture dresses and drawings, currently archived in Paris, will be showcased in a terracotta interior by Studio KO (below; fondation-pb-ysl.net). S H O P P I N G Sourcer of

Berber rugs, Souad Larusi recommends Marrakech’s backstreets for buying woven wonders: ‘For embroidered linen I really recommend Al Nour, a cooperative run by local disabled women artisans, and for rugs, 20th-century and antique Moroccan carpet specialist Ben Rahal’s store houses museum-quality carpets’ (larusi.com).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 231


Escape | N E W S

MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME

Visiting London? Ditch the hotel and opt for one of these superstylish serviced apartments Locke calls itself an ‘aparthotel’, and hopes its 168 apartments in Shoreditch will appeal to visitors to the tech hub of east London – the building has super-fast Wi-Fi, two meeting rooms and a 24-hour gym. The flats (right) all have a fully fitted kitchen and living area, and are almost double the size of a typical hotel room at 29 square metres or more. Modern, simply furnished rooms come with Kinsey Apothecary bath products and T2 teas; opening next month is an Edinburgh branch. From £120 per night (lockeliving.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: SALVA LOPEZ

Cuckooz is a smaller setup, also in east London, with just nine apartments (left), all styled by duo 2 Lovely Gays. The studio commissioned illustrations by Joe Gamble and Libby Needham and added furnishings by Habitat and local designers such as Custhom and Flock Studio. Guests can take a class at exercise studio BLOK London, sip a London Fields Brewery ale and make use of Kennedy City Bicycles – all included in the price. From £180 per night (cuckooz.co.uk).

The New Road Residence is perhaps the most exciting of the three. A one-off project by founder of clothing store and tailor Hostem, this three-bedroom retreat lies within an 18th-century townhouse in Whitechapel. Stone and stripped pine floors run throughout and it has working fireplaces, a wine cellar and a glass-roofed summerhouse. Design touches to pique attention include a Pierre Jeanneret writing desk, industrial pieces by Faye Toogood and bedlinen by Once Milano: best of all, everything in the house is available to buy. Carefully selected bottles of wine are included in the price of staying, as is a daily delivery of fresh produce from local grocery Leila’s. From £750 per night (33newroad.com).

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 233


Escape | N E W S

JOIN THE CLUB Love the idea of being a member of a London club, but not the gentlemen’s joints of yore? Here are three modern options we think you’ll love

F O R D E S I G N F I E N D S The Design

Museum’s members’ lounge is now open. Universal Design Studio have overseen the interior, which features a polished pewter bar teamed with a muted blue colour palette. £65 per year (designmuseum.org).

BITE AT THE MUSEUM F O R F O O D I E S 28 Dean Street, once Karl

Marx’s London home and now restaurant Quo Vadis, is a Soho favourite that has just reopened after a beautiful redesign. Upstairs in the members’ area, walls are teal, chairs are cerulean and shelves lined with books. From £200 per year (quovadissoho.co.uk).

FOR WORKAHOLICS SEEKING W E L L N E S S The new Devonshire Club

is housed in a listed 19th century Regency warehouse and has been refurbished with 1950s-style glamour in mind. Its spa, No 4 Wellness, has a gym, exercise studio, hair salon and nail bar. Members get priority, but it is open to mere mortals, too! From £2,400 per year (devonshire.club).

234 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GREG FUNNELL, LAURENCE MOUTON, M GIESBRECH

There’s no better time to board the Eurostar – three major Parisian museums have new brasseries that are ready to impress you. The Musée Des Arts Decoratifs’ restaurant is called Loulou (above) and has been designed by Joseph Dirand. He has transformed the historic dining room at the heart of the 13th-century Palais du Louvre; Eero Saarinen’s ‘Tulip’ chairs perch atop a Breccia di Medici marble floor, and a subtle trompel’œil Flanders landscape stretches across two walls (loulou-paris.com). Next door, the Louvre’s Café Mollien (below left) complements the museum’s majestic architecture with contemporary design. We love the extraordinary brass and acrylic lights that the project’s interior designer, Mathieu Lehanneur, describes as ‘large scale pale-pink eggs’ (louvre.fr). Elsewhere, Paris’ oldest factory, La Monnaie de Paris (the French mint) – which still produces commemorative coins, jewellery and Légion d’Honneur medals – has a new joint: super-chef Guy Savoy’s eponymous restaurant (below right). The Michelin-starred brasserie’s décor is sultry and atmospheric, with the look of its three high-ceilinged salons overseen by architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte (guysavoy.com).


Escape | G A R D E N I N G

Green in the city Gardening can be a scary prospect for urbanites without space or green fingers. Be inspired by the example of novelist Charlotte Mendelson, who turned a tiny city garden into an oasis of edible plants Illustration BABETH LAFON

Would you like a neat and pretty garden? A rectangle of lawn, bright flowers and a couple of deckchairs in which to drink Prosecco? Perhaps you already have an outdoor room: an oasis of tranquillity, dotted with low-maintenance plants, a gas-fired barbecue and discreet solar lighting. Does your idea of a garden involve space for a pond? Is it measured in acres? Does it feature a pergola? Then step away. That’s not what this is about. But if, despite cluelessness and lack of space, you dream of selfsufficiency – a Little House on the Prairie-style homestead where you will gather eggs and make interesting preserves, come closer. If you yearn to grow a salad, but have only a tangle of nameless shrubbery, or a tiny fume-filled

balcony above a corner shop, don’t despair. I too am a committed citydweller, better suited to sofas than sheds. Until recently the idea of visiting other people’s gardens, let alone reading about them, violently bored me. I had no idea what perennials were, or blight, or weevils and I never planned to find out. Then something happened: I acquired a tiny garden of my own, and fell in love. Now my six square metres of polluted soil produces over a hundred different kinds of unusual, edible crops: eight or nine types of tomato; five varieties of kale; ten varieties of Asian greens; herbs from Greece and Mexico; and too many beans – yellow, purple, speckled, as long as your arm or curled like baby prawns. I make salads with twenty or thirty different ➤


THE GARDEN CALENDAR

An easy-to-follow guide to what to plant and when January Check that stakes and ties are sturdy enough to survive the winter. Buy seeds for spring. ‘Visit otterfarm.co.uk or franchi.co.uk and buy packs of seeds for mixed salad, Italian beans and some edible flowers – I love calendula “Indian Prince” and “Cupani” sweet peas.

February Prune shrubs, climbers and hedges, and keep delicate plants insulated by wrapping them in bubble wrap or hessian. Protect trees and shrubs with a layer of dry mulch.

leaves; I harvest tiny quantities of the most delicious fruit you can imagine: wild strawberries, blackberries, wineberries, loganberries, pink gooseberries, sour cherries, black grapes, fat figs, fragrant quinces and glorious blackcurrants. Until we moved to our 1900s brick terraced house on a busy London road, I’d been a flat-dweller, entirely cut off from the seasons. I’d hoped for a lawn, not a miniature but well-loved paved garden. But look: actual mud, in flowerbeds! When it rained, there were snails! I was entranced. Poor naive fool: how little I knew. It was winter, and plants were a mystery. A sensible person would have waited for a year, to let the garden’s bones emerge; sadly, I was not that person. Soon I was chopping down mature shrubs with a

March Get rid of old, dead foliage to encourage new growth; start planting seeds. ‘It’s so simple – just follow the instructions on the packet and you’ll have a riot of flowers,’ says Mendelson. ‘City gardens have slugs and cats, so start seeds off in small pots until they’re tough enough to cope with real life.’

April Weeds will need to be kept in check now. Grow tomatoes: ‘I buy tomato seedlings from simpsonsseeds.co.uk: “Black Russian”; “Green Zebra”; “Tigerella” and “Matt’s Wild Cherry” are favourites’, says Mendelson.

If you want to see a happy author, forget literary festivals and look for me in the garden, covered in homemade compost pound-shop saw and attempting to grow dinner from seed. Failure was inevitable, for several reasons. First, gardening is not innate. If you haven’t spent your childhood helping Grandpa tie in the runner beans, or following your elegant mother among the roses, how are you meant to identify anything, let alone nurture it? Second, gardening requires skills I lack. At home, I crash into door frames, confuse left and right, fail to assemble even the simplest objects; I am

May Plant hanging baskets and start feeding the lawn. The ground is softer now, so it’s the time to start work on any big garden projects, such as decking.

devoid of the slightest spatial sense. Unfortunately, this also makes me totally unfit to prune anything, let alone use sharp tools, up a ladder, in a flowerbed. What could possibly go wrong? Life might have been simpler had I done what normal people do, and stuck to pansies and geraniums. But I am totally obsessed with food; what’s the point in growing anything one can’t eat? So what if edible plants are far more labour-intensive than simple shrubbery? Imagine cooking with home-grown raspberries, or bunches of fragrant fresh tarragon; I couldn’t resist. Out there, alone and unguided, the mistakes were tragic and the expense was terrifying. When have common sense and passion ever mixed? Because my immigrant grandparents didn’t have


Escape | G A R D E N I N G

June Harvest time begins. ‘Pinch out the side shoots on tomatoes, tie unruly bean stems to bamboo and water plants weekly with tomato food,’ recommends Mendelson. ‘Collect salad leaves often and show off about them.’

July/August Water everything, especially container plants. Test for dryness with a finger; if the soil isn’t damp a centimetre down, water. Deadhead plants regularly to encourage repeat flowering.

allotments, or orchards, I had no preconceptions about what one ought to grow. Rather than the traditional vegetables – cabbages, which double as slugs’ holiday homes; carrots, secretly much better from the supermarket – I based my choices on a) deliciousness b) interestingness and c) expense in shops. Instead of leeks, I went for Egyptian walking onions; rather than cauliflower I grew white ‘Nine Star’ sprouting broccoli. Even when it comes to lettuce, the most romantically foreign varieties prevailed: who wouldn’t be curious about maroon-splashed ‘Speckled Trout’ or ‘Rouge d’Hiver’? If you prefer order and convention, my garden would horrify you. But there is such beauty in a tangle of bright, dark and silvery-green leaves, in sunlight shining

September Gather beans and tomatoes frequently, so more will grow. As plants die back, collect seeds for sowing next spring. Think ahead and plant bulbs for spring blooms.

October/November Dig over soil with compost and manure. Prune fruit trees back. Gather fallen autumn leaves in a container – they will break down to form mulch.

through a burgundy ‘Bull’s Blood’ beetroot leaf. Let’s gaze together at the translucency of a ripe whitecurrant; the methylated-spirit violet of a ‘Cosse Violette’ french bean flower; at the venous tinge of radicchio darkening in the frost. I don’t have daffodils, but I do have curlicues of squash tendrils, scented sweet peas, hot pink cosmos and some truly hilariously-shaped courgettes. I have the peace that comes from finding one’s flow. If you want to see a happy author, forget literary festivals and look for me in the garden, covered in homemade compost. And I have a magnificent excuse for shopping. Is that a mulberry tree? A rare Italian salad leaf? Hold me back. Charlotte Mendelson’s latest book ‘Rhapsody in Green’ is published by Kyle Books (£16.99) E D

December Develop an addiction to succulents. Try blueleafplants.co.uk for Echeverias, the dramatic metallic-black Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’ or Rosary vines; plant in a stylish shallow dish with drainage (not the glass dishes you see in shops), avoid watering, and love them.

HOW TO GROW EDIBLE PLANTS IN A TINY GARDEN There’s a plant to suit the smallest of plots. Here’s Mendelson’s top picks • One pot Grow garlic chives and Mizuna. The chives are long-lived and delicious; the Mizuna, a Japanese leaf, will save you a fortune in salad bags. • Window box Buy a couple of ‘Sungold’ tomato plants. Everyone loves the taste, even Nigel Slater. • Narrow garden Go for height with ‘Cosse Violette’ beans. Soon you’ll have a trembling tower of purple beans and a hum of happy bees. • Tiny yard Plant wild strawberries – the world’s most delicious ground cover – and sow a few courgette seeds.

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 239


Escape | G E T A W AY

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

JORDAAN, AMSTERDAM Tulips, sunshine on the water and fluffy poffertjes pastries dusted in icing sugar… the Dutch capital’s coolest quarter comes into its own in spring Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

PICTURE: SANDER BAKS

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD North of the major museums and west of the red-light district’s coffee shops lies the crosshatch of canals that is Jordaan. Picture-perfect bridges link residential boulevards with the ‘Nine Streets’ district of plentiful markets, cafés and design shops. Read on for our guide to the hidden gems in this picturesque area. ➤

The Pulitzer hotel occupies a row of 25 waterside houses and has its own barge

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 241


1

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL WHERE TO STAY Occupying a row of 25 waterside townhouses, most built around 1615, the Pulitzer hotel (1) has just reopened following a revamp that perfectly combines grandiose (Old Master oil paintings, antique chandeliers, mini-bars on Art Deco drinks trolleys and velvet chairs by Sé London) with low-key (in-room bike repair kits and attic rooms with beams). Doubles from £235 per night (Prinsengracht 315; pulitzeramsterdam.com). Amsterdam also has great Airbnb properties, from bedsits up in the eaves to spacious open-plan midcentury apartments (airbnb.com).

1 1 VI

3

NOO

RDER

N

MAR

KE

HA

N

ST

RA

AT

AR

LE

M

M

ER

HO

UT

TU

IN

EN

KT

6

8 WES

TERS

T TRAA

12

11

RO

G ZEN

RAC

PRINSENGRACHT

2

HT

RA

1

AD

HU

ISSTRAAT

7 REESTRAAT

SINGEL

10 4 5

BERENSTRAAT

13 4 WINE AND DINE Book a beer tasting at Hoppa! (2), a new joint pioneering Amsterdam’s brewing heritage (Singel 460; hoppa.amsterdam), or stop by the quirky Vesper Bar (3) for a strong cocktail (Vinkenstraat 57; vesperbar.nl). Try the delicious lamb and feta burgers at Venus & Adonis (4), whose design is inspired by the painting by Rembrandt’s apprentice Ferdinand Bol (Prinsengracht 274; venusenadnois.nl); or head to Restaurant T Zwaantje (5) for Belgianstyle mussels; it tends to be bursting with locals (Berenstraat 12; zwaantje-restaurant.nl).

RUNSTRAAT

9 10 MINUTE WALK 2 12 MINUTE WALK

14 BREAKFAST AND LUNCH On a Saturday visit Noordermarkt (6), which originally purveyed pigeons and canaries, but is now a farmer’s market selling everything from organic eggs to fresh fish and – ideal with a hot coffee to start the day – loaves of gingery ontbijtkoek, ‘breakfast cake’. For lunch, stop by Winkel (8, Noordermarkt 43; winkel43.nl) for a hearty stew and rye sandwich. Or head to cosy-but-chic Ree7 (7) for an omelette (Reestraat 7; ree7.nl).


Escape | G E T A W AY 9

ARTS AND CULTURE An artistic home as it was during Amsterdam’s 17th-century Golden Age, Museum Van Loon (9) is a private residence still owned by the Van Loon family: rooms are painted in gorgeous hues and the formal garden is a joy (Keizersgracht 672; museumvanloon.nl). Also visit YellowKorner (10), a contemporary gallery with a mission to make photography accessible to all (Singel 282; yellowkorner.com). SHOP Bookworms should head to Architectura & Natura (11), a library-like space packed with tomes on these two subjects (Leliegracht 22; architectura.nl), while Moooi (12) is a must-visit for all modern design fiends (Westerstraat 187; moooi.com). Finally, Anouk Beerents (13) specialises in buying, selling and restoring Italian and 12 French mirrors, and her open-house studio happily welcomes voyeurs (Prinsengracht 467; anoukbeerents.nl).

