Page 1


KITCHEN TRENDS

Delve into our edit of the nine hottest kitchen looks – packed full of ideas, inspiration and all of the details you need to update your home now

SEPTEMBER 2017 Style

69

38 Design We chat to designer Kenzo Takada and ELLE’s new Editor-InChief Anne-Marie Curtis. Plus, the history of furniture brand Baxter and why Italian creatives Giò Ponti and Angelo Mangiarotti’s influence on our homes is stronger than ever 53 Decorating Interior designer Rebecca Wakefield shares her tips for arranging your living room, fresh paints from Earthborn and Little Greene, and new ways to use wood 58 Architecture Peek inside our first ever Open House. Plus, we chat to Sir Norman Foster and Alison Brooks 64 Technology The latest gadgets that are pieces of decor in their own right 66 Colour The power of bronze – why it’s captured the imagination for centuries

COVER IMAGE: HELENIO BARBETTA/LIVING INSIDE (PHOTOGRAPHY), CHIARA DAL CANTO (PRODUCTION) SUBS COVER IMAGE: FLOTSAM PRINT BY TOM PIGEON (TOMPIGEON.COM)

44

ON THE COVER Our newsstand cover features Villa Roccia. With a mix of 1960s architecture and contemporary taste, it’s the perfect ‘New Modern’ abode, p98.

This month’s special subscriber cover is a celebration of British designer Tom Pigeon’s Flotsam print – a true high street hit, p23.

THE BIG

HIGHSTREET HOTLIST 21

Shop the season’s must-have looks without breaking the bank, with our definitive list of best buys and exciting new launches

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 11


TH E N E W MO D E R N 98 New radical This updated 1960s Swiss house has an experimental spirit that’s totally contemporary 108 Nature study Scandinavian simplicity takes a warmer, more textural turn in this Swedish abode 118 Giò for it How to add Ponti’s on-trend style to your home 124 Quiet confidence Luxe elements in restrained hues are the height of fashion in this Australian apartment – we show you how to get the look 138 Mega mix Mixed materials is the trend of the moment. This Cape Town home perfects the style using texture and metallic touches 146 Turn to stone From slate and concrete to decadent marble, it’s time to fill your home with a palette of subtle greys 152 Sultry sophistication This Zurich apartment embraces the new modern palette – moody colours in seductive, sludgy tones 162 Rural splendour Country style is given a reboot in this Tuscan farmhouse, which combines the traditional and the contemporary

173

124 Escape 173 News The best UK spas to visit, an art festival in a picture-perfect Norwegian village and the Garden Museum’s brand new look 181 Getaway Live like a local in Lisbon, soaking up the architecture, exploring concept stores and sampling freshly baked treats

Finally

118

18 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 184 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 194 The story of the bathtub Tin tubs, avocado suites and beyond...

12 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


THE VALUE FACTOR My father used to say that the value of anything is what you’re prepared to pay for it. I think this is an interesting premise, particularly when we consider the prevalence of affordable homeware on the high street, to which this issue devotes a special section. If you absolutely love a vase, and it’s only £10, is it ‘worth’ less to you than something from Baccarat or Lalique? Of course, there will be vast differences in the processes of manufacture and related ‘quality’, but that’s not necessarily a factor in ‘value’. Then, of course, there is the ‘if something’s too good to be true, it probably is’ adage. To pursue my analogy, can a £10 vase really be any good? Again, all relative, and nothing to do with value. If you love it, maybe it won’t matter if it chips rather than ages elegantly because it was mass produced rather than handmade. Perhaps, because it only cost a tenner, it won’t matter as much if it gets broken? I’m not sure. You see, the thing with valuing something is that it’s an essentially intangible quality, you simply either do, or don’t; it’s not a commodity that can be quantified in black and white terms.

The thing with valuing something is that it’s an essentially intangible quality, you simply either do or don’t; it can’t be quantified in black and white terms

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

The Collins Dictionary definition of value is ‘the desirability of a thing, often in respect of some property such as usefulness or exchangeability’. So, does this mean anything that you can’t bear to part with? Which prompts the next question: what would you let go from your life? Anything that no longer has any worth to you? Or, more personally, anyone that we feel no longer respects us? It’s interesting to me too that another definition of value is ‘the moral principles or accepted standards of a person or group’. As such, our values, and what we value, define us. So back to that ten pound vase. I think, if you spot a vase that you love, and you can get it for a steal, then you’re a supremely smart shopper. The high street is an incredibly fertile shopping ground, so to dismiss it would be folly. However, it’s crowded, and there is a surfeit of choice, so we’ve done the hard work for you in singling out the best buys. In other words, the pieces we feel adhere to the values we at ELLE Decoration have always held dear: integrity, elegance and honesty. Not forgetting a little dash of fairy dust! Another intangible quality… but that probably deserves a whole other letter.

Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Instagram: @michelleogundehin

Twitter: @ELLEDecoMO

Visit elledecoration.co.uk SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 15


M ICH E L L E O GU N DE H I N Editor-in-Chief Editor’s Assistant Molly Hutchinson (020 7534 2522) Email editor@elledecoration.co.uk 72 Broadwick Street, London W1F 9EP (elledecoration.co.uk) Editorial enquiries elledecoration@hearst.co.uk Homes submissions homes@elledecoration.co.uk

E DI T OR I A L Art Director Tony Peters (020 7534 2521) Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs (020 7439 5027) Photography Director Flora Bathurst (020 7534 2503) Homes Director Jackie Daly (020 7534 2512) Deputy Art Director Philippe Blanchin (020 7534 2518) Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin (020 7534 2519) Features Editor Amy Moorea Wong (020 7534 2524) Decorating Editor Kiera Buckley-Jones (020 7439 5337) Photography Editor James Williams (020 7534 2513) Features Writer Charlotte Brook (020 7534 2522) Junior Designer Jack Melrose (020 7534 2581) Sub Editor Rebecca Hastings (020 7439 5343) Managing Editor Debbie Black (020 7534 2558) Workflow Director Christina Simone (020 7439 5273) Contributing Editors Amy Bradford Eliza Honey Emma Love Sarah Slade Editor-at-Large Talib Choudhry Contributing Stylists Hannah Bort Sania Pell Amanda Smith-Corston Suzanne Stankus

PU BL I SH I NG & A DV E RT I SI NG Group Publishing Director Jacqui Cave (020 7439 5273) Publisher’s Assistant Rachel Macbeth (020 7439 2555) Associate Publisher Christopher Daunt (020 7439 5175) Account Manager Marina Connolly (020 7297 3468) Account Manager Stephanie Tomlinson (020 7297 5462) Classified Sales Executive Charlie Ollivier (020 7297 3482) Director of Hearst Magazines Direct Cameron Dunn (020 7927 4699) Regional Sales Lisa Rogers (01619 629254/07702 346037) Director of Commercial Strategy Dan Levitt (020 3640 2184) Creative Solutions Art Director Tanja Rusi (020 7439 5374) Creative Solutions Art Editor Leo Goddard (020 7439 5000) Project Manager Camilla Weston (020 7439 5376) PR Executive Alice Roberta Taylor (020 7439 5047)

PRODUCT ION Production Director John Hughes (020 7439 5200) Production Manager Stephen Osborne (020 7439 5414) Production Coordinator Carl Latter (020 7439 5402)

CI RCU L AT ION Circulation and Marketing Director Reid Holland Head of Consumer Sales & Marketing James Hill Group Customer Marketing Manager Karen Sharp (020 7439 5543) Junior Consumer Marketing Manager Vicky Chandler (020 3728 7688) Subscriptions Marketing Executive Kimberley Cooper (020 7439 5687) Customer Marketing Manager Georgina Pearson (020 7439 5145)

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S U K Chief Executive Officer James Wildman Chief Operating Officer Claire J Blunt Chief Revenue Officer Duncan Chater Chief Operations Director Clare Gorman Director of Communications Lisa Quinn HR Director Surinder Simmons ELLE Decoration is published by Hearst Magazines UK, a trading name of The National Magazine Company Ltd.

OCTOBER ISSUE ON SALE 31 AUGUST 2017

H E A R ST M AG A Z I N E S I N T E R N AT ION A L

T R A DEM A R K NO T ICE

ELLE® and ELLE Decoration™ are used under Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse and General Manager Simon Horne ELLE Decoration is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation and abides by the Senior Vice President/International Editor’s Code of Practice. We are committed to Publishing Director upholding the highest standards of journalism. Jeannette Chang If you think that we have not met those standards Senior Vice President/Editorial Director and want to make a complaint, contact Kim St Clair Bodden complaints@hearst.co.uk or visit hearst.co.uk/ Executive Editor hearst-magazines-uk-complaints-procedure. If we Eleonore Marchand are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, Executive Creative Director contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit ipso.co.uk Peter Yates LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Fashion and Entertainment Director Chairman and CEO Lagardère Active Kristen Ingersoll Denis Olivennes B ACK I S SU E S & CEO ELLE France & International SU B S CR I P T IONS Constance Benqué Hearst Magazines UK, Tower House, CEO ELLE International Media Licenses Sovereign Park, Market Harborough, François Coruzzi Leicestershire LE16 9EF Brand Management of To order or renew a subscription, telephone ELLE DECORATION Sylvie de Chirée 01858 438846 or fax 01858 461739 SVP/International Director of For any other subscription enquiries, telephone ELLE DECORATION Cristina Romero 01858 438880 or email elledecoration@ SVP/Director of International Media subscription.co.uk. Lines open Mon–Fri Licenses, Digital Development & 8am–9pm; Sat 8am–4pm. Standard rates Syndication Mickaël Berret for 12 issues: UK £52.80; Eire & Europe Airmail Editorial Executive of ELLE Decoration £55; USA £65; Rest Of The World £75 PRINTED BY Wyndeham Roche Ltd, St Austell Linda Bergmark Marketing Executive of ELLE Decoration COVER PRINTED BY Westdale, Cardiff Flora Régibier Paper supplied by Burgo Group DISTRIBUTION Comag, Tavistock Road, Syndication Coordinator West Drayton, UB7 7QE Audrey Schneuwly 01895 433600 (comag.co.uk) INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi SVP/International Advertising Stéphanie Delattre stephanie.delattre@lagardere-active.com Lagardère Global Advertising , 10 rue Thierry Le Luron 92300 Levallois- Perret, France

THE WORLD OF ELLE DECORATION Find even more interiors inspiration online at elledecoration.co.uk and sign up to our newsletter for the best of ELLE Decoration direct to your inbox

16 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

SU B SCRI B E A N D J O I N T H E EL L E D ECO R AT I O N VIP CLU B AT ELLED ECO R ATI O N.CO.U K @ELLEDecoUK

@elledecorationuk

ELLE Decoration

ELLE Decoration UK


£54

YOU PAY £34.99*

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE SAVE 35% Just £34.99 for a year’s subscription* Free delivery direct to your door every month Exclusive subscriber covers Plus, special handpicked offers just for you TO SUBSCRIBE SECURELY ONLINE, VISIT OUR WEBSITE

hearstmagazines.co.uk/ec/sep17 OR CALL 0844 322 1769 QUOTING 1EC11236. LINES OPEN MON–FRI 8AM–9.30PM, SAT 8AM–4PM Terms and conditions Offer valid for UK subscriptions only. *When paying by Direct Debit, your subscription will continue at £34.99 every 12 issues unless you are notified otherwise. All orders will be acknowledged and you will be advised of the start issue within 14 days. Subscriptions may be cancelled by providing 28 days’ notice. All savings are based on the basic cover price of £4.50. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packaged with the magazine. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other subscription offer and closes on 31 August 2017. For UK subscription enquiries, please call 01858 438 877. For overseas subscription rates and enquiries, please call +44 1858 438794 or visit hearstmagazines.co.uk. Calls to 0844 numbers from a UK landline cost 7p per minute plus your phone company’s access charge. Lines open weekdays, 8am–9.30pm; Saturdays, 8am–4pm. All information is correct at time of going to press. For our data policy, visit Hearst.co.uk/dp

18 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


There’s never been a better time to be an interiors shopper! The latest trends are hitting the high street quicker than ever, and with price tags that are sure to tempt. But with so much on offer, how do you find the real gems? Easy. All you need is this essential edit of the best affordable and stylish buys

1

IKEA X HAY

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: OSKAR FALCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Fans of affordable design, rejoice. Swedish superbrand Ikea is teaming up with Hay, the leaders of minimalist Danish style. The new ‘Ypperlig’ collection’s name translates from Swedish as ‘excellent’ – an accurate description of its look. ‘Ypperlig’ vase, £12; table, £150; cushions, £5 each; stools, £20 each; wall shelf, £12 (ikea.com).


Style | 3

2

H HIG STREET HITS

PERFECT PAIRING Inky blue and dusky pink is the high-street palette of the moment – elevate it with a pop of mustard yellow

1

2

7

8

6 5

9

10 4

COMPILED BY: MOLLY HUTCHINSON PICTURES: ANDREA FERRARI

11

1 Influenced by designer David Hicks’ use of bold colour, ‘Hicks’ Blue’ paint is the prettiest navy hue. From £21 for one litre, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 2 These interconnecting ‘Shipwreck’ screenprints are inspired by objects found while beachcombing. £150 for a set of three, Tom Pigeon (tompigeon.com) 3 We love the hand-painted abstract palm leaves of the ‘Fresco’ fabric in ‘002 Storm Blue’. £169 per metre, Dedar (dedar.com) 4 With its gold frame, this wire basket is a stylish choice for storage. £5 for a set of two, George Home (george.com) 5 Small in size, the ‘Mickey’ mango wood desk is perfect for compact home working. £219, Swoon Editions (swooneditions.com) 6 We can’t believe this cheery yellow ceramic storage canister – perfect for pens – is only £5. Matalan (matalan.co.uk) 7 Wall-mounted or free-standing, the caseless ‘Flip’ clock by Karlsson is a real eye-catcher. £95, Ross and Brown (rossandbrownhome.co.uk) 8 The ‘Little Slam Dunk in Brass’ table lamp with its ‘Sea Salt’ linen shade is truly charming. £75, Loaf (loaf.com) 9 This velvet fringe-trimmed cushion in yellow adds a touch of character to any scheme. £28, Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com) 10 Sit down in style with this metal frame dining chair in ‘Nightshade’, inspired by mid-century school chairs. £169, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 11 We love the on-trend rose pink of this ‘Arran’ rug. £539, Furniture Village (furniturevillage.co.uk)

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 23


Style |

H HIG STREET HITS

3

Features Editor Amy Moorea Wong on why Zara Home is her go-to shop Why do I love it? Zara Home is first on my list when I want to update something small in my house. The amount of glassware, cutlery and linens it stocks could be overwhelming, but the fact that everything in store is organised by colour makes for a calm – and oddly satisfying – shopping experience. What is it best for? Mixing the latest trends with classic pieces. Like its fashionable sister brand, it doesn’t shy away from wild patterns and seasonally changing themes – but Zara Home uses soft whites and neutrals as its base, and features natural materials such as wicker and wood to create a timeless look.

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: STUDIO YAGÜE

My top picks: This black cutlery (from £2.99 for a teaspoon), salad bowl (£19.99) and serving dish (£29.99). My cupboards are piled high with tableware, but I can find space for this breezy take on classic pottery colours (zarahome.com).

4

BRAND NEW

John Lewis has always been a home shopping destination, but this autumn’s launches see the retailer going for gold as a home brand in its own right. The new season brings a bevy of in-house designed pieces that span everything from basics to luxurious extras. We’re especially taken by the ‘Palm Springs’ collection (above), with its 1950s-inspired retro curves, dark wood finishes and glass and brass accents. The goal is that, eventually, more than 50 per cent of the homeware products on the shop floor will be John Lewis’ own designs. With these releases, along with the popularity of its ultra-affordable ‘House’ range, it’s well on its way to success ( johnlewis.com).

5

BITS AND BO

Danish retailer BoConcept is bringing lustre and luxury back to the dining table with its latest range of accessories. And, as the price tags are brilliantly affordable, we suggest combining a selection of its pieces to create an eye-catching look that’s all about texture and finish. The well named ‘Diamond’ candlestick (left, £51) has a gem-like quality, and we love the simple, coloured aluminium ‘North’ bowl, (left, £59). Want to add more glamour? How about the tarnished brass ‘Oxidised’ vases (below left, from £62) or the elegant ‘Vila’ candleholders (below, £36)? Head to one of its many UK stores (boconcept.com).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 25


Style |

6

H HIG STREET HITS

LUXURY FOR ALL

This season, prolific fashion and homeware designer Jasper Conran is adding more furniture and home accessories to his ‘J by Jasper Conran’ range at Debenhams. The new designs nail the trend for luxe touches such as velvet, marble and metallics. Sink into his new midcentury-inspired ‘Ellsworth’ sofa (£1,140), which looks especially striking when combined with this metal-framed marble side table (£400). It’s refined ostentation at seriously accessible prices (debenhams.com).

8

Chief Sub Editor Clare Sartin sings the praises of Urban Outfitters Why do I love it? Urban Outfitters is so much more than a hipsters’ paradise of retro gadgets and reclaimed clothing. It’s where I look if I need an injection of modern, bohemian style in my home. What is it best for? Washed out textiles that are knowingly kitsch, with an air of Californian cool. The brand has also embraced the trend for marbling – find it on everything from bedding to tableware. And, of course, it has a love of retro – its shag pile cushions may not be for everyone, but I love them.

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

7

My top picks: The ‘Banana Leaves’ print by Rafael Farias (from £29), ‘Concrete’ candle by Paddywax (£15) and ‘Ida’ planter (£34; (urbanoutfitters.com).

STRIKE A CORD

Habitat’s growing, Quakerinspired ‘Oregan’ collection uses timeless natural materials in a winningly modern way. The original design, the best-selling ‘Oregan’ dining chair (left, £150), features a neatly woven cord seat and a beautifully curved wooden backrest. Its simple, elegant shape has inspired the new dining table (left, £200), with a delicate chamfered edge and curved legs – it’s available in oak or walnut. Other additions to the collection include a woven stool (£130), and a charming bench (£350) with a grey rattan seat (habitat.co.uk). SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 27


10

GO WITH THE GRAIN

The White Company has collaborated with Yorkshire-based furniture workshop Galvin Brothers on the ‘Brocklesby Ash’ collection, made from sustainably sourced English Ash. Simple, yet beautifully constructed, the set of tables – console, coffee and side – and the miniature stool have roughly hewn edges and smooth surfaces that highlight the wood’s grain and natural textures. It’s easy to tell how important provenance is to Galvin Brothers – it’s gone as far as to stamp each individual product with the date and place where the tree it was made from was felled. From £275 (thewhitecompany.com).

9

BELLE OF THE BEDS

It’s time to make your dream bed a reality. Handmade bed expert Button & Sprung now offers designs that can be customised down to the last detail – plus, you can try them out in person at its Chelsea showroom. Our pick, the ‘Holly’ (above), brings a sense of drama into the bedroom with its tall, curved upholstered headboard. Choose from 80 different fabrics to cover it. From £825 (buttonandsprung.com).

11

THE INSIDER PICK Jason Wilary-Attew, buying and merchandise director at The Conran Shop I love our new black and green ‘MAG’ side tables created by The Conran Shop in collaboration with British designer Daniel Schofield. They originate from Auvergne in France and are made from a ceramic derivative of volcanic stone. I particularly like the way the glaze is poured and how it develops a crackled effect during the firing process. ‘MAG’ side tables, from £875 each (theconranshop.com)

12 FOODIE ESSENTIALS

Further adding to its ever-popular homeware offering, H&M has launched its newly expanded range of kitchen utensils and tableware must-haves. ‘We wanted to create pieces that customers can collect over a long time,’ says head of design Evelina Kravaev. Take the new collection of matt dinnerware in three versatile colours – white, black and concrete – which is made for mixing and matching, and can easily be added to over the years as trends change. The wooden bowls and serving spoons offer a rustic finishing touch. From £1.99 for a plate or mug (hm.com).


Style |

13

H HIG STREET HITS

INSTANT OPULENCE This combination of deep, rich purple and emerald looks regal, but it’s more affordable than you’d think 2

1

4

5

3 7 10

8 9

11

12

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: TIM YOUNG, MORGANE LE GALE

6

13

1 The embroidered ‘Kayapo’ fabric in ‘Perroquet’ is inspired by the geometry of formal gardens. £155.50 per metre, Lelievre (lelievre.eu) 2 Named after the green mineral, this ‘Malachite’ paint is a real statement. From £39.50 for 2.5 litres of matt emulsion, Fired Earth (firedearth.com) 3 Bring the royal botanic gardens into your home with the ‘Kew Palms’ screenprint by Lucille Clerc. £230, Print Club London (printclublondon.com) 4 Use the ‘Globe Pearl Drop’ ceiling light as a stylish centrepiece. £135, Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk) 5 Bring a luxe feel to any space with this brass hammered pendant light by House Doctor. £79.99, Haygen (haygenshop.com) 6 The understated ‘Bella’ solid oak coffee table in ‘Brunswick Green’ can be displayed individually or as part of a group. £195, Hay (hay.dk) 7 Add a subtle metallic glimmer to your scheme with this ‘Huxley’ table lamp. £60, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 8 This elegant glass vase in plum makes a pretty addition to any coffee table. £35, White Stuff (whitestuff.com) 9 Give your flowers the stylish display they deserve with this ‘Scandi’ blue stone vase. £40, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 10 A nod to mid-century style, the ‘Eden’ sofa in ‘Dusky Velvet Ocean’ is minimal and elegant. From £1,629, Sofa Workshop (sofaworkshop.com) 11 Add a pop of colour and texture to your living room with this pleated teal cushion. £12.99, TK Maxx (tkmaxx.com) 12 Plum is the shade of the moment, so this velvet cushion from the ‘J by Jasper Conran’ range is wonderfully in vogue. £35, Debenhams (debenhams.com) 13 We can’t resist the tonal greens of the ‘Nodebo’ wool rug by S Edholm and L Ullenius. £250, Ikea (ikea.com)

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 29


H HIG STREET HITS

| Style

14

15

T H E N E W S H O P P I N G D E S T I N AT I O N

Danish lifestyle store Arket opens on London’s Regent Street this Autumn. We already have our wish list ready…

Contributing Editor Eliza Honey on why you should pop into Oliver Bonas Why do I love it? Aside from being the ultimate gift shop, with a great selection of cards, jewellery, and other crowd-pleasing doo-dads, the evergrowing chain is also becoming a place I rely on for the occasional interiors refresh.

‘Bona’ coffee drip kettle by Hario, £49, Arket (arket.com)

Bowl by Carina Seth Andersson, £19, Arket (arket.com)

Perfectly simple wooden salad set, £17, Arket (arket.com)

16

Buy this Velvet seating is the designer look of the moment, but it doesn’t have to cost the earth. The aptly-named and perfectly-sized ‘Snuggler’ armchair by stalwart of the British high street House of Fraser costs £1,650 (houseoffraser.co.uk).

What is it best for? Trend-focused small furnishings and accessories. Need a cactus pattern in your life? Want Art Decoinspired metallic touches? Whether it’s a frame, a love seat or a side table, you need look no further. My top picks: Speaking of on-trend, rattan is high on my wish list. The ‘Miroco Rattan Bench’ (£295) works for the outdoors during the warmer months, but I like it even better as a textural touch indoors. Accessorise with the ‘Foil Grid’ blue cushion (£30) that has a subtle metallic pattern (oliverbonas.com).

Beech wood large chopping board, £29, Arket (arket.com)

17

Renters and new homeowners should have Made.com on their radar. The online retailer, known for making designer furniture more affordable by cutting out the middleman, has released its new ‘Essentials’ collection – with even more new designs set to launch in September. The pared-down pieces come in a neutral palette with the occasional pop of colour, making them a great base for your personal style. Covering everything from wine glasses and placemats to rugs, shelving, beds and more, the range is a complete starter set for anyone in a furnishing fix. ‘Alida’ home office set, £29; ‘Kleur’ shelves, £139; ‘Elkan’ rug, £89 (made.com). 30 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

BARE NECESSITIES


21

Sub Editor Rebecca Hastings explains why she’s a firm fan of H&M Why do I love it? As a self-confessed homeware obsessive and high street native, shopping in H&M’s homeware department is something of a spiritual experience for me. Having just moved into a new flat, I’ve been spending a little too much time in its Oxford Street branch – everything in there looks like it’s jumped straight off of a Pinterest board.

18

COCKTAIL HOUR Now you can pick up stylish accoutrements for your home bar along with your grocery shop. Our standout pieces from the supermarket offerings include Tesco’s gold or copper Moscow mule mugs (right, £5 each; tesco.com), and a classic cocktail shaker and set in stainless steel from George Home (above right, £14; asda.com). Meanwhile, Sainsbury’s has released the ‘Renaissance Boutique’ collection (right, decanter, £15; tumblers, £5 each; sainsburys.co.uk). The perfect storage solution? Marks & Spencer’s inky-black, Art Deco-inspired ‘Webster’ cabinet (above left, £599; marksandspencer.com).

19

THE INSIDER PICK Oliver Tress, founder and managing director of Oliver Bonas With three small children and a busy diary, my home has to work for all of us. I’m not a fan of matchy-matchy design, and am relaxed around the informality of a mix of texture, style and colour. Here, the side table and stripy lampshade add elements of surprise and fun, which work well in contrast with the relative sobriety of the ‘1958’ sofa. Side table, £250; lampshade, £55; ‘1958’ two-seater sofa, £895 (oliverbonas.com)

20

FOUR OF THE BEST FLOOR LAMPS

Lighting that makes a big statement, without the price tag 1 The white marble and gold ‘Luna’ lamp by Jasper Conran has a built-in shelf. £180, Debenhams (debenhams.com). 2 Brass and marble are always elegant, as this ‘Kuriko’ lamp by Aaron Probyn proves. £250, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). 3 The ‘Hammered Copper’ tripod floor lamp with its large copper lampshade is a glamorous take on the industrial look. £375, French Connection (frenchconnection.com). 4 With a spun black metal shade and a burnished brass stem, the ‘Black & Brass Club’ floor lamp is effortlessly chic. £550, Cox & Cox (coxandcox.co.uk).

4

1 2

3

What is it best for? Bedlinen, curtains and rugs – H&M has a swoon-worthy library of textiles to suit all colour palettes, from dusky greys and pastel pinks through to mustard yellows and botanical greens. My top picks: The slub-weave cushion cover (£6.99), with its eye-catching fish design, large smokeygrey glass vase (£19.99), wooden box (£17.99), and pale green and brass tealight holder (£2.99; hm.com).


Style |

22

H HIG STREET HITS

2

CHOOSE CALM

5

Achieve tranquility on a budget with these pieces in pale purple and natural shades

1

4

3 12

10

7

9

11

8 6

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: DOUGLAS FISHER

13

1 This ‘Bamboo’ wallpaper in ‘W7025-05’ is the perfect backdrop for a calming bedroom. £65 per ten-metre roll, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) 2 The ‘Koven’ linen fabric is embroidered with a black stitch pattern that has a delicate appeal. £84 per metre, Larsen (larsenfabrics.com) 3 Industrial accessories are having a moment, and this hanging light by Gray & Willow is only £70. House of Fraser (houseoffraser.co.uk) 4 We love the simple shape of this concrete pendant light. £85, French Connection Home (frenchconnection.com) 5 This natural emulsion paint in ‘Slate’ is the ideal neutral wall colour. £41.50 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) 6 The ‘Brunel Tripod’ smoked ash and steel table is robust but understated. £95, The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) 7 The ‘Fredd’ bed in tan leather by Matthew Long has a cushioned headboard, ideal for sitting up against to read. From £895, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 8 Add a hint of bold geometric pattern with the ‘Broadchalke’ cushion in ‘Chalk Face’. £125, Eleanor Pritchard (eleanorpritchard.com) 9 The soft colour of this faded coarse cotton cushion cover is a perfect pairing with a neutral scheme. £19.99, Zara Home (zarahome.com) 10 Make a serious style statement with the modern ‘Hendrix Angular’ floor lamp in grey. £80, Very Home (very.co.uk) 11 Cosy up with this knitted pom pom throw in softly feminine ‘Heather’ by Fox & Ivy. £40, Tesco (tesco.com) 12 Parquet isn’t just for the floor – add some natural pattern with the ‘Hoxton Chevron’ wardrobe. £625, Next (next.co.uk) 13 The grey tones of the ‘Nelly’ rug in silver perfectly complement most colour palettes. £489, Heal’s (heals.com)

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


H HIG STREET HITS

| Style

23

EASTERN PROMISE Asian-inspired patterns and prints are always stylish, and this season, we’re pleased to be seeing more of them than ever before on the high street. A real highlight is Ted Baker’s new bedding collection, which is decorated with delicate sprigs of pretty pink cherry blossom – just what we want to wake up to. From £115 (tedbaker.com).

24

INSIDER PICK Adam Daghorn, designer and head of French Connection Home I always like to use a mirror over a console table – it helps to throw light around the room and makes a design statement. Dark grey walls work really well with white marble, creating a strong and sophisticated contrast. Marble console, £355 (frenchconnection.com)

25

T R U LY EVERGREEN

For those who struggle to keep houseplants alive, brands are creating cool alternatives that require zero care. Yonder Living’s ceramic succulents (above right) come in a pleasing palette of greens, blues and pinks (from £14; yonderliving.com). Meanwhile Ross & Brown’s art prints of houseplants such as ficus, alocasia and strelitzia (above left) do not require watering (from £34; rossandbrownhome.co.uk). Equally low-maintenance is Abigail Ahern’s collection of realistic faux houseplants (cactus, above), which recently debuted at Debenhams. These beautifully detailed specimens will fool even the most green-fingered friends (from £9; debenhams.com).

26 27

FOUR OF THE BEST HANDMADE CERAMICS

This season, the high street is the place to find unique craft for your table

Brickett Davda’s designs are inspired by the English countryside. From £26, Toast (toa.st).

34 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

These inky, speckled dishes make a moody table setting. £8.99, Very (very.co.uk).

This range by Nkuku is made by craftspeople in India. From £9, Heal’s (heals.com).

Ikea’s ‘Efftertanke’ range made by women in Thailand – available October, from £5 (ikea.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: GITA PUSNOVAITE, BILDFELDT AB

Try this Have the perfect sofa in mind but can’t find it in any of the shops? Is there a dining table of your dreams? You need the newly expanded ‘Made for You’ service by Heal’s, now available online and in-store. There are so many fabrics and finishes to choose from that the finished product is practically bespoke, but at a fraction of the price. £2,479 for a four-seater sofa (heals.com).


H HIG STREET HITS

| Style

29

Features Writer Charlotte Brook champions Oxfam’s homeware gems

AESOP’S FABLES As beauty brand Aesop celebrates its 30th anniversary, we take a closer look at its inspirational high street shops – every one a design destination Not many brands have become as successful as Aesop without also becoming ubiquitous. That the Australian company has retained its allure is largely down to one thing: its approach to store design. Where others reproduce the same template over and over again, every Aesop store is different. Though the name is a familiar presence on London’s high streets – it will open its 19th UK branch, in Chelsea’s Duke of York Square, this September – it is never a predictable one.

Details such as the green Moroccan tiles in Aesop’s Covent Garden store (below) offer inspiration for real-life homes This year is Aesop’s 30th anniversary, but the brand was unconventional from the start. The first stand-alone store, opened in 2003 in St Kilda, Melbourne, was housed in a tunnel-like ramp leading to an underground car park. Later openings were similarly experimental: the ceiling of the Adelaide boutique (above right), for instance, is decorated with over 7,000 amber glass bottles – the same material used for Aesop’s products. ‘We have always acknowledged the effect good design has, and endeavour to bring something worthwhile to every space,’ says creative director Marsha Meredith. Many stores, such as the one overseen by interior designer Ilse Crawford in Mayfair in 2008, take their cue from homes in an effort to make people feel at ease. Restful jade green walls and parquet floors featured in Crawford’s design (top left), while details such as the green Moroccan tiles in the Covent Garden store (right) and the red brick and copper sinks in the Ginza, Tokyo branch offer inspiration for real-life homes. It’s no surprise, then, that Aesop has a website dedicated to its retail projects – taxonomyofdesign.com. Here’s to many more years of stylish stores (aesop.com). 36 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

What is it best for? Either very simple, practical kit (stainlesssteel utensils or a set of plain glass tumblers) or one-off vintage showstoppers (a pink Art Deco glass bowl, polished brass 19thcentury weighing scales, or an emerald green lustreware jug). My top picks: Mid-century steel and antique Sheffield silver cutlery sets sell for a song. Also look out for original Wedgwood Jasperware (oxfam. org.uk).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: WARREN MACRIS, THE KALONY AGENCY, DIANNA SNAPE, ALAMY

28

Why do I love it? The Oxfam secret has been out among fashionistas for years (if you drop by a branch in a chi-chi London neighbourhood regularly enough, the chances are you’ll discover a designer gem). But I suggest bypassing the clothing and heading straight for the homeware. You’ll find unique items, contribute to a great cause, and help to reduce landfill waste.


The power of Ponti ‘Enchantment,’ said Giò Ponti: ‘a useless thing, but indispensible as bread’. This is not a slogan or a manifesto – he hated such things – but rather an expression of a feeling that was essential to Ponti’s life and work. Throughout his sixty-year career – whether the great man was working on fabrics, furniture, ceramics, coffee machines, homes, hotels, the interiors of trains, cutlery, churches, offices, a government ministry in Pakistan or the Denver Art Museum in Colorado – enchantment was never far away. Ponti’s best-known piece of furniture, the ‘Superleggera’ chair (above) – which

is still being produced by Cassina today – sums him up. The seat is a work of both craft and engineering, its frame made from triangular pieces of wood that have been refined into barelypossible slenderness, and the bend in its back prompting a healthy posture. This is not just a beautiful object, but an accessory to the social nature of humanity. And then there is its moment of enchantment – it is so light that you can lift it with one finger. Or you could consider the interiors that he designed for the Parco dei Principi hotel in Sorrento, Italy, ➤

PICTURES: GETTY, GIO PONTI ARCHIVES

Designer, architect, writer, inspiration – the work of the late, great Giò Ponti is a major influence on the ‘New Modern’ trend. Architectural writer Rowan Moore explains why


Style | D E S I G N

Clockwise from top left The Ponti-designed Pirelli tower, Milan. A room in the Parco dei Principi hotel. Ponti’s ‘D.655.2’ chest of drawers for Molteni & C. A bottle by Ponti for Venini. Domus magazine. Molteni & C’s ‘Heritage Collection’, including the ‘D.153.1’ chair, ‘D.522.2’ table and ‘D.355.1’ bookcase, all by Giò Ponti

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 39


Style | D E S I G N

GIÒ PONTI where he chose to create a different tile pattern (one shown on previous page) – no matter whether anyone would notice or not – for each of its 100 rooms, or the outbreaks of decoration within the clean lines and modern architecture of his villas in Caracas, Venezuela. Alternatively, you could look at the glass frill – the ‘crinoline’ – he put around a bottle designed for historic Murano glass brand Venini, at his use of the ancient intaglia technique (carving a pattern into or under the surface of stone or metal), or at his concept of the ‘furnished window’, by which objects are arranged in front of glass so that ‘the outside is seen through the foreground of the furniture’. Of all the great polymathic designers – such as Charles and Ray Eames or Alvar Aalto – Ponti moved most fluently through scales and techniques. He could plan mass housing, or he could decorate a vase, and you couldn’t say at which particular discipline he excelled most. What you can say is that he worked from the small to the large, from things you touch and hold to buildings, and from interiors outwards. His architecture

in vain to achieve. But this lack of grandeur was consistent with Ponti’s approach to everything. He wanted design to embellish life, not to make statements. He chose lightness and enchantment. Which, for Ponti, were not just nice, diverting things to have around you – rather, they were fundamental to civilised human life. One writer has commented on the ‘substantiality of the impalpable’ in Ponti’s pieces, meaning that they are suggestive of something beyond themselves, the lives that might be lived around them; nuances, qualities and atmospheres that can’t be put into words. ‘Comfort in the home lies in obtaining, through architecture, a measure for our own thoughts,’ Ponti said. Much like certain novels or poems, the designer’s spaces and objects evoke a sense of life that is beautiful, but also ephemeral and fragile. Ponti’s attitude was distinctly Italian, as he liked to note himself. He had an Italian view of the modern – not as a violent wrench with the past, but as the continuation of ancient patterns of culture. ‘We proceed’, he said, ‘we don’t progress’. Or, ‘in culture,

From top A display from Molteni & C’s ‘Heritage Collection’, including Ponti’s ‘D.357.1’ bookcase and the ‘D.154.2’ armchair. Ponti’s ‘Great Mother of God’ cathedral in Taranto, Italy. The interior of the Montecatini headquarters in Milan, designed by Ponti. The ‘Superleggera’ chair for Cassina

40 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

grows from intimacy, the bodily and mental enjoyment of rooms and furniture – what he called the joie d’y vivre, ‘the joy of living there’ – rather than determining a form into which the life of the building must fit. His writing, too, has inspired many. Ponti founded architecture and design magazine Domus in 1928 and edited it, with a six year break to found and run another magazine, Stile, until his death in 1979. This work was another part of his generous world view, his fascination with people and creativity. His personality allowed others to flourish – Italian-born Brazilian Modernist architect Lina Bo Bardi and painter, sculptor and interior decorator Piero Fornasetti both worked with him. Italian architect and designer Carlo Mollino once said that the support of Domus brought him to the attention of the world. Ponti was a mine of ideas that is still being excavated today by design practices such as Studiopepe and Dimore Studio – both trailblazers of what we refer to as the ‘New Modern’ aesthetic. If Ponti’s career lacked anything, you might say it was the single, indisputable architectural masterpiece (though the Pirelli tower in Milan certainly comes close) that critic Bruno Zevi pressed him

everything is contemporary’. He hated fake recreations of the past, but could calmly combine new and old techniques and motifs. His early work had classical influences, which dissolved as his career developed, but he still saw himself as part of the same tradition as Italian architects of the past. His delicacy is more remarkable for the fact that he maintained it through decades of turbulence – first Mussolini’s dictatorship and then the destruction of war. Ponti felt that the best possible response to chaos was to continue the pursuit of the culture of delightfulness. ‘Italy has nothing but its civilisation to save its civilisation’, he said. Perhaps, as we also live in troubled times, Ponti’s belief in the ‘grace’ that can coexist with ‘barbarity’ is part of his attraction today – Cassina and Artemide are selling as many ‘Superleggera’ chairs and ‘Fato’ lights as ever, and Molteni & C has started re-issuing more Ponti classics in response to his continued popularity. He spoke, too, of the Italian understanding of ‘the reckless gifts of freedom, independence and improvisation,’ of which we can see an echo in Studiopepe’s claim to be ‘inspired by the unexpected’. It’s clear that Ponti and his enchantment are still just as indispensible as ever. E D

PICTURES: GETTY, ALAMY

Ponti could plan mass housing, or he could decorate a vase, and you couldn’t say at which particular discipline he excelled most


Style | D E S I G N

H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D B A X T E R

One of the most original brands on the Italian interiors scene and an expert in luxury leathers, Baxter’s intriguing past is as rich as its design output When it comes to Italian furniture brands, it can be said that there is a typical style: clean lines, boxy shapes and neutral colours. Baxter is different. One of the younger labels on the scene – it was established in 1990 – it marries traditional influences with bold, modern twists. Baxter is a family-run company, with all its products crafted at its factory near Como. So far, so Italian – but why the British-sounding brand name? Apparently, this was chosen because Baxter’s original collection of upholstered furniture had a ‘typically English mood’. A hint of this can still be seen in its gentleman’s club-style armchairs and buttoned sofas.

F O U R K E Y FA C T S ABOUT BAXTER

1

Baxter’s three bestselling designs are all sofas by Paola Navone. In order of popularity, they are the ‘Chester Moon’ (below), the ‘Budapest Soft’ and the ‘Casablanca’.

The ‘Chester Moon’ sofa epitomises Baxter’s skill for combining classic shapes with modern, witty details

‘Berbère’ rug, ‘Janette’ sofa, ‘Icaro’ small table, ‘Loren’ small table, ‘Anais’ pouf, ‘Etienne Bergère’ armchair Above ‘Innsbruck’ bed Right ‘Leggia’ outdoor armchair, ‘Organique’ small tables

42 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

2

Baxter’s leathers are tanned in wooden barrels using ancient techniques and all-natural dyes.

3

All Baxter designs are made to order using largely manual methods that allow for high levels of customisation in terms of colour, pattern and material. Even the shade of the thread used for stitching can be specified by the customer. It can take several months to craft just one piece.

4

You can see Baxter’s designs at the new Silvera Showroom on King’s Road, London.

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: ANDREA FERRARI

The Chesterfield-style ‘Chester Moon’ sofa (2009) is Baxter’s most famous design. Extravagantly buttoned all over and available in five widths, including an extra-large size measuring almost four metres, it epitomises the brand’s skill for combining classic shapes with witty, modern details. The sofa was designed by Paola Navone, who has collaborated with Baxter since 2003. Her inimitable colour sense – which encompasses jewel-like blues, botanical greens and oxblood reds – has played a major role in shaping the brand’s identity, as has her flair for big shapes and tactile finishes. For 2017, the brand is venturing into new territory with its debut collection of outdoor furniture. Overseen by Paola Navone and designer Antonino Sciortino, it features sculptural designs in tubular copper and high-tech, water-resistant leathers. It seems that Baxter’s expertise in skins knows Top of page (from left) ‘Blade’ floor lamp, no bounds (baxter.it).


K E N ZO TA K A DA PAT T E R N PROVO C AT E UR We catch up with the flamboyant fashion designer at home to discuss his latest project – creating a new look for Roche Bobois’ ‘Mah Jong’ sofa Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

Jerry Hall disco-ed down the catwalk waving a Champagne bottle above her head for Kenzo Takada’s wild 1976 fashion show, but the designer claims he now prefers a quieter life – he officially ‘retired’ in 1999. Step into Takada’s townhouse just off the elegant boutique and bistro-lined streets of St Germain on Paris’ left bank and you enter four floors of hushed, immaculately curated rooms. Each one is painted white and filled with fine art; the air perfumed by white freesias, roses and towering arum lilies. A black lacquer take on the traditional Japanese shoji screen partially conceals

glass buddhas – designed by Takada for French crystalliers Baccarat – sitting crosslegged atop a marble mantelpiece. So far, so zen. Can this really be the home and studio of the Himeiji-born youth who daubed mad Henri Rousseau-inspired murals onto the walls of his first shop in the 70s, called the look ‘Jungle Jap’ and sold out of the kaleidoscopic, culture-clashing athleisurewear he designed and sold there? Absolutely. After a childhood in rural Japan, Takada set sail on a six-week crossing to Paris in 1964. He’s never looked back, but still draws on his birth country’s craft and

culture for inspiration. As outlined in our August issue, the Japonisme look is having a moment in the design world: simplicity, black carbonized wood, the imperfect wabisabi aesthetic. At the opposite end of that trend sit the pixelated Tokyo pop-culture references and the kimono-style graphics of Kenzo clothes. When did one era end and the other begin? ‘Never!’ he tells us. ‘I need black and white, the sober colours of zen, but I also love colour-saturated pattern. It’s the contrast between the two that I love.’ Having disrupted the abiding aesthetic of tailored silhouettes and the pared-back ➤


Style | D E S I G N

‘I need black and white, the sober colours of zen, but I also love coloursaturated pattern’

PICTURES: ERIC MATHERON-BALAY, GETTY

Far left Takada on the ‘Mah Jong’ sofa at his home Top left Jerry Hall modelling at Kenzo’s 1976 show Centre A young Takada Above and below Patterns created for the ‘Mah Jong’ range for Roche Bobois

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 45


KENZO TAKADA symbolic motifs). The patterns come in three colourways that echo the changing light of day – Asa (dawn, pastel pinks and yellows), Hiru (midday, crimson and sky blue) and Yoru (evening, midnight blues). The designs are indicative of the optimistic playfulness that pervaded Takada’s fashion lines. Having lived in Paris for over fifty years now, which country does the designer feel most connected to, France or Japan? He

Takada is the latest in a line of designers to have ‘dressed the ‘Mah Jong’ sofa, including Jean Paul Gautier pauses for thought. ‘In Japan, I feel so French, but when I’m in Paris, I definitely feel Japanese.’ This East-West mélange clearly manifests itself in Takada’s home: bohemian artist Jean Cocteau’s matador drawings hang beside a Japanese ink calligraphy sketch; the delicately corniced wall in one of his workspaces is decorated with a 100-strong fleet of origami birds, painted pure white. He uses a beloved 18th-century Provençal

A selection of accessories from the modular ‘Mah Jong’ collection, in ‘Hiru’ reds (above) and ‘Yoru’ (top right)

dinner service for parties, and drinks his tea from Japanese porcelain cups. Any remaining dreams? ‘To buy a major piece of modern art.’ By who? ‘I’m not saying!’ Indeed, Takada’s mischievous and nomadic spirit has not faded: according to his studio assistants, who are cheerfully beavering away on sewing machines next door in the light-filled ‘workshop’ as we talk, their boss may be scheming to move once more. He dreams of a riverside apartment, as he’s never lived on the Seine. ‘My perfect abode would be a mix of Haussmann (the five-floor, symmetrically proportioned 19th-century Parisian buildings) with a Japanese aesthetic,’ he decides. ‘A little contemporary, but I don’t care for too much modern – no Corbusier! After all,’ he muses, looking about his tree-filled drawing room, ‘it’s all about atmosphere’. Takada plans to continue experimenting with ceramics, painting, travelling – and working. ‘Now, I like work. I need it. I must work to stay young!’ he exclaims, though he’d prefer to collaborate than work on solo projects. Indeed, Takada is all about the final adornment of an already existing form – whether that’s Jerry Hall or the ‘Mah Jong’ sofa. roche-bobois.com E D

PICTURES: MICHEL GIBERT, GETTY, ERIC MATHERON-BALAY

palette of French fashion (‘I gave the French journalists something fresh to talk about,’ he fondly reminisces), Takada sold what had become a cult label to luxury power corporation LVMH in 1999, and announced his retirement from fashion in order to focus on his art. Oil painted selfportraits hang on the walls of his home, sketches are everywhere, and he recently tried his hand at pottery in rural Japan. Takada hasn’t completely stepped out of the limelight, though. The family of French furniture brand Roche Bobois spotted his eye for colour and invited him to design three new fabric covers for its signature sofa: the ‘Mah Jong’. Designed for modern, informal living, the modular ‘Mah Jong’ can be bought piece-by-piece to create a mismatched effect, and has, remarkably, been the brand’s best-selling product every year since its launch in 1970. The latest in a line of designers to have ‘dressed’ the sofa, including Jean Paul Gaultier and the Missoni house, Takada has created six geometrically-patterned fabrics inspired by the kimonos worn in productions at Noh theatres in Paris (Noh is an ancient form of Japanese storytelling, where actors wear opulent attire and masks, often heavy with


Style | D E S I G N

‘MAH JONG’ D AW N T O D U S K A closer look at the three colourways of Kenzo Takada’s new collection ‘Asa’

‘Ichimatsu’ cushion, £80; ‘Aka Muji’ vase, £435; ‘Aka Uroku’ vases, £725 each ‘Hiru’

‘Aka Hanawa’ vase with gold decoration, from £2,175; ‘ Hanagame’ cushion, £80 ‘Yoru’

‘Ichimatsu’ cushion, £80; ‘Aka Muji’ vase, £435, all from Roche Bobois

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


Style | D E S I G N

DESIGN HERO ANGELO MANGIAROTTI

Agape Casa’s ‘Mangiarotti Collection’ is placing this designer’s legacy firmly back in the limelight Who is Angelo Mangiarotti? Haven’t heard of him? Italian brand Agape Casa is on a mission to change that. Responsible for railway stations, office buildings, factories and even a glass church in Baranzate, Milan, this very prolific architect (1921–2012) also extended his talents into industrial design, creating many timeless chairs, tables and shelving units from the 1950s onwards. Since 2010, Agape Casa – the homewares division of bathroom specialist Agape – has re-issued many of the great man’s original designs, adding slight styling tweaks and material updates to suit contemporary tastes – all with the blessing of the architect’s studio. Now, Agape Casa’s ‘Mangiarotti Collection’, as it is known, has flourished into a cohesive and highly covetable range.

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: LEO TORRI

The Angelo Mangiarotti magic touch involves combining complex feats of engineering and objects of sculptural beauty. It’s a look that is still highly covetable and incredibly on-trend What’s his signature style? The Mangiarotti magic touch involves combining complex feats of engineering and objects of sculptural beauty. For example, his 1971 ‘Eros’ table (above right), of which there are more than 25 configurations, consists of a slab of marble deftly supported on pillar-like legs without joints or clamps (from £3,004). The recent addition of two new versions in rich green Verde Alpi and brown Emperador marbles has made this piece even more desirable than ever. What else does the collection include? The new ‘Asolo’ table has two almost impossibly thin marble legs that slot perfectly into the tabletop, again without any visible joints (from £4,215). Meanwhile, the shelves of the ‘Loico’ bookcase (right) appear almost weightless in contrast to their stocky column supports (from £5,641). These ontrend designs are complemented by some of Mangiarotti’s chairs, such as the three-legged ‘Tre 3’ from 1978 (centre right), which features a strip of tanned leather for the seat (from £818; agapecasa.it).

From top ‘Eros’ dining table . ‘Loico’ shelving unit. ‘Asolo’ dining table. ‘Tre 3’ chair. ‘Eccentrico’ coffee tables

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 49


Style | D E S I G N

1

M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E ANNE-MARIE CURTIS

We ask a style icon to share what they are reading, watching, listening to and more Starting her fashion career in the early 1990s as part of Wallpaper* magazine’s founding team, Anne-Marie Curtis was fashion director of ELLE for 12 years and has just been appointed the title’s Editor-in-Chief, a role she describes as her dream job. The first issue under her impeccably chic leadership, the September edition, is out this month (@amcELLE; elleuk.com). The song that makes me feel instantly happy is You’re the First, the Last, My Everything by Barry White. It was the first dance at my wedding in 2009. Tony and I got married at the Institute of Contemporary Arts just before Christmas, when our children Cecilia and Luca were nine and seven respectively. It snowed as we exchanged vows, I wore a beautiful Erdem dress and we had all the people we love there. I’m currently listening to anything from my 15year-old son’s Spotify playlist! He’s taken to ‘educating’ me about music – Royal Blood (7) is a current 3 favourite. It’s interesting to see the bands he’s discovering, such as the Smashing Pumpkins and Soundgarden, that I was into in the 90s. I am a big reader of novels, and I find Truman Capote’s writing utterly transporting, I have read and re-read all of his stories and always take a battered copy of A Capote Reader on holidays – my favourite 4 story is The Grass Harp (2). The famous quote that makes me think is ‘Be yourself, everyone else is taken’ – coined by Oscar Wilde. It’s a brilliantly simple life philosophy, and one I always come back to – when you’re working in the everchanging world of fashion, it’s easy to lose sight of who you are. My favourite film has to be Woody Allen’s Annie Hall (3), for its brilliantly funny writing and 6

7

50 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

iconic fashion. I also love the sweeping epic drama and the incredible Ennio Morricone music score from Once Upon a Time 5 in America, directed by Sergio Leone. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve seen When Harry Met Sally and Breakfast at Tiffany’s, too – pure comfort viewing. My perfect evening involves dinner with friends at my favourite restaurant, Patron in Kentish Town (5). It’s a French brasserie that feels like a little slice of Paris. The last exhibition I went to was the ‘Christian Dior, Couturier du Rêve’ exhibition at Paris’ Musée des Arts Décoratifs (4), which celebrates the 70th anniversary of the creation of the House of Dior. It’s truly extraordinary. My favourite place in the world is India (1). I’m hoping to go again soon, to celebrate a friend’s 50th birthday in the northern city of Varanasi – it’s supposed to be magical. For family holidays, it has to be the Cyclades Islands in Greece (6). The food, the landscape and the waters are absolute heaven. My next stop? New York, for work. To paraphrase Samuel Johnson, ‘When a (wo) man is tired of New York, (s)he is tired of life.’ There’s always somewhere new to try.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: LES ARTS DÉCORATIFS/NICHOLAS ALAN COPE, GETTY, ALAMY, DAVID LOFTUS, WIRE IMAGE

2


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X R E B E C C A WA K E F I E L D

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their work and ask them to share their styling tips

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: SARAH HOGAN

Who is she? British interior designer Wakefield is a qualified architect, but realised during her degree at Newcastle University that she was ‘far more fascinated by the internal experience of a space’. After graduating, she worked at clothing retailer Gap for six years as a visual merchandiser, which instilled in her a strong sense of how to create immediate visual impact. After that, she went to work for a property developer, specialising in London warehouse apartments. In 2011, she joined Banda Property, where she is now creative director. This London firm undertakes everything from bespoke property development to private interior decoration commissions and furniture design. Its recent projects have included revamping a group of flats in a stuccoed Regency terrace and the conversion of a Richmond brewery. Wakefield oversees the creative aspects of every project, so she has an impressive contacts book of architects, structural engineers and artisans. What’s her style? Typical Banda interiors feature understated colours, beautiful parquet floors (as seen in the interior Banda designed for a Marylebone flat, above right and below right) and precious materials such as marble and brass (as demonstrated in the firm’s kitchen for Parkgate House, Battersea, below left). ‘I’m drawn to a simple and effortless look, so I love exploring textures, tones and materials within a restricted palette,’ she says. Wakefield’s special skills include matching pieces of art to interiors and creating rooms that harmonise with historical buildings. ‘I always start a concept with the architectural element at the forefront of my mind,’ Wakefield explains. ‘Architecture and interiors are

‘Architecture and interiors are so heavily intertwined that one skill set without the other can prevent exceptional design’ so heavily intertwined that one skill set without the other can prevent exceptional design.’ Her inspiration comes from unexpected sources: hidden buildings in the capital, Swedish fashion label Acne and London florist Petalon, which creates modern-rustic arrangements. What are her recent projects? The Heritage Collection, a set of apartments in a converted bakery in Battersea, saw Wakefield team up with restaurateur Mark Hix on a dark wood and marble kitchen design. She has also worked on a house in Oxfordshire, which was constructed using traditional Cotswold stone and decorated in classic countryhouse style with a modern twist. What is she currently working on? Several interior design commissions, including a riverside apartment in Richmond, a Brixton townhouse and a small pied à terre in Chelsea. She says ‘I love gritty, urban areas of London, so my dream project would be a warehouse project – something like a boutique hotel, for example.’ Turn over for Rebecca Wakefield’s advice on arranging your living room ➤ SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 53


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E REBECCA WAKEFIELD’S INSIDER GUIDE TO ARRANGING YOUR LIVING ROOM

How to place your furniture and objects for maximum impact 1 The rule of three There is an unwritten rule of still-life styling that says you should work with uneven numbers. Avoid symmetry and ‘coupling’ objects; instead, think about balance for a more interesting and appealing composition. Arranging a lateral object (such as a book or tray) with something tall and vertical (like a vase or candlestick) and something low and bulky (such as a paperweight or bowl) is a great starting point for styling a coffee table or sideboard.

3 Get the right rug A rug should be the main anchor of your room. Avoid it being too small; a rug covering only the floor around a coffee table will make the space feel incohesive. Go for the largest rug you can – they should extend at least halfway under sofas and 30 centimetres either side of them; side tables need to sit either fully on or offto avoid a messy look. 4 How to hang art I am a huge advocate of unexpected artwork positioning and sizing, which adds real interest to a space. If you’re not confident doing this, use your furniture layout and architectural features as a guide. Don’t just hang an artwork precisely in the middle of a wall, as it can look contrived. Hanging a small piece above a side table in the corner of a room, and adding a lamp alongside, can create the illusion of a secondary space. 54 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

LINEN ROCKS William Clark & Sons’ new ‘Earthed’ range is the world’s first ever collection of digitally printed Irish linen – an intriguing concept, since the brand is known for its traditional production methods such as beetling (pounding the cloth with mallets to create a closer weave). Part of this range is the new ‘Sub Surface’ collection, which evokes the colours and textures of natural stones and minerals. From £70 per metre (earthedbywmclark.co.uk).

L I G H T T H E WAY

Get ready for darker autumn evenings with Italian brand Giorgetti’s new ‘Gea’ table and floor lamps, which look just as good in your garden as they do indoors. Conveniently, the lamps can be battery powered – perfect for when you’re out in the open, away from an electrical source. Designed by architect Chi Wing Lo, the steel frame lamps have a light appearance that’s complemented by the rich glow that emanates from their onyx or crystal lanterns. From £776.40 (giorgettimilano.it).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD, ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: SARAH HOGAN

2 Work with your room size If you have a large room, don’t be afraid to buy an oversized sofa and armchairs – you can often get away with much bigger pieces than you’d think. It will look underdressed if you scrimp with small furniture. You can add more delicate elements with lamps and side tables. With a small space, it’s the opposite: you often have to downscale more than you’d think to create the illusion of an open, airy space. Get a sofa that is less deep but as wide as the room can take, placing it against the wall. Armchairs should be smaller too, but if you don’t have room for any, don’t force them in – they will overpower the space.


EMERALD PRETTY Bring a sense of British history to any room with kitchen specialist Devol’s new range of handmade tiles in a deep emerald green. Reminiscent of the traditional tiles that adorned old London tube stations and Victorian pubs, they have a lovely irregularity that comes from their being painstakingly glazed by hand. Try them on a kitchen splashback or an entire wall to add depth. From £15 per tile (devolkitchens.co.uk).

B R E AT H E E A SY Walls in need of a colourful refresh? This time, choose a paint brand with products that are free from chemicals. One of the leaders in that department is Earthborn, whose ‘breathable’ paints are free from oils, acrylics and vinyls. Its ultra-matt Claypaint goes on thick and is extra quick to dry – try it in one of the brand’s five new hues (right, from top) ‘Can-Can’, ‘Hobby Wood’, ‘Peach Baby’, ‘Sapling’ and ‘Trumpet’. From £38 for 2.5 litres (earthbornpaints.co.uk). THE NEW D AY S O F R O M E

S H OW YO U R M ETA L Tile brand Indigenous’s new metallic collection includes natural and oxidised copper (above left), brass and zinc tiles that all boast a beautiful patina. There’s also the ‘Oak & Metal Patchwork’ range (above right), which mixes the new metals with oak tiles, creating a checkerboard that’s perfect for a feature wall. From £214.80 per square metre (indigenous.co.uk).

Decorate your walls with elaborate frescoes by some of ancient history’s greatest artists. Italian wallpaper brand WallPepper’s ‘Classic’ collection includes faithful reproductions of famous murals, motifs and architectural details. Take the ‘Livia’ design (left), which recreates the garden-inspired art that once adorned the walls of Emperor Augustus’ wife Livia’s Roman villa from 39BC (now the Palazzo Massimo). Some things never go out of style. £78 per square metre (wallpepper.it).


Style | D E C O R A T I N G

C O L O U R F U L PA S T Dipping into Little Greene’s 2017 ‘Colours of England’ range is a time traveller’s delight – it features several years’ worth of the British paint manufacturer’s colours. Prefer a more contemporary aesthetic? The collection also includes seven new launches – among them is ‘Mortlake Yellow’ (right), a warm, creamy shade of mustard that is as on-trend as can be. £21 for one litre of Absolute Matt Emulsion (littlegreene.com).

Visit this New one-stop shop Style Library brings fabric, wallpaper and paint giants Zoffany, Morris & Co, Sanderson, Harlequin, Scion and Anthology all under one roof at its showroom in Chelsea Harbour Design Centre (stylelibrary.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY

TOUGH BY NATURE Surface specialist Caesarstone has added three new natural finishes to its ‘Supernatural’ quartz collection of heat-, stain-, and scratchresistant stones that are designed for the demands of kitchens or bathrooms (no need to seal them!). We also love the equally tough ‘Concrete’ series – its new ‘4033 Rugged Concrete’ look (above) is ideal for lovers of industrial style. From £300 (caesarstone.co.uk).

D R E A M W E AV E Wallpaper and fabric brand CLJ (the name stands for the initials of its founder, Charlotte Lawson Johnston) has given the classic cane weave pattern a refresh with its ‘Slatcane’ linen collection. In pale but interesting tones of yellow, green, dusty pink and navy blue, the design has a slightly retro feel – à la famed interior designer David Hicks’ classic geometric patterns. Try it out on curtains or a chair for a playful effect. £56 per metre (cljhome.com).

T H R E E N E W WAY S W I T H W O O D There’s an ever-widening world of possibilities when it comes to wooden floors 1 The ‘GrandPattern’ by Dinesen sees the Danish brand put its own twist on classic herringbone, with extra-wide oak or Douglas fir planks dyed deep black. From £50 per square metre (dinesen.com). 2 ‘Oak Surface Plane Chevron’ by Ecora shows off the new and reclaimed flooring specialist’s planing technique that allows the oak to display some of its naturally coarse grain. From £139.85 per square metre (ecora.co.uk). 3 ‘Square’ by Ted Todd is a subtly unconventional alternative to planks. Known for its historic parquet patterns, Ted Todd’s contemporary collections are always guaranteed to turn heads. From £59.75 per square metre (tedtodd.co.uk).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 57


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

OPEN HOUSE LA COLOMBIÈRE BY YH2 ARCHITECTS

Transformed from a small hut to an ultra-contemporary woodland dwelling, this architectural gem is a masterclass in blending a home into its natural surroundings This is a house that has grown out of the forest. Located in Quebec, Canada, it was originally a storage space owned by a lumberjack. It was turned into a small cottage by subsequent owners, and in this third incarnation, conceived by YH2 Architects, it stands tall amid bark and leaf like a giant birdhouse. Indeed, its name, La Colombière, means dovecote or pigeon house in French.

WORDS: JACKIE DALY PICTURES: LOUKAS YIACOUVAKIS

The unique building resembles a giant birdhouse, standing tall amid bark and leaf in a forest outside Quebec, Canada To preserve the surrounding landscape, the building was extended upwards instead of outwards, leaving the original footprint of the property exactly the same. To further limit damage to the forest, the new extension was completed without the use of heavy machinery and without any trees being felled. The whole building is clad in dark cedar, and blends chameleon-like into the thicket. Inside, a wooden walkway cuts through the white space, morphing into a staircase that zigzags between floors. At intervals, the stairs appear held up by a single piece of folded metal. On the top floor, the wooden path becomes a bridge, leading to the diamond-shaped outdoor terrace, which is accessed through glass doors. Perched in the house’s canopy, it is a comfortable, covered observation post in which to sit and take in the views of the glorious greenery. yh2architecture.com SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 59


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

FIVE MINUTES WITH SIR NORMAN FOSTER

ELLE Decoration’s Associate Publisher Chris Daunt talks with the architectural icon

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: GETTY, HUFTON + CROW

V&A TRANSFORMED London’s Victoria & Albert museum is now home to a new, futuristic design destination. Described by the V&A’s new director Tristram Hunt as ‘a hugely exciting moment... our largest architectural intervention in the last 100 years’, the Exhibition Road Quarter is a modern addition to one of the capital’s most loved museums. Designed by Stirling Prizewinning British architect Amanda Levete and her practice AL_A (ala.uk.com), the complex on the western wing features exceptional spaces. The Sackler Courtyard (above) – the first porcelain-tiled public courtyard in the country – will offer intimate pop-up performances throughout the year. Below it sits the underground Sainsbury Gallery, a 1,100 metresquared column-free exhibition hall – purpose-built for temporary exhibitions – which will allow artists to exhibit work in an open, free and flexible environment. In addition to the new spaces, many of the museum’s existing period features have been restored, including the original 1909 entrance arches (above right) designed by Victorian architect Sir Aston Webb, the creator of Buckingham Palace’s iconic facade (vam.ac.uk).

Sir Norman Foster is one of Britain’s best-known architects. In London alone, his architecture firm Foster + Partners has been responsible for iconic structures such as City Hall, Wembley Stadium, the Gherkin, and the British Museum’s Royal Court (below). But his reputation is global, his influence stretching far beyond British shores. I talked with Sir Norman at the opening of ‘Cartier in Motion’, an exhibition he curated for the French watch brand at the Design Museum, London. We discussed one of his early projects: fashion label Katharine Hamnett’s flagship store on London’s Brompton Road. Housed in a converted car repair workshop, the store was set back from the street and reached via a bridge of illuminated etched glass panels (below) – an approach designed to conjure up a catwalk. The interior was a cavernous white room, with mirrored panels and old industrial windows, which were re-glazed with translucent white glass. He told me that he had created the space on a shoestring and completed it in a matter of months – therein lies genius.

Date for your diary Now in its 25th year, Open House London is partnering up with RIBA to reveal more architectural delights to the public. Don’t miss your chance to see the views from the redesigned GRID Architects’ Vantage Point – formerly Archway Tower (16–17 September; openhouselondon.org.uk). SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 61


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

2 1

This month, we talk to Alison Brooks, creative director and founder of award-winning practice Alison Brooks Architects, which has worked on projects ranging from the innovative Cohen Quadrangle for Exeter College in Oxford (1) to the joyful ‘The Smile’ structure (4) for last year’s London Design Festival

4

5

What inspired you to become an architect? Expo ’67 in Montreal, Canada, even though I was only five years old. From the house I grew up in, to the grand Toronto City Hall (2), to just driving around southern Ontario with my mother, looking at the Georgian farmhouses and Romanesque university buildings. What has been your favourite project to date? It’s like choosing between children, but I’d have to say our new building in Oxford – the Cohen Quadrangle (1) for Exeter College, part of Oxford University, which holds Oxford’s first social learning space. It tells a story as you move through it. Its curved, stainless steel shingled roof was conceived as a cloak that drapes itself over the building in a series of waves, and its checkerboard pattern was inspired by the college’s famous Neo-Gothic chapel and the work of textile designer William Morris, an Exeter College alumnus. Can you describe your personal working process? I love to draw. Sometimes, the smallest sketch leads to the clearest and most sophisticated solution. I think and sketch in perspective, like a photographer moving through spaces to find the best shot. Sketching allows me to test my first instincts, then quickly move on to try the exact opposite. If you can describe your major concept and architectural ideas in words, they act as a conduit to a clear design. What is your favourite room in your house? Our bedroom – a very recent loft conversion designed with my partner, architect Charles Walker. It’s like going into another dimension at the top of our 1899 house. You disappear into a solid

62 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

3

cherry wood suspended staircase (5) that spirals up to herringbone floors, trapezoidal spaces, flared dormers and windows that let you watch the moon travel across the sky at night. What does the word ‘home’ mean to you? Home is a repository of meaningful things – a retreat, a place for light, being part of a neighbourhood. Trees rustling in the wind that you can hear from your bedroom window. Cherry wood furniture, a front hall that can hold lots of people, or a garden for barbecues – all those little details that make you smile.

‘Sometimes the smallest sketch leads to the most sophisticated solution’ If you weren’t an architect, what do you think you would be? A writer, a photographer, a designer or a giant slalom ski racer. This year, you celebrate the 21st anniversary of your practice. What have been your proudest achievements? I’m very honoured to have delivered a major education building in Oxford. I’m also proud of my great team – some of whom have been with me for over ten years – as well as being part of the 2008 Stirling Prize-winning practice and being shortlisted for the 2017 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture for Ely Court (3), a housing and regeneration project. And of course, my two sons, Dylan and Declan. I had Dylan the same year that I founded ABA, so for years I had to think of him first to remember the age of my practice. alisonbrooksarchitects.com

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: BEN BLOSSOM, SONIA RUBIO, GETTY

ASK AN ARCHITECT ALISON BROOKS


Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

A NEW PERSPECTIVE Last issue, we looked at a TV cleverly designed to blend into your home’s decor. Loewe’s ‘Bild 9’ (above), however, is the decor. The German brand collaborated with London-based designer Bodo Sperlein over the course of seven months to create this exceptionally slim statement 4K (the new peak of picture quality) TV that ‘floats’ on a hand-forged steel frame. Sperlein’s Bauhaus-inspired design – he describes it as ‘a strong statement, without being too fashion-orientated’ – also extends to the TV’s six standalone speakers. A piece of art in its own right, this is technology that demands attention. From £6,990 for a 55-inch screen (uk.loewe.tv).

Buy this Concerned about home security? The ‘Arlo Pro’ smart camera is our favourite digital guard dog. It’s wire-free (meaning it’s simple enough to install without calling an electrician), rechargeable and weatherproof. The price includes an app that lets you keep an eye on your home from your smartphone, wherever you are. £300 (arlo.com).

A significant proportion of home gym equipment ends up gathering dust, but it’s hard to imagine that fate befalling the uber-modern ‘Fuoripista’ exercise bike. Handcrafted in Italy, it’s an extravagant workout tool made of wood, leather and glass. Place an iPad in the stand and you can tackle virtual alpine climbs from your bedroom. From £11,000 ( fuoripista.eu).

64 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

SOUND OF THE SUMMER Blending simplicity with cutting-edge technology is no easy feat, but Swiss company Geneva Lab’s ‘Touring S’ DAB radio with Bluetooth achieves it with effortless precision. The 1970s-style milled aluminium shell contains speakers that deliver audio as crisp as mountain air, while a powerful battery provides 20 hours of tunes on the go. £170 (genevalab.com).

WORDS: TOM BAILEY PICTURE: FABRIZIO MUSA

THE ART OF SPIN


Style | C O L O U R

BRONZE PANTONE ® 8582

A metallic hue with a warmth and strength that has fascinated mankind for many centuries

There’s a reason that so many fairy tales have fishermen as protagonists. When they cast their nets into the sea, they do it blindly: who knows what they might catch. In 1926, a fisherman in a boat just off the northwest coast of the Greek island Euboia hauled up something unexpected. There, at the bottom of his net, was a gigantic left forearm cast in bronze. It would take another two years before the statue – now known as the Artemision Bronze – was recovered in full and could be appreciated as a whole. Over two metres tall, it depicted the god Zeus in the act of hurling a lightning bolt. Although it had been made around 460BC and had lain at the bottom of the sea for a millennium or more, it was nearly intact. A mixture of copper and tin, bronze has a low melting point, and so was one of the earliest metal alloys that human beings used to make tools. These days, craftspeople enjoy using it to create more refined objects. Its warm colour – deeper toned than copper – makes bronze a popular choice for lighting. Habitat has used it on the interior of its ‘Grande’ lampshade (from £60; habitat.co.uk), as has British design brand Original BTC on its ‘Titan’ pendant light (£239; uk.originalbtc.com). True bronze enthusiasts will fall for Cole & Son’s

African-inspired ‘Ardmore’ wallpaper range, particularly ‘Matrinah’ (£80 per metre) and ‘Senzo Spot’ (£75 per metre; cole-and-son.com), which both allow entire rooms to bask in the glow of this sophisticated hue. Bronze lends weight and structure to off-kilter designs that might seem kitsch when made from other metals. The quirkily architectural ‘Don Diego’ side table from Bellavista Collection (from £1,000; bellavistacollection.com) is a case in point – it’s composed of twin hammered bronze struts joined at the top to form a handle. For something more

Its warm colour – deeper toned than copper – makes bronze a popular choice for lighting monumental, it’s hard to beat Fredrikson Stallard’s ‘Hybrideae’ planters (from £10,578; fredriksonstallard.com), made by forming tiny models in terracotta, digitally scanning them and then enlarging the design – fingerprints and all – before finally casting them into otherworldly pale bronze sculptures. Although playful, these designs have a strength and permanence to them, too – like the Artemision Bronze, they are made to last.

WORDS: KASSIA ST.CLAIR PICTURE: ALAMY

Paints to try ‘Old Bronze’ metallic emulsion, £62 for one litre, Eicó (eico.co.uk). ‘Millionaire’ metallic emulsion by Crown, £18.99 for 1.25 litres, Homebase (homebase.co.uk)

66 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

HOMES, BY DESIGN A unique, bespoke approach to kitchen and furniture design – discover it for yourself with Extreme A home is a reflection of the people who inhabit it. At its most successful, that extends beyond surface ornamentation and is embedded within the very DNA of its design. Creating that vision, however, requires a bespoke service that seems out of reach for many. Enter Extreme. Established in 1993 to deliver a fully personalised approach to kitchen design that its founders believed to be missing from the wider market, the company prides itself on its uniquely collaborative methods. Extreme’s designers work closely with you through every stage of the process – from concept sketches and mood boards to the completed project – to create a space that resonates personally, reflecting your style, passions and achievements. From the kitchens it is best known for to custom-created furniture designs for any room in your house, it’s easy to tell your story with Extreme.

TRUST IN EXTREME Whether you’re renovating a single room or building your dream home, Extreme’s boutique, tailor-made service will guide you through the entire process with professional ease, turning each project into an exciting collaborative journey from start to finish. As Extreme’s creative director, Marcello Cuconato, says: ‘There are no limitations.’ Find out more at extreme-design.co.uk


Words ELIZA HONEY

PICTURE: ALEXANDER & CO (ALEXANDERAND.CO), CLARE DELMAR (STYLING)

KITCHEN TRENDS

Revealed: the nine big trends in kitchens right now! Delve into our definitive edit, packed full of ideas, inspiration and all of the details you need to make your dream room a reality

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 69


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE BLUE KITCHEN Consider blue the new neutral kitchen hue – a serene and calming backdrop to your daily routine. Reform, the Denmark-based company known for its designer fronts for Ikea cabinets, makes a strong case for the colour with the ‘Basis 01’ linoleum kitchen in ‘Pewter’, complete with oak detailing and circular handles inspired by 1960s architecture. The design can be ordered to fit all Ikea kitchen dimensions (from £1,903; reformcph.com). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 71


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE MOROCCAN KITCHEN If the kitchen is the heart of your home, make sure it’s cosy by layering texture and pattern. This simple, whitewashed space feels warm and inviting, thanks to its stylish mix of accessories with a crafted feel. The Beni Ourain rug (£1,215), Tunisian seagrass lampshade (from £258) and the ornate Moroccan cement tiles on the splashback (24 tiles for £86) are all from Finnish shop Zoco Home (zocohome.com). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 73


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE LOUNGE KITCHEN An open-plan kitchen and living area is practical and popular, but what about when you want to hide away the culinary clutter? That’s when you’ll need Boffi’s ‘On-Off’ kitchen. This compact, matt black design has everything the modern cook needs, including integrated melamine-coated cabinetry and hidden appliances, but can be quickly tucked away from view behind a remote-controlled screen that descends from the top of the workspace, leaving your lounge calm and pristine. From £32,000 (boffi.com). ➤

74 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

T H E L I B R A RY KITCHEN Display your prized cookbook collection in style, with its own custom-made shelf. The small oak cut-out in the cabinetry of this kitchen by Extreme Design frames the books as if they were artworks, and stands out from the grey lacquered cupboards and similarly coloured marble worktop. From £35,000 for a custom kitchen (extreme-design.co.uk). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 77


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE SOCIAL KITCHEN Love entertaining? You need a kitchen that allows you to be the ultimate host and a consummate chef. Italian designer Vittore Niolu’s ‘Motus’ design for Scavolini visually blends your living room and kitchen, encouraging guests to mingle as you cook. Its lacquered cabinets function as storage for everything from books and ceramics to tableware. Meanwhile, the kitchen island – with its elegant angled legs – acts not as a room divider, but an invitation for people to perch while you put the finishing touches to a meal. From £20,000 (scavolini.design). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 79


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE OAK KITCHEN Think outside the box when it comes to wooden kitchens – oak doesn’t have to be rustic or traditional. Here, Australian design firm Robson Rak (robsonrak.com.au) has used French oak floorboards, arranged horizontally, to conceal the pantry and most of the kitchen appliances. It’s a modern celebration of the material’s natural grain, and a great way to add warmth without compromising on slick style. The oak bookshelf built into the white kitchen island continues the look, as does the trio of Another Country’s ‘Bar Stool One’ (£395 each; anothercountry.com). ➤

80 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE ORGANISED KITCHEN As the expression goes, ‘A place for everything and everything in its place’. With his sleek ‘Alea’ scheme for Italian kitchen maker Varenna, designer Paolo Piva has turned storage into an art form. The modular open cabinets above the worktop are all purpose-built for kitchen essentials, helping you to organise spice jars, glasses and other necessities, and keep them all within reach. From £40,000 (varennacucine.com). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 83


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

THE KITCHEN IN A CUPBOARD Not a fan of open storage? Bulthaup’s ‘b2’ kitchen fits everything a modern cook needs into two walnut workshop cabinets – one holds tools and pantry essentials, the other houses appliances. All that’s left on display is a stainlesssteel ‘workbench’ with a built-in sink. From £15,000 (bulthaup.com). ➤

84 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

PLUS, I F YO U O N LY D O O N E TH I N G…

UPDATE YOUR SPLASHBACK

1 M E T R O T I L E S The craftspeople at Plain English have opted for a soft, neutral shade, rather than the classic white metro tile. To further update the look, they have gone big, extending the splashback all the way up to the ceiling. An offcut of marble is propped above the stovetop, breaking up the uniformity. Kitchens from £60,000 (plainenglishdesign.co.uk). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 87


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

U P DAT E YO U R S P L AS H BACK 2 S Q U A R E T I L E S Handmade ‘Field’ tiles from The Winchester Tile Company (£84.96 per square metre; thetilebox.co.uk) create a neat grid. It is an artful contrast to the vertical oak boards that adorn the custom-made kitchen island in the Belgian home of designer Frederic Kielemoes (frederickielemoes.be).

3 M I R R O R A reflective splashback creates the illusion of space. This beauty was designed by London-based architectural studio Mwai (from £30,000; mwai.co.uk), but you can get a similar look with ‘Silver Mirror’ from DIY Splashbacks (£387.50 per square metre; diysplashbacks.co.uk). 4 M A R B L E Delicately veined Carrara marble

PICTURE: CARLA ATLEY, CLARE DELMAR (STYLING)

is the height of luxury and a beautiful choice for a splashback. Make like Sydney-based interior design company Alexander & Co (alexanderand.co) and use marble to make a statement in your kitchen – Lapicida is a Carrara expert (£234 per square metre; lapicida.com).

5 C H E V R O N S Australian studio Turner Interior Design (turnerinteriordesign.com.au) chose Mutina’s ‘Mews’ tiles, designed by Barber & Osgerby, to give this space some geometric flair. Hesitant to use a bold pattern? Choose a soft palette – this is ‘Soot’, a range of 15 shades that resemble artists’ charcoals (£242.28 per square metre, Domus; domustiles.co.uk). ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 89


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

U P DAT E YO U R S P L AS H BACK 6 A N T I Q U E D G L A S S In this light, bright kitchen by Humphrey Munson (humphreymunson.co.uk) the foxed glass splashback adds an element of texture and patina. For a similar look, try the ‘Smoked Antique’ toughened glass from Antique Mirror Glass (from £350 per square metre; antiquemirrorglass.com). ➤

90 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


Sourcebook | K I T C H E N

TRENDS

U P DAT E YO U R S P L AS H BACK 7 Q U A R T Z I T E In this moody bespoke kitchen designed by Smallbone of Devizes, dark grey stained oak cabinetry may dominate the space, but it’s the ‘Sky Gold’ quartzite splashback with its burnished veins that caught our eye. Kitchens from £45,000 (smallbone.co.uk).

92 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


THE POWER OF QUARTZ Uncompromising quality and pioneering innovation in a material that’s as easy to install as it is to maintain – look no further than Caesarstone Kitchens are more than practical spaces in which we gather to prepare and eat food; as the focal point of many modern homes they increasingly serve multiple purposes. The inexorable rise of the kitchen island as both a design feature and focus for family activity is one recent example of this. Functioning as everything from worktop and cooking space to informal dining table or bar, at their best they are hardwearing, practical and essential for a modern kitchen. Which is where Caesarstone comes in. An innovator in creating premium quartz surface materials that offer good looks and

outstanding performance on everything from walls and floors to worktops, its products are ideal for both kitchens and bathrooms. As one of nature’s strongest materials, quartz is more durable than most stone, marble and granite. It doesn’t stain, scratch or crack and is highly resistant to temperature extremes. With up to 93 per cent quartz in its surfaces, Caesarstone perfectly marries practicality with a stunning array of finishes that will suit every home, from classic marble and bold granite-inspired finishes to industrial styles. ‘Rugged Concrete’ (above), for example, is the latest addition to the brand’s ‘Concrete’


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

Main image Kitchen island, built-in storage and walls in ‘Rugged Concrete’. Left Kitchen island and wall in ‘Statuario Maximus’ Above Worktop in ‘Montblanc’ Below, left Walls and floors covered in ‘Calacatta Nuvo’. All by Caesarstone. From £500 per square metre (excluding installation)

series and taps into the current design trend for raw, urban-inspired finishes. Expertly crafted to replicate the appearance and finish of the material it is inspired by – complete with imperfections and a textured look – its deep, dark grey tone is as rugged-looking as its name suggests. It’s perfect for anyone wanting to make a bold, industrial-inspired design statement. A slightly more muted, but equally showstopping take on Caesarstone’s natural aesthetic is apparent in another new release: ‘Montblanc’ (above right). Part of the ‘Supernatural’ collection, it is a neutral, harmonising light grey infused with rich,

‘One of nature’s strongest materials, quartz is more durable than most stone, marble or granite’

warm lines and random patternation designed to replicate the beauty of natural stone. Easy to install and incredibly flexible in its use (it can be curved and shaped as required), Caesarstone’s surfaces can be adapted to almost any environment. Plus, with no need to seal, treat or polish any of its designs, it offers the kind of easy-care maintainence that many other natural finishes are unable to provide. Performance and impeccable looks; in any modern, design-conscious home that’s got to be a win-win. Find out more about the range at caesarstone.co.uk, or email info@caesarstone.co.uk to request samples


THE NEW MODERN THE WORLD’S MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES E L L E D E C O R AT I O N . C O . U K


THE NEW MODERN

NEW RADICAL Designed in the late 1960s and recently updated, Villa Roccia has an experimental spirit that remains totally contemporary Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography HELENIO BARBETTA/LIVING INSIDE Production CHIARA DAL CANTO


n 1969, this striking house – with its concrete-clad, openplan interior and vast panes of glass – was considered highly radical, particularly in conservative Switzerland. Today, expertly expanded and restored, the property feels just as progressive. The aim, says its owner François Droulers, was to preserve its original character and experimental nature, but also to evolve it for 21st-century family life. ‘We didn’t want a 1960s or 70s-themed house,’ says François, who lives here with his wife Chiara Costacurta and their four children, Stefano, Carola, Leonardo and Delphine. ‘We wanted to make the most of its space, height and light, and put our stamp on it.’ Known as Villa Roccia (Rock House), the property is located in Muzzano, on the hills surrounding Lake Lugano in Italian-speaking Switzerland. It was originally designed by local architect Mario Campi for the artist Felice Filippini, known for his bold, abstract paintings. Campi, inspired by Le Corbusier and Italian architect Carlo Scarpa, dreamed up the building’s open-plan flow, 5.5-metre-high living space (originally Filippini’s studio), and dramatic staircase. The house’s design has a subtle symmetry – every dimension, from the size of the windows to the rooms, is developed in multiples of 60 centimetres. ‘It lends the house a certain harmony,’ says François. The biggest change has been the expansion of the property from 500 square metres to 800 square metres. ‘It had previously been lived in by single men, but we are a family of six, so we had to do some “massaging” to accommodate everyone,’ says François. The house is now divided into four areas: François and Chiara’s bedroom and bathroom is on the top floor, which has its own private grassed terrace; on the first floor is the living space, dining area and kitchen; and the four bedrooms for the couple’s children, along with a pool and sauna, cinema room, and office are on the ground floor. ‘We wanted everyone to enjoy the house together, but to have their own private areas, too,’ explains François. François’ sister, Nathalie Droulers (from Droulers Architecture), redesigned the interior, including the bespoke seating and tables. The house is filled with European design classics and bespoke furniture, as well as 17th- and 18th-century antiques. The materials used are wideranging: Italian walnut, teak, steel window frames, white Italian Statuario marble, and, of course, cement and concrete. ‘We used materials that were in vogue at the time of construction, to keep the feel of the original design,’ says François. droulers-architecture.com

Living room The sofas, armchairs and silk-topped coffee table are bespoke pieces by architect Nathalie Droulers. Zara Home sells velvet cushions, and John Lewis is a good source for brass lamps Previous page The ‘Barcelona’ daybed is by Mies van der Rohe for Knoll (available at Aram Store). The desk chair is Mario Botta’s ‘Prima’ (try 1st Dibs), and for similar table lamps, try India Jane Stockist details on p184 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 101


The building’s original design was inspired by famous architects Le Corbusier and Carlo Scarpa


Kitchen For similar handleless cabinetry, try Bulthaup. The marble dining table is bespoke. The black light above the table is by Serge Mouille and the dining chairs are the ‘Standard’ by Jean Prouvé for Vitra Stockist details on p184 ➤


Dining room The glass table is bespoke (Glas Italia sells similar pieces, available at Made in Design). For black pendant lights in this style, try Artifact Lighting Stockist details on p184 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L R E W O R K I N G A C L A S S I C

Five tips for sensitively updating your property 1 Stick closely to the house’s original materials. They were chosen for a reason, and will help you to retain cohesion. 2 Avoid being tied down to specific themes by choosing furniture from different eras and styles and mixing them all together, from antiques to contemporary pieces. 3 Bring the outside in. You don’t need double-height windows – a small balcony filled with plants will do. 4 Be prepared to work hard. The owner removed white paint from every wall to uncover the original finishes in this home. 5 Don’t be afraid to put your own stamp on a house – its evolution adds to its character and sense of modernity.


Stairway The stairs are fitted with a coconut fibre runner (try Natural Stair Runners for similar). The Totem pole in the living area is by artist Pino Urbano (for similar sculptural artworks, try artgallery.co.uk) Swimming pool The blue water is reflected in a ceiling mirror Stockist details on p184 E D


‘We wanted everyone to enjoy the house together, but to have their own private areas, too’


THE NEW MODERN

NATUR E STU DY The contemporary twist on Scandinavian simplicity involves a shift towards a warmer, textural approach. This Swedish home perfects the look Words AMY BRADFORD Photography PETRA BINDEL/HOUSE OF PICTURES Production EMMA PERSSON LAGERBERG


I

t’s easy to imagine the ways in which an ultra-modern, new-build home might be at odds with nature, but Sofia and Johan Wäborg’s villa in southern Sweden has no such shortcomings. So skilful is the use of natural materials and colours in this abode that it almost seems as though the house has grown organically out of the landscape. The couple has lived here since 2012 with their twins Emmy and Isak, now eight. Their previous home was an apartment in Malmö, but, after the children arrived, they realised a move was necessary. ‘We wanted a house with a garden,’ explains Sofia. ‘We are both very much into architecture and love big projects, so we decided to buy our own plot of land and create a new house just to suit us.’ Sofia’s job as a project manager for a property developer gave her a head start (Johan is in the pharmaceutical industry). She contacted an architect she had worked with in the past, Hanne Birk, to help design their new home. ‘I knew Hanne could give us what we wanted. She gathered a lot of images that inspired us – but really, the process was as much about creating a feeling of harmony and mindfulness as it was about architecture and interiors.’ When it came to picking the location, the couple didn’t have to travel far. ‘We visited a few villages around Malmö and felt at home in Höllviken,’ says Sofia. ‘It’s very green, but still close to Malmö, and Copenhagen is just across the Øresund bridge. It used to be popular for summer houses, as it has a big pine forest and sandy beaches, but now it’s inhabited all year round.’ Both Sofia and Johan grew up close to the coast and wanted their villa to be an escape from the stresses of working life. ‘Our idea was to create a home in which nature becomes part of the architecture,’ says Sofia. ‘We wanted it to feel as though it had always been there.’ The three-bedroom stone building took a year to plan and another year to build. A wooden terrace and pathway wrap around the structure, while an outdoor shower area maximises the potential for enjoying time outside. The garden has a wild feel to it: pine trees and rhododendrons mix with crops of blueberries, strawberries and raspberries. ‘We had no desire for a “perfect” garden,’ says Sofia. Inside, the layout revolves around the kitchen, with a huge openplan room that can accommodate lots of friends and family. The mantra for the decoration was ‘simple and real’: natural materials such as stone, wood and leather, and pale, sandy colours that reflect the coastal landscape. Sofia and Johan chose white stone for the interior walls as a ‘natural base’ and hand-picked pieces of Douglas fir timber from Danish company Dinesen, which were used for flooring and doors, as well as to clad built-in storage. The only non-natural element is the polished concrete used on the floor of the main living space, but even this blends seamlessly with the serene palette. Sensual fabrics, such as sheepskin and raw linens, bring a sense of comfort, while a striking contemporary fireplace has as much warmth as any traditional design, and is a natural gathering point. ‘For me, the most important element of any home is family,’ says Sofia. ‘This is where we all come to feel calm.’

Kitchen The SieMatic kitchen boasts Gaggenau appliances and Carrara marble worktops. The curtains are from Designers Guild. The ‘Saucer Bubble’ pendant lights are by George Nelson for Herman Miller (available from SCP) Previous page The ash ‘CH006’ dining table and ‘Wishbone’ chairs are all by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen & Søn (try Skandium), and are accessorised with vintage crockery. The pendant light is the ‘PH Snowball’ designed by Poul Henningsen for Louis Poulsen, sold at Skandium Stockist details on p184 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 111


So skilful is the use of natural materials that it almost seems as though the house has grown organically out of the landscape Detail The vintage ‘Fjord’ cutlery was designed by Jens Quistgaard for Dansk – you can buy modern reissues at MoMA Design Store Living area This cosy spot is part of one big room that also contains the kitchen and dining zone. The leather ‘Trifolium’ chair and ‘Ox’ stool are from Danish store Ox Denmarq. The huge rug is from Designers Guild. The modern glass fireplace is double-sided, allowing views through to the kitchen while sitting by the fire Stockist details on p184 ➤


‘The process was as much about creating a feeling of harmony and mindfulness as it was about architecture and interiors’

Opposite The ‘901’ tea trolley is by Alvar Aalto for Artek (try Nest in the UK). Muuto’s ‘The Dots’ wall hooks are used to hang coats and bags (find them at Utility). The ‘Fast’ downlights are from Malmö lighting store Ljusmiljö Above The floorboards and window seat are made from white-soaped Douglas fir from Dinesen. The sheepskins were bought from a farm on the Swedish island of Gotland, and the ‘Flag Halyard’ chair by Hans J Wegner for PP Møbler is sold at Skandium Stockist details on p184 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L ‘ N E W M O D E R N ’ S C A N D I S T Y L E Five

Homeowner Sofia Wäborg’s top four ways to get the look 1 Take inspiration from the local landscape The natural materials, colours and textures in this house – the stone, the Douglas fir, the concrete, even the sand-coloured rug in front of the fireplace – were inspired by the surrounding forest and the beautiful nearby beach. 2 Choose your materials carefully The incredible grain on the white-soaped Douglas fir timber from Danish company Dinesen, used throughout the interior, is no accident. ‘We hand-picked almost every piece of wood we wanted to use in the house,’ says Sofia. 3 Buy sustainably ‘We tend to buy most of our furniture via secondhand stores online, such as Lauritz.com,’ explains Sofia. The couple has found many design classics this way – their collection of pre-loved Hans J Wegner pieces adds bags of character to their abode. 4 Keep it simple ‘To create a calm feeling in our home, we felt it was important not to use too many different materials or colours,’ says Sofia. Nothing in the house jars with the serene country location, and the restrained palette creates a sense of rhythm and harmony.


Bathroom Try Travertine Direct for similar white tiles. The shower fittings are by Vola. For a cane basket, try Ikea Bedroom For similar bedlinen, try The Linen Works. The curtains are from Designers Guild. The cupboards are clad in Douglas fir from Dinesen. The ladder was made to match. On the ceiling is a copper ‘Star 6’ light by Jonas Bohlin for Örsjö Stockist details on p184 E D


THE NEW MODERN

FOR IT

The design world is taking inspiration from the late, great Italian designer and architect Giò Ponti. Here’s how to Ponti-fy your home, with a mix of new creations and classic pieces Photography DAMIAN RUSSELL Styling SANIA PELL

From left ‘Over 10’ flooring tiles by India Mahdavi, £184.80 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.it). ‘Lead III’ grey paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Deep Space Blue’ paint, £42 for 2.5 litres, Little Greene (littlegreene.com). ‘Net’ side table by Benjamin Hubert, £708, Moroso (moroso.it). Carafe, £53; beaker, £32, both in ‘Bottle’, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). ‘D.154.2’ armchairs (two pictured) by Giò Ponti, £3,708 each, Molteni & C (molteni.it). ‘Abstract Shard’ cushion cover, £75, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Cloud’ medium coffee table, £565; small coffee table, £540, both by Nendo, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Fish’ platter in ‘Bottle’, £91, Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com). Paperweight by Michael Anastassiades, £140, Salvatori (salvatori.it). ‘Constructed Vessel’ ceramic pot, £378; ‘Large Angled Vessel’ vase, £634, both by Derek Wilson, Contemporary Ceramics Centre (cpaceramics.com). ‘Blue Room’ tapestry, £3,299, Nicolette Brunklaus (nicolettebrunklaus.com). ‘Pugil’ floor lamp, £980, Bert Frank (bertfrank.co.uk). ‘Blue’s Blue’ paint, £46.50 for


2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). Untitled #41 (2014) framed print by Richard Caldicott, from £4,050, Atlas Gallery (atlasgallery.com). ‘Navy Alalpardo’ curtains, from £408, Bert & May (bertandmay.com). ‘Homework’ desk by Niels Bendtsen for Bensen, £1,595, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Creative TRC9-3’ green tiles (on desk),£214 per square metre, Ateliers Zelij (zelij.com). ‘Earlobe’ brass bookends by Carl Auböck, £415, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). Concrete sculpture, from £210, Jeffrey James (jeffreyjames.org). ‘Serious Structure’ notebook by Normann Copenhagen, £24.50, The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Shear’ table lamp, £443, Bert Frank (bertfrank.co.uk). ‘Shortwave’ chair by Diesel, £720, Moroso (moroso.it). ‘Monotone I’ oak sculpture, £350; ‘Monotone III’ oak sculpture, £500, both by Dominic McHenry, India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com). ‘Petrol Blue’ vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). ‘Roxburgh Indigo’ rug, from £795, Designers Guild (designersguild.com) ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 119


GIÒ FOR IT From left ‘Eclipse 25’ flooring tiles by India Mahdavi, £169.20 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.it). ‘Sage Green’ vinyl flooring, £28 per square metre, The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk). ‘Scala’ wall panels by Anya Sebton, from £269 for a 603x800mm panel, Abstracta (abstracta.se). ‘-ISH’ divider, £920, De Allegri and Fogale (deallegrifogale.com). ‘Karui’ large brass tray, £216; small brass tray, £100, both by GamFratesi for Skultuna, SCP (scp.co.uk). Cup by Kasper Würtz, £35, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). ‘Conical Constructed’ vessel by Derek Wilson, £378, Contemporary Ceramics Centre (cpaceramics.com). Beetle’ chairs (two pictured) by GamFratesi for Gubi, £858 each, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Snaregade’ dining table by Norm Architects, £1,749, Menu (menu.as). Monotone I’ and ‘Monotone II’ sculptures (on table) by Dominic McHenry, £350 each, India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com). ‘Italic’ pepper mill by Carl Auböck and Michael Anastassiades, £550, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). ‘Plat-Eau Classic 04’ platter by Silvia Fanticelli, £195, Salvatori (salvatori.it). ‘Triad 9’ chandelier


by Apparatus, £8,680, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Lead III’ paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com). ‘Storybook’ paint (in square), £38 for 2.5 litres, Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk). White wall panel, from £2,200, Talisman London (talismanlondon.com). ‘A’dammer Twist’ sideboard by Aldo Van Den Nieuwelaar for Pastoe, £1,345, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). White enamel plate by Astrid Keller, £442, Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Angled’ vessel, £354; ‘Constructed’ concrete sculpture, £1,220, both by Derek Wilson, Contemporary Ceramics Centre (cpaceramics.com). ‘Fato’ square table light by Giò Ponti, £250, Artemide (artemide.com). White bowl by Kasper Würtz, £50, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). ‘Brookland’ side plate, £6; pasta bowl, £7, both Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Mantis BS1’ floor light by Bernard Schottlander for DCW Éditions, £920, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Untitled #40 (2014) framed print by Richard Caldicott, from £4,050, Atlas Gallery (atlasgallery.com). ‘Baba’ chair by Serena Confalonieri, from £704, My Home Collection (myhomecollection.it) ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 121


PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT: DAVID LINTON STYLING ASSISTANTS: ENRICO DONADELLO, CAROL DALY

GIÒ FOR IT From left ‘Eclipse 25’ flooring tiles by India Mahdavi, £169.20 per square metre, Bisazza (bisazza.it). ‘Baba’ chair by Serena Confalonieri, from £704, My Home Collection (myhomecollection.it). ‘Snaregade’ dining table by Norm Architects, £1,749, Menu (menu.as). ‘Brookland’ side plate, £6, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). ‘Plat-Eau Classic 04’ platter by Silvia Fanticelli, £195, Salvatori (salvatori.it). ‘Karui’ brass and green tray by GamFratesi for Skultuna, £100, SCP (scp.co.uk). Black and white enamel plate by Astrid Keller, £265; ‘Stripe’ jug by Justine Allison, £208, both Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk). ‘Yves Klein Blue’ wallhanging by Martino Gamper and Brigitte Niedermair, from £5,200, Dedar (dedar.com). ‘Homework’ desk by Niels Bendtsen for Bensen, £1,595,


The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Earlobe’ brass bookends by Carl Auböck, £415, Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com). Concrete sculpture, from £210, Jeffrey James (jeffreyjames.org). ‘Stop’ marble bookend by Philipp Mainzer for E15, £144, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Smarrimenti book by Guido Scarabottolo, £17, La Grande Illusion (lagrandeillusion.it). ‘Serious Structure’ notebook by Normann Copenhagen, £24.50; brass pen by Not Another Bill, £45, both The Conran Shop (conranshop.co.uk). ‘Shear’ table lamp, £443, Bert Frank (bertfrank.co.uk). ‘C3’ chair by Carl Jacobs for Kandya, £380, Béton Brut (betonbrut.co.uk). ‘Blue’s Blue’ paint, £46.50 for 2.5 litres, Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com)

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 123


THE NEW MODERN

A rich, yet restrained palette of materials is the epitome of modernity in this Australian apartment Words KARINE MONIÉ Photography BROOKE HOLM Styling MARSHA GOLEMAC


T

he air of sleek, modern luxury that defines Helen Russell’s Melbourne apartment is a far cry from the original florid, mock-Georgian duplex that she commissioned interior designer David Flack of Flack Studio to ‘de-faux’. His considered approach was to retain the classical-style features of the apartment that still worked – the herringbone parquet floors, solid panelled doors, 3.6-metre-high ceilings and mouldings – but strip the space of its frills in favour of strong, graphic details. The result is strikingly modern. David revised the layout of the apartment to create a sense of spaciousness. Helen, who enjoys entertaining at home, has both a formal living room and an open-plan kitchen-dining-living space, which spills onto a sundrenched courtyard. But it is David’s rich, dark palette of materials that elevates the fluid backdrop into something spectacular. ‘My studio is known for using deep tones, but Helen is cautious about colour, so we explored this in another way, by selecting hand-rubbed bronze detailing, chocolate oak flooring, black American oak cabinetry and white Calacatta marble,’ he says. ‘It was important to Helen that the interior conveyed a sense of sophistication to her guests, but it is also her home, and had to feel comfortable.’ The finished aesthetic deftly skirts the fine line between cutting-edge and classic. ‘This home has a contemporary ambience, and yet feels as though it has some age to it,’ says David. ‘You can’t pinpoint exactly when the house was designed – to me, this exemplifies the “new modern” look.’ The consideration of symmetry and the repetition of key features – such as the brass-lined American oak cabinetry, which is the focal point of the kitchen and is also used on the bookcases in the living room and the units in the bathrooms – creates a sense of cohesion, with every element meticulously executed. David’s team even experimented with the level of bronzing (a process that involves applying acid to raw brass) that would perfectly frame the furniture. ‘The more acid and rubbing you apply, the darker the brass becomes,’ he explains. ‘Modernism is always simple in execution, but usually has one standout detail that is repeated.’ Elsewhere, design classics – the ‘Beetle’ chairs by Gubi, ‘Bristol’ sofa by Poliform and the Serge Mouille ceiling light – add to the air of timeless elegance. Feeling completely at ease in her new home, Helen loves to sit by the open fire and read a book. She particularly appreciates having plenty of room for her grandchildren when they visit, and enjoys watching them from the kitchen as they play. flackstudio.com.au

Living room A black marble fireplace is flanked by American oak bookcases, which have been edged with brass. The ‘Beetle’ lounge chair by GamFratesi for Gubi and ‘Naviglio’ sofa by Arflex complete the scheme. A painting by Australian artist Craig Waddell hangs above the fireplace Stockist details on p184 ➤


Dining area The ‘Lim 3.0’ table is by Bruno Fattorini for MDF Italia, and the ‘Doll’ chairs are by Emilio Nanni for Billiani. A ‘Trapeze 10’ light by Apparatus hangs above Stockist details on p184 ➤


‘MODERNISM IS ALWAYS SIMPLE IN EXECUTION, BUT USUALLY HAS ONE STANDOUT DETAIL’


‘YOU CAN’T PINPOINT EXACTLY WHEN THE HOUSE WAS DESIGNED – TO ME, THIS EXEMPLIFIES THE “NEW MODERN” LOOK’


Kitchen This space is deďŹ ned by a strong palette of materials: black American oak cabinetry edged with brass and luxurious white marble countertops Stockist details on p184 ➤


GET THE LOOK

Sophistication is simple to achieve when you use this home’s winning combination of dark oak, richly-veined stone and hints of bronze

1

2

Above In the kitchen, black American oak cabinetry with brass detailing allows the white marble countertop and splashback to shine Right The home’s original parquet flooring has an aged beauty Stockist details on p184


3

PICTURES: HEARST STUDIOS

4

1 ‘Calacatta Oro’ white marble, from £750 per square metre, Stone Age (stone-age.co.uk) 2 ‘Iona’ oak herringbone floorboards, from £129 per square metre, Solid Floor (solidfloor.co.uk) 3 ‘Deco Mirror’ by Deco Glaze, from £99 for a 60x75cm sheet, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 4 ‘Natural Engineered Oak Jet Black Brushed UV Lacquered’, from £30 per square metre, Wood and Beyond (woodandbeyond.co.uk) 5 ‘Light Bronzed’ brass, from £295 per square metre, James Gilbert & Son (jamesgilbertandson.com) 6 ‘Cosmic Black’ titanium granite, from £170 per square metre, Stone World London (stoneworldlondon.co.uk)

Top Black granite clads the wall and the basin in the bathroom Above The details of the granite complement the splashes of bronze used as accents throughout the house. Here, the stone is paired with aged brass taps by Astra Walker Stockist details on p184 ➤

5 6 SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 133


‘IT WAS IMPORTANT THAT THE INTERIOR CONVEYED A SENSE OF SOPHISTICATION, BUT IT ALSO HAD TO FEEL COMFORTABLE’


Hallway A ‘Zanuso’ table lamp by Oluce sits on a console table by the front door Formal living room This space also includes a ‘Beetle’ lounge chair from Gubi, as well as a ‘Bristol’ sofa by Poliform, a ‘45°/Tavolino’ side table by Ron Gilad for Molteni & C and a Serge Mouille floor light (try Tanguy Rolin) Stockist details on p184 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L M O D E R N L U X U R Y

Interior designer David Flack’s five tips for creating an elegant and contemporary home 1 Keep it simple The original proportions of the rooms in this apartment were good, but there were too many elements going on, which confused the eye and made the space feel cramped. I de-cluttered it, removing everything from the wallpaper to the crystal chandeliers, and retaining only the features that brought classic touches to the home. 2 Don’t commit to too many ideas A scheme needs a thread that pulls it together and allows you to use the same language in every space. In this duplex, we employed a limited palette of materials and colours to subtly convey both contrast (light and shade), and repetition – this creates a sense of harmony in a home. 3 Choose strong, statement materials Bronze, wood and marble add a glamorous edge to classical architectural details. 4 Work with the dimensions of your home Make the most of your house’s best features, such as gloriously high ceilings. 5 Create strong sight lines Here, some of the most impactful pieces of furniture and lighting direct the attention to a specific space or corner of a room. Playing with perspective creates flow through a space.


Bathroom Black ‘Titanium’ granite creates a dramatic scheme, combined with a bronze-edged mirror from In-Ex Living Bedroom The ‘Ipanema’ bed by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform is paired with a ‘You’ bedside table by D&T, also for Poliform. The ‘Geolight’ table light is by Sébastian Bergne and the large artwork is the NTBD#4 by Ry David Bradley from Tristian Koenig Stockist details on p184 E D


THE NEW MODERN

M E GA M I X Mixed materials is the trend of the moment. Think textural walls in natural ďŹ nishes elevated by accents of lustrous metals, as seen in this Cape Town home Words KERRYN FISCHER Photography ELSA YOUNG/FRANK FEATURES Production LUANNE TOMS


eil Roake had an ambitious vision for his new-build Modernist home. His plan was to construct two concrete residences on this steep plot in Bakoven, Cape Town – one an investment property, split over two levels and accessed at street level, the other Neil’s private 350-square-metre apartment spread over three floors. The decor would be a talking point, and each of the rooms defined by walls of blue stone, wood or marble, inspired by the rugged coastal setting. ‘I wanted to instil a sense of history by using raw materials, but also to create respite and calm from the relentless sun and the noise of the nearby beach,’ says Neil, who is a chef and cookbook author as well as a retailer and hotelier. ‘Naturally, creating my dream kitchen was central to the plan.’ Stellenbosch-based architect Willem Bosch was commissioned to bring Neil’s ideas to life, and his conservatory-encased kitchen sits at the heart of this new home. It is a ‘theatre kitchen’, from where Neil commands the room and his guests’ conversation inevitably turns to the striking design of the cabinetry, which is punctured by copper-clad wall units. Beyond the kitchen, there is a leafy sunken courtyard with a natural swimming pool as well as a two-metre-high vertical garden that trails down to a water feature. The main living spaces are screened from the nearby buildings by a large glass structure (below right). ‘I designed the screen myself – it took eight men to move it onto the site,’ Neil says. ‘At sunset, the screen is transformed into a magical sculpture set aglow by the crimson sun.’ While the architectural details are cutting-edge and visually engaging, their sole purpose is to enhance the level of comfort inside Neil’s home. ‘This is very much a family space, where I can spend time catching up with my grown-up children,’ he says. ‘There are two en suite bedrooms for guests on the first floor, while the balcony room belongs to my daughter, Jordan Alexandra, and the twin bedroom next door is reserved for Tyler Hope, my son.’ Neil’s bedroom, meanwhile, occupies the entire top floor and segues into a dressing room and shower area – all with sweeping views of the Twelve Apostles mountain range and Bakoven beach. ‘This project has changed me, and I like that,’ says Neil. ‘Often I’ll be downstairs when I’ll suddenly realise that there’s magic happening over the ocean, and I’ll nip upstairs to see the sun setting on the horizon, like a firecracker leaving its mark in the sky. I hope this house has the same mesmerising effect on the landscape.’ wpboscharchitects.co.za

‘NATURALLY, CREATING MY DREAM KITCHEN WAS CENTRAL TO THE PLAN’

Kitchen The cabinetry is bespoke, with copper-clad units and granite worktops (try The Marble Store for similar). A giant Iroko wood chopping board sits on top of the island and a ‘Yeats Hanging’ pendant light by Egg Designs hangs above Dining room A ‘Little Miss Fat Marble Round’ table is teamed with ‘Wire 69’ chairs, all from Egg Designs Stockist details on p184 ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 141


‘I WANTED TO CREATE RESPITE AND CALM FROM THE RELENTLESS SUN AND THE NOISE OF THE NEARBY BEACH’


Garden The sunken pool and pebbled courtyard are perfect spots to relax Living room Natural materials define this space: one wall is blue stone, while the other is covered in moss-coloured wallpaper (try Graham & Brown’s ‘Crocodile’ design). The floors are solid white gum timber. The ‘Shaker’ sofa and ‘Sling’ chairs are from Egg Designs Stockist details on p184 ➤


SLEEK, MODERN FURNISHINGS ALLOW THE STUNNING VIEWS OVER BAKOVEN BEACH TO BE THE MAIN FOCUS

Bedroom This completely serene space includes a ‘Safari’ bed from Weylandts, and a table and chairs from Cécile & Boyd Bathroom The sleek, white tub is by Dadobaths and the minimalist, black side table is from Lim Stockist details on p184 E D


THE NEW MODERN

From hardwearing slate and concrete to decadent marble, this timeless material is being updated with sculptural designs Photography ENOK HOLSEGÅRD Styling SOFIE BRÜNNER

From left ‘Archetype’ chair, £1,570, Sofie Østerby (sofieoesterby.com). ‘O’ table by Dennis Marquart, £590, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Iron pitcher by Aldo Bakker, £65, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). Black and white vase, £95, Gurli Elbækgaard (elbaekgaard.dk). ‘Twinkle’ black jewellery jar by Finnsdottir, £118, Wayfair (wayfair.co.uk). ‘Belle’ gold jewellery jar by Claesson Koivisto Rune for Skultuna, £113, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Lens’ round pot by Thomas Jenkins for Hay, from £49, Amara (amara.com). Grey box, stylist’s own. Black saucer, from £10 with flowerpot, Hay (hay.dk). ‘Fog’ pendant light by Front Design for Zero Lighting, from £455, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Black diamond object (on floor), stylist’s own. ‘Lektor’ table lamp by Niclas Hoflin for Rubn, £380, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Drop’ chair by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen, £294, Skandium (skandium.com). ‘Taille’ hat rack, £620, Kevin Josias (kevinjosias.com)


Black plate, £37,

Gu r

li E

lbæ

kg

a ar el b d( ae k ga .d k)

ed

blu

ep

(b ja

ot ,

st yl

ist ’s

ow n

iv i

ck b

ow l b

y U h La La Cer

a mi

c s,

£6 2,

St

ill

i (st en

‘B

n on

ièr

la e’ b

eb

on b

s@simnet.is)

Pin

da r

kb

l,

1 £3

a r ni Sig urdsson , Bj

rn

ow

a rd

Do m

l le ben

ou

g

ma

de s elec tion f s by

S c h o lt e n &

Ba

iji n 13 ,

ot ,

)

H ay

ers.d k

Hay ( hay.d k) ➤

ow

as

, f rom £10 w it hfl c er

l ’g

gs

ck

u sa

p er

rom Lady Fingers ( lady-fing

Do t

hr

‘ G ol d

tt

a

ele

Bl

tr

rac

nd

al

gaa rd.d k). R ings a nd b

ha

Ov

l b a ek

,a

a

.d k )

,

æ

d (e

ut ho

y,

03 £1

r Gu

lb li E

ar k ga

( hay.d k)


TURN TO STONE Opposite page, from left Midnight print, £85, Kristina Krogh (kkrogh.dk). ‘Afteroom’ dining chair by Afteroom for Menu, £249, Nest (nest.co.uk). ‘POV’ candleholder by Note Design Studio for Menu, £35, Utility (utilitydesign.co.uk). White diamond object, stylist’s own. Pitcher by Aldo Bakker, £188, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). ‘Prism’ large sculpture (three bases and a triangular top), from £583 for a base, Étage Projects (etageprojects.com). White marbled vase, £72, Bjarni Sigurdsson (bjarnividars@simnet.is). ‘Stilleliv’ metal containers, prototypes, Maria Bruun (mariabruun.com) Above, from left Glass sculpture, £170, Marion Fortat (marionfortat.com). Grey vase by Hanne Willmann for Menu, £80, Selfridges (selfridges.com). White marble box by Nordstjerne, £32, Royal Design (royaldesign.co.uk). Elastic ball, £5, Hay (hay.dk). Marble clock by Norm Architects for Menu, £219, Heal’s (heals.com). ‘Bonbonnière’ lidded round pot by Uh La La Ceramics, £62, Stilleben (stilleben.dk). Marble board by Hay, from £90, Home Institute (homeinstitute.co.uk). Small bowl, £31, Bjarni Sigurdsson (bjarnividars@simnet.is). ‘Chawan’ bowl, £81, Arhøj (arhoj.com) ➤


‘Base’ concrete lamp holder by NUD, £56, Trouva (trouva.com)

‘Kub’ marble and gla ss cube by Eva Lilja Lö wenhielm, £409, Asp by Aldo Bakker, Georg lund Store (asplundsto Jensen (georg jensen re.se). Sugar bowl, £54 .com). ‘Lup’ black can ; pourer, £45, both dlestick by Shane Sch neck for Hay, £19, Uti lity (utilitydesign.co.u k)

‘Lens’ po t by Hay, from £49 Amara (a , mara.com ). ‘Vulcan vase, £13 ’ 7, Bjarni S igurdsson (bjarnivid ars@sim net.is)

Small black va (mettedued se, £57, Bjarni Sigu rdss ah Dyke & Dea l.com). Pencil, £2; go on (bjarnividars@si m ld clip, £5, n (dykeandd both Hay (h net.is). Pencil pot, £ ean.com). 23 ay.dk). ‘Dia Platter by mond Light , Mette Duedahl Röshults, £1 ’ bulb by F 91, Ambien rama, £33 te Direct (a , mbientedi rect.com) Black cu ttin Vintage (d g board by House es D Bjarni Sig ignvintage.co.uk). octor, £18.50, Des ign White va urdsson (b se, £17.50 jarnivida brass sp , oon by H rs@simn ay, £8, Tro et.is). ‘Cli p Clip’ uva (trou va.com)


TURN TO STONE From left Round clothing rail (on wall), £215, Annaleena (annaleena.se). ‘Ninety’ bench by Dennis Marquart for Ox Denmarq, £949, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). ‘Plissé’ folder by All the Way to Paris for Hay, £18, Finnish Design Shop (finnishdesignshop.com). Geometric object, stylist’s own. ‘PK62’ low table by Poul Kjærholm for Fritz Hansen, £1,633, Aram Store (aram.co.uk). Table lamp by Maurizio Navone for RestartMilano, £480, Mint (mintshop.co.uk). ‘Bonbonnière’ lidded pot by Uh La La Ceramics, £62, Stilleben (stilleben.dk). Lavastone board, £43, Made a Mano (madeamano.com). Plate, £66, Gurli Elbækgaard (elbaekgaard.dk). Waves print (on floor), £86, Kristina Krogh (kkrogh.dk). ‘Äng’ oblong vase by Klong, £104, Royal Design (royaldesign.co.uk). Pencils, £2 each; scissors, £6, all by Hay, Nook (nookshop.co.uk). Side table by JLK/DS, £3,662, Made a Mano (madeamano.com). Marble tealight holder by Andreas Engesvik for Menu, £45, Amara (amara.com). ‘Geometri’ candlestick, £53, Kneip (kneip.no). ‘Half Lamp’ table light, £170, Marion Fortat (marionfortat.com) E D


THE NEW MODERN

Sult r y sophist icat ion The new modern palette embraces moody colours in seductive, sludgy tones. Team them with statement lighting, as in this Zurich apartment

Words AMY BRADFORD Photography FABRIZIO CICCONI/LIVING INSIDE Styling FRANCESCA DAVOLI


Living room The walls are painted brown – try ‘Chocolate Colour’ by Little Greene – to highlight the painting by Israeli-born artist Natanel Gluska. An ‘EcoChair’ by EcoFurn and an armchair by Norman Cherner (try The Conran Shop) are placed beside a leather daybed – try Poul Kjærholm’s ‘PK80’ for Fritz Hansen. The carpet is from Tisca Tiara Stockist details on p184 ➤


V

era Miler has the spirit of adventure. An avid traveller and the manager of Burberry’s store in Zurich, she has owned this elegant apartment in the city’s popular Seefeld district since 2005. Situated on the third floor of a beautiful Art Nouveau building dating from 1908, her home is as outward looking as she is: it boasts three balconies, two of which look out towards Lake Zürich. Vera found the apartment through a friend, who had been using it as an office. ‘There was no real bathroom or kitchen, but I fell in love with the parquet floors, the huge bay windows and the four-metre-high ceilings,’ she recalls. To turn it into a family home for herself and son Max (17), she enlisted the help of interior designer Hanne Poli. It was Hanne who suggested the apartment’s grown-up colour scheme of warm greys and chocolate browns – ‘colours with no name’, as she describes them. ‘The building exudes old-world nobility and refinement – I wanted to underline that aspect but in a modern, personal way,’ says Vera. The dark colours were a bold choice, especially in the hallway, which has little natural light. Hanne and Vera made them work framing them with paler shades and installing mirrored walls, which are discreet, but create the illusion of more open space. They

‘The building exudes old-world nobility and refinement – I wanted to underline that aspect but in a modern, personal way’ experimented in other ways, too, particularly with lighting – which Hanne prefers to hang in the corners of rooms, rather than in the centre, to create drama – and with wooden furniture, which contrasts with the apartment’s refined proportions. Though Hanne and Vera kept pattern to a minimum, there is plenty of texture. It catches the eye in a modern, understated way. ‘Because I work in fashion, texture is like an addiction for me,’ explains Vera. ‘I love precious fabrics like linen and cashmere, and refined tone-on-tone patterns, such as the white wallpaper in my bedroom.’ Vera sees her home as a work in progress, and goes to greater lengths than most to find the perfect pieces to furnish it. Recently, she saw a picture of a sofa by Danish designer Oliver Gustav and promptly hopped on a plane to Copenhagen so that she could meet him and see his design in the flesh. ‘I think this sofa will be the next thing I buy,’ she says. hannepoli.com

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 155


Library The white sofa is by Josef Hoffmann – try Paolo Piva’s ‘Metro’ design for Wittmann – and is complemented by two ‘Spillo’ side tables from Extendo Hallway ‘Battersea’ pendant lights by Toscot add drama to the dark walls and ceiling Stockist details on p184 ➤


Dark colours were a bold choice in the hallway, but framing them with paler shades makes up for a lack of natural light

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 157


2 The lighting You will seldom see a light fitting in the centre of a ceiling in my interiors. I love creating asymmetry in a symmetrical space – it’s about producing dramatic scenery as well as functionality. I always ask clients what they want to use lighting for – reading, eating or snuggling up.

Design tricks to steal Interior designer Hanne Poli reveals the ideas that make this apartment a success 1 The colours I use exactly the same shades as I did 20 years ago, when I started my business: all kinds of nudes, warm greys – colours that have no name, if you like. Some hues in Vera’s apartment were borrowed from artworks: for example, the chocolate brown behind the dining table was taken from the Natanel Gluska painting hanging on the wall. I knew that using it would make the piece pop. I often mix my own colours, and I can see right away which shade will make a room fantastic.

Entrance ‘Tallanstown Grey’ by Paint & Paper Library matches the colour in the hallway. £46.50 for 2.5 litres of Pure Flat Emulsion (paintandpaperlibrary.com).

Living room ‘Chocolate Colour’ by Little Greene is similar to this deep shade (above). £21 for one litre of Absolute Matt Emulsion (littlegreene.com).

Kitchen ‘Dimpse’ by Farrow & Ball is a good match for this pale grey (far right). £43.50 for 2.5 litres of Estate Emulsion (farrow-ball.com).

3 The mirrors I use a lot of mirrored walls in my interiors projects; they’re a smart way of getting light into a room or making it appear larger or taller. They’re incorporated in such a way that it’s hard to see they are even there. I like the idea that people might not really understand what something is, only the effect it creates.

2

3

4 The library Vera’s apartment used to be an office, and the area where the big bookcase now is used to be a library – so for me, it was a no-brainer to use this space for her vast book collection. To create a sense of grand proportions, two rooms were opened into one big living space and a huge white sofa was placed in front of the wall of shelving. The overall effect is so arresting; it has such an impact when you walk into the room.

4

158 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


Kitchen The stainless-steel kitchen units and wall shelves are from Ikea. For a similar black metal shelves, try Cox & Cox. In one corner of the room hangs a pair of cage lamps, bought in New York (try Urban Cottage Industries) and a portrait of Jane Birkin by fashion photographer Xandra M Linsin Stockist details on p184 ➤


Bedroom Vera’s bed is dressed with linen sheets, which she buys on her travels. She found the pendant lights by the bed in Merci, a store in Paris, and the fabric for the curtains is from Parisian brand Houlès. For stylish textured wallpaper, try Anaglypta Stockist details on p184 E D

160 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


‘I love precious fabrics, such as linen and cashmere, and refined tone-on-tone patterns’


RU

TH

R

E

N

EW

L A

R U O D N E L P S

MO

D

N ER


Country style is given a glamorous reboot in this 15th-century Tuscan farmhouse, which showcases the best of the traditional and the cutting-edge Words CLARE SARTIN Photography MONICA SPEZIA/LIVING INSIDE Production MARZIA NICOLINI


P

erched amongst the ancient orchards and picturesque olive groves in Travalle, a Tuscan village situated near Florence, Podere Bussolaio is a picture-perfect 15th-century farmhouse with a difference. The 700-square-metre estate belongs to two creative sisters, Claudia and Elisa, who together embarked on a four-year renovation project, undertaken by architecture firm B-Arch, transforming this historical property into two very on-trend family homes. The challenge of the project was to respect the building’s original Tuscan architecture without being restrained by it. In Elisa’s section of the farmhouse, where she lives with her husband Diego and their two children, Niccolò and Tilda, the building’s exposed beams and bare stone walls co-exist with urban materials such as slick poured cement floors and limewash walls. The palette is soft and subtly modern, but the furnishings are daringly contemporary, from the ‘Modo’ chandelier by Roll & Hill to ‘Beetle’ chairs by Gubi and a ‘Cloud’ sofa by Francesco Rota for Lema. These statement designs elevate what could be a classic country home into something very special – a new kind of modern. A highlight of the interior is the metallic bookcase in the living room – designed by B-Arch architects, it resembles a golden, glistening birdcage. Amid this modernity, there are still knowing nods to the past: in the kitchen, a traditional fireplace and restored bread oven add charm to the custom-designed cabinetry. It is a stylish reinvention of the farmhouse kitchen; still the beating heart of the home, but completely open-plan, finished in white marble and stainless steel. Outdoors, large gazebos sit beside the swimming pool, giving Claudia and Elisa’s families a beautiful place to relax together, listen to the chirping of the cicadas and enjoy the views as they cook on the barbecue. Life here is the perfect balance of old and new, traditional and modern, combined with an eye for the fashionable. b-arch.it

This house features in our ELLE Decoration Country book – the place to find the world’s most beautiful homes in the country. For more inspiration and to buy it now, go to elledecoration.co.uk/country

164 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

Statement designs elevate what could be a classic country home into something very special – a new kind of modern


Portrait Homeowner Elisa and her husband Diego with their children, Niccoló and Tilda Living room A leather ‘Cloud’ sofa by Francesco Rota for Lema provides modern relaxation and is paired with a classic Eames lounger (available from Skandium). The side table is the ‘Habibi’ by Philipp Mainzer for E15 and the bookcase is a bespoke design by B-Arch architects Stockist details on p184 ➤


Exposed beams co-exist with contemporary, urban touches, such as slick poured cement oors and limewash walls


Dining room The vintage table is surrounded by ‘Beetle’ chairs by Gubi (available at The Conran Shop). The ‘Modo’ chandelier is from Roll & Hill Kitchen Gubi stools provide a spot to eat breakfast at the marble and stainless-steel island Stockist details on p184 ➤


Still the beating heart of the home, the farmhouse kitchen has been reimagined in white marble and stainless steel


Kitchen The restored fireplace and bread oven contrast with the modern marble and stainlesssteel island designed by B-Arch architects. The large ‘Caravaggio’ pendant lights by Cecilie Manz for Light Years accentuate the feeling of spaciousness Stockist details on p184 ➤


Bedroom The metallic look of the ‘Harold’ wardrobe by Jesse Visser is mirrored in the brass finish of the ‘Habibi’ bedside table from E15. The pouf covered in pink velvet is a bespoke design by B-Arch architects Stockist details on p184 E D


HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

ESCAPE SPA FROM HOME

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK

Chinese spa Amanyangyun opens this month, and is as far from a sterile salon as a health centre can be. Run by Aman Resorts, the site offers traditional Chinese medicinal healing using locally-grown herbs and flowers, as well as hydrotherapy, reflexology and yoga. Guests can stay in one of the thirteen ancient villas, perched on ornamental lakes and flanked by lush camphor trees that bely the minimalist, very chic bamboo and stone interiors designed by Australian tropical architecture specialists Kerry Hill Architects (aman.com).

Turn over for more spas to visit closer to home ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 173


Escape | N E W S

T H R E E O F T H E B E S T E U R O P E A N S PA S 1 JW Marriott, Venice The ‘JW Marriott’ collection (right) is the highest-end and most imaginative of the Marriott group’s outposts. Created by Milanese design supremo Matteo Thun, it’s a mix of Venetian 20thcentury buildings and new builds, and is surrounded by fruit orchards, olive groves and idyllic manicured lawns on Isola delle Rose (an island in Venice). After visiting the churches and fish markets of Venice, make use of the sauna, bio-sauna (milder temperature and higher humidity), yoga lessons and rooftop swimming pool ( jwmarriottvenice.com).

2 The Lanesborough Club & Spa, London Brighten up your daily workout by joining the capital’s most glamorous new health and fitness centre. The state-of-the-art gym (starring Art Deco mirrors and spotlighting) and hydro pool are perfectly complemented by the changing rooms (left), which feature glass chandeliers, luxurious leather banquettes and lockers designed to resemble built-in wardrobes. Its massages and facials make use of Swiss brand La Prairie’s products, and a pedicure in the Painting Room is an essential indulgence (lanesborough.com).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: MIRCO TOFFOLO, FRANCIS AMIAND, JUSTIN PAGET

3 Le Roch Hotel & Spa, Paris The spa at this new hotel – of which the interiors were overseen by French designer Sarah Lavoine – is well worth a Eurostar trip. Tucked away in a quiet spot within the city’s 1st arrondissement, it features an extremely stylish candle-lit swimming pool made from black lava rock (right), a relaxing hammam and an enticing à la carte menu of beauty treatments masterminded by cool young skincare brand Codage, whose tailor-made tinctures are inspired by traditional French pharmacies (leroch-hotel.com).

GEORGIAN BRITAIN NEEDS YOU Beavering away in its headquarters in an unassuming townhouse on London’s Fitzroy Square is The Georgian Group, which saves, consults on and champions the cause of Georgian architecture, town planning, applied arts and craftsmanship. It is a font of information and inspiration for all – we love the individual illustrated guides to the history, design and restoration of the era’s decor that are available to download from the website. The group is celebrating its 80th anniversary this year, which is a good excuse to join the cause – the £40 annual membership fee (£25 for under-35s) goes towards its rescue projects. Moreover, you’ll be invited on weekend jaunts and evening parties held at famous Georgian landmarks or celebrating little-known masterpieces – as well as visits to the studios of craftspeople commissioned to help with restorations (georgiangroup.org.uk).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 175


AN APPETITE FOR DESIGN Our favourite new restaurants are either small but perfectly formed, or grand in both scale and style M I N I AT U R E Ben Chapman, the owner of Kiln (2) – a new Soho gem serving fragrant ‘side-of-the-road’ dishes from Thai villages – built the restaurant’s interior himself with the help of friend and woodwork craftsman Dan Preston. Out of the oven, dishes such as smoky cumin Cornish lamb and turmeric curry of wild mussels appear, served in terracotta pots (kilnsoho.com). Down in south London, Plot (3) – a British kitchen in Tooting Market – has just opened, serving modern brasserie-style dishes: think old-fashioned ham hock terrine with delicate pickled cucumber (plotkitchen.co.uk). Meanwhile, in Spitalfields, Madame D’s (1) has opened in the room above a bar with just nine tables and a copper counter. Try the Himalayan-inspired plates, such as steamed Tibetan duck dumplings followed by date pancakes (madame-d.com).

4

3

1

2

5

M O N U M E N TA L

6

The Midland Bank in the City of London has been repurposed into The Ned, Soho House’s latest project, with a whopping nine restaurants – the best for a special lunch is Millie’s Lounge (6), where Dorset crab and English sparkling wines are served under the high ceilings of the Edwin Lutyens-designed building (thened.com). Opening this month at the Langham Hotel, new tavern The Wigmore (4), designed by Martin Brudnizki, is also housed in a former bank, offering old-school dishes (the-wigmore.com). Meanwhile, London designer Robert Angell has refurbished historic restaurant Simpsons in the Strand (5), but Charles Dickens’ former haunt will still serve the rib of roast beef on a trolley that it has dished up since opening in 1828 (simpsonsinthestrand.co.uk).


Escape | N E W S

N O R W AY ’ S S U M M E R O F A R T

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: SIMON BROWN, JAMES BEDFORD, ALAMY, TIZIANO SARTORIO

Once a year, the Lofoten Islands on the country’s west coast become a hotspot for contemporary art – the month-long Lofoten International Art Festival (LIAF) is held this year in the postcardperfect cod fishing village of Henningsvær. Artists will be performing, screening films and exhibiting site-specific works in keeping with the 2017 theme of ‘I Taste the Future’ (1 September – 1 October; liaf.no). Make an odyssey of it and explore the surrounding fjords. Not sure where to stay? Try the timber-clad Storfjord Hotel (£204 per night; storfjordhotel.com) or the Juvet Landscape Hotel, a glass-fronted eco cabin perched in Valldal’s aspen, pine and birch forest (£154 per night; juvet.com). Alternatively, opt for a sophisticated stopover in one of Hotel Brosundet’s suites by cool Nordic design studio Snøhetta, either in a converted Art Nouveau warehouse or a nearby lighthouse on Ålesund seafront (£118 per night; brosundet.no).

ROOM WITH A VIU

Hotel Viu is Milan’s swankiest new five-star hotel – Arassociati architects dreamed up the building, collaborating with Nicola Gallizi Studio for the interiors and Italian superbrand Molteni & C for furniture. Although it is very contemporary, nature abounds in everything from the building materials to vertical gardens of jasmine and wisteria and the plant-based Malin + Goetz toiletries. Best of all is the rooftop swimming pool – amazingly, the city’s first – which is fringed with young olive trees ( from £194 per night; hotelviumilan.com). SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 177


AWAY D AY S

2

Need to recharge and reboot? Book a weekend in one of these quaint or quirky retreats

1

The Little Cottage, Cornwall The second home of architect Alex Michaelis can be rented out by regular holidaymakers. Its name is ironic: the property’s super Modernist white design is more Los Angeles villa than country cottage, and it sleeps up to 11 people. The building has a grass-planted roof, and its silhouette echoes Cornish Art Deco vernacular style: no wonder that The Little Cottage is now listed on Holiday Architecture, the go-to website for architecturally top-notch rentals (from £825 for three nights; holidayarchitecture.com).

2

The Woodman’s Treehouse, Dorset Crafty Camping – a woodwork and eco-glamping site in the West Country – is the location of this treehouse for grown-ups, handmade by owner and cabinetmaker Guy Mallinson. The two-person retreat sits on stilts around an untouched oak tree and offers an outdoor shower and wood-fired pizza oven. After a spell in the sauna yurt, or an evening playing board games by the fire in the communal tent, book a slot in a wood-bending workshop with Mallinson himself, who has starred on BBC’s Mastercrafts series (from £310 per night; mallinson.co.uk).

3

No 38 The Park, Cheltenham Part of The Lucky Onion – a group of cosy-but-chic Cotswolds hotels, restaurants and country pubs – this 13-bedroom converted Regency townhouse in Gloucestershire’s spa town makes the perfect weekend retreat. Excellent extras – such as Bose iPod docks, an honesty bar serving local cider and Champagne and luxurious in-room spa treatments using organic 100 Acres products – are on offer (doubles from £120; theluckyonion.com).

3

4

4

The Birdhouse, Shropshire The Landmark Trust, which rescues historically or architecturally interesting buildings from deterioration and lets them out to the public, has a new, superbly positioned one-bedroom property on its books. Commissioned in the 1790s to enhance a natural ravine in the estate of wealthy industrialist and architect James Wyatt, the micro-pavilion is built in the Greek Revival style and has a loggia overlooking the valley (four nights from £280; landmarktrust.org.uk).

1


Escape | N E W S

IN THE WHITE GARDEN

NEW GROWTH Following a £7.5 million spruce-up, The Garden Museum is back in full bloom. Permanent collections include horticultural paintings and equipment acquired over centuries, while the opening show is a celebration of botanical illustrations, anchored by ‘Tradescant’s Orchard’, a 17th-century collection of watercolours (until September). There will be talks, interviews and three exhibitions each year celebrating figures ranging from – in the museum’s words – ‘forgotten plant-hunters to the designers and writers in fashion today’ (gardenmuseum.org.uk).

Visit this Perennial favourite Kew Gardens opens its inaugural sculpture exhibition this month. Titled ‘Sculpt At Kew’, it will see the site sprinkled with twentieth-century and modern pieces by various artists (18 September – 15 October; kew.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: DAVID GRANDORGE, RICHARD BRYANT/ ARCAID IMAGES, ALAMY, GETTY, JOHN MILLER, NICK GUTTRIDGE, CHRIS TERRY

BRANCHING OUT These days, you’re likely to find the skylines of Britain’s finest gardens punctured with frothy fronds sprouting from the trunk of a Dickonsia Antarctica. Tree ferns, as they’re more commonly known, are the heroes of contemporary green spaces. We first spotted them in landscape architect Tom Stuart-Smith’s 2013 design for the Keepers’ House garden at the Royal Academy (left) – a sheltered, walled space rendered tropical by these evergreens, whose punky perennial foliage thrives in shady, humid spots. They are now the urban jungle’s tree du jour, adding an architectural high point. Make a space in your patch for this slow-growing sapling immediately – it’s yours for £55.99 from Waitrose Garden (waitrosegarden.com).

There’s nothing more magical than a garden filled only with white flowers – ivory irises, pearly puffs of white lilacs and star-shaped jasmine, whose scent is insurpassable. Take inspiration for your flower bed, trough or window box from The White Garden at Sissinghurst (above): the venerated 20th-century plantswoman Vita Sackville-West’s design prioritised the plants’ silhouettes. At night, it glows. A white garden does require forward planning: to enjoy a white plot next summer, install the following favourites this autumn… Allium bulbs The ‘Mont Blanc’ version of these puffballs of petals pack a pearly punch. Summer jasmine Plant a small common white jasmine tree by a sheltered, sunny wall or trellis. Lily bulbs Tie the stems of the surprisingly hardy white trumpet lily (try Lilium Candidum) to bamboo cane stakes when they emerge in June to support the burgeoning bloom on the top. White lilac Frothy clusters of the flowers on the lilac tree are back in vogue – the ‘Madame Lemoine’ variety is particularly splendid. White Agapanthus bulbs Position ‘White Haven’ agapanthus in well-drained pots by your front door and their dense orbs of petals will rise up to a metre to greet you come June (rhsplants.co.uk).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 179


LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

PRÍNCIPE REAL AND BAIXA, LISBON Planning a Portuguese city break? Visit chic Príncipe Real and characterful Baixa to get an authentic taste of Lisbon Words JACKIE DALY

PICTURE: GETTY

THE NEIGHBOURHOODS Modern Lisbon – the ‘city of seven hills’ – is a patchwork of eclectic red-roofed districts that sit beside the Tagus river. To the north, with bird’s eye views of the historic settlement, is Príncipe Real. Its trendy eateries and boutiques rest quietly on the hilltop above the Bairro Alto – the hub of the city’s nightlife. Head south into downtown Baixa and you’re in the throng of Lisbon life: a heady mix of smart shopping malls, waterside bars and must-see monuments. ➤

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 181


LIVE LIKE A LOCAL WHERE TO STAY The five-star Memmo Príncipe Real boutique hotel (1) claims to have the best views of Lisbon – and it doesn’t disappoint. Concealed behind a cobbled street, its 41 suites are suitably contemporary: check out the huge rain showers and Hermès toiletries in the bathrooms. Take the hotel’s free city tour – it’s a wonderfully welcoming introduction to Lisbon (rooms from £205 1 per night; memmohotels.com). Baixa House (2), situated in an 18th-century villa, sits at the heart of the city’s shopping and sightseeing mecca. Its 12 airy apartments have a modern feel, with traditional artisanal details such as Portuguese patterned tiles. Expect fresh bread delivered to your door, a fridge stocked with the essentials and all your home comforts (apartments from £151 for three nights; baixahouse.com). 1

2

4

LOCAL DELICACIES Manteigaria bakery (9) in Chiado is the place to sample Portugal’s famous pastel de nata (left), an egg tart with a crisp, melt-in-the-mouth pastry. Wait for the bell to ring – that’s when a fresh batch is served from the oven. Head to a local supermarket or deli to try the Portuguese cheese: São Jorge is considered among one of the best in the country, and the spicy Beira Baixa cheese made from sheep’s or goat’s milk is a delight. For dinner, book a table at Can the Can (5) on Praça do Comércio and savour its unexpected signature delicacy: tinned sardines (canthecan.net).

PICTURES: GETTY, ALAMY

DAY TO NIGHT Amble around leafy Príncipe Real to peruse the many design shops and galleries – we love the selection of new and covetable brands at 21pr Concept Store (4) and the neo-Moorish surroundings of Embaixada (8), a shopping centre housed in a 17th-century mansion that showcases mostly Portuguese brands. Then head down the hill to Chiado, a modern shopping district, where fashion houses and historic cafes sit beside museums, bookshops and smart restaurants. As night falls, head into the nearby Bairro Alto 3 (3), the city’s edgy nocturnal neighbourhood. This warren of cobbles and sun-bleached buildings bustles with bohemian bars, and is the home of traditional Fado music (soulful melodies with melancholic lyrics).


Escape | G E T A W AY

6

ART AND CULTURE Just a short stroll from Baixa – a magnificent mix of Art Deco-fronted stores, tobacconists, cafes and boutiques – is an imposing 18th-century arcade that leads to Praça do Comércio (6), said to be the largest city square in Europe. From here, scale the hill (or take the tram) to the Moorish São Jorge Castle (10), a citadel with striking battlement vistas, surrounded by the shops and taverns of Alfama. On the way, you’ll see the rose-windowed Lisbon Cathedral (11) – the city’s oldest building – and further up the hill is the Decorative Arts Museum (7), housed within the 17th-century Azurara Palace and showcasing Portuguese crafts such as gilding, woodcarving and bookbinding. Beyond the castle is the National Pantheon Church (12). 7

POP IN FOR A DRINK Gin Lovers & Less (13)– a bar, restaurant and shop – is a true haven for gin enthusiasts. Across the road is Lost In, a terrace bar within an Indian emporium – nestled next to the Memmo Príncipe Real hotel, it shares its incredible views. Just a short stroll from here is Pavilhão Chinês (14), a kooky bar stuffed with toys, hanging airplanes and military uniforms. E D 5

4 5

8

PR A

ÇA

13

DO

P R ÍN

1 CIPE REA L

14 R. D D RUA

RATA

A ALEN AGD AM ROS QUIE FAN

DA P

DOS

RUA

C AI S S OD R É

RUA

RUA DOM LUIS I

9

ANTONIA MARIA RUA CARDOSO RUA DO ALECRIM

RUA D E S. PA ULO

DIA ÓR

CALÇADA DO COMBRO

10

RIC ISE

3

12

AM

PRÍNCIPE REAL

2

RUA

DO

5 6

L

ENA

ARS

IRA

IBE AV.R

DAS

7 11 BAIXA

IM RD JA R.

DO

CO BA TA

A UE EG IQ ND NR RUA DA ALFÃ HE M DO TE AN IN F AV.

S

NAU

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 183


ELLE Decoration | A D D R E S S

BOOK

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

1st Dibs (1stdibs.com) Abstracta (abstracta.se) Agape (agapedesign.it) Amara (amara.com) Ambiente Direct (ambientedirect.com) Anaglypta (anaglypta.co.uk) Annaleena (annaleena.se) Another Country (anothercountry.com) Apparatus (apparatusstudio.com) Arhøj (arhoj.com) Arket (arket.com) Arlo (arlo.com) Artemide (artemide.com) ArtGallery.co.uk (artgallery.co.uk) Artifact Lighting (artifact-lighting.com) Asda (asda.com) Asplund Store (asplundstore.se) Astra Walker (astrawalker.com.au) Ateliers Zelij (zelij.com) Atlas Gallery (atlasgallery.com) Baxter (baxter.it) Bert & May (bertandmay.com) Bert Frank (bertfrank.co.uk) Billiani (billiani.it) Bisazza (bisazza.it) Bjarni Sigurdsson (bjarnividars@simnet.is) BoConcept (boconcept.com) Boffi (boffi.com) Bulthaup (bulthaup.com) Button & Sprung (buttonandsprung.com) Caesarstone (caesarstone.co.uk) Carl Hansen & Søn (carlhansen.com) Cassina (cassina.com) Cécile & Boyd (cecileandboyds.com) CLJ Home (cljhome.com) Contemporary Ceramics Centre (cpaceramics.com) Cox & Cox (coxandcox.co.uk) Dadobaths (dadobaths.co.za) De Allegri and Fogale (deallegrifogale.com) De Ferranti (deferranti.com) K Debenhams (debenhams.com) Deco Glaze (decoglaze.co.uk) Dedar (dedar.com) Design Vintage (designvintage.co.uk) L Designers Guild (desginersguild.com) Devol (devolkitchens.co.uk) Dinesen (dinesen.com) Domus (domustiles.co.uk) Dyke & Dean (dykeanddean.com) E15 (e15.co) Earthborn (earthbornpaints.co.uk) Earthed by William Clark (earthedbywmclark.co.uk) EcoFurn (ecofurn.eu) Ecora (ecora.co.uk) Edward Bulmer Natural Paint M (edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk) Egg Designs (eggdesigns.co.za) Eicó (eico.co.uk) Eleanor Pritchard (eleanorpritchard.com) Étage Projects (etageprojects.com) Extendo (extendoweb.com) Extreme (extreme-design.co.uk) Farrow & Ball (farrow-ball.com) Finnish Design Shop (finnishdesignshop.com) Fired Earth (firedearth.com) Flow Gallery (flowgallery.co.uk) French Connection (frenchconnection.com) Fritz Hansen (fritzhansen.com) Fuoripista (fuoripista.eu) Gaggenau (gaggenau.com) N Geneva Lab (genevalab.com) Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com) George Home (george.com) Giorgetti (giorgettimilano.it) Graham & Brown (grahambrown.com) Gubi (gubi.com) O Gurli Elbækgaard (elbaekgaard.dk) H&M (hm.com) Habitat (habitat.co.uk) Hay (hay.dk) Haygen (haygenshop.com) Heal’s (heals.com) P Home Institute (homeinstitute.co.uk) Homebase (homebase.co.uk) Houlès (houles.com) House of Fraser (houseoffraser.co.uk) R Ikea (ikea.com) India Dickinson Gallery (indiadickinson.com) India Jane (indiajane.co.uk) Indigenous (indigenous.co.uk) In-Ex Living (in-ex.com.au) James Gilbert & Son (jamesgilbertandson.com) S Jeffrey James ( jeffreyjames.org)

184 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

Jesse Visser ( jessevisser.com) John Lewis ( johnlewis.com) Kevin Josias (kevinjosias.com) Kneip (kneip.no) Kristina Krogh (kkrogh.dk) La Grande Illusion (lagrandeillusion.it) Lady Fingers (lady-fingers.dk) Lapicida (lapicida.com) Larsen (larsenfabrics.com) Lelievre (lelievre.eu) Lema (lemamobili.com) Light Years (lightyears.dk) Lim (lim.co.za) Little Greene (littlegreene.com) Ljusmiljö (ljusmiljo.com) Loaf (loaf.com) Loewe (uk.loewe.tv) Made a Mano (madeamano.com) Made in Design (madeindesign.co.uk) T Made.com (made.com) Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com) Marion Fortat (marionfortat.com) Marks & Spencer (marksandspencer.com) MDF Italia (mdfitalia.com) Menu (menu.as) Merci (merci-merci.com) Mette Duedahl (metteduedahl.com) Mint (mintshop.co.uk) Molteni & C (molteni.it) MoMA Design Store (store.moma.org) Moroso (moroso.it) Mud Australia (mudaustralia.com) My Home Collection (myhomecollection.it) Natural Stair Runners (naturalstairrunners.co.uk) Nest (nest.co.uk) Next (next.co.uk) Nicolette Brunklaus (nicolettebrunklaus.com) Nook (nookshop.co.uk) Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) U Oluce (oluce.com) Örsjö (orsjo.com) V Aram Store (aram.co.uk) Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) Ox Denmarq (oxdenmarq.com) Paint & Paper Library (paintandpaperlibrary.com) Plain English (plainenglishdesign.co.uk) W Poliform (poliformuk.com) Print Club London (printclublondon.com) Reform (reformcph.com) RHS Plants (rhsplants.co.uk) Rockett St George (rockettstgeorge.co.uk) Roll & Hill (rollandhill.com) Ross and Brown (rossandbrownhome.co.uk) Royal Design (royaldesign.co.uk) Z Sainsbury’s (sainsburys.co.uk) Salvatori (salvatori.it)

Scavolini (scavolini.design) SCP (scp.co.uk) Sébastian Bergne (sebastianbergne.com) Selfridges (selfridges.com) Serge Mouille (sergemouille.com) SieMatic (siematic.com) Sigmar (sigmarlondon.com) Skandium (skandium.com) Smallbone of Devizes (smallbone.co.uk) Sofa Workshop (sofaworkshop.com) Sofa.com (sofa.com) Sofie Østerby (sofieoesterby.com) Solid Floor (solidfloor.co.uk) Stilleben (stilleben.dk) Stone Age (stone-age.co.uk) Stone World (stoneworldlondon.co.uk) Style Library (stylelibrary.com) Swoon Editions (swooneditions.com) Talisman London (talismanlondon.com) Tanguy Rolin (tanguyrolin.co.uk) Ted Baker (tedbaker.com) Ted Todd (tedtodd.co.uk) Tesco (tesco.com) The Colour Flooring Company (colourflooring.co.uk) The Conran Shop (theconranshop.com) The Linen Works (thelinenworks.co.uk) The Marble Store (themarblestore.co.uk) The Stone Collection (thestonecollection.co.uk) The Tile Box (thetilebox.co.uk) The White Company (thewhitecompany.com) Tisca Tiara (tiscatiara.com) TK Maxx (tkmaxx.com) Toast (toa.st) Tom Pigeon (tompigeon.com) Toscot (toscot.it) Travertine Direct (travertinedirect.co.uk) Tristian Koenig (tristiankoenig.com) Trouva (trouva.com) Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com) Utility (utilitydesign.co.uk) Varenna (varennacucine.com) Very Home (very.co.uk) Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk) Vitra (vitra.com) Vola (vola.com) Waitrose Garden (waitrosegarden.com) WallPepper (wallpepper.it) Wayfair (wayfair.co.uk) West Elm (westelm.co.uk) Weylandts (weylandts.co.za) Wittmann (wittmann.at) Wood and Beyond (woodandbeyond.co.uk) Yonder Living (yonderliving.com) Zara Home (zarahome.com) Zoco Home (zocohome.com)

PICTURE: BROOKE HOLM (PHOTOGRAPHY), MARSHA GOLEMAC (STYLING)

Stockists


Advertising feature

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection BRITISH MADE SOFAS, SOFA BEDS AND BEDS Prepare your home for summer guests with Willow & Hall's handmade British furniture range. Choose from our irresistibly comfy sofa beds with 14cm deep mattress options, to chic chaises with handy storage or beautiful luxurious beds. All furniture is made to order by skilled craftsmen in Wiltshire with over 35 years' experience. Designs are available in over 100 fabrics and delivered for free to most of the UK Mainland within around 4-5 weeks. Plus, they offer 14-day free returns on all orders. To explore their range visit their London showroom, shop online at www.willowandhall.co.uk or call 020 8939 3800. Use code ELLE28917 by 28th September to save an extra 5% off prices already 30% lower than the high street.

Product featured: The Buttermere sofa/sofa bed shown in Country Linen Zinc from £952 or £1,128

DAVID STUDWELL David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen and Elizabeth Taylor all feature in his work evoking a strong sense of nostalgia and bringing elements of the past into the present. He has exhibited in London and also the USA, and been published. Featured here is Steve McQueen I, a limited edition silk screen (57 x 45cm, £300). Visit www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@gmail.com

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT Hailed as a top 50 British brand for your home. Their natural paint is as healthy and eco-friendly as it is beautiful – offering unrivalled coverage in just two coats and a soft, chalky matt finish. Choose from 72 stunning colours for both modern and period interiors. Call 01544 388535 or visit www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk for your complimentary colour chart. Why compromise?

FREE TREE STUDIO Free Tree Studio hand makes live edge tables, reclaimed wood furniture and tree stump tables. The soul of each creation is a piece of solid wood exhibited in the frames of modern materials. The basic premise of each project is maintaining the natural form of the wood and underlining its beauty. We customise size and colour of our furniture. www.freetreestudio.com


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

LIGHTING & INTERIORS

TIMELESS BESPOKE LIGHTING

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

186 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260 INTERIORS & ANTIQUE FURNITURE

Classifieds | A – Z RUGS & INTERIORS

Vibrant Contemporary Rugs www. sonyawinner. com

www.casabotelho.com

ANTIQUES BESPOKE LIFESTYLE

augustusbrandt.co.uk

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 187


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & KITCHENS

barnby design

furniture design handmade in HAY.

view the range at: www.barnbydesign.co.uk

188 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z FURNITURE

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 189


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS

OO TW

British midcentury and modern design www.britaincanmakeit.com Use discount code robinday to get 15% off Valid until 31/12/2017

COVELLI TENNANT Vintage Textiles & Bespoke Upholstery

020 8876 0131

07855 256 007

07971 043 916

www.covellitennant.com

190 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z FIREPLACES, FLOORING & TILES

These legendary French fireplaces are now available in the UK.

For stockists and to see the full range of fireplaces and contemporary stoves please visit:

www.focus-fireplaces.com

79 Margaret Street, London, W1W 8TA 02074956 706

NEW LONDON DESIGN CENTRE NOW OPEN The finest new, antique and reclaimed wood floors

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 191


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

LUXURY HOMEWARE, BLINDS & GARDEN ART

LUXURY ACCESSORIES

www.aurumhome.co

Björk Haraldsdóttir Contemporary Handbuilt Ceramics

www.ceramicsbybjork.com

Unique, organic, ceramic sculptures Bespoke commissions www.kiramics.com

192 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z DOORS, SHUTTERS & DANISH FURNITURE

NORTH4.COM DORGLAZE® VISION PANELS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

steel reinforced natural hardwood doors entrance doors internal feature doors garage doors made and designed in UK

urbanfront.co.uk +44 (0)1494 778787

SEPTEMBER 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 193


THESTORYOFTHEBATHTUB We focus on the fascinating history of humble household items. This month, the biography of the bath

2 7 B C MARBLE BATH, Rome The apex of elegance, the

1 8 0 0 S HIP BATH, UK The Victorians’ go-to

marble bath has its origins in Ancient Rome and is enjoying a resurgence in popularity. Bert & May sells reclaimed versions, and at Villa Cetinale in Tuscany there is a bespoke tub carved from a single piece of marble.

bath for the masses, this armchair-style bowl made washing easy for 19th century families – who would have filled it with hot water and taken turns to soak in it – and helped spawn the popular proverb that ‘cleanliness is next to godliness’.

7 0 0 FURO, Japan Usually made from watertight, fragrant Hinoki timber, steep-sided furos are found in homes across Britain, thanks to the western world’s interest in the Japanese ritual of bathing and the tub’s minimal design.

1970S AVOCADO SUITE, UK When plumbing became a legal requirement in all properties, homeowners lusted after the fabulous new bathroom look – an avocado-coloured bathtub with matching sink and loo.

1 5 0 0 S WOODEN TUB, Hampton Court Palace

2 0 0 0 S FREESTANDING ROLL TOP BATH, UK

The tub commissioned by Henry VII continued to be favoured by queens until the late Georgian era. They enjoyed botanicals such as sage and camomile, steeped in hot water pumped up to the palace’s Bayne Tower (from the French bain).

This is the bath on the wish list of many 21st-century homeowners – ideally situated in a large, open-plan bedroom. Go for the classic clawfoot tub, or a matt black version instead, such as ‘Cuna’ by Agape (right).

Free next month… ELLE Decoration Bathrooms Volume 2 – your essential guide to creating the perfect bathroom 194 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK SEPTEMBER 2017

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GETTY, ALAMY

Before bathing became a solitary, indulgent activity, it was a practical, shared pleasure. From Southwark’s medieval bathhouses to Tudor knights’ sessions in a herb-infused pool in the Tower of London, the bath was enjoyed by all. Lucy Worsley, author of If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home (Faber, £12.99) tells us that the modern love of bathing arrived with the birth of the bathroom in the early 20th century. ‘It became positive to wallow in a bath thanks to Hollywood – when people saw film stars drinking cocktails and talking on the telephone in a bubble bath,’ she says. Here are some highlights of the tub’s deep, occasionally murky, history.


tạp chí nội thất tháng 9  

tạp chí nội thất tháng 9

tạp chí nội thất tháng 9  

tạp chí nội thất tháng 9

Advertisement