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BEIJING 2018’s TRAVEL HOTSPOT

MABONENG STYLE AT HOME IN SIR DAVID ADJAYE’S HALLMARK HOUSE

SOUTH AFRICA JAN/FEB 2018

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ROMANC NG TH C TY

YOUR GO-TO GUIDE FOR CHIC URBAN LIVING

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DIRECTIONAL LOOKS FOR WALLS + FLOORS


CONTENTS

12

MY STYLISH LIFE Johannesburg-based designer Yasmin Furmie on what has shaped her personal style

14

DIGITAL The latest on DECO’s digital platforms

18

TRENDS, INNOVATIONS, WORD OF MOUTH The Cape Town Art Fair, retro decor, Design Indaba 2018, Ini Archibong on his collections of fantastical lights; new showrooms, stores, art and more

24

IDEAS An introduction to an Afrofuturist aesthetic

26

PEOPLE Who was out and about at the Design Foundation Awards and the opening of the new Roche Bobois showroom

30

STUDIO VISIT Noks Nxumalo of Hush Interiors invites DECO into her Kramerville studio

34

TREND ALERT DECO’s forecast: a sable palette, soft industrial and a revival of Delft blues

38

SHORTLIST Dakar-based entrepreneur Sarah Diouf explores the stories behind her favourite things

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SHOPPING 44

ETCETERA Armchairs, stools and seats in a delightful variety of colours and coverings

46

TECH Gadgets for city living

50

TOOLBOX Find out how to make the best of a room’s walls and floors

124

30 HOMES 62

DOWNTOWN AERIE This swish penthouse in Maboneng brings luxury and considered design into the heart of an of-the-moment locale

74

NEW MOOD Tammy Tinker’s charming home in De Waterkant is a fresh take on city living

84

REIMAGINE THAT French interior designer Charlotte Macaux Perelman has masterfully reinvented this Parisian apartment

94

PLACE TO PLACE Architect Lesley Lokko’s spacious Johannesburg apartment holds memories of the different places and spaces she has visited

LIVING 114 TRAVEL BEIJING Discover the Chinese capital through its contemporary art scene 118 WEEKEND GETAWAY Escape to historic Muldersdrift at the edge of the metropolis

62

120 FOOD & DRINK Recipes from three chefs featured at the Littlegig 24-hour Festival, plus new restaurants, a recipe for an Iceplant Negroni and more 124 HOTELS New York’s 11 Howard and Hong Kong’s The Fleming

108

126 ICON: GREGOR JENKIN The award-winning designer-maker challenges the idea of what furniture can be 128 GARDENS How to green a wall 130 LAST LOOK Les Étoiles de la Mer 2 wallpaper by Versace Home

PHOTOGRAPHS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT) NOKS NXUMALO BY GRAHAM WYLLIE; MOLECULE 8 LIGHT FROM HOI P’LOY; HOME MABONENG BY ELSA YOUNG; 11 HOWARD

THE URBAN ISSUE

SPOTLIGHT


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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

@khanyidhlomo

Versace dress R21 895 Steve Madden shoes R1 499 Thula Sindi dress Khanyi’s own Roller table lamp R10 000, Studio 19 Legs11 powder-coated stool (excluding fabric) R3 900, Studio 19 Nesting bronze crescent table R9 500, Studio 19 Diamond Shuttle Weave Dhurrie Carpet R2 995, Weylandts

‘Above all, the spaces we’ve showcased this month demonstrate their owners’ ability to take risks and go with a particular vision. Almost every time, risks of this kind pay off ’

6 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE

he New Year is traditionally a time for revising, reimagining and recreating both inner and outer spaces. In this issue, we bring you a wealth of inspiring ideas for doing just that. We’ve focused on the amazingly diverse ways in which urban homes, however small, can be transformed into sanctuaries of peace, hubs of energy, and marvellous combinations of contemporary and traditional elements. City life has had unfairly bad press for many decades, but in these pages we show how well a fusion of urban energy and creative courage can work. The four homes we’ve featured – two in Johannesburg (Maboneng and Braamfontein), one in De Waterkant, Cape Town, and another in Paris – are triumphs of their owners’ ingenuity. We also explore Beijing, China, as an exciting travel destination. Beijing has long been associated with smog, overpopulation and haphazard municipal design, yet the discovery of a superb combination of Western romanticism, Oriental form and playfulness reveals how much magic resides even within crowded streets and high-rise monoliths. Above all, the spaces we’ve showcased this month demonstrate their owners’ ability to take risks and go with a particular vision. Almost every time, risks of this kind pay off. We’d like to make 2018 a year of undertaking more such ventures, not only in our environmental spaces, but in our inner narratives and relationships. There’ll be an element of fear and doubt in this, but these are the things that trigger growth, beauty and wonderful surprises. Happy new year to you all!