11

14

PICTURES: A WOUTER VAN DER SAR, SANDER BAKS, PETER KOOIJMAN

13

INSIDER TIP Cooking dinner in your rented apartment? Buy a bottle to accompany it from Peter Renalda’s cellar, De Wijnwinkel Renalda (14). He has been selling crates to Amsterdam’s most exclusive restaurants and one-off wines to discerning drinkers since 1985 – the prices may be higher than average, but the advice and chat is on the house (Runstraat 23; wijnwinkel.com). E D APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 243


ELLE Decoration | A D D R E S S

BOOK

Stockists A

B

PICTURE: MIKKEL MORTENSEN NOTE: COLOURS MAY APPEAR DIFFERENT IN PRINT. ALWAYS CHECK SWATCH CARDS

C

D

E

F

&Klevering (klevering.nl) &New (andnew.co.uk) & Other Stories (stories.com) &Tradition (andtradition.com) 12 Thirteen Store (12-thirteenstore.com) 17 Patterns (17patterns.com) 1882 Ltd (1882ltd.com) 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com) 42 Pressed (42pressed.com) Abbott & Boyd (abbottandboyd.co.uk) Absolute Flowers (absoluteflowersandhome.com) Alberto Levi Gallery (albertolevi.com) Altfield (altfield.com) Amara (amara.com) Anchor Ceramics (anchorceramics.com) Andrew Nebbett Antiques (andrewnebbett.com) Annie Sloan (anniesloan.com) Another Country (anothercountry.com) Aram Store (aram.co.uk) Artek (artek.fi) Artemide (artemide.com) Arteveneta (arteveneta.com.au) Ashley Wilde Group (ashleywildegroup.com) Astep (astep.design) Atelier Areti (atelierareti.com) Atipico (atipico.it) AYTM (aytm.dk) Bang & Olufsen (bang-olufsen.com) Barbara Osorio Fabrics (pedrosoeosorio.com) Bauwerk (bauwerkcolour.co.uk) Benjamin Moore (benjaminmoore.com) Bennison Fabrics (bennisonfabrics.com) Bert & May (bertandmay.com) Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk) Bill Amberg Studio (billamberg.com) Bisazza (bisazza.it) Bitossi Ceramiche (bitossihome.it) Black Edition (blackedition.com) Bohemian Works (bohemianworks.com) Bolon (bolon.com) Braun (braun.com) Brian Yates (brian-yates.co.uk) Camengo (camengo.fr) Caparol Icons (caparol.de) Casamance (casamance.com) Casamania (casamania.it) Casetta Living (casettaliving.com) Cassina (cassina.com) CC Tapis (cc-tapis.com) Chaplins (chaplins.co.uk) Christian Fischbacher (fischbacher.com) Christian Lacroix Maison (christian-lacroix.com) Christian Liaigre (christian-liaigre.fr) Christopher Farr (christopherfarrcloth.com) Clarke & Clarke (clarke-clarke.com) Clements Ribeiro (clementsribeiro.com) Clerkenwell London (clerkenwell-london.com) Cole & Son (cole-and-son.com) Colefax and Fowler (colefax.com) Connox (connox.co.uk) Creativ Light (creativ-light.de) Crown (crownpaints.co.uk) Custhom (custhom.co.uk) De Le Cuona (delecuona.com) Dedar (dedar.com) Designers Guild (designersguild.com) Dimore Studio (dimorestudio.eu) Domus Tiles (domustiles.co.uk) Douglas and Bec (douglasandbec.com) Dulux (dulux.co.uk) E15 (e15.com) Earthed by WM Clark (earthedbywmclark.co.uk) Edward Bulmer (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) Eicó (eico.co.uk) Element 7 (element7.co.uk) Élitis (elitis.fr) Ella Doran (elladoran.co.uk) Emery & Cie (emeryetcie.com) Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) Fault Lines (faultlinesdesign.com) Feathr (feathr.com) Ferm Living (fermliving.com) Fermoie (fermoie.com)

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Flaminia (ceramicaflaminia.it) Flexform (flexform.it) Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk) Førest (forestlondon.com) Forest + Found (forest-and-found.com) Fornasetti (fornasetti.com) Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com) Gainsborough Silk (gainsborough.co.uk) Gam Fratesi (gamfratesi.com) Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com) Gervasoni (gervasoni1882.it) Gold Leaf Supplies (goldleafsupplies.com) GP & J Baker (gpjbaker.com) Gubi (gubi.com) Habibi Interiors (habibi-interiors.com) Habitat (habitat.co.uk) Hand & Eye Studio (handandeyestudio.co.uk) Handvärk (handvark.com) Hay (hay.dk) Heal’s (heals.com) Helen Amy Murray (helenamymurray.com) Heliot & Co (heliotandco.com) Hend Krichen (hendkrichen.com) Herman Miller (hermanmiller.co.uk) House Doctor (housedoctor.dk) Ichendorf Milano (ichendorfmilano.com) Iittala (iittala.com) Ikea (ikea.com) Inkster (inksterprojects.com) James Hare ( james-hare.com) Jason D’Souza ( jasondsouza.co.uk) Jeld Wen ( jeld-wen.co.uk) John Lewis ( johnlewis.com) Jujumade ( jujumade.com) Kartell (kartell.com) Kirkby Design (kirkbydesign.com) Kleins (kleins.uk) Knoll (knoll.com) Knots Rugs (knotsrugs.co.uk) Komplot Design (komplot.dk) Kvadrat (kvadrat.dk) Ladies & Gentlemen Studio (ladiesandgentlemenstudio.com) Lambert & Fils (lambertetfils.com) Lapicida (lapicida.com) Larusi (larusi.com) Lassco (lassco.co.uk) Lee Jofa (leejofa.com) Lelievre (lelievre.eu) Lenovo (lenovo.com) Liberty (libertylondon.com) Lightyears (en.lightyears.dk) Ligne Roset (ligne-roset.com) Linwood (linwoodfabric.com) Little Greene (littlegreene.com) Liza Giles (lizagiles.com) Lizzo (lizzo.net) Louis Poulsen (louispoulsen.com) Lyngby Porcelæn (lyngbyporcelain.com) MacCulloch & Wallis (macculloch.london) Made In Design (madeindesign.co.uk) Manuel Canovas (manuelcanovas.com) Mappin & Webb (mappinandwebb.com) Margo Selby (margoselby.com) Marks & Spencer (mands.com) Marrakech Design (marrakechdesign.se) Martyn Thompson Studio (martynthompsonstudio.com) Mattiazzi (mattiazzi.eu) Maud & Mabel (maudandmabel.com) Menu (menu.as) Milagros (milagros.co.uk) Miniforms (miniforms.com) Minor Goods (minorgoods.com) Molteni & C (molteni.it) Momosan (momosanshop.com) Monologue (monologuelondon.com) Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com) Muji (muji.eu) Munna (munnadesign.com) Murals Wallpaper (muralswallpaper.co.uk) Mutina (mutina.it) Muuto (muuto.com) Mylands (mylands.co.uk) Neo/Craft (neocraft.com)

O

P

R

S

Nest (nest.co.uk) Nest (nestdesign.co.uk) New Works (newworks.dk) Nic Webb (nicwebb.com) Nicholas Haslam (nicholashaslam.com) Nivito (nivito.se) Nkuku (nkuku.com) Nobilis (nobilis.fr) Nordic House (nordichouse.co.uk) Norm Architects (normcph.com) Nya Nordiska (nya.com) Ochre (ochre.net) Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) Olivia Bard (oliviabard.co.uk) Onefortythree (onefortythree.com) Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) Paint by Conran (paintbyconran.com) Panik (panik-design.com) Pepe Penalver (pepepenalver.com) Phil Cuttance (philcuttance.com) Phillip Jeffries (phillipjeffries.com) Pinch (pinchdesign.com) Pollack (pollackassociates.com) Porro (porro.com) Pretty Pegs (prettypegs.com) Really Well Made (reallywellmade.co.uk) Reiko Kaneko (reikokaneko.co.uk) Ressource Peintures (ressource-peintures.com) Roche Bobois (roche-bobois.com) Roll & Hill (rollandhill.com) Ross & Brown (rossandbrownhome.co.uk) Rubelli/Donghia (rubelli.com) Ruby in the Dust (rubyinthedust.co.uk) Safari Living (safariliving.com) Sandberg (sandbergwallpaper.com) Sanderson (sanderson-uk.com) Santa & Cole (santacole.com) Scarlet & Violet (scarletandviolet.com) SCP (scp.co.uk) Selfridges (selfridges.com) Sicis (sicis.com) Silo Studio (silostudio.net) Skandium (skandium.com) Staffan Tollgård (tollgard.co.uk) Studio Four NYC (studiofournyc.com) Studioart (studioart.it) Sue Pryke (suepryke.com) Sueno (sueno.co.uk)

Summerill & Bishop (summerillandbishop.com) Sword + Fern (swordandfern.com) T Tai Ping (houseoftaiping.com) Tate (shop.tate.org.uk) The Barbican Shop (shop.barbican.org.uk) The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) The Linen Works (thelinenworks.co.uk) The London Door Company (londondoor.co.uk) The New Craftsmen (thenewcraftsmen.com) The Shelley Panton Store (shelleypanton.com) The Water Monopoly (thewatermonopoly.com) Tidy Street General Store (tidystreetstore.com) Tiipoi (tiipoi.com) Tinsmiths (tinsmiths.co.uk) Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net) Topps Tiles (toppstiles.co.uk) Totem Road (totemroad.com) Trouva (trouva.com) Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) U Unique & Unity (uniqueandunity.co.uk) Urban Cottage Industries (urbancottageindustries.com) Urban Front (urbanfront.com) Urbanara (urbanara.co.uk) Urbane Living (urbaneliving.co.uk) Utility Design (utilitydesign.co.uk) V V&A Paint (vandapaint.com) Vanderhurd (vanderhurd.com) Venini (venini.com) Verpan (verpan.com) Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk) Victoria & Albert (vandabaths.com) Vita Copenhagen (vitacopenhagen.com) Vitra (vitra.com) Vitsœ (vitsoe.com) Vorwerk (kobold.vorwerk.co.uk) W Walking on Wood (walkingonwood.co.uk) Wall & Deco (wallanddeco.com) Wooden & Woven (woodwoven.com) Woodworks by Ted Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com) Y Yonder Living (yonderliving.com) Z Zera (zera.com) Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com) Zuchetti Kos (zucchettikos.it)

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 245


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

BOLD TUESDAY

CHAPTER SEVEN DESIGN Chapter Seven Design specialises in stunning bespoke interior design and interior architecture solutions for luxury residential, commercial and private clients. A multi-disciplinary studio, they fuse innovative and exceptional design flair with a philosophy that each project should fully embody a client’s needs and desires. These core values of creativity, aspiration and collaboration lie at the heart of everything they do. They also offer spatial planning, furniture and lighting design, audio/visual solutions and 3D CAD modelling. 07540 779118 / 07940 911132 www.chaptersevendesign.co.uk

Inspired by Scandinavian design, Bold Tuesday creates uniquely aesthetic maps and prints to incite curiosity, travel, and minimalistic beauty. Each thoughtful design acts as a canvas, allowing you to bring your world to your walls and mark your travels. Shown here, List Of Countries simplifies, beautifies, and reorganises the world by true size to invoke a fresh cosmopolitan perspective. Readers save 15% with code ELLEDEC. To order go to www.boldtuesday.com Offer expires May 1st 2017.

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT This Spring, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint brings your home to life with a collection of 72 beautiful and wholly natural paints. The colours work as well in modern spaces as period homes, with a palette of unique and unrivalled colours they create extraordinary depth and a response to light which synthetic paints just cannot replicate. Call 01544 388535 or order your complimentary colour chart www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk

J&S RECLAIMED WOOD J&S Reclaimed Wood Custom Furniture of Vancouver, Canada rescues antique lumber from heritage building demolitions and derelict old barns to build quality handmade furniture. The coffee table pictured is made from 101 year old oak timbers with a hand-tooled brass base. www.jsreclaimedwood.com email: contact@jsreclaimedwood.com Call: 778 317 3027

SOFARSONEAR @BELGRAVIA INTERIOR BOUTIQUE Luxurious and unique copper textiles. Weaved in Italy, the Cuprum range comes from a constant search for unique and unusual materials. Not only is it flame retardant and highly resistant, it is also the ideal fabric for any outdoor application, thanks to the use of a special thread offering a solidity to light and weathering above seven. The collection includes a range of soft accessories to complement it: cushions, throws and spectacular tassels. Belgravia interior boutique, 19 Grosvenor Place, SW1X 7HT. Tel. +44 (0)2072357599 www.sofarsonear.com www.bib-london.co.uk


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ARROW & WILD Arrow & Wild, an independent London based studio brings you the Flora Skull Collection. Carefully decorated by hand, these beautiful bones are the perfect addition to your rustic country or bohemian inspired wall decor. For more information visit www.arrowandwild.com or email info@arrowandwild.com

DAVID STUDWELL David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen and Elizabeth Taylor all feature in his work evoking a strong sense of nostalgia and bringing elements of the past into the present. He has exhibited in London and also the USA, and been published. Featured here is ‘Elvis 1,’ a limited edition silk screen (57 x 46cm, £300). Visit www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@hotmail.com

OFFICE MEETS HOME You’ll love to work from home with the newly remastered Aeron chair from Herman Miller. Designed with your comfort in mind, the new Aeron incorporates more than 20 years of research on the science of sitting. When paired with the stunning Airia desk, you’ll be able to work in comfort and style. www.hermanmiller.co.uk

BRITISH MADE SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS Embarking on a new interiors project or considering a home makeover this spring? Why not invest in Willow & Hall's uniquely handcrafted British furniture. Choose from stylish sofa beds with 14cm deep mattress options, to chaises with handy storage or luxurious, cosy beds. All furniture is made to order by skilled craftsmen in Wiltshire with over 35 years' experience. Designs are available in over 100 fabrics and delivered for free to most of the UK Mainland within around 4-5 weeks. Plus, they offer 14-day free returns on all orders. To update your home for the spring season, visit their London showroom, shop online at www.willowandhall.co.uk or call 0845 468 0577. Use code ELLE27417 by 27th April to save an extra 5% off prices already 30% lower than the high street. Product featured: The Hamptworth sofa/sofa bed shown in House Linen Argent from £932 and £1,118


Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

“We bring you the mystique of the East” 07838 142008

www.ottotiles.co.uk

Monthly hygge treats delivered to your home, with love from The Little House of Hygge

Flawless homewares for the fashionable home Haus of Hyde is the ultimate destination for interior junkies!

RESERVE YOUR FIRST BOX TODAY AND SAVE 10% USING CODE ELLE10

hausofhyde.com

THELITTLEHOUSEOFHYGGE.COM

07984257484 | hausofhyde@gmail.com

/thelittlehouseofhygge

@the_little_house_of_hygge

250 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

@tlhohygge

/Hausofhyde

@haus_of_hyde

@HAUS_OF_HYDE


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

Unique

V I N TAG E RUGS

Luxury Furniture

New collection EMILY´S

HOUSE

L O N D O N

Since 2009

E M I LY S H O U S E L O N D O N. C O M

www.thehouseoutfit.com @thehouseoutfit

www.aurumhome.co

   DORGLAZE ® VISION PANEL KITS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 251


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

INTERIORS

N o11 Swan Street, Bawtry, Doncaster.

order from busterandpunch.com

www.casabotelho.com

HEAV Y METAL MAT T BL ACK EDITION FROM £89

252 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

INTERIORS & LIGHTING

Classic and contemporary furniture, lighting, accessories and vintage finds from Blue Isle.

Go onli 100s ofne for n designsew

extensive, not expensive

Visit our online boutique store at www.blueisle.co.uk 01425 653031

From classical chandeliers to modern statement pieces and more, let us inspire you.

t: 020 7384 1485 e: sales@tindle-lighting.co.uk www.tindle-lighting.co.uk

www.pooky.com

M O D E R N G L A S S L I G H T I N G , M A D E I N N E W YO R K

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 253


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

GARDEN ART & SCANDINAVIAN FURNITURE

NEW WEB SHOP LAUNCH

100% AUTHENTIC & ORIGINAL Scandinavian collections Visit our web shop and take a look at our great range of classic products scandesignclassic.com

+44 (0) 7468 433530

254 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

info@scandesignclassic.com


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

HELL☺ I’M

VI☺LET I’M MDE WITH LOVE IN THE UK AND AVAILABLE IN OVER 100 FABRICS

Violet 4 Seater in Soft Woven Chenille - Wolf Eye £1,349

Find me at theloungeco.com, in our Chiswick store or in one of our 20 galleries nationwide

CURVACEOUS. TIMELESS. INIMITABLE. UNMISTAKABLE HANDMADE DESIGN SINCE 1996

10% OFF * with code ELLEDECO7

Artisan made furniture, contemporary collections and a bespoke design service.

020 8876 0131 Designers and Makers of Bespoke Kitchens and Living Spaces

www.tomschneider.co.uk *Offer ends 30.04.17. Applies to Online Shop only. Code cannot be used with any other offer.

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 255


Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

256 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z

FURNITURE & FLOORING

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

view the range at: www.barnbydesign.co.uk

furniture design handmade in HAY.

barnby design

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath material creates a difference you can feel. With over 50 models available, we’ll have a size for bathrooms big or small. Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

the ALBION bath co Handmade bathrooms directly from our factory

APRIL 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 257


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions, plus the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month Photography Editor James Williams has given an old-fashioned fireplace a style makeover

‘The wooden fireplace in my new house looked completely out of place. To give it a contemporary update, I painted it in Farrow & Ball’s “Plummett”. It’s a beautiful shade of grey; at first it can look cold, but when applied on small features it can really elevate a space.’

Deputy Chief Sub Editor Sarah Morgan took on electrical wiring... and won Rather than hire an electrician, my boyfriend and I decided to wire in our new ‘Elias Retro’ light from John Lewis ourselves. Here’s what I learnt. Photograph the existing wiring Once you’ve removed the original ceiling light, you’ll be able to see how it was wired in. Take a picture so you have a valuable reference. Test the light before final fixing Putting the leftover flex into the rose and screwing the fitting into position is a fiddly job that you won’t want to repeat. Stay strong This job requires you to spend a while with your arms above your head!

Contributing Editor Eliza Honey tells us about her latest must-follow Instagrammer

‘Blogger and pattern addict Emma Jane Palin’s account is a daily source of cheer for me. In her walks – mostly around London – she discovers pockets of colour in floor tiles, wall murals and graffiti, encouraging proof that this city is significantly brighter than I often think, especially on grey winter days.’ @emmajanepalin Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin turns his hand to at-home headboard upholstery I wanted to create a hotel look by incorporating a large headboard to give the guest bedroom drama and focus. They can be expensive, so I thought I would have a go at making one myself. I started by cutting a piece of MDF to size, then I attached fire-retardant wadding to the board using a staple gun. In the same way, I fixed the fabric in position, leaving a 20-centimetre border around the edge for a contrasting material. Where the two fabrics join, I covered the staples with upholstery pins to create a neater finish. I fixed brackets to the back of the MDF and then hung it on the wall, pushing the bed up close to secure it in position.

258 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK APRIL 2017


KITCHENS

CONTENTS 11

#E DK I T C H E N S TA K E OV E R For the whole of March we’ll be going kitchens crazy – join the fun! 12

DAT E S T O K N OW From restaurant openings to the best foodie festivals, these are the events to put in your diary 19

NEWS Original ways to work the hottest trends, plus the biggest launches and names to know 34

T E C H N OL O G Y App-controlled appliances and gadgets that can make your kitchen smarter 36

S HOPPI N G The ultimate edit of cookware, utensils and accessories to complete your home 42

H E A RT OF M Y HOM E Top tastemakers welcome us into their kitchens and tell us about their favourite pieces 51

I N S PI R AT ION Step inside the world’s most beautiful kitchens and discover unique, imaginative decorating ideas to help you with your next project – plus everything you’ll need to steal their style 87

T H E S HOW R O OM DI R E C T ORY Try before you buy: our definitive guide to the best brand showrooms across the UK 96

STOCKISTS Love something you’ve seen? Find out where to buy it in our address book 98

DE C ODE D The story behind Bulthaup’s beautiful ‘b’ kitchen ranges

SUBSCRIBE TO ELLE DECOR ATION AT ELLEDECOR ATION.CO.UK Follow us on Twitter: @ELLEDecoUK

Follow us on Instagram: @elledecorationuk

Find us on Facebook: ELLE Decoration 7


KITCHENS

R E C I PE F OR S UC C E S S It’s perhaps a cliché to call the kitchen the heart of the home, but for many of us it’s exactly that: a vital hub where our daily lives unfold. It’s a space for life, love and laughter and the odd bit of burnt toast and homework on the dining table inbetween. This, the second annual edition of ELLE Decoration Kitchens, is here to help you perfect yours. To reassure and guide you, whether you’re looking to embark on a full renovation or simply want to update certain elements; whether you’re starting from scratch or merely replacing your pots and pans. On the following pages, you’ll find everything you could possibly need to create your dream space. Alongside the latest trends and launches, top technology and kitchen kit, we reveal the most stylish kitchens across the world and how to get the look yourself. Plus, there’s our fully updated list of the UK’s best showrooms to suit every style and budget. And don’t forget to follow #EDkitchens online and across Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest for even more ideas and inspiration.

Supplement Editor DOWNLOAD NOW!

PICTURE: HEIDI LERKENFELDT

Do you have our previous 100-page kitchen and bathroom inspiration books? If not – don’t worry – you can still download them via the ELLE Decoration app for just £2.99 each

Editor-in-Chief M I C H E L L E O G U N D E H I N Deputy Art Director P H I L I P P E B L A N C H I N

Photography Director F L O R A B A T H U R S T Features Writer C H A R L O T T E B R O O K

Deputy Editor B E N S P R I G G S Art Director T O N Y P E T E R S

Junior Designer J A C K M E L R O S E

Chief Sub Editor C L A R E S A R T I N

Photography Editor J A M E S W I L L I A M S

Contributing Editor E L I Z A H O N E Y

Deputy Chief Sub Editor S A R A H M O R G A N

Homes Director J A C K I E D A L Y

Editorial Intern M O L L Y H U T C H I N S O N

Thanks to M A R K J A M E S L O W E

9


SHOWROOM OPENINGS

CHEFS TO KNOW RECIPES

PINTEREST KITCHEN BOARDS

I N S TA G R A M S T O R I E S

NEW LAUNCHES

#EDkitchens TA K E OV E R

For the whole of the month of March, ELLE Decoration is going kitchens crazy. We’ll be celebrating this vital home hub everywhere from Instagram to our website, with a different daily feast of exclusive #EDkitchens content. F O L L O W, S I G N U P O R L I K E T O J O I N T H E F U N !

E L L ED E CO R AT I O N .CO.U K @ELLEDecoUK

@elledecorationuk

ELLE Decoration

ELLE Decoration UK

COOKBOOKS TO KNOW

FOODIE INFLUENCERS

SHELFIES

Q&A SESSIONS

PICTURES: JAKE CURTIS, BEN ANDERS

#EDFILMS


YOUR #EDKITCHENS CALENDAR

D AT E S T O K N O W From restaurant openings to book launches and the best foodie festivals, these are the events to put in your diary for spring/summer 2017

M A RCH

OLD SCHOOL DINNERS

With the month already in full swing, you can find all of the most exciting March events on elledecoration.co.uk, plus #EDfilms, kitchen Pinterest boards, recipes, Q+A sessions and Instagram stories. Make sure you follow the #EDkitchens hashtag on social media to stay up to date with the latest news.

Nostalgia and food go hand in hand, and in the spirit of embracing all things throwback, invest in kitchen kit that reminds you of dining days gone by. British gadget guru Swan (creator of the infamous ‘Teasmade’) has launched a deliberately retro slow cooker. Sky blue with a removable ceramic pot and settings to gently simmer stews or cook a crumble, it looks and cooks the part (£24.99; swan-brand.co.uk).

KEEP IT KOSHER Inspired by the classic Jewish delis of America, like the kitschy classic Katz’s in New York, the chefs at Monty’s Deli are bringing delicacies like babka, baked fresh daily, meaty Reuben sandwiches and nightly Shabbat dinners to Hoxton Street, London (montys-deli.com).

A GIFT FROM THE SEA

HEART OF THE ARTICHOKE Kitchen firm Artichoke is turning 25 and to celebrate, it’s inviting ELLE Decoration readers to its Somerset space on 27 April for a talk hosted by creative director Bruce Hodgson, as well as a spin around its state-of-the art workshops. Email elle@artichoke.co.uk to book a place (artichoke-ltd.com). 12

Kitchen showroom ALNO launches a new shop in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, on 4 April from 4–8pm. For the opening night Miele’s executive chef, Sven-Hanson Britt, will be running cookery demonstrations, showing us how to get the best out of Miele appliances. Be sure to book your place online (alnokitchens.co.uk/events).

NOMA GOES NOMADIC

GRIND FORCE

The London Coffee Festival returns to the Old Truman Brewery from 6–9 April. Watch the Coffee Masters competition to find the world’s best barista and have a go yourself. Advance tickets £16.50 (londoncoffeefestival.com).

ALNO OPENS

The team behind north London restaurant Primeur is opening a new spot, Westerns Laundry, in Highbury & Islington. Expect seasonal British fare and a focus on seafood from the British Isles, along with a great selection of funky wines and interiors designed by co-owner Jeremie Cometto-Lingenheim (primeurn5.co.uk).

The team at Copenhagen’s world-famous Noma restaurant are off on a sojourn to the ever-sohip beach retreat Tulum, in Mexico. They’ll be cooking up their brand of neo-Nordic molecular gastronomy at an open-air restaurant planted in the middle of the wilds of the Riviera Maya, facing the beautiful waters of the Caribbean Sea (noma.dk).

WORDS THROUGHOUT: ELIZA HONEY AND CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: PATRICIA NIVEN, KATHERINE ANNE ROSE, PAUL WINCH-FURNESS

A PR I L


Kitchens | C A L E N D A R

BOROUGH INTO BBQ

M AY

In preparation for summer, London shop Borough Kitchen is offering barbecue workshops at two of its locales, demonstrating how to use the ‘Big Green Egg’ barbecue to get the best out of different cuts of meat, teaching a few homemade sauce recipes, and offering free personalisation with the purchase of a Witloft leather apron. Vegans and vegetarians welcome, too! Saturday 29 April, 12–4pm at 186 Chiswick High Road, W4; Sunday 20 April, 1–5pm at 1 Hampstead High Street, NW3. The event is free, but make sure you sign up (boroughkitchen.com/bbq-workshop).

TA C O T I M E Celebrate Cinco de Mayo on 5 May at one of London’s many new taquerias. In our opinion, the reigning taco champion is the beautiful Temper in Soho, which opened last year. The modern barbecue joint’s unusual taco flavours include aubergine and chipotle miso, and crab and pickled onion pork skin (temperrestaurant.com).

A FINE BALANCE

HANDS-ON IN HAMPSHIRE

Angela Hartnett has organised an esoteric set of masterclasses at the elegant Limewood country house hotel and spa in the New Forest. While ponies and deer potter outside, take the ‘Crash Course In Crustaceans’ (6 April), join the ‘Hot Cross Bun Bake-Off ’ (13–14 April) or learn to make a ‘Signature Salami’ (27 April). From £65 (limewoodhotel.co.uk). H I G H LY G R AT E D The late Zaha Hadid’s final design for Alessi is out this month: ‘Forma’ is the most sculptural, organically-shaped cheese grater on the market. It more resembles a rock formation or opera house than a kitchen gadget. Designed to fit naturally into the palm of a user’s hand, the stainless steel grater is asymmetrical, meaning parmesan will fall artfully on to the plate (£45; alessi.com).

The Balance Festival brings many of the country’s biggest names in wellness together for a weekend of workouts and live cooking demos. Everyone from Detox Kitchen to Zanna Van Dijk will be taking turns at the state-of-the-art kitchen, teaching healthy cooking tips to incorporate into your everyday. 12–14 May at the Old Truman Brewery in Shoreditch. Tickets from £24 for a day pass (balance-festival.com). COOKING THE BOOKS New tome The Great Dixter Cookbook (Phaidon, £24.95) offers a valuable growing guide for fruit and vegetables, making it a great spring companion.

THE DIRT ON SOIL The better your soil, the better your veg: at least, that’s flower-growing team The Land Gardener’s philosophy. Go down the wormhole at their beautiful Oxfordshire property Wardington Manor and learn all about microbial rich compost at its full-day workshop on 11 May. Tickets are £95 each, available via the events page (landgardeners.com).

Y O U R D A I LY B R E A D

Food crusader Karen Collins and her brand Happy Tummy Co are out to save our collective digestive systems from the perils of the low-carb diet trend with her secret fermented bread recipe. Available from spring onwards for delivery across the UK, it’s guaranteed to restore you from the inside out (thehappytummyco.com).

C O F F E E O N TA P Get to know NitroBrew, which, from now onwards, will be offered at all the Soho House locations in London, plus the new Ned hotel. It’s a frothy, coldpressed coffee infused with nitrogen that comes straight from the tap, resembling a glass of Guinness. A clever invention from Sandows (sandows.com). ➤ 13


Kitchens | C A L E N D A R

JUNE

J U LY

AMALFI ADVENTURE

YOURS, TRULLO

Tim Siadatan of beloved pasta restaurants Trullo and Padella has written a cookbook. ‘Trullo’ (Square Peg, £25) features seasonal British twists on modern Italian cuisine. You’ll nail the perfect pasta sauce this month.

If holidaying along Italy’s Amalfi coast, stop at the iconic hotel Il San Pietro di Positano for lunch. The restaurant has been updated with a contemporary open kitchen so that guests can see chefs at work – if they aren’t distracted by the vistas along the coast to colourful cliffside town Praiano, that is (ilsanpietro.it).

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL

Taste of London festival has quickly become one of the food industry’s headline events, featuring a feast of samples from London’s best restaurants, as well as workshops and masterclasses. 14–18 June, tickets on sale March; Regent’s Park (london.tastefestivals.com). THE REAL DEAL On 29 June nutritionist Eve Kalinik is hosting ‘Debunking Healthy Eating: A REAL Food Masterclass’, a workshop centred on the myths that seem to circulate around healthy eating (evekalinik.com).

C A P I TA L G A I N S Food writer Aleksandra Crapranzano’s book, The London Cookbook (Sphere, £20), is a love letter to the city’s vibrant food scene. Launching in June, this will be the London foodie’s source for the best recipes in town, from the River Café’s much-loved lemon tagliatelle to Nopi’s cardamom gin.

PERFECT PRODUCE If Natoora, the best chefs’ not-so-secret purveyor of seasonal fruit and veg, is anything to go by, the summer’s highlights will be white peaches from Campania, Honeymoon melons and Datterini tomatoes. Stop by its well-stocked shop near Sloane Street for these and the pick of the season’s finest produce (natoora.co.uk). 14

SITTING ON THE DOCK Rick Stein’s eponymous city restaurant in Barnes has been given a ravishing refresh, making it a perfect spot for a summertime Sunday roast. Expect Stein’s luscious classics along with his take on seaside dishes like Dover Sole and Indonesian Curry (above). Bag a table on the water’s edge (depotbrasserie.co.uk).

CORNISH DELIGHT England’s grooviest festival, Port Eliot, returns to Cornwall from 27–30 July. This year, the house’s restored Georgian kitchen (above) is opening up to allow Alex Hely-Hutchinson, founder of 26 Grains, to host cardamom bun-making workshops (porteliotfestival.com).

TA K E M E T O T H E R I V E R

Now’s the time to treat yourself to a meal at Ruth Rogers and Rose Gray’s legendary River Café. Join the team in celebrating 30 years of seasonal cuisine at their beautiful Richard Rogers-designed dining room (rivercafe.co.uk). ➤

PICTURE: VALERIA NECCHIO

I N G O O D TA S T E

Kitchen designer Neil Lerner is holding a workshop titled ‘How to Design Your Kitchen’ at the space he designed and donated to the JW3 community and cultural centre in London. Learn how to get the most out of your own kitchen. 13 June at 7.30pm, tickets £15 each ( jw3.org.uk).


Kitchens | C A L E N D A R

AUGU S T

S E P T E M BE R

VA M P I R E W E E K E N D

S E A , S M E L L , TA S T E

19–20 August sees the Garlic Festival return to the Isle of Wight for its annual, pungent celebration. As well as buyable bulbs of every hue, shape and size, expect live music, dog agility classes and, of course, salads, stews and street food enhanced with all manner of garlic varieties (garlicfestival.co.uk).

Who knew that there were purveyors of sparkling wine, raw honey, organic sausages, stem ginger ice cream and beanto-bar chocolate all producing their wares in the Suffolk countryside? Taste all of these, plus many more, at Aldeburgh Food & Drink festival, from 23–24 September. Plus, chefs from near and far will be coming to cook up a storm for hungry punters by the seaside (aldeburghfoodanddrink.co.uk).

FEAST YOUR EYES

DANISH DELIGHTS

The Nordic city of Copenhagen is lighting up for a full eight-day foodie frenzy also known as the Copenhagen Cooking & Food Festival, 18–27 August, with workshops, smörgåsbord tastings and the opportunity to dine at the homes of many of Denmark’s best chefs. Watch out for more updates online (copenhagencooking.com). 16

HUNTING FOR RICHES Book now to visit Villa Lena, surely the artiest agriturismo (working farm with accommodation) in Italy, where in the autumn you can join artists in residence for daily expeditions to forage truffles in the surrounding woods. At the end of the day, head back to the kitchen to cook something tasty, before sitting down with chefs, artists and foragers to eat and drink the estate’s wine (villa-lena.it).

P U M P K I N PAT C H

G O U R M E T G R E AT OUTDOORS

The Good Life Experience festival, 15–17 September, is BBC Radio 6 DJ Cerys Matthews’ annual shindig celebrating all things outdoors. This year, ticketholders can learn to cook over a campfire or in pit ovens with Thomasina Miers of Wahaca (above), Petersham Nurseries head chef Damian Clisby and fifthgeneration baker Tom Herbert. From £77.50 for a weekend ticket (thegoodlifeexperience.co.uk).

Be it to carve a spooky jack-o’lantern or to use for cooking a hearty soup, this is the month to head out of town to pick your own pumpkin. Foxes Farm Produce now has two patches within easy reach of London, in Basildon and Colchester. Entrance to the farms is free; you just pay for your fruit, according to its size. Open from 1 October, pumpkins from £2 ( foxesfarmproduce.co.uk).

SWEET SUCCESS Yotam Ottolenghi’s long-awaited desserts cookbook, Sweet (Ebury, £27), arrives this month, packed with all of his and collaborator Helen Goh’s greatest hits and more. Expect to find at least 120 recipes that draw inspiration from many parts of the world and incorporate the chef’s trademark blend of exotic spices and flavourings, such as fig, rose petal saffron and pomegranate. Like his other cookbooks, this one is bound to include a wealth of new tastes.

A FORAGED FEAST Spend the day in the wilds of Richmond with Petersham Nurseries’ own foraging expert Claudio. Not only will you learn which wild fruits, berries and herbs you can pick at this time of year, but why they’re beneficial and how you can prepare a meal with them. The hour-long walk is followed by a demonstration with Claudio. 28 October, 9:30–12pm, tickets £40 (petershamnurseries.com). E D

PICTURES: RASMUS FLINDT PEDERSEN, ANDREW WHITTON

Jamie Oliver and Alex James (Blur bassist and cheesemaker) started The Big Feastival at his Oxfordshire farm in 2011, and it’s become a mainstay for the London foodie crowd ever since, with Mark Hix, Stevie Parle and more in regular attendance. This year’s lineup, on 25–27 August is as promising as ever. Tickets from £79.50 (ticketmaster.co.uk).

O C T OBE R


SHOPPING • DESIGN • NA MES TO KNOW • TECHNOLOGY • BIG IDEA S

NEWS

WORDS THROUGHOUT: ELIZA HONEY

G E T F OX Y

We love the light and subtle shimmer that foxed glass brings to a kitchen, which is why this design by bespoke kitchen maker Humphrey Munson caught our eye. Its trademark glass splashbacks give its contemporary kitchens a sense of playful romance. If an entire slab of antiqued mirror is beyond your budget, do not despair. Embrace the trend with Ochre’s ‘Moon’ glass mats ( from £60; ochre.net), which make great table settings. From £40,000 ( humphreymunson.co.uk).


Kitchens | N E W S

I N T O T H E BLU E Powdery shades of blue are the latest trend for kitchens. Light and soothing, they look beautiful when combined with metal appliances. One of our favourite examples is Naked Kitchens’ design for a NimTim Architects project in London (above right, from £20,000; nakedkitchens.com). The finished space contrasts cool blue cabinetry with warming brass hardware and a worktop and splashback made of beautiful stone. On the other side of the world, Melbourne company Cantilever Interiors’ ‘K2’ kitchen (above left) sports a pop of teal on its overhead cabinetry, proving that even a smaller hit of blue can make a big splash (cantileverinteriors.com).

Book this Satisfy the need to knead by booking a masterclass at Bread Ahead in London’s Borough Market. Run by loaf enthusiasts, the workshops include a crash course in Middle Eastern flatbread (30 and 31 March) and an introduction to Italian baking (22 and 24 March). From £80 per person for a half day (breadahead.com).

PICTURES: MEGAN TAYLOR, MARTINA GEMMOLA, JEPPE SØRENSEN

PULL UP A STOOL

Everyone knows that the best seats in the house are at the bar. Just ask the team at Barrafina and The Barbary, two permanently packed out London joints that are bar-seating only. Bring some of their style to your home with these four stunning stools.

‘Caribou’ by Ochre Wrapped in Italian saddle leather with a plump nubuck cushion, this sleek number also comes in red. From £2,124 (ochre.net).

‘The Bum Stool’ by Devol Members of the team sat on wet clay in order to create a form comfortable for all shapes and sizes. £280 (devolkitchens.co.uk).

‘Avery’ by Pinch London The ultimate combination of simplicity and comfort – perfect for an extended meal at the bar. From £995 (pinchdesign.com).

‘Just’ by Normann Copenhagen A pared-back design with a clean profile. Its classic look will fit any style. £180 (normanncopenhagen.com).

21


Kitchens | N E W S

FA L L I N L I N E At the acclaimed Restaurant Relæ in Copenhagen we came across a design detail that’s remained ingrained in our memory ever since: a personal cutlery drawer for every diner, including wooden inserts that had been custom-made to the exact contours of its contents. With an eye to bringing the idea home, we sought out three kitchen companies that are making tableware organisers which create beauty from order.

Riva1920 Conceived by American designer Terry Dwan, the ‘Only One’ collection includes teak countertop display units for showing off your prized plates and most attractive kitchen accessories. From £476 (riva1920.it).

DE VOL’ S I N T H E DE TA I L S

PICTURE: SISKA VANDECASTEELE

Henrybuilt The American kitchen and home furnishings brand makes nifty bread bins and storage bays that hide neatly, almost imperceptibly, inside its wooden kitchen worktops. From £31,700 (henrybuilt.com).

Second Nature Instantly organise your drawers with this UK company’s wooden inserts, with slots for every tool and plate imaginable. From £250 for the drawer insert and corresponding knives (sncollection.co.uk).

Designed at Devol’s expansive workshop at Cotes Mill in Leicestershire, the new ‘Ceramic Pendant Light’ is one of the brand’s first product launches (the other is ‘The Bum Stool’ – see previous page). The simple form and beautiful crackle glaze of the pendant light is a perfect fit with Devol’s Shaker-style kitchens: pictured here is British designer Sebastian Cox’s creation for the brand, which features inky blue/black stained wood. Lights, £150 each (devolkitchens.co.uk).

TA K E F I V E

Bring a colourful twist to the table with design duo Muller Van Severen’s stackable trays. As the name suggests, the ‘Five Circles’ trays are sold in sets of five: each includes three polyethylene discs and two marble ones. Stack them up as an artful centrepiece or employ them as placemats for an eye-catching table setting. There are also five colour combinations to choose from. £368 for a set, Valerie Objects (valerie-objects.com). 23


ON THE GRID

These geometric ‘Graphpaper’ tiles by Fired Earth are a tribute to the wannabe maths whizz in us all. Their gridline pattern is particularly pleasing to those who prize neatness – you can write lists in chalk right on the walls, with the grid acting as a line guide. Made of matt porcelain, they’re easy to clean and hardy enough to be used on floors. £90 per square metre ( firedearth.com).

24


Kitchens | N E W S 1

RAINBOW RANGES Who said cookers need to be stainless steel or white? Turn up the heat with these three colourful finds, from a compact oven to a modern range.

‘Portofino’ by Smeg The colour options for this extra-large cooker are inspired by the Amalfi coast – think sunny orange to verdant green. Increase the holiday vibes by adding a refractory stone for pizzas in minutes. From £2,399 (smeguk.com).

PICTURES: MAURO SMEG, APVDSRL, MAX ZAMBELLI

‘Everhot 60’ by Everhot First released 35 years ago, this classic compact model is available in every colour from teal to tangerine. Features include two ovens, hot plates and an integrated grill. From £4,825 (everhot.co.uk).

THE W HITE A L BU M Simple though they may be, white kitchens are anything but boring. Case in point is Cesar’s new ‘UNIT’ kitchen (2, from £13,276; cesar.it), which comes in this wonderful silky finish complemented by slimline brass handles. For a sleek feel, we love the simplicity of Modulnova’s lacquered ‘Twenty’ kitchen (1, from £25,000, Design Space London; designspacelondon.com), topped with a slab of light grey Carrara marble. Seeking a white kitchen with more character? The ‘Mayfair’ by Visionnaire (3, £156,633; visionnaire-home.com), with its graphic stainless-steel detailing, is just plain sexy. 2

3

‘Oxford’ by Steel Cucine New from the family-owned Italian brand known for its handcrafted kitchen appliances is this classic looking range, available in a red-hot burgundy. £2,340, Bradshaw Luxury (bradshawluxury.co.uk).

25


Kitchens | N E W S

T H E A RT OF DI S PL AY While the neat freaks’ impulse is to squirrel everything away behind closed doors, more and more kitchen designers are creating open storage solutions for displaying beautiful pots, glassware and tableware. Piero Lissoni’s new ‘Boffi_Code’ kitchen for Boffi (above) sports ultra-thin open shelves that come in on-trend brass or Abonos Oak, a fossilised wood found in Eastern European lake beds ( from £80,000; boffiuk.com). Also on our radar is the ‘Genius Loci’ by Valcucine (right), which has a gallery-like display system. Show off select items on its glass shelving and stash all other essentials in the kitchen island’s roomy drawers (£50,000; valcucine.com).

Try this Ever wished you could browse all of your cookbooks at once for a recipe that suits your fridge? Eat Your Books is a website that allows you to build a virtual database of the recipes from your own cookbooks, and you can search them all by ingredient! Free for the first five cookbooks, then £24 per year (eatyourbooks.com).

PICTURE: MAX ZAMBELLI

TA P I N T O M E TA L L I C S

Zip’s ‘HydroTaps’, which dispense filtered, boiling, chilled or sparkling water, are now smarter than ever, available in a spectrum of metallic finishes from rose gold to gunmetal and nickel. The ‘Platinum Design Range’ is a godsend for those looking to create a truly coordinated kitchen – once you choose your shade, there are plenty of accessories out there to match! From £1,549 (zipwater.com).

27


Kitchens | N E W S

C O U N T E R C U LT U R E The most popular surface materials of the moment are hardy, versatile alternatives to marble that don’t scrimp on appeal or durability. They combine the patterns and textures of luxurious stone with high-tech, low-maintenance qualities. Here are three of our favourite new worktops made from quartz and natural stone.

‘Supernaturals’ by Caesarstone A new surface collection that comes in a pleasingly toned-down palette. This kitchen is fitted in polished ‘5130 Cosmopolitan White’. From £300 per square metre (caesarstone.co.uk).

A B E T T E R B R E A K FA S T Give the most important meal of the day the attention it deserves by dedicating an entire cupboard to it. Hogarth Architects have re-introduced and revamped the toast hub, a popular 1990s kitchen feature, with a purpose-built cabinet – it’s also a way to keep surfaces completely clear, even of the kettle and toaster. With drawers and compartments for jams, eggcups and cutlery, plus room for the teapot, breadbin and coffee maker, it cleverly consolidates the morning routine. The kitchen is taking up more space than ever before in open-plan living situations, and smart storage solutions like these are now even more of a must, quickly and cleverly hiding away the mess of our busy modern lives. From £5,000 for a standalone unit (hogartharchitects.co.uk). 28

Silestone by Cosentino Quartz surfaces that offer durability and vast options when it comes to colour and texture. This year’s range includes ‘Eternal Calacatta Gold’ (above), from £400 per square metre (silestone.co.uk).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: LUNDHS/MORTEN RAKKE, RICHARD SOUTHALL

‘Antique’ by Lundhs Perfect for a hint of sparkle, these surfaces feature flecks of blue and purple crystals, which really pop against the natural stone’s rich brown tones. From £970 per square metre (lundhsrealstone.com).


Kitchens | N E W S

PL A S T IC FA N TA S T IC Part of a company-wide initiative to curb its impact on the environment, Ikea has launched a new line of kitchen fronts, ‘Kungsbacka’, made out of recycled-PET bottles and wood. PET (polyethylene terephthalate) is a recyclable material that unfortunately ends up in landfill almost 70 per cent of the time. However, in Ikea’s innovative hands, it gives the new fronts a lasting, easy-to-clean sheen. Happily, the rich anthracite grey designs are compatible with Ikea’s existing range of ‘Metod’ cabinets. From £5 for a drawer front (ikea.com).

H AV E A R I C E D AY As compact as it is elegant, Muji’s new rice cooker fits in with Naoto Fukusawa’s other minimal designs for the brand – a toaster and kettle. Turn it on before setting off to work and come home to warm, perfectly cooked rice. £149 (muji.eu).

THE BAR IS OPEN! A made-to-measure drinks cabinet tops many dream home wishlists, and we’re coveting these two. Smallbone of Devizes’ ‘Wine Wall’ (above left) is a quaffer’s dream, with a laser-cut leather backdrop and glass shelves that make the wine bottles appear to float in mid-air (from £45,000; smallbone.co.uk). Meanwhile, cocktail hour is all the more enjoyable with Pinch’s new ‘Frans’ drinks cabinet. Made from oak, cherry, or American walnut with a lacquered base available in a spectrum of colours – red included – it neatly conceals all cocktail paraphernalia (from £7,650; pinchdesign.com). 30


Kitchens | D E S I G N

2

B R A N D T O K N O W VA R E N N A

1

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD

Varenna, part of the Poliform furniture brand, is famed for its slick architect-designed kitchens Kitchens are one of the most complex elements of any home. Just think of the number of materials that have to work together to make one: wood, steel, 4 marble, aluminium, ceramic… and that’s before you’ve started exploring the number of cuttingedge composite and eco materials there are to choose from. 3 Varenna is a past master at synthesising this diverse material palette to create covetable modern kitchens. A respected name in the industry since 1950, its design credentials soared in 1996, when it was taken over by furniture brand Poliform. Under the latter’s guidance, architects such as Paolo Piva, Vincent Van Duysen and Carlo Colombo were brought in to maximise the company’s potential, and now Varenna is the ultimate purveyor of luxuriously appointed spaces that blend seamlessly with your living environment. Varenna’s kitchens are not just to cook in, but also to live in, dine in and even party in. Poliform has seven factories north of Milan, one of which is devoted exclusively to the making of Varenna VARENNA’S MODERN kitchens. The brand’s innovation is led by a five-person research and KITCHENS ARE development team, which works SPACES NOT JUST TO closely with international architects and designers to ensure the perfect COOK IN, BUT ALSO mix of form and function in its cooking spaces. The resulting designs TO LIVE IN, DINE IN offer something for everyone – from AND EVEN PARTY IN Paolo Piva’s ‘Matrix’ kitchen, with its huge workspace and generous storage aimed at the dedicated cook, to the ‘Alea’, which has a streamlined style suited to small spaces. Varenna kitchens have been installed in high-profile locations around the world, including architect Daniel Libeskind’s Sapphire apartment building in Berlin and Foster + Partners’ 50 United Nations Plaza development in New York. Perhaps the best thing about the company is the potential it offers for curating your space. Varenna kitchens come in endless finishes – so whether your style is modern-rustic timber, cool grey concrete or bright red lacquer, there’s an option to suit. It also offers a free planning service for all its designs, so you can create a kitchen that’s tailored precisely to your home and lifestyle. poliformuk.com

F O U R C L A S S I C VA R E N N A KITCHENS TO KNOW 1 ‘ T R A I L’ B Y C A R L O C O L O M B O & C R & S VA R E N N A

One for minimalists, this sleek design features lacquer doors and a marble top with edges that slant at a 45-degree angle, creating a beautiful shadow-gap detail. 2 ‘ A L E A’ B Y PA O L O P I VA & C R & S VA R E N N A

With its simple doors available in many finishes and storage hidden behind banks of dark wood, this design is popular with architects, thanks to its pristine lines. Show off tableware in the smoked-glass cupboards. 3 ‘ P H O E N I X ’ B Y C R & S VA R E N N A

A delicate balance of original recessed handles, a thin steel worktop, solid wood base units and large illuminated glass cabinetry. The original composition has a practical layout perfect for entertaining. 4 ‘ T W E LV E ’ B Y C A R L O C O L O M B O & C R & S VA R E N N A

This purist design is characterised by its super-slim surfaces, including cabinet doors that are just 12 millimetres thick. It’s at its most elegant in back-painted glass, available in six colours, or stainless steel.

33


TECHNOLOGY

T H E HOM E H U B The ‘D90’ kitchen by TM Italia is designed to resemble a cityscape – all industrial glass and metal – and its selection of built-in appliances and high-tech features are perfect for urban dwellers. The doors, which hide the shelves, and the pantry can both be opened and closed using an app. From £40,000 (hubkitchens.com).

Buy this Terraillon’s ‘NutriSmart’ kitchen scale can help you manage your calorie intake by providing nutritional information for any food. Place your ingredient on the scale and the built-in camera scans it, sending its findings to a free wellness app. £160 , available autumn (terraillon.com). YOUR NEW SOUS CHEF

A RARE FIND

This new handleless oven – part of Miele’s ‘Generation 6000 ArtLine’ collection – helps you produce restaurant-quality meals at home. It has a wireless food probe (stored in the door) that you place in your food during cooking. Ideal for achieving perfect medium rare beef or succulent chicken, it tracks meat’s core temperature. £5,349 (miele.co.uk). 34

Michelin-starred chefs, including king of experimentation Heston Blumenthal, use the intelligent ‘Vorwerk’ food processor to expand their repertoire of textures and flavours. It’s a whole kitchen counter of gadgets combined in one. It can weigh, chop, blend, mix, grind, grate, cook, steam, whisk or knead. The latest model even includes a database of tasty recipes, all accessible via the built-in colour touchscreen. £964, Thermomix (thermomix. vorwerk.co.uk).


Kitchens | T E C H N O L O G Y

THREE OF THE BEST GADGETS FOR WINE LOVERS The no-mess chiller No ice in the freezer? No bother. With Kaelo’s ‘iceless’ ice bucket built into your kitchen counter you can chill a bottle of wine (and keep it cool) using less electricity than a 60-watt light bulb. Just touch its bezel to activate the cold chamber. £1,890 (kaelo.co.uk).

The speedy decanter When you don’t have the time to let your wine sit in a traditional decanter, the ‘iFavine iSommelier’ is here to help. It is designed to aerate and filter wine in minutes, mimicking the natural process by putting your favourite pinot in contact with concentrated, purified oxygen. £349, Selfridges (selfridges.com).

COOL COFFEE

N OW YOU SEE ME

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURES: DENNIS SAVINI, RENE WEIGLER

The less cold air you let escape from your fridge, the fresher your food stays. LG’s ‘Smart InstaView’ refrigerator offers a solution – it allows indecisive snackers to peek inside without opening the door. Simply knock twice and a tinted glass panel turns translucent. Out summer 2017 (lg.com).

The wine bar For those who want to make wine the centrepiece of their kitchen, there is the Dacor ‘Discovery WineStation DYWS4’. An automated, temperature-controlled system that dispenses wines by the glass, preserving bottles for up to 60 days after opening. £4,500 (dacor.com).

N U M B E R O N E FA N Do away with clunky overhead extractor fans and invest in Elica’s ‘Nikola Tesla Aspiration’, an induction hob with integrated air suction in the middle. The jet engine-inspired system draws steam and odours into a concealed ceramic filter, automatically adjusting its performance as you cook. From £2,500 (elica.com).

Not to be confused with iced coffee, cold-brew coffee is a totally on-trend method of steeping beans in water for 12–24 hours to extract complex flavours. OXO’s simple, effective ‘Cold Brew Coffee System’ includes a ‘Rainmaker’ attachment that ensures water falls evenly over the grounds, resulting in a smoother and sweeter taste. £45 (oxouk.com).

R A I S I N G S TA N D A R D S

AEG’s new range of ‘Mastery’ appliances deploy innovative technologies to tackle practical problems. The ‘ComfortLift’ dishwasher, for example, features a bottom rack that swings up so that you don’t have to bend down to load or unload it. Its cycle runs at a whisper-quiet 37 decibels, too. £899 (electroluxgroup.com). 35


D E TA I L S

BL AC K M AG I C For a timeless urban aesthetic, team monochrome utensils and appliances with accessories that add a touch of graphic pattern

1

7 3

4

6

5

1 ‘Linear Stem’ spaghetti jar by Orla Kiely, £40, Amara (amara.com) 2 ‘Oiva Basket’ teapot by Carina Seth Andersson and Sami Ruotsalainen, £69, Marimekko (marimekko.com) 3 Grey-blue jug, £25, White Stuff (whitestuff.com) 4 ‘Malmsjön’ mixer tap by Mikael Warnhammar, £80, Ikea (ikea.com) 5 ‘Timeline’ sink, from £454, Villeroy & Boch (villeroy-boch.co.uk) 6 ‘SinkBase Plus’ sink tidy by Joseph Joseph, £20, Amara (amara.com) 7 ‘Pure Black’ knives by Stelton, £39.95, Dotmaison (dotmaison.com) 8 ‘Pebble’ boards by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, from £49.90 each, Selfridges (selfridges.com) 9 Casserole dish, £35, George Home (george.com) 10 ‘Collar’ milk jug by Studio Something for Stelton, £39.95, Skandium (skandium.com) 11 ‘Mr & Mrs’ mug, £35, Sue Pryke (suepryke.com) 12 ‘Lauderdale’ tea towel by Lindsey Lang for Barbican, £16.50, Barbican Centre Shop (barbican.org.uk/shop) 13 ‘Pieni Tiiliskivi’ tea towel by Armi Ratia, £16, Marimekko (marimekko.com) 14 ‘Pharmacy’ handle, £18, Superfront (superfront.com) 15 ‘Salamanca’ black bowl, £25.50, Canvas Home (canvashomestore.co.uk) 16 ‘Raw’ grey bowl, £17, Zakkia (zakkia.eu) 17 ‘Restoration’ wire basket, £6, Sainsbury’s (sainsburys.co.uk) 18 Cutlery, £38 for a 16-piece set, Next (next.co.uk) 19 ‘Pebble’ cheese plane, £14.90; cheese knife, £14.90, both by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, Selfridges (selfridges.com) 20 ‘Small Cone’ black light, £470, Asaf Weinbroom (asafweinbroom.com) 21 ‘Small Knot’ clear light, £130, Vitamin (vitaminliving.com) Backgrounds, from top ‘Stone_Art’ tiles, £47.52 per square metre, Marazzi Group (marazzitile.co.uk). ‘Mimica Arabescato’ worktop, from £90 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) ➤

COMPILED BY: MOLLY HUTCHINSON

2


Kitchens | S H O P P I N G

20

21

17

8

18

9

10 11 15 19

16 12 13

14


D E TA I L S

B E YO N D T H E PA L E Pair the natural grain of oak and ash with the milky polish of ceramics for a modern take on the country kitchen

6 7

1

3

4 5 2


Kitchens | S H O P P I N G

15 14

13 9 10

8

12 11

1 Acrylic and wood storage boxes, £73, Hübsch (hubsch-interior.com) 2 ‘Paddle’ grinder, £59; ‘Paddle’ jar, £29, both by Noidoi Design Studio for Skagerak, Skandium (skandium.com) 3 Storage pot by RJR John Rocha, £13, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 4 ‘Mulle’ pestle and mortar, £41.30, Broste Copenhagen (brostecopenhagen.com) 5 Citrus reamer by Gray & Willow, £25, House of Fraser (houseoffraser.co.uk) 6 ‘Veggie’ board, £49.90; 7 ‘Bread’ board, £79.90, both by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, Selfridges (selfridges.com) 8 ‘Marble and Mango Wood’ board, £36, French Connection (frenchconnection.com) 9 ‘Ash’ board by Hübsch, £28, Workshop (workshopliving.co.uk) 10 French coffee press, £67.49, Yield (yielddesign.co) 11 ‘Elzora’ mug, £6, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 12 Brass handle ceramic teapot, £25, White Stuff (whitestuff.com) 13 ‘Emma’ kettle by Holmbäck Nordentoft, £139, Stelton (stelton.com) 14 ‘Aplomb’ pendant light by Lucidi and Pevere for Foscarini, from £506, Aram Store (aram.co.uk) 15 ‘Concrete’ wall clock by Wild + Wood, £99, Oggetto (oggetto.com) Backgrounds, from top ‘Natural Stone’ tiles by Cerim, £28.84 per square metre, Florim Ceramiche (florim.it). ‘Colmar Oak’ worktop, £78 for 3 metres x 0.6 metres, B&Q (diy.com) ➤


16

D E TA I L S

SHINING EX AMPLES

17

Copper and terracotta are two of this season’s hottest materials. Artfully combine them for a kitchen that’s bang on trend

1

4

3

6 2

5 7

1 ‘Zen’ mixer tap, £1,512, The Watermark Collection (thewatermarkcollection.eu) 2 ‘Monarch Variant 40 Copper’ sink by Alveus, from £317.86, Olif (olif.co.uk) 3 Electric salt and pepper mills by Morphy Richards Accents, £19.99, Very (very.co.uk) 4 ‘Puolikas’ tray by Sami Ruotsalainen, £16, Marimekko (marimekko.com) 5 ‘Evelyse’ bowl, £15; 6 ‘Evelyse’ jug, £10, both by Bloomingville, Ross & Brown (rossandbrownhome.co.uk) 7 Stoneware mug, £12.50; 8 storage jar, £25, both White Stuff (whitestuff.com) 9 ‘Terra’ casserole dish by Jansen + Co, £100, Skandium (skandium.com) 10 Oven mitt, £13.77, Ferm Living (fermliving.com) 11 ‘Bronzini’ hangers by Alessandro Zambelli, from £132 each, Portego (puntaportego.com) 12 Copper spatula, £16 (part of a set of six); 13 kettle, £28, both Next (next.co.uk) 14 Knife block by Viners, £59.99, Very (very.co.uk) 15 ‘Tank’ whiskey glasses, £45; whiskey decanter, £75, both Tom Dixon (tomdixon.net) 16 Copper and wood pendant light, £40, Cox & Cox (coxandcox.co.uk) 17 ‘Cloak & Dagger’ copper pendant light by Esther Patterson, £475, Curiousa & Curiousa (curiousa.co.uk) 18 ‘Folded’ shelf by Johan van Hengel for Muuto, £99, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) 19 Perforated spoon and ladle, £16 (part of a set of six), Next (next.co.uk) 20 ‘Marigold’ mug, £12.50, Marks and Spencer (mands.com) Background ‘Lana’ marble, from £199 per square metre, Ann Sacks (annsacks.com) E D


Kitchens | S H O P P I N G

18 20

19

13 8

14 9

12

15

11 10


THE HEART O F MY H OM E

Follow us into the kitchens of some of three top tastemakers as they reveal the stories behind their favourite pieces

1

C L A R E L AT T I N , R E S TA U R AT E U R

WORDS: NELL CARD PICTURES: KRISTIN PERERS

Clare Lattin lives in a converted factory in east London. Together with her business partners Rory McCoy and Tom Hill, she runs two restaurants: Ducksoup in Soho and Rawduck in Hackney. A third site – with a focus on pickles and fermented food – is due to open later this year. She also has her own ceramics brand, Vessel & Time, and is the co-author of Ducksoup Cookbook: The Wisdom of Simple Cooking (Square Peg, £25), which champions relaxed, unfussy food. Here, she takes us on a tour of her kitchen, the homely test lab where many of her recipes take shape. The kitchen was open plan when I moved in and I wanted to keep it that way. I knew I didn’t want anything too overly designed. I wanted to be able to see everything, so there are no cupboards, just shelves. I have always been in love with the boxed concrete shelving they do so well in Morocco and Spain, but I couldn’t afford that at the time, so I asked my neighbour, Seng Watson, for his advice. He casts all the concrete for our restaurants’ interiors. He helped me recreate the look using reclaimed fire doors, which I then painted white. The worksurface is an old iroko wood laboratory top from Retrouvius. You tend to be tidier with everything on display. There are no closed doors, so the kitchen will never look streamlined, but there is still space for everything to breathe. I am more selective with my possessions and more organised for it. Having said that, sometimes I do get bored of looking at the same plates all the time. I can easily get caught up in the urge to buy new things. The whole kitchen was designed around the dining table. I think it’s a very old worktable because it’s covered in scalpel marks. It’s very functional – not just for eating at. I don’t want to place fruit bowls or flowers on it, because I also use it as a countertop. That’s why my toaster, bread board and lamp are on there. It needs to be both minimal and practical. The space sometimes functions as a test kitchen for my restaurants, and I do a lot of fermenting at home. I’ve just been experimenting with fermented chillies and I have some Indian pickles on the go: a pumpkin achar and lime pickle, which is always popular. I also have some white kimchi [a Korean speciality] and some brine-fermented carrots in the fridge, plus some kombucha [fermented black or green tea]. Rory recently bought me some spiced drinking vinegar and I have a couple of teaspoons of that in the morning. It’s an effective way to wake up. I like objects that feel like they have life – woven baskets, hessian mats, old wooden bowls and spoons. I love materials that age well and are beautiful to handle, so no plastic utensils! I often buy inexpensive objects on my travels and pay a fortune to have them shipped home. I spend most of my time in the kitchen. In fact, I could lose half of the space in my apartment and still be very happy here. ➤ 42


Kitchens | P R O F I L E

‘YOU TEND TO BE TIDIER WITH EVERYTHING ON DISPLAY. THE KITCHEN WILL NEVER LOOK STREAMLINED, BUT THERE IS SPACE FOR EVERYTHING TO BREATHE’

43


T H E H E A RT O F M Y H O M E MY ESSENTIAL KITCHEN KIT

Clare shares the five kitchen utensils that she couldn’t live without Toast rack I spend a lot of time in antiques shops searching for beautiful silver toast racks, but they are the hardest things to find. I have one hanging on my utensil rack that I use every day. Red stovetop kettle There’s something comforting about drinking water that’s been boiled on the stove rather than an electric kettle. It wouldn’t occur to me to have any other kind of kettle. Japanese knife When our restaurant chef Tom comes around, he always uses my Japanese knife. The others just aren’t quite sharp enough for him. Mandolin This is brilliant for preparing veg for fermenting and salads. It cuts vegetables wafer thin, so that the slices dance over the plate. Japanese saucepan I bought my favourite saucepan on a trip to Japan. It’s made from dimpled, galvanised metal and it has a lovely wooden handle and a spout. It’s the perfect size – not too deep, not too shallow. ➤

44


Kitchens | P R O F I L E

‘I LIKE OBJECTS THAT FEEL LIKE THEY HAVE A LIFE – WOVEN BASKETS, HESSIAN MATS, OLD WOODEN BOWLS. I LOVE MATERIALS THAT AGE WELL AND ARE BEAUTIFUL TO HANDLE’

45


T H E H E A RT O F M Y H O M E

2

G A M F R AT E S I , D E S I G N D U O

Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi founded Gam Fratesi, based in Copenhagen, in 2006 and have since created iconic pieces for superbrands including Gubi, Fredericia and Porro. They are known for their ability to elevate simple clean lines into something inventive and beautiful. It’s a skill that is clearly on display in the design of their own kitchen – a colourful but elegant space that they believe evolves alongside their work. Here, they tell us about the inspiration behind its striking look. Like our work, our kitchen is a combination of contrasts. Our love of minimalist lines is combined with our use of strong, natural materials and craftsmanship. It references our respect for our different cultures: Danish and Italian. It is a recipe that says a lot about us – rigorous, but also rooted in Italy’s aesthetic tradition. We designed this room at the same time as creating our mirrored ‘In Between’ installation at the ‘Mind Craft 15’ exhibition during the 2015 Salone del Mobile design week in Milan. We filled the floor of a historic courtyard in the Danish Ministry with mirrors to create a real-life optical illusion. Reflection, as a concept, was in our consciousness at the time, and we wanted to transfer this idea to our home. The mirrored cabinets emphasise the sense of space and reflect the beautiful kitchen floor, which is covered in recycled tiles found in an old demolished palazzo in Italy. The marble [used on the splashback and countertop] is from the mountains, not far from where Enrico grew up. We went down to the quarry to select the stone ourselves. The materials in this room are essential to the success of its design. They give the kitchen a story and their natural imperfections make the space feel more lived in. Colour is almost as important as materials, and so the reflective lines of our kitchen are punctuated by bright accents, from the vintage graphic blue lights by Verner Panton for Louis Poulsen to the red of our own ‘Chariot’ bar cart, designed for Gubi. This is a space we use a lot and it, both directly and indirectly, reflects our everyday life. Many of our own pieces have made their way into this room [‘Beetle’ chairs for Gubi surround the vintage rosewood dining table and, above that, there’s an ‘Edition 50’ lithography print by Gam Fratesi for Japanese design and furniture shop Cibone]. There is an intimate, but also a lively, feel to our kitchen. It’s ideal for us. gamfratesi.com ➤

PICTURES: HEIDI LERKENFELDT

‘THE MIRRORED CABINETS EMPHASISE THE SENSE OF SPACE AND REFLECT THE BEAUTIFUL FLOOR, WHICH IS COVERED IN RECYCLED TILES FROM A DEMOLISHED PALAZZO IN ITALY’

46


Kitchens | P R O F I L E

47


48


Kitchens | P R O F I L E

THE HEART OF MY HOME MY ESSENTIAL KITCHEN KIT

Stine and Enrico tell us about the finishing touches that make a big difference Marble chopping board This circular board (below right) is an offcut from our ‘TS’ table for Gubi. It is made from heavily veined Marrone Emperador marble. Vintage glassware We love our collection of pastelcoloured pieces by Holmegaard from the 1950 and 60s. Bar trolley This is one of our own designs, the ‘Chariot’ for Gubi (previous page). Its bright red colour stands out, reflected in the mirrored cabinets. Ceramics We have a lot of Danish designs in our kitchen. The white milk and sugar set on the countertop is by contemporary designer Ditte Fischer. E D

‘THE MATERIALS IN THIS ROOM ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE SUCCESS OF ITS DESIGN. THEY GIVE THE KITCHEN A STORY AND THEIR NATURAL IMPERFECTIONS MAKE THE SPACE FEEL MORE LIVED IN’

49


KEY TR ENDS TO TRY NOW • THE WOR LD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL KITCHENS

INSPIRATION

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE: NIKLAS HART

HOT TREND

#1 S E T T H E T O N E

Be experimental! Play with complementary shades and add hints of metal Cook up the perfect colour combination, like interior designer Cecilie Claussen’s mix of deep teal, powdery pale green and brass. The effect here is stunning, but the bones of this kitchen are simple and affordable. They’re Ikea ‘Metod’ cabinets, to which Claussen has added cupboard fronts and handles by Swedish company Superfront. The brand offers a wide range of shades and finishes, making it possible to try out new schemes without too much hassle or expense. ‘Blocks’ cupboard fronts in ‘Aerugo Green’ (top), from £72 each; ‘No Pattern’ cupboard fronts in ‘Bottle Green’ (bottom), from £55 each; ‘Holy Wafer’ handles, £11 each, all Superfront (superfront.com) ➤


HOT TREND

#2 PERIOD DRAMA

Love minimalism but live in a heritage building? Team sleek cabinetry with original cornicing Architect and photographer Tom Ferguson has used a palette of wood and monochrome to add a contemporary twist to this airy room, replete with intricate mouldings. Get the look by teaming matt-black lacquered handleless units with warm grey walls, and paint mouldings and skirting in a bright white that lets them stand out. Last but far from least: make a striking showpiece out of your surfaces by using the same quartz across both splashback and worktop.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: TOM FERGUSON

Bespoke kitchens from £25,000, TFAD Architects (tfad.com.au) ➤


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Salt of the earth

Cabinetry and shelving Reclaimed pine by Brandler London (kitchens from £20,000; brandler.london) Worktop 30-millimetre blue/grey Moleanos limestone by Brandler London (as before) Wall Painted in ‘Castle Gray’ by Farrow & Ball, from £74.50 for five litres (farrow-ball.com) Accessories Marble dish and stand, £69, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk). Glass with gold band, £13, Serax (serax.com). Coffee pot, £39, House Doctor, (housedoctor.dk). ‘Luna’ plates (on counter), from £10 each, John Lewis (johnlewis.com). ‘Loft’ sugar bowl, £14, Heal’s (heals.com). Black bowl by Mervyn Gers, £12, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Kahala’ black storage jar, £15, Habitat (habitat.com)

54

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURE: JOSH RUSHBY, PHOEBE HARRIS

Light stone, treated pine, ceramics and deep green shades form a tactile, natural palette in this London kitchen, a collaboration between Brandler London, Swoon Editions and Coupdeville Architects


HOT TREND

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: STÅLE ERIKSON

#3 C O N C R E T E COHESION

Let your kitchen’s substance become its style by allowing a pared-back mix of materials to take centre stage Worktops made from pre-cast concrete slabs sandblasted to a soft finish sit atop handleless oak veneer shelving and cabinetry in this north London family kitchen, designed by David Chipperfield alumni Demian Erbar and Holger Mattes. The shelving and cupboards match the white oiled-oak floorboards, which in turn blend beautifully with the limewashed masonry wall on the right. The result? A kitchen that celebrates its tactile materials and conceals the clutter. Bespoke kitchens from £50,000, Erbar Mattes (erbarmattes.com) ➤


WORDS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURE:BEN BLOSSOM


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Into the deep Colour is used to visually divide this south London open-plan ground floor into kitchen and living zones. London practice Bureau de Change (b-de-c.com) applied the same dark blue on the walls, floors and ceilings. Note the point where the floor changes to concrete – perfectly in line with the island Cabinetry Custom-made by Bureau de Change. The handles on the units are the same shape as the bespoke lighting above, to maintain continuity. Spray painted in ‘Hicks’ Blue’ by Little Greene, £38 for 2.5 litres (littlegreene.com) Worktop ‘Pietro di Piombo’, a stone-like material by Neolith that is hardwearing and waterproof, £122 per square metre, The Marble Store (themarblestore.co.uk) Extractor and hob Both by Bosch: for similar, try the brand’s ‘DWW077A50B’ hood, £369 and ‘PCR715M90E’ hob, £359, both stocked at John Lewis (johnlewis.com) Island Designed by Bureau de Change. Both the floor and island are finished in ‘Solacir Interiors Microscreed’, a concrete-look material by Floored Genius (flooredgenius.com) Tap An Ikea design no longer available – try the single-lever version for similar, £80 (ikea.com) Chairs White ‘A’ steel chairs by Tolix, £200 each, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk) Flooring Made from ‘MC Poured Solo’ resin by Floored Genius, available in any RAL colour, £144 per square metre for areas over 40 square metres ➤


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#4 G O GRAPHIC Give geometric style a boost with glistening copper

The irregular tiling in this kitchen by interior design studio Field Day (fielddaystudio.com) is inspired by the Brutalist architecture that surrounds it in Blackfriars, London. But this is no cold, austere kitchen. Touches of copper and texture add some much-needed panache. Differing sizes of white ‘Interni’ tiles by Domus produce the arresting pattern on the wall, with small segments sporting a metallic finish. Instead of concrete, that stalwart of Brutalism, the large ‘Under The Bell’ pendant lights by Iskos-Berlin for Muuto (£595 each, Nest; nest.co.uk) are made of soft felt. The ‘Push’ coffee set is also from Muuto (£85 for coffee press; £31 for two mugs, Trouva; trouva.com).

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN

‘Interni’ tiles, from £37.84 per square metre, Domus (domustiles.co.uk) ➤

58


59


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Copper cavern Maximise space by making a single wall work extra hard. For this flat in London’s Hackney, architecture firm Studio 304 (studio-304.com) installed clever cabinetry with integrated appliances and an alcove clad in copper, which offers drama and durability Cabinetry Spray-lacquered MDF. Magnet has a good selection (magnet.co.uk) Cladding The whole alcove is coated in unlacquered copper, which is naturally antibacterial. Metal Sheets can manufacture cut-to-size pieces of natural, brushed, mirrored, beaten or distressed copper (metalsheets.co.uk) Shelving and wall lining Timber blackened using shou sugi ban – the Japanese method of blow-torching – lines the ceiling and side of the alcove. The charred panels hide the extractor above the hob, and a bi-fold door opens to let appliances slide out on wheeled shelves. In the UK, Shou Sugi Ban is a charred wood specialist (shousugiban.co.uk) Sink ‘Sirius’ sink in hard-wearing composite Tectonite, from £117, Franke (franke.com) Tap Abode’s ‘Atik’ tap in Granite Black, £376, Appliance House (appliancehouse.co.uk) Hob Studio 304 bought a Smeg gas hob, took it apart and integrated it into the copper worktop. Try Smeg’s ‘Linea’ model, £680, Currys (currys.co.uk) Table and chairs Bespoke designs by David Blair Ross (davidblairross.com) ➤

60


WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: RADU PALICICA

Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

61


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#5 C I T Y FA R M

The key to blending urban and country styles? Neutral colours and high-shine finishes Decorated in a palette of soft neutrals and accessorised with a careful mix of slick and rough-hewn pieces, this gorgeous kitchen is the perfect blend of modern trends and country classics. The Shakerstyle cabinetry, painted in pale grey, has sleek white quartz worktops and shining brass pendant lights that pack a contemporary punch. Finely crafted stools reflect the heavily grained wooden beams above, while white walls, shelving and tableware keep things feeling fresh. ‘Real Shaker’ kitchen, from £12,000; ‘The Bum Stools’, £280 each, all Devol (devolkitchens.co.uk) ➤

62


WORDS: SARAH MORGAN


HOT TREND

#6 F O R E S T G R E E N Paint walls and cabinetry in this soothing shade, which connotes calm and makes white accessories shine

Warm and rich, the ‘Cactus’ green of this ‘Suffolk’ kitchen by Neptune allows its bright white butler sink and ‘Keats’ pendant lights to stand out. Painting the wall as well as the cabinetry gives the room a contemporary appeal. Pair with utilitarian white tableware to mimic the look. Love the colour? You’ll be pleased to know that Neptune sells this exact shade, so you can use it on your existing cabinetry.

WORDS: SARAH MORGAN

‘Suffolk’ kitchen from £12,000; ‘Keats’ pendant lights, £74 each; ‘Cactus’ emulsion, £37 for 2.5 litres, all Neptune (neptune.com)

64


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Pretty in plywood

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: OLMO PEETERS

Plain plywood cabinetry isn’t just an affordable option, it also brings a light, airy touch to the room. Be inspired by this Made Architects (madearchitects.be) project

Cabinetry Plywood cupboards and shelves, custom built by Made Architects Worktop and splashback Carrara marble – try Carrara in the UK (carraramarble.co.uk) Hob Integrated, from £186, Beko (beko.co.uk) Extractor Integrated design by Novy. For similar, try Smeg’s ‘Dolce Stil Novo’ range, £699 (smeg.co.uk) Sink ‘VBK 710’ ceramic sink, from £448, Franke (franke.co.uk) Flooring White glass mosaic tiles – try Ann Sacks’ ‘Belle Coquille’ for similar, from £446 per square metre (annsacks.com) ➤

65


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Homespun charm

Cabinetry Custom-made using oak and painted in ‘Off-Black’ in a ‘Dead Flat’ finish, from £60 for 2.5 litres, Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) Worktop Concrete, made by Jan de Jong Interieur Splashback Made using handmade ‘Whites’ tiles, £2.50 each, Albarello (albarello.nl) Wall lights ‘222’ by La Lampe Gras, £292 each, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) Sink ‘VFR 475’, from £692, Alpes Inox (alpesinox.com) Curtain Made from ‘Basato’ linen from Kinnasand (kinnasand.com); try Linen Me for a good, affordable selection (linenme.com) Chair ‘Standard’ by Jean Prouvé for Vitra, £559, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com)

66

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: ANNA DE LEEUW, HEIDI LERKENFELDT

Designed by Christien Starkenburg for the studio at her family-run shop, Jan de Jong Interieur (jandejonginterieur.nl) in Dutch city Leeuwarden, this simple kitchen – with its linen curtain, wooden details and task lighting – has all the warmth of a family home


HOT TREND

#7 P L U M JOB

The original colour combination of deep purple and pistachio creates a calming atmosphere As well as providing an efficient one-stop chopping, brewing and cooking station, the kitchen should offer respite and calm. Look to unusual colours to provide a subtle shift of mood: these bespoke cabinets, covered in antibacterial linoleum by Copenhagen surface-maker &Shufl, are teamed with pale pistachio terracotta wall tiles inspired by 17th-century Japanese art. ‘Edo’ tiles, £221 per square metre, File Under Pop ( fileunderpop.com). Linoleum to cover kitchen units, £3,500, &Schufl (andshufl.com) ➤

67


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#8 HIDDEN DEPTHS

The key to a minimalist look? Maximum storage! Take inspiration from this sleek design Glossy cabinetry and chunky oak drawers hide all manner of kitchen clutter in this stunning ‘VVD’ kitchen by Belgian designer Vincent Van Duysen. His background in architecture is reflected especially in the glass and aluminium shelving units – strong yet sleek, they epitomise his minimalist aesthetic. The sturdy lavastone worktop hides simple recessed handles in the cabinetry, creating a clean finish; hiding away every pot, pan, spice jar and utensil renders the worktops far more useful.

WORDS: SARAH MORGAN PICTURE: TIZIANO SARTORIO

‘VVD’ kitchen by Vincent Van Duysen, from £30,000, Dada (dada-kitchens.com) ➤

68


69


70

WORDS:: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE JEF JACOBS


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Make like Mondrian An unsightly cooker hood is turned into a bright, boxy work of art in this loft apartment located in a converted school in Antwerp, Belgium. The cabinetry is the work of Dries Otten (driesotten.be), a designer with a love of combining simple lines and playful colour Cabinetry The cupboard covering the cooker hood and the line of units (fading from white to pink) across the wall are all bespoke designs by Dries Otten. From £25,630, design fees not included Worktop Dries Otten designed this black worktop, made from high-pressure laminate with a section of bright green plastic Sink ‘Rondo’ by Blanco, £319, Banyo (banyo.co.uk) Tap ‘Filo’ by Blanco, £284, Kitchen Market (kitchenmarket.co.uk) Table A vintage design by Willy Van Der Meeren for Belgian company Tubax. For a similar look, try 1st Dibs (1stdibs.com) Chairs A black ‘Revolt’ chair by Dutchman Friso Kramer, blue side chair by Finnish designer Ilmari Tapiovaara, and two mid-century seats, all vintage finds. Try 1st Dibs for similar (1stdibs.com) ➤


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#9 FA N TA S Y ISLAND This monolithic kitchen island is a real showstopper. Designed for a luxury penthouse apartment by Luke Beveridge at Design Space London, it is clad in naturally beautiful Taj Mahal quartzite – as is the floor, splashback and countertop. The stone’s subtle veining is the design detail that ties the whole room together and helps to visually separate the kitchen from the rest of the open-plan space. So as not to distract from the pale quartzite, the sleek Modulnova ‘MH6’ cabinets are simple, but equally opulent, finished with a burnished bronze lacquer. Bespoke kitchens from £25,000, Design Space London (designspacelondon.com) ➤ 72

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN

Clad in luxurious quartzite, this island is the ultimate indulgence


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Open season Designed by West Architecture (westarchitecture.co.uk), this London kitchen blends seamlessly with the rest of this open-plan room thanks to hidden appliances and a worktop that matches the mezzanine. A live/work studio, it’s a lesson in mixing public and private spaces Island, cabinetry Custom-made plywood units with bespoke interiors, laminated with white Formica, approximately £18,500 as pictured, Barnaby Reynolds (barnabyreynolds.com) Worktop Brushed stainless steel bonded to 36-millimetre birch plywood, with sink in stainless steel, all by Barnaby Reynolds Tap Brushed stainless steel ‘KV1’ tap, from £814, Vola (vola.com) Light ‘Span’ pendant light, £1,739, E15 (e15.com) Hob From £529, Siemens (siemens-home.bsh-group.com) Fridge ‘NCD191I’ drawer fridge, hidden under the counter, £742, Hotpoint (hotpoint.co.uk) ➤


WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: : BEN BLOSSOM


HOT TREND

#10 A G A I N S T THE GRAIN

It’s time to take a closer look at a wood with more character We love the speckled and swirling grain of the wooden cupboard doors in this ‘Modern’ kitchen by Middleton Bespoke. They are made using our new favourite wood: pippy oak. Normally found growing in hedgerows, these trees are sometimes known as ‘cat’s paw oaks’, because of the unique pattern of the timber’s knots. If you’re using a timber with this much personality, it’s best to keep other features simple. Here, a fossilised limestone worktop and strip of dark grey ‘Oratory’ paint by Mylands (£22 for one litre; mylands.com) create a subtle backdrop.

WORDS: CLARE SARTIN PICTURE: POLLY ELLES

‘Modern’ kitchen, from £25,000, Middleton Bespoke (middleton-bespoke.co.uk)


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Make a splash

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK. PICTURE: STEWART LEISHMAN

Fresh aquamarine herringbone tiles on the wall and splashback bring a natural vibe to this eco-minded home in a leafy Melbourne suburb. Interior architect Georgia Ezra’s firm Gabbe (gabbe.com.au) was hired to maximise the storage and bring more sunlight into an existing kitchen. The dramatic tiles are from her side project, Tiles of Ezra

Tiles ‘FL006’ tiles in Aqua, £240 per square metre, Tiles of Ezra (tilesofezra.com) Cabinetry A cabinetmaker built these timber panels using dampened sheets of wicker from Camberwell Cane (camberwellcane.com.au). Find wicker panels in the UK at Cane Store (canestore.co.uk) Worktop Bespoke stainless steel. Try London-based Powell Picano (powellpicano.co.uk) Oven and stove Single-oven gas cooker by Smeg, from £1,079, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) Rug Although this is a vintage piece belonging to the homeowners, you can find similar at Liberty’s legendary oriental rug store (libertyorientalcarpets.com) Flooring Self-levelling concrete in a mid-grey tone. Concreations produces perfect poured floors in the UK (concreations.co.uk) ➤

77


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#11 I N T E G R AT E D LIGHTING

Softly lit shelving creates a gallery feel and illuminates worksurfaces Show off your favourite pieces of kitchen kit by brightening not just your countertops, but your shelving too. The ethereal glow created by the integrated lighting in this kitchen adds an architectural element to the slimline shelves and highlights treasured accessories. Go for a sleek look with this ‘Maxima 2.2’ kitchen by Cesar – so named because its doors are just 2.2 centimetres thick – and team silk-effect white lacquered units with dark wood shelving and worktops.

WORDS: SARAH MORGAN

‘Maxima 2.2’ kitchen by Gian Vittorio Plazzogna in bianco lacquer and bronzite melamine, from £10,000 excluding appliances, Cesar (cesar.it)

78


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

New heights

PICTURE: EBBA BONNIER

The storage units in this 19thcentury Stockholm apartment make good use of the building’s high ceilings. The strikingly dark colour of the cabinetry is offset by pale wood flooring, furniture and, of course, the daylight that streams through the large windows

Cabinetry By Swedish brand Kvänum. Hand-painted in a rich green/black colour: for similar, try ‘Obsidian Green’ by Little Greene, £42 for 2.5 litres (littlegreene.com). For simple stainless-steel handles, try ‘Wire’ by Superfront, £15 each (superfront.com) Sink For similar, try Villeroy & Boch (villeroy-boch.co.uk) and for a similar tap, try the ‘Tradition’, £390, Aston Matthews (astonmatthews.co.uk) Table ‘Arkitecture PPK1-2-3’ dining table, £1,522, Nikari (nikari.fi). Accessories ‘Pallo’ vase by Skruf, £362, Desk Store (deskstore.com) Chairs ‘J39’ chairs by Børge Mogensen for Fredericia, £402 each, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com) ➤


HOT TREND

#12 RAISE THE BAR Elevate your space by choosing a super-slim countertop

Turn a functional breakfast bar into a thing of elegant beauty by choosing the thinnest slither of marble-look Corian. This kitchen features a slimline floating worktop with a protruding ‘shark nose’ profile. It provides extra space for food preparation, eating and socialising, but without dominating the room. Here, the chic look is completed by walls painted in Farrow & Ball’s grey ‘Mole’s Breath’ and laminated cabinets in ‘Elephant’s Breath’, which has a touch of pink to it (£43.50 for 2.5 litres; farrow-ball.com). Three ‘Copper Round’ lights by Tom Dixon add a soft, sophisticated glow (£400 each; tomdixon.net). Bespoke kitchens, from £35,000, Roundhouse (roundhousedesign.com) ➤


WORDS: CLARE SARTIN P


Kitchens | I N S P I R A T I O N

HOT TREND

#13 SHOW YOUR M E TA L

The glamorous Statuary marble worktops and glossy Bardiglio ‘mini mosaic’ splashback bring chic and sheen to this ‘Mulberry Street’ kitchen by Smallbone, but we’re more interested in the metallic nuts-and-bolts of the design. The cabinets, made from sustainably sourced European oak, are fitted with chunky steel handles and wire mesh panels that strengthen the glass while allowing you to see the cupboards’ contents. Copper pans and powder-coated lights also help to create a professional feel. The final flourish? A mirrored steel kickboard so shiny that it looks like an optical illusion. ‘Mulberry Street’ kitchen, from £45,000, Smallbone of Devizes (smallbone.co.uk) ➤ 82

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Steel details give this charming space an industrial edge


HOT TREND

#14 N E W T R A D I T I O N S Update a country kitchen with a palette of moody blues and pale wood

Channel the moody calm achieved by Plain English for the kitchen of this Gothic family house. The cabinetmaker’s ‘Spitalfields’ cupboards and ‘Folgate’ doors are painted in its own grey-blue ‘Draughty Passage’ shade, while the walls are ‘Mid Lead’ by Little Greene (littlegreene.co.uk). The colour is lifted by a worktop made from blue limestone; the island is topped with pale timber.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Kitchens from £45,000, Plain English (plainenglishdesign.co.uk)

84


K I T C H E N I N D E TA I L

Time to reflect This copper kitchen island not only looks divine, but its mirrored finish bounces sunshine around the light, bright room

Island Get the look with mirrored copper sheets on your units: buy them cut to size at Metal Sheets (metalsheets.co.uk) Worktop Made from Corian and manufactured by Dupont (dupont.co.uk) Tap If you like this, try Zip’s ‘Hydrotap’, which is very similar in silhouette, dispenses filtered, boiling, chilled or sparkling water, and comes in eight metallic hues. From £1,549 (zipwater.com) Hob Miele sells similarly discreet black induction hobs that can be connected with an extraction hood and lie flush on the worktop, from £1,449 (miele.co.uk) Lamp Chocolate Creative has a similar lamp for £65, available from Furnish (furnish.co.uk) Walls For a similar shade, try Paint & Paper Library’s ‘Cotton I’ pure flat emulsion or the water-based ‘Architects’ Matt’ for a wipe-clean version, both from £98.40 (paintandpaperlibrary.com) E D


D I R E C T O RY

Kitchens | D I R E C T O R Y

There’s never been more choice when it comes to planning a new kitchen, with a wealth of styles, materials and technology to tempt you. So how do you avoid making a pricey mistake? We present you with our definitive guide to the best kitchen showrooms in the country, where you can size-up the latest designs, test appliances, stroke surfaces, and ask the experts everything you want to know Words SARAH SLADE

A L N O Consider this brand’s German-made kitchens, available in glossy laminates and luxury ceramics. Showrooms include a new branch in Bishop’s Stortford, and the Leeds flagship. Pictured ‘Alnostar Dur’ in ‘Ferro Bronze’ and ‘Alnostar Pearl’ in high-gloss ‘Ultra White’ handleless kitchen, from £10,000 Prices from £10,000 4 The Boulevard, City West One Office Park, Gelderd Road, Leeds LS12 (alnokitchens.co.uk)

B

THE SHOWROOM

B & Q This DIY specialist has more than 300 showrooms and currently carries 13 price-friendly kitchen lines ranging from the traditional to the trend-led, which can be complemented by a variety of appliances. A good port of call for a basic white handleless kitchen. Pictured ‘Carisbrooke Taupe’ kitchen by Cooke & Lewis, from £2,150 Prices from £762 for a galley kitchen with eight units Showrooms nationwide (diy.com)

A

A G A Made at its Shropshire foundry, cast-iron cookers – which enable all types of cooking to be carried out at the same time – come in 15 colours to flatter all kitchens. The latest ‘Dartmouth Blue’ shade is available on its ‘Total Control’, ‘Dual Control’ and ‘City60’ models. Pictured The brand’s three-oven AGA ‘Dual Control’ in its new timeless ‘Dartmouth Blue’ colourway, £10,595 Prices from £5,695 Showrooms nationwide (agaliving.com)

A R T I C H O K E The expert in country house kitchens. Expect bespoke handcrafted designs made with care – the company has experience of materials, architectural styles and mouldings. Pictured This modern rustic kitchen takes influence from Flemish design with its rich combination of oak, Bental White marble and bronze handles Prices from £120,000 for commissions Unit 9 Cheddar Business Park, Wedmore Road, Cheddar BS27 (artichoke-ltd.com)

B L A K E S L O N D O N Founded by furniture designer James Blake, this company creates stylish kitchens. In its London showroom, customers can book to view four of its most popular ranges. Pictured This kitchen was designed using bespoke cabinetry, Calacatta Paonazzo worktops and a Kohler tap. Approximately £72,000 including all appliances and works Prices from £21,600 for cabinetry 46–48 Jaggard Way, London SW12 (blakeslondon.com) ➤ 87


B O F F I An Italian firm known for its

B R I T I S H S TA N D A R D C U P B O A R D S The more affordable

B U LT H A U P

offshoot of traditional joiner Plain English (see p94). All of its products are made in Plain English’s workshop, but costs are kept down by not offering bespoke sizes, delivery or fitting. Pictured Shaker-style cupboards painted in ‘Hague Blue’ by Farrow & Ball Prices from £465 for a cabinet 41 Hoxton Square, London N1 ( britishstandardcupboards.co.uk)

With three streamlined looks – the minimalist ‘b1’, workshop-inspired ‘b2’ and architecture-driven ‘b3’ – this high-end German brand sells slick kitchens for tailored open-plan living. There are 14 UK stores you can visit to get a feel for the brand’s modern aesthetic. Pictured The ‘b3’ kitchen, from £30,000 Prices from £10,000 37 Wigmore Street, London W1 (bulthaup.com)

C A P L E A maker of classic and contemporary cabinetry. Customers can view door fronts at its showroom in Bristol by appointment. The ‘Elements’ collection has a light aesthetic with pale wood veneers and integrated handles. Also, there’s the brand’s appliance range, from cooker hoods to sinks and taps. Pictured ‘Anola Driftwood’ kitchen, from the ‘Elements’ collection, from £8,600 Prices from £8,000 Showrooms nationwide (caple.co.uk)

CHAMBER FURNITURE

C H A R L I E K I N G H A M This

Specialising in hardwood kitchens, this Kent-based business prides itself on craftsmanship. Styles range from the rustic to the contemporary, with hand-sprayed, burnished, lacquered or painted finishes to choose from. Pictured Stained oak handleless kitchen with brass liquid metal oval dining island Prices from £40,000 for commissions The Old Timber Yard, London Road, Halstead TN14 (chamberfurniture.co.uk)

bespoke cabinetmaker focuses on classic joinery methods to craft unique furniture. Visit its London showroom to commission a statement butchers block or larder. Pictured A hardwood Shaker-style kitchen with fitted cabinets and integrated larder unit painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Pavilion Gray’ Prices from £30,000 for commissions 53 Blandford Street, London W1 (charliekingham.co.uk)

CHRISTOPHER PEACOCK

C O C O C U C I N E Customers at this London showroom, which deals in Italian kitchens, can choose between the main collection – bespoke and standard styles – or a tailor-made ‘Infinity’ kitchen. Pictured Walnut tall cabinets are built around a picture window, while an island unit is finished with a stainless-steel worktop and solid wood breakfast bar Prices from £25,000 300 Kensal Road, London W10 (cococucine.co.uk)

CONNAUGHT KITCHENS

super-chic kitchens and collaborations with big-name designers. Head to its main showroom to see the ‘Salinas’ modular kitchen by Patricia Urquiola. Pictured The ‘Boffi_Code’ kitchen with Grey Stone marble, Durinox stainless steel doors and worktops, and Canaletto Light walnut units, from £80,000 Prices from £36,000 254 Brompton Road, London SW3 (boffiuk.com)

C

Cabinetry crafted from rich woods is the speciality of this firm based in Connecticut, US – there’s a showroom at London’s Design Centre Chelsea Harbour. Pictured The brand’s modern classic ‘Refectory’ kitchen, inspired by prep school halls, features quartered white oak and polished nickel oversized latches Prices from £70,000 for commissions Unit 113, Design Centre East Chelsea Harbour, London SW10 (peacockhome.com) 88

German engineering is the theme at this London brand, which sells streamlined kitchens by Leicht and appliances by Miele, Siemens and Franke. It also offers bespoke kitchens by British brand Stoneham. Pictured The new ‘Topos Stone’ kitchen with sandstone effect surfaces by Leicht, from £30,000 Prices from £30,000 2 Porchester Place, London W2 (connaughtkitchens.co.uk)


Kitchens | D I R E C T O R Y

C O T T E S W O O D Firm creating quality fitted and freestanding timber furniture. Doors are made with traditional mortise and tenoned frames and drawers are dovetailed for durability. The workshop and main showroom is in Chipping Norton with a second branch in Amersham. Pictured The ‘Renaissance’ kitchen blends classic furniture with modern accents Prices from £23,000 for commissions Station Road, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire OX7 (cotteswood.co.uk)

D

D A D A B Y M O LT E N I & C

D AV O N P O R T Bespoke cabinetry,

Visit the London showroom for designs by the likes of Luca Meda and Rodolfo Dordoni, and to mix and match elements from models to create an original space. Pictured The new bespoke ‘VVD’ kitchen with integrated stone sink and undercounter trolleys by the brand’s creative director Vincent Van Duysen, from £30,000 Prices from £15,000 for commissions 199 Shaftesbury Avenue, London WC2 (dada-kitchens.com)

from traditional designs through to handleless styles, is created in this firm’s Colchester workshop, next door to its showroom. Its kitchens are also sold through partner dealers across the South. Pictured The new ‘Soho’ kitchen teams concrete and sandblasted hardwoods with deep blue cabinetry and striking granite Prices from £35,000 for commissions Davonport House, Peartree Road, Stanway, Colchester CO3 (davonport.com)

D E S I G N S PA C E L O N D O N Head to this dramatic 370-squaremetre showroom to explore the latest kitchen innovations by Italian brand Modulnova, with bathroom and living concepts shown alongside. Pictured The ‘Float’ kitchen with slatted lacquered wooden doors and black aluminium ‘Barra’ handles by Modulnova Prices from £25,000 for commissions 120 Webber Street, London SE1 (designspacelondon.com)

D E V O L Visit this company’s showrooms in Leicestershire and London to see the retro-style ‘Air’ and its most recent kitchen by Sebastian Cox, which is crafted using sustainable British timber. You’ll also be tempted by Devol’s range of ceramic tableware. Pictured ‘The Real Shaker’ kitchen, from £12,000 Prices from £12,000 Cotes Mill, Nottingham Road, Loughborough LE12 (devolkitchens.co.uk)

E

E X T R E M E D E S I G N This family-run business creates exquisite custom kitchens and other luxury furniture – on display in west London, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire. The company is unique in that it designs around the customers’ own style and habits. It also works with appliance brands Gaggenau and Sub-Zero & Wolf. Pictured High-gloss cabinetry and sumptuous ‘Juperana Torrone’ worktops Prices from £35,000 for commissions 145 Church Road, Barnes, London SW13 (extreme-design.co.uk) ➤ 89


E L A M B Y T I S E T TA N TA

ESPRESSO DESIGN

This modern Italian furniture company presents its collection of highly customisable kitchens, such as ‘Light’ with motorised worktops and ‘Opera’, available with cool cement features – in swish central London surroundings. Pictured ‘Vision’ stone and Canaletto walnut kitchen, £90,000 Prices from £25,000 83–85 Wigmore Street, London W1 (tisettanta.com)

Expect to find sleek entertaining spaces, using Italian-made Cesar, Euromobil and Aster kitchens. Visit the main showroom in Battersea or a branch at London’s Design Centre Chelsea Harbour. Pictured The new ‘Unit’ lacquer and walnut veneer kitchen – marble worktop by Cesar and hob by Barazza, from £22,000 Prices from £20,000 149 St John’s Hill, Battersea, London SW11 (espressodesign.co.uk)

G

G L O B A L L U X U RY L O N D O N Discover Italian-made

Scic and Fendi Casa kitchens at this showroom. The wow-factor comes from the use of decadent and unorthodox materials, such as leather-covered doors and beautiful rare woods. Pictured The new ‘Villa Livia’ collection by Fendi Casa, £360,000 Prices from £50,000 87–89 Wigmore Street, London W1 (globalluxurylondon.com)

H O L L O WAY S O F L U D L O W Mixing and matching materials to create one-of-a-kind kitchens is this company’s business. It also deals in modern Schuller designs. A third London showroom opens in Clapham this March. Pictured The ‘Broseley’ oak kitchen takes its inspiration from the brand’s architectural salvage heritage Prices from £30,000 for commissions 67 Northcote Road, London SW11 (hollowayskitchens.com) 90

H

F

F I R E D E A R T H Beautifully versatile kitchens to suit both period and modern homes are complemented by an excellent paint and tile collection. Ten of this brand’s 62 showrooms incorporate kitchen displays, including a significant store in London’s Portman Square. Pictured ‘Bastide’ handcrafted oak kitchen, from £12,000 Prices from £10,000 10 Portman Square, London W1 ( firedearth.com)

H A B I TAT Sells fitted kitchens in 30 styles with over 55 handle options. A studio at the Tottenham Court Road branch has 3D software to help you plan your space. Pictured ‘Line N’ kitchen with white gloss ‘Lux’ doors and ‘Laser Ferro Bronze’ worktops, from around £13,000 excluding appliances Prices from £10,000 for a medium-sized kitchen with appliances 196–199 Tottenham Court Road, London W1 (habitat.co.uk)

H A RV E Y J O N E S For over 35

H O U S E L A B This east London showroom represents top-of-the-range kitchens by Italian brand Del Tongo and new designs from Zampieri and Key Sbabo, which until now have been hard to come by. Pictured ‘MetalWood’ kitchen with marble countertop and tall storage units by Benedini Associati for Key Sbabo, from £35,000 Prices from £20,000 151 Goswell Road, London EC1 ( houselab.co.uk)

H U B K I T C H E N S Discover streamlined Italian-made kitchens by Record è Cucine and TM Italia, as well as the latest professional-grade appliances from Falmec, Gaggenau and Miele at this Battersea-based showroom – which has recently had a makeover. Pictured ‘The Cut’ kitchen by Record è Cucine, from £40,000 Prices from £40,000 Oyster Wharf, 20 Lombard Road, London SW11 (hubkitchens.com)

years, this company has been making its timeless ‘Shaker’, ‘Original’ and ‘Linear’ kitchens, which are primed ready to be painted any colour of your choosing. There are 31 showrooms nationwide, but visit the Guildford store for the largest range of inspirational kitchen sets. Pictured The ‘Linear’, from £18,000 Prices from £18,000 Showrooms nationwide (harveyjones.com)


Kitchens | D I R E C T O R Y

I

I K E A Create your perfect kitchen space with this brand’s modular ‘Metod’ system. Simply select your preferred door fronts then pick handles, worktop and appliances. All kitchens carry a free 25-year guarantee. Pictured The ‘Kalvia’ printed door front comes in six sizes and can be hung left or right, turned 180 degrees and combined with additional fronts to create the desired pattern, from £28 each Prices from around £4,000 Showrooms nationwide (ikea.co.uk)

H U M P H R E Y M U N S O N A family firm with cabinetmaking at its heart, this brand’s exceptional handmade kitchens – including the contemporary ‘Spenlow’ – have beautiful wood accents. The workshop and showroom are in Felsted; there’s a second showroom in St Albans. Kitchens come with a lifetime guarantee on all workmanship. Pictured The latest edition of the brand’s bestselling ‘Nickleby’ kitchen Prices from £40,000 for commissions The Joinery Works, Gransmore Green, Felsted CM6 (humphreymunson.co.uk)

J PICTURES: NICHOLAS YARSLEY

JOHN LEWIS OF H U N G E R F O R D Stop by the west London showroom of this kitchen brand to compare its handmade ‘Shaker’, ‘Artisan’, ‘Urban’, ‘Crème de la Crème’ and ‘Pure’ ranges, as well as freestanding larders and dining furniture. There are 13 further stores around the country. Pictured ‘Artisan’ kitchen, from £25,000 Prices from £17,500 156–158 Wandsworth Bridge Road, London SW6 ( john-lewis.co.uk)

K

KITCHENS I N T E R N AT I O N A L This luxury

retailer has a strong presence in Scotland, including a new outlet within the Sterling Furniture Showroom in Tillicoultry. Pictured ‘Cubanit’ gloss kitchen from the ‘KI’ collection with Silestone worktop in ‘Blanco Zeus Suede’ and Siemens appliances, from £27,000 Prices from £15,000 Denmore Road, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen AB23 (kitchensinternational.co.uk)

I N T E RVA R I This London showroom is the only place in the country where you can buy high-end minimalist kitchens by Spanish brand Mobalco. It also sells reasonably priced designs by Second Nature and Burbidge, alongside its own fully customisable line. Pictured ‘Metrica’ handleless matt lacquer kitchen by Mobalco, £69,000 as shown Prices from £18,000 16a Wigmore Street, London W1 (intervari.com)

L

LAURENCE PIDGEON Superb architectural kitchens by Italian brand Elmar and the German-made Häcker are on display at this west London showroom. You’ll also spot high-tech appliances by Swiss brand V Zug and Yorkshire-based firm Westin. Pictured The ‘@HOME’ kitchen by Elmar Prices from £20,000 for commissions 31–35 Fulham High Street, London SW6 (laurencepidgeon.com) ➤ 91


L I V I N G S PA C E A trio of London showrooms that promote the latest in modern Italian design, selling Ernestomeda and Lago kitchens, as well as bespoke creations with quality components. A full interior design service is available. Pictured The ‘Air’ circular island/table, from £8,320 and induction hob, £2,784 by Lago Prices from £20,000 for commissions 36 Cross Street, London N1 (livingspaceuk.com)

M

M A G N E T Classic styling, clever

M A R T I N M O O R E Sophisticated

storage ideas and competitive prices. For added simplicity, the British kitchen giant divides its collections into three broad ranges based on price: ‘Uniquely’, ‘Purely’ and ‘Simply’ are all available at more than 200 showrooms nationwide. Pictured ‘City Cashmere’ gloss-finished kitchen with ‘Anthracite’ ceramic worktops, £210.50 for a single base unit Prices from £1,343 for a kitchen Showrooms nationwide (magnet.co.uk)

custom cabinetry painted in warm neutral shades and paired with mirrored glass, metallics and antiqued stone flooring is this company’s signature look. Pictured ‘New Classic’ kitchen in the brand’s own ‘Manhattan’ and ‘Bluebird’ paint with Caesarstone worktop and walnut splashback Prices from £35,000 for commissions 176 Westbourne Grove, London W11 (martinmoore.com)

MASTERCLASS/SIGMA3 Modern, well-priced kitchens with a fresh aesthetic and calming colour palettes can be found at eight showrooms around the country, including branches in Cardiff, Esher and Swansea, as well as independent showrooms nationwide. Pictured The new ‘Deco H Line’ kitchen, from £7,500 Prices from £7,500 Showrooms nationwide (masterclasskitchens.co.uk)

M AT R I X D E S I G N Contemporary style is the driving force at this company, which moves its showroom to southwest London this April. Furniture is given its own unique embellishments. Pictured Stainless-steel bespoke kitchen with brass and granite worktop and hidden pocket door cupboard for dry storage and small appliances Prices from £30,000 for commissions 308 Upper Richmond Road, Sheen SW14 (matrixkitchens.co.uk) 92

M I E L E German firm Miele manufactures some of the most cutting-edge kitchen appliances on the market, from combi-steam ovens to top-of-the-range induction hobs and bean-to-cup coffee machines. At the new Miele London Experience Centre, the brand’s experts will demonstrate how to get the most out of all of its products. Pictured ‘Generation 6000 H6160 BP ContourLine’ oven, from £1,599 Prices from £749 for ovens 15–19 Cavendish Place, London W1 (miele.co.uk)


Kitchens | D I R E C T O R Y

M C S T O N E Expect to find topquality handleless kitchens, designed and made in Italy. This west London showroom is well worth a visit, whether you’re seeking a simple upgrade or a significant refurbishment. Pictured Sleek, stainless steel worktops are now the surface finish of choice for the company’s kitchens, from around £15,000 Prices from £5,000 for cabinetry 2 Chippenham Mews, London W9 (mcstone.co.uk)

M O D U S Clean-lined cabinetry. It

M O W L E M & C O A bespoke

specialises in three different kitchen brands and price tiers: Warendorf, Pronorm and the more purse-friendly Nobilia. Pictured This Anthracite and Opaque White smooth lacquer kitchen by Warendorf features tall pocket doors, which conceal countertop appliances, from £30,000 Prices from £8,000 95 Chamberlayne Road, London NW10 (moduskitchens.com)

design company with showrooms in London, Knutsford, Newcastle and a newly opened branch in Harrogate. Luxe, timeless details such as silver-leaf splashbacks and accents of high-quality marble are signature motifs. Pictured The ‘Synergy’ kitchen features classic hand-painted and panelled cabinetry with a modern handleless finish Prices from £30,000 for commissions Showrooms nationwide (mowlemandco.com)

N

N E I L L E R N E R Bespoke contemporary kitchen design with over 60 door finishes and styles to choose from, plus a professional installation service. Look out for its hot new gloss and matt blue units, which contrast with neutral furniture and worktops. Pictured The ‘Velvet Blue’ kitchen, from £30,000 Prices from £30,000 487–489 Finchley Road, London NW3 (neillerner.com)

NICHOLAS ANTHONY Founded in 1963, this family-run brand sells premium kitchens by Siematic alongside its own collection. Displays promote the variety of bespoke finishes and colours on offer. The flagship showroom is in London’s Marylebone. Pictured The ‘Urban’ kitchen by Siematic, from £30,000 Prices from £30,000 44–48 Wigmore Street, London W1 (nicholas-anthony.co.uk)

N E P T U N E With showrooms nationwide, including a new branch in Farnham and stores opening in Bristol, Cheltenham and Wimbledon in early 2017, this British business designs and makes quality timber furniture. Its range of modern handcrafted kitchens – like the warm ‘Henley’ and elegant ‘Chichester’ – offers great value for money. Pictured ‘Limehouse’ hand-painted kitchen in ‘Lily’ and ‘Fog’, from £12,000 Prices from £10,000 305–307 Chiswick High Road, London W4 (neptune.com) ➤ 93


O

OFFICINE GULLO Prestigious cooking suites and kitchens with a signature metalwork style and exciting colour palette, all handcrafted in Florence. Accessories include burnished brass sinks and mirror-finished hobs. Pictured The ‘Avana Pearl’ kitchen, from £23,000 for a cooking area block unit Prices from £130,000 for a mediumsized kitchen 570 King’s Road, London SW6 (officinegullo.com)

P

PEDINI LONDON BY L I D A C U C I N A Discover a wide array of kitchens at this south London showroom, which is Pedini’s largest in Europe. On display is the latest ‘Arts & Crafts’ semi-fitted kitchen and ‘Materika’. Pictured The ‘Integra’ white matt lacquer kitchen with wood effect textured oak panels, from £35,000 Prices from £35,000 76 Queenstown Road, London SW8 (pedinilondon.co.uk)

P L A I N E N G L I S H Fine bespoke cabinetry finished in the brand’s own heritage-inspired hues. There’s a flagship space in London’s Marylebone. If you’re on a budget, check out its more affordable offshoot British Standard (see p88). Pictured ‘Spitalfields’ cabinetry with honed oyster stone worktops and central island topped with pippy oak wood Prices from £60,000 for commissions 28 Blandford Street, London W1 (plainenglishdesign.co.uk)

P O G G E N P O H L Made-tomeasure quality kitchens available in a range of finishes from 19 venues across England and Scotland. All five of its London showrooms have been refurbished with new displays of the brand’s streamlined ‘P’7350’ kitchen, created with Porsche Design. Pictured The ‘P’7350’ kitchen, from £60,000 Prices from £30,000 Showrooms nationwide (poggenpohl.com)

P R O M E M O R I A Uber-luxe Italian furnishings are this firm’s style. Its hero kitchen is ‘Angelina’, a customisable design built using fine woods and stones, and finished with extras like wine storage. Pictured ‘Angelina’ natural smoked larch, mirror and bronze kitchen with paisley patterned engraved doors and Murano glass handles Prices from £76,000 99–101 Pimlico Road, London SW1 (promemoria.com) 94

S M A L L B O N E O F D E V I Z E S Handmade kitchens crafted in Wiltshire and displayed in showrooms across the country – visit the recently renovated Thurloe Place to see the latest collections, including ‘Brasserie’, which sports knotted timber. Pictured The ‘Mulberry Street’ European Oak kitchen with book-matched Calacatta Oro marble worktops, rose gold fittings and glazed cabinet doors Prices from £45,000 for commissions 6–7 Thurloe Place, London SW7 (smallbone.co.uk)


Kitchens | D I R E C T O R Y

R

R O S S A N A Visit the showroom of

R O U N D H O U S E Four made-to-

this Italian firm to marvel at its range of opulent kitchens, from the ‘DC10’ finished in burnished brass and Cappuccino stone to the ‘TU24’ display cabinet in exotic timber. ‘K-In/K-Out’, a stunning indooroutdoor kitchen, launches later this year. Pictured The new ‘W75’ kitchen collection in burnished silver, from £40,000, shown with ‘TU24’ cabinet in Eucalyptus wood Prices from £30,000 17 Duke Street, London W1 (rossana.uk.com)

order kitchen ranges are offered by this company, which has a flagship London showroom and five further stores. Pictured The brand’s signature ‘Urbo’ island in ‘River-washed’ horizontal walnut ply and ‘Sharknose White Fantasy’ work surface with ‘Metro’ cabinetry in burnished copper Prices from £35,000 for commissions 11 Wigmore Street, London W1 (roundhousedesign.com)

S

S C AV O L I N I B Y M U LT I L I V I N G Visit the flagship

London showroom for premium Scavolini kitchens. Discover the new ‘LiberaMente’ range – a modern design with beautiful storage ideas and material combinations. Pictured The new ‘Diesel Social’ industrial-style kitchen created with the Italian fashion brand, from £30,000 Prices from £20,000 39 Fortune Green Road, London NW6 (multiliving.co.uk)

T

T O M H O W L E Y Elegant handpainted bespoke kitchens, including Shaker styles. You can view the designs in 12 showrooms, including a new outlet in Tunbridge Wells. All furniture comes with a 10-year guarantee. Pictured A stylish kitchen finished in the brand’s own ‘Dewberry’ paint, with a ‘Lyra’ worktop Prices from £35,000 for commissions 3 Wigmore Street, London W1 (tomhowley.co.uk)

V

VA L C U C I N E / F O R Z A

Not only does this London showroom offer own-brand contemporary kitchens by top Italian firms Valcucine and Forza it also deals in furniture and lighting. Pictured The ‘Genius Loci’ glass kitchen by Gabriele Centazzo for Valcucine, which features luxe copper undercounter drawers, from £50,000 Prices from £25,000 for commissions 143–149 Great Portland Street, London W1 ( forza.co.uk)

VA R E N N A B Y P O L I F O R M Discover the latest kitchen trends at this Italian furniture company’s Chelsea showroom. Freshly installed is the sleek ‘Trail’ design by Carlo Colombo, which wows thanks to its integrated handles. Pictured ‘Twelve’ stainless-steel kitchen with Barazza steel worktop, ‘Blade’ snack table in solid Canaletto walnut; and black frosted-glass units by Carlo Colombo, from £50,000 Prices from £50,000 278 King’s Road, London SW3 (poliformuk.com) E D 95


ADDRESS BOOK

STOCKISTS

Love something you’ve seen in ELLE Decoration Kitchens? Here’s where to buy it &SHUFL andshufl.com 1ST DIBS 1stdibs.com AEG electroluxgroup.com ALBARELLO albarello.nl ALPES INOX alpesinox.com ALVEUS alveus.co.uk AMARA amara.com ANN SACKS annsacks.com APPLIANCE HOUSE appliancehouse.co.uk ARAM STORE aram.co.uk ASAF WEINBROOM asafweinbroom.com ASTON MATTHEWS astonmatthews.co.uk B&Q diy.com BANYO banyo.co.uk BARBICAN barbican.org.uk/shop BARNABY REYNOLDS barnabyreynolds.com BEKO beko.co.uk BLOOMINGVILLE bloomingville.com BOFFI boffiuk.com BRADSHAW LUXURY bradshaw.co.uk BRANDLER LONDON brandler.london BROSTE COPENHAGEN

brostecopenhagen.com CAESARSTONE caesarstone.co.uk CAMBERWELL CANE camberwellcane.com.au CANE STORE canestore.co.uk CANTILEVER cantileverinteriors.com CANVAS HOME canvashomestore.co.uk CARRARA carraramarble.co.uk CERIM cerim.it CESAR cesar.it CONCREATIONS concreations.co.uk COX & COX coxandcox.co.uk CURIOUSA & CURIOUSA curiousa.co.uk CURRYS currys.co.uk DACOR dacor.com DADA dada-kitchens.com DAVID BLAIR ROSS davidblairross.com DEBENHAMS debenhams.com

FIRED EARTH firedearth.com FLOORED GENIUS flooredgenius.com FLORIM CERAMICHE florim.it FRANKE franke.com FRENCH CONNECTION frenchconnection.com FURNISH furnish.co.uk GEORGE HOME george.com GRAY & WILLOW grayandwillow.uk.com HABITAT habitat.co.uk HEAL’S heals.com HENRYBUILT henrybuilt.com HOGARTH ARCHITECTS

hogartharchitects.co.uk HOTPOINT hotpoint.co.uk HOUSE DOCTOR housedoctor.dk HOUSE OF FRASER houseoffraser.co.uk HUB hubkitchens.com HUBSCH hubsch-interior.com HUMPHREY MUNSON

humphreymunson.co.uk IKEA ikea.com JANSEN + CO jansenco.nl JOHN LEWIS johnlewis.com KAELO kaelo.co.uk KINNASAND kinnasand.com KITCHEN MARKET kitchenmarket.co.uk KVÄNUM kvanum.com LG lg.com LIBERTY libertylondon.com LINEN ME linenme.com LITTLE GREENE littlegreene.com LUNDHS lundhsrealstone.com MAGNET magnet.co.uk MANDARIN STONE mandarinstone.com MARAZZI GROUP marazzitile.co.uk MARIMEKKO marimekko.com MARKS & SPENCER mands.com METAL SHEETS metalsheets.co.uk MIDDLETON BESPOKE

OLIF olif.co.uk OXO oxouk.com PAINT & PAPER LIBRARY

paintandpaperlibrary.com PINCH pinchdesign.com PLAIN ENGLISH plainenglishdesign.co.uk POLIFORM VARENNA poliformuk.com POWELL PICANO powellpicano.co.uk PUNTA PORTEGO puntaportego.com RIVA1920 riva1920.it ROCKETT ST GEORGE rockettstgeorge.co.uk ROSS & BROWN rossandbrownhome.co.uk ROUNDHOUSE roundhousedesign.com SAINSBURY’S sainsburys.co.uk SECOND NATURE sncollection.co.uk SELFRIDGES selfridges.com SERAX serax.com SHOU SUGI BAN shousugiban.co.uk SIEMENS siemens-home.bsh-group.com SILESTONE BY COSENTINO silestone.co.uk SKANDIUM skandium.com SMALLBONE OF DEVIZES

smallbone.co.uk SMEG smeguk.com STELTON stelton.com SUE PRYKE suepryke.com SUPERFRONT superfront.com.uk SWOON EDITIONS swooneditions.com TERRAILLON terraillon.com TFAD ARCHITECTS tfad.com.au THE CONRAN SHOP conranshop.co.uk THE MARBLE STORE themarblestore.co.uk THE WATERMARK COLLECTION

thewatermarkcollection.eu THERMOMIX thermomix.vorwerk.co.uk TILES OF EZRA tilesofezra.com TM ITALIA tmitalia.com TOM DIXON tomdixon.net TROUVA trouva.com

DESIGN SPACE LONDON

middleton-bespoke.co.uk

TWENTYTWENTYONE

designspacelondon.com DESK STORE deskstore.com DEVOL devolkitchens.co.uk DINESEN dinesen.com DOMUS domustiles.co.uk DOTMAISON dotmaison.com DUPONT dupont.co.uk E15 e15.com EAT YOUR BOOKS eatyourbooks.com ELICA elica.com ERBAR MATTES erbarmattes.com EVERHOT everhot.co.uk FARROW & BALL farrow-ball.com FERM LIVING fermliving.com FIELD DAY fielddaystudio.com FILE UNDER POP fileunderpop.com

MIELE miele.co.uk MODULNOVA modulnova.com MORPHY RICHARDS morphyrichards.co.uk MR RESISTOR mr-resistor.co.uk MUJI muji.eu MUUTO muuto.com MYLANDS mylands.com NAKED KITCHENS nakedkitchens.com NEPTUNE neptune.com NEST nest.co.uk NEXT next.co.uk NIKARI nikari.fi NORMANN COPENHAGEN

VALCUCINE valcucine.com VALERIE OBJECTS valerie-objects.com VERY very.co.uk VILLEROY & BOCH villeroy-boch.co.uk VINERS viners.co.uk VISIONNAIRE visionnaire-home.com VITAMIN vitaminliving.com VOLA vola.com WHITE STUFF whitestuff.com WILD + WOOD wildandwood.co.uk WORKSHOP

96

normann-copenhagen.com OCHRE ochre.net OGGETTO oggetto.com

twentytwentyone.com

workshopliving.co.uk YIELD yielddesign.co ZAKKIA zakkia.eu ZIP zipwater.com


D E S I G N D E C O D E D The making of a modern classic The ‘b’ kitchen system by Bulthaup When Bulthaup was founded in 1949 by Martin Bulthaup, it was a small-scale sawmill in Bodenkirchen, Bavaria. At first, the company produced simple kitchen sideboards, all handcrafted from locally sourced woods, but as popularity grew, the family business began to sell all over Germany. Investing in another factory in nearby Neumarkt-Sankt Veit, Bulthaup was able to export across Europe, creating product ranges in new materials such as aluminium and stainless steel. The brand quickly garnered international acclaim with the launch of the clean-lined, minimalist ‘Style 75’ kitchen. That success was followed in 1974 by the ‘Concept 12’ kitchen, again sporting Bulthaup’s signature aesthetic. The brand’s big design shake-up came in 1978, when Bulthaup’s son Gerd took over after his father’s death. His passion for architecture, Bauhaus philosophy and appreciation for timeless design added fresh vigour to the brand’s vision.

He brought in famed graphic designer Otl Aicher, known for his simplified approach to form and function (he had recently designed the 1972 Munich Olympics logo). Utilising Aicher’s expertise, the pair reworked Bulthaup’s identity. By closely studying people’s living and eating habits, Aicher developed a new kitchen design philosophy: The Kitchen is for Cooking, published in 1982. The result of this set of principles was the ‘b’ system. Launched in 1984, it was ‘a space to live in rather than a place to work in’. It delivered on what Bulthaup and Aicher had discovered people wanted in their kitchen: hardwearing worktops and finishes, workbenches, easy-to-reach storage solutions and freestanding units. The design won numerous awards and its style lives on. Inspired by the original ‘b’ system, the brand now offers three versions – the ‘b1’, ‘b2’ and ‘b3’ – all with the same functional, ergonomic and minimalist design. From £10,000 (bulthaup.com). E D

T H E V I S I O N A RY Martin Bulthaup founded Martin Bulthaup Möbelfabrik (Martin Bulthaup Furniture Factory) in 1949 when Herford, the former centre for Germany’s furniture industry, was being rebuilt after WWII. Later, Bulthaup set up shop in Bodenkirchen – not far from where the brand’s state-of-the-art headquarters are today.

L AY I N G T H E F O U N D AT I O N S Before the ‘b1’ (above), ‘b2’ and ‘b3’ kitchen ranges, the brand launched the ‘Style 75’ (right) in 1969 and ‘Concept 12’ in 1974. Both designs delivered innovative solutions for modern living, laying the groundwork for its later designs.

98

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS

E A R LY D AY S In the first years of the company, kitchen sideboards were delivered to local customers by horsedrawn carts. The company’s good reputation and personal touch enabled Bulthaup to expand quickly all over Germany.

K I T C H E N C U LT U R E Bulthaup and designer Otl Aicher launched a study into changing dining habits that took over 50 trips abroad, exploring people’s living and eating routines, to compile. Its findings formed The Kitchen is for Cooking (1982) – a classic that is still referred to by today’s kitchen designers.


tạp chí ell tháng 4  

tạp chí ell tháng 4

tạp chí ell tháng 4  

tạp chí ell tháng 4

Advertisement