PHOTOGRAPH SHAUN MALLETT; MAKE-UP BY CLARA BANX

@KhanyiDhlomo


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‘ The fact that Cape Town has been named a UNESCO City of Design, the first in Africa, hints at the forces gradually working to reshape and reimagine what is historically a place of division’

ities have a way of provoking passionate responses, often igniting enduring love affairs. I’ve fallen head over heels for Paris (who hasn’t?), Madrid and Helsinki, but have found renewed appreciation for my home city, Cape Town. It might have something to do with the view from the desk in my newish office, where I spend a not insignificant amount of time gazing out over the rooftops of Bo-Kaap (increasingly sporting cool pockets of green) and Table Mountain. But there’s more to it than being dazzled by its surface beauty, however enduring. The fact that Cape Town has been named a UNESCO City of Design, the first in Africa, hints at the forces gradually working to reshape and reimagine what is historically a place of division. Over and above culturally rigorous events like February’s Cape Town Art Fair and Design Indaba, it’s the interventions that seek to delight and unite ordinary people out on the street that are causing a shift in how the city is experienced. What a surprise to see a drab square transformed into an urban park, complete with faux grass and public-use deckchairs, a pop-up affair with the goal of encouraging civic engagement (in Church Square until May – go and see it if you can). Johannesburg’s ongoing urban renaissance has also attracted a growing share of attention, notably when British-Nigerian architect Sir David Adjaye came onboard to transform an old factory in Maboneng into what is arguably the city’s most alluring new residential and mixed-use development. We’re elated to share a glimpse inside one of its breathtakingly stylish penthouse apartments in this issue, which celebrates urban living. The space itself is a sort of ode to the gritty materiality of the city, revealing rather than concealing the patina of its industrial past, with every window artfully framing Joburg’s iconic skyline. The interiors present something of a masterclass in balancing contrasts: the hardness of concrete and glass, offset by the most tactile of soft furnishings. The DECO team’s preoccupation with materials can also be seen on our Toolbox pages, compiled by Decor Stylist Sanri Pienaar who shares her own insights as well as those from leading local designers on some of the top trends for wall finishes and flooring for 2018. Whether you’re planning an update of your city pad, suburban haven or country escape, we hope you’ll find the inspiration you need right here. We can’t wait to share many more great decorating ideas with you this year, as ELLE DECORATION South Africa marks its milestone 20th anniversary!

leigh.robertson@ndalomedia.com x @lil_robertson

8 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPH ADAM LETCH

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PUBLISHER & CEO: NDALO MEDIA

Khanyi Dhlomo EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Ntombenhle Shezi DECOR DECOR STYLIST Sanri Pienaar

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CONTRIBUTORS Jessica Spiro, Jessie Bell, Mary Maurel, Mila Crewe-Brown, Mxolisi Makhubo and Tracy Lynn Chemaly

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ELLE (ISSN 1025-9791) January/February 2018. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be sent to The Editor, ELLE, PO Box 2077, Lonehill 2062. All due care will be taken with material submitted, but the magazine and publishers cannot be held responsible for loss or damage. ELLE assumes no responsibility for returning unsolicited editorial, graphic or other material. All rights in letters and unsolicited editorial and graphic material will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and material will be subject to ELLE’s unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially. ELLE is fully protected by copyright and nothing may be reprinted in whole or part without written permission from the publisher. While reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of advice and information given to readers, the Editor, publisher and proprietor cannot accept responsibility for any damage or inconvenience that may arise therefrom.


RUG COLLECTION

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Sakhile Sash Cebekhulu

Tom Dixon lights

x @yasminfurmie

The Johannesburg-based designer on decor trends, affecting fashion collections and what has shaped her personal style Whether sporting an eclectic ensemble, or running SiSi – a fashion label that focuses on shirts – with friend Cynthia Allie, social-worker-turned-designer and street style maven Yasmin Furmie marches to her own beat, defying preconceived ideas about acting one’s age. Right now, you’re inspired by… The young designers who are making their mark in the fashion, art and music worlds. Fashion designers who stand out for me are the likes of Thebe Magugu and Rich Mnisi, and Sakhile Sash Cebekhulu, who is a visual artist and fashion designer. Their work tells a cohesive story and the standard of production is amazing. What’s on your decor wish list? Tom Dixon lights. I love the mixed metals and the organic shapes. An artist everyone should have their eye on? One of my favourite young artists is Siwa Mgoboza. His work is thought-provoking, set in a utopian world where people aren’t placed in boxes and are shielded from all the ‘-isms’ by the colourful shweshwe cloth that comprises the most magicallooking outfits. An important part of your everyday style? Not overthinking anything. The ability to put looks together comes naturally. If it doesn’t and all one does is cut and paste, the end result is a contrived and inauthentic 12 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE

look. Another important part of my everyday style has to be socks and shoes or sneakers. What is the first fragrance you owned? The first proper fragrance I owned as an adult was First by Van Cleef & Arpels. It made me feel sophisticated and oh-so grown up. The fashion collection that changed your life? Locally, the collection that really caught my eye was Chu Suwannapha’s 2015 debut label, Chulaap. It made me fall in love with prints and presented a truly African aesthetic with a global, contemporary appeal. I’ve worn his clothes ever since. The designer you would most like to have lunch with? In South Africa, it has to be Clive Rundle. His longevity, his knowledge and brilliance would keep me occupied – I would want to know how he has sustained himself in a very difficult environment where local fashion is often not supported. Favourite piece of furniture you own? My Rogan Jenkins coffee table. It’s simple, but effective. The person who has most influenced your career? Jamal Nxledana was instrumental in paving the way for me in fashion after I collaborated with his label, Missshape. Favourite material to work with? Cotton poplin. It’s what [the SiSi label] white shirts are made of.

Siwa Mgoboza at Matter Gallery, Canada

Rogan Jenkins table

PORTRAIT AND SISI FASHION IMAGE COURTESY OF YASMIN FURMIE; SIWA MGOBOZA PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF MATTER GALLERY; SAKHILE SASH CEBEKHULU PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; GETTY IMAGES/ GALLO IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/ALAMY

MY STYLISH LIFE


BEAUTIFUL

LIVING The new lounge collections from Mobelli bring modern, easy living home. Curated by Sam Lurie from Sprout Design, these new collections express attainable beauty and comfort. Available in a range of design styles and soft hues to complement your home.

Find us on... Sea Point | Illovo | Fourways | Menlyn Piazza NEW Concept Showroom now open in Paarden Eiland

mobelli.co.za


DIGITAL BIG CITY LIFE BACK TO BLACK Want to incorporate the colour black into the interior of your home? DECO’s stylist shows you how.

URBAN NAUTILUS Self-taught French photographer Matthieu Venot captures intricate, minimalist details in urban landscapes.

FROM THE WINDOW TO THE WALL There’s no surface left unseen: DECO’s Instagram feed is filled with design inspiration from all over the world.

ELLEDECOR ATION.CO.ZA WHERE WILD THINGS ARE

TIME TO TR AVEL

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for the latest news in art, design and more.

From hotspots in hit cities to remote island getaways, DECO explores the most beautiful travel destinations.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT New Year’s detox? DECO reveals healthy alternatives for your favourite dishes.

URBAN BEAT Step into the local and international homes that redefine city living.

x @ELLE_DECO b ELLEDECORATIONSA d ELLE_DECOSA a @ELLE_DECO


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SPOTLIGHT HUSH INTERIORS BY GRAHAM WYLLIE

ARCHITECTURE • DESIGN • ART • CULTURE • PEOPLE • PL ACES

Ones to watch at the Cape Town Art Fair (p18) and highlights at Design Indaba 2018 (p20). Swiss-based designer Ini Archibong explores glass and light (p21) and DECO reveals two new showrooms (p22) and highlights new ceramics, art and architecture (p23)


5 TO WATCH AT THE CAPE TOWN ART FAIR Local and international contemporary artists and galleries converge in the Mother City for the Cape Town Art Fair, from 16 to 18 February, at the Cape Town International Convention Centre. Now in its sixth year, the fair has a new addition, SOLO, a section highlighting the work of female artists whose chosen pieces are ‘all about upsetting the norm and the image of women,’ says guest curator Nontobeko Ntombela. Here are DECO’s top five picks from SOLO Kimathi Mafafo (Ebony/Curated) was born in Kimberley and draws on lush landscapes as a backdrop for celebrating the black female form and to signify a desire to reconnect with nature. Mafafo uses embroidery, oil paint and installation in her multidisciplinary practice. Lucinda Mudge (Everard Read CIRCA Gallery) lived between Cape Town, where she studied fine art, and the UK, before settling in Plettenberg Bay. Her intricate and colourful ceramic works belie darker themes, such as violence, that simmer below the surface. Lola Keyezua (MOV’ART) was born in Luanda and is a graduate of the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. Her narrativedriven work explores the African Renaissance through photography, film and mixed media. Maïmouna Guerresi (Officine dell’Immagine) lives and works between Dakar and Milan and has exhibited widely, using the mediums of photography, sculpture, video and installation. Her work is suffused with mysticism and spirituality, drawing on the cultures in which she is immersed. Lhola Amira (SMAC Gallery) was born in Gugulethu and has had residencies in Sweden and Spain. Her performative craft deals with socio-economic and political conditions of race, gender, sexuality and geographical location. capetownartfair.co.za

AISHA, 2015 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND OFFICINE DELL'IMMAGINE, MILAN; BREAKING BREAD WITH THE SELF-RIGHTEOUS I, 2017 PHOTOGRAPH BY RAG BARYTA DISEC

from top left Fortia 3, photograph by Lola Keyezua; Aisha, 2015, Lambda print by Maïmouna Guerresi; Baby I Live For Danger, 2016, ceramic by Lucinda Mudge; Embolden, 2017, embroidered panel by Kimathi Mafafo; Breaking Bread With The Self-Righteous I, 2017, Giclée print on Hanhnemuhle by Lhola Amira


SPOTLIGHT: TREND

Retro Revival A pick and mix of objects that reinterpret popular decor forms of the recent past is all the rage

clockwise from top left Leaf Chandelier light, R6 000, SHF; Geo Flower scarf, R2 800, Blandat; Freeform malachite pendant necklace, R1 500, Matter of Fakt; Rulle armchair by Stabรถrd, from R27 500, Establishment; 80s Post Modern tea set, R500, Liam Mooney; Lands coffee table by Fiam, R53 300, Casarredo; Well Hung headboard, R8 700, Flaunt; Brooches by Liz Louber, R2 250 each, Tinsel Gallery; Glazed Chineseware vase made from Czech glass beads, R950, Chandler House; Constantin side table by Simon Collezione for Cassina, R64 945, True Design; The Odd Vase, R1 128, Liam Mooney

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 19


CREATIVE CURRENCY IN AFRICA The multisensory Design Indaba conference, taking place from 21 to 23 February, will feature prominent creative thinkers and design activists, including Zimbabwean filmmaker Sunu Gonera whose Cannes Lions award-winning Absolut-sponsored music video for Khuli Chana challenges the way branded content is made on the continent, creating a new visual palette with which to represent Africa. LOLA Landscape Architects, a firm studying degraded or derelict landscapes and working on landscape transformation strategies is a particularly relevant must-see. New ideas, like Studio Swine’s ‘Metallic Geology’ made from foamed aluminium, will also be on show. designindaba.com

Still from One Source directed by Sunu Gonera Studio Swine’s ‘Metallic Geology'

Redevelopment of a sports park in Belgium by LOLA Landscape Architects

ART UNDERFOOT ‘Geometric forms are intrinsic to African tribal art and simple, expressive vector forms date back centuries. These graphic shapes were less to do with aesthetic value and more concerned with an intuitive and symbolic exploration,’ says OKHA director Adam Court of the brand’s new Stone rug collection, created in collaboration with Zoya rugs, which takes as its starting point reduced abstract line and shape, rearranging and reconstructing compositions, playing with resonances of colour, and regularity and irregularity of form. okha.com


SPOTLIGHT: INNOVATION

DelSol floor lamps from the Formentera colllection

Light shaper Designer Ini Archibong, who is currently based in Switzerland, elaborates on his collections of fantastical lights

Hive lamp from the Kundalini collection

PHOTOGRAPHS JADIS LIGHTING SCULPTURE BY PIOTR NIEPSUJ; ORION TABLE BY ANDREAS ZIMMERMANN

Orion Table from the Secret Garden collection

How does your background in architecture inform your work? As architecture was my entry into the world of design, I developed an awareness of how spatial relationships of objects and architectural features affect people. Every product, regardless of size, becomes an element in a space, and every element is experienced in relation to the other elements that occupy a space, especially light-emitting objects. Architecture is the shaping and control of light through spatial elements and material qualities. What is the core inspiration and goal of your designs? I see my life as a continuous search to discover new ways to view the world around me and translate these discoveries into meaningful and longlasting products and experiences that hold enough depth and emotional power to fascinate and enrich the lives of the people who own them and inspire those who come into contact with them. What is the appeal of working with glass? It’s by far my favourite material to work with. I feel like I have barely even scratched the surface of its possibilities, and I hope to have a lifelong relationship with the material. Everything from the material properties to its visual fragility and spectrum of colours absolutely enthralled me from the beginning of my experiments. For me, glass is the perfect medium for expressing concepts rooted in fantasy. We are so accustomed to seeing and using glass products in our everyday lives that it’s easy to take its magical presence for granted. designbyini.com

Ini Archibong

Jardis lighting sculpture from the Secret Garden collection

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 21


Johannesburg-based Dutch designer Debby van der Veer’s BLANDAT brand (which means ‘mixed’ in Swedish) produces bold patterned prints for interiors and fashion. The current collection includes fabrics, scarves, bags and made-to-order upholstery and wallpaper. Available online. blandat-studio.com

NEW STORY Mobelli’s new concept showroom in Cape Town brings the brand’s latest collections to life in the form of decor ‘stories’ created in collaboration with interior designer Sam Lurie and based on this year’s hot trends. mobelli.co.za

Sleek selection It’s fitting that eminent Italian furniture brand Minotti has opened a lavish flagship showroom in the new, design-centric Canal District at Cape Town’s V&A Waterfront. With Ducatti next door and a host of sleek stores pending, its striking collection of pieces is right at home. Located adjacent to longstanding partner Limeline, Minotti’s offering comprises a selection of its best-selling sofas, armchairs and coffee tables, paired with works by local artists. limeline.co.za


SPOTLIGHT: WORD OF MOUTH

LINES OF CONNECTION

Cape Town-based artist Leila Walter’s Monologue series of drawings expresses continuity between the lines and forms of cityscapes. The meditative detail of the 16 works, which document public spaces from various cities around the world, is an exercise in finding pause in the commonplace and noticing urban environmental details easily overlooked by the commuter or passerby. ‘As far as possible, I avoided obvious landmarks and facades,’ says Walter. ‘The drawings are architectural glimpses, awkward views from balconies, or stolen peeks through fences. They capture moments that I shared with these spaces.’ The Monologue series is currently on show at Chandler House in Cape Town. @leila_walter

A PL ACE TO GATHER The iconic Johannesburg Council Chamber in Braamfontein recently got a facelift, with a redesign inspired by the Tswana concept of Lekgotla, a circular outdoor meeting space where people gather and anyone is allowed to speak without interruption. The cylindrical building is covered by a glass facade that illuminates at night. Shortlisted works from the Council Chamber‘s Totem Art Competition 2016 are on permanent display in the building. joburg.org.za

DARK MATTER Ceramicist Munnike Geldenhuys’s Black Vessels collection in collaboration with Konnect, a design network by Blok Living, includes moody, matte ceramic vessels made from pitchy clay. @munnike

FAIR TR ADE The Storer in Fourways sells fair-trade products produced by small communities around the world. thestorer.co

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 23


Makoko Waterfront, Olalekan Jeyifous

‘This architecture cannot be subjected to any law of historical continuity. It must be new, just as our state of mind is new’ – Antonio Sant’Elia, Manifesto of Futurist Architecture (1914)

An architectural model by Olalekan Jeyifous

Mali Ya Mfalme, Macho Nne | Morocco Ngome (Morocco Castle), 2016, Cyrus Kabiru

Sharmans Blues , Thokozani Mthiyane

INTO THE FUTURE

Johannesburg-based architect Mxolisi Makhubo considers the impact of an Afrofuturist aesthetic in African art and architecture and introduces the work of South African artist Thokozani Mthiyane TEXT MXOLISI MAKHUBO


IDEAS

n 1993, American cultural critic Mark Dery, journalist Greg Tate, academic Tricia Rose and science-fiction author Samuel R Delany sat at a roundtable to discuss the lack of black science fiction in the American mainstream. What emerged from those discussions was the term ‘Afrofuturism’ to encapsulate all categories of black cultural production that are concerned with the future (think: Detroit techno, Credo Mutwa’s alien figurines, Wangechi Mutu’s otherworldly collages and Cyrus Kilbury’s wearable sculptures). Significantly, and perhaps drawing it further from other futurist practices, Afrofuturism places equal emphasis on knowledge of the past as a way to imagine black experience into the future. It isn’t a practice concerned with the future for future’s sake, and is equally a criticism of the unlivable present. ‘Whether through literature, visual arts, music, or grassroots organising, Afrofuturists redefine culture and notions of blackness for today and the future,’ writes author and Afrofuturism authority Ytasha L Womack. ‘Both an artistic aesthetic and a framework for critical theory, Afrofuturism combines elements of science, historical fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy, Afrocentricity, and magic realism with non-Western beliefs. In some cases, it is a total re-envisioning of the past and speculation about the future rife with cultural critiques.’ The Seventies marked a critical phase in which black people ‘hacked’ mainstream media to foreground their experiences, in doing so making pop culture ‘ghetto’ (for example, the Black Panthers, and film director Melvin Van Peebles’s aesthetics). The black cultural community had managed to disseminate a universal aesthetic for black resistance, which would later reappear throughout the world. Although Afrofuturism is, in the strictest sense, a black American invention, because it has placed at its centre ‘looking into the past to find a future’, Africa is central to an Afrofuturist dream and an Afrofuturist aesthetic. Like the mythic Greek god Janus, Afrofuturism pulls in two directions: it takes the past, in the form of African mythology, which is then used to propel the black experience into the future, ‘repurposing oppression’ to make something new. This produces a cross-pollination of cultural signifiers drawn from commonalities across the black diaspora. South African artist Thokozani Mthiyane’s artwork forms part of this lineage of black aesthetics that ‘hack’ Western cultural hegemony, artwork that is both locally responsive but is also part of a global black aesthetic. I first met Mthiyane at The Afrikan Freedom Station (AFS), a music venue in Westdene. He stood furiously sketching on a piece of paper, occasionally pacing up and down, returning an impassive glance at the performance onstage, then returning to his sketch. Later in the night, he continued what might have been his 10th sketch, with the same dedication he had given to the first. Something about this scene could have read as unnecessarily serious, especially so late in the night, but Mthiyane’s age suggested something else. The artist seemed to be working hard to get his work to catch up with his mind. Mthiyane, now 48, has spent much of his life moving between mediums and situations: he was a cashier at Exclusive Books; a dancer and actor with the Inzalo Dance and Theatre Company; a poet, all while pursuing a career as a visual artist. Scan through his Facebook profile pictures and you’ll find one portrait of him that sticks out: he stands cocooned in canvas, with just his head sticking out. The image looks like he is mid-metamorphosis, and maybe he is. The same image conjures up inyanga esekuthwaseni (a traditional healer transitioning from a secular life to a full inyanga in a trancelike state, unaware and not bothered by the material plane). This double vision is something that accompanies most of Mthiyane’s later abstract work, which is at once ethereal and seemingly a serendipitous mash-up of relics collected over a lifetime. He curates this work on his Facebook page with the skill of a younger generation, without ever appearing corny. It is not accidental that Mthiyane is equally adept with his phone’s keypad as he is with his brush – he can’t afford to leave the fate of his analogue work to a digital world. At times, Mthiyane uses symbolism that harkens back to Mutwa’s sculptures of otherworldly beings, while simultaneously using iconography (like hearts and crucifixes) that is more common in graffiti. This method locates his work both in the past and the present. Mthiyane is an Afrofuturist, having managed to situate his work in a technological space and still pursue an artistic practice rooted in African spirituality. He has his feet planted firmly in the past and the present, with a phantom limb in the spiritual realm. He is not that Rasta guy making a painting with burnt oranges and baobabs for tourists to memorialise their trip to the motherland, but he’ll take viewers on a trip nonetheless.

FUTURISM IN PRACTICE Cities are changing rapidly to accommodate population growth, while transforming into smart cities with new technologies and modern designs. Architecture is an important site to think about Afrofuturism. The following buildings on the continent have an Afrofuturistic aesthetic:

MAKOKO FLOATING SCHOOL A floating structure built for the historical fishing community in Lagos. The aim of the school was to generate sustainable, alternative building systems while providing clean water for the vast population of Africa’s coastal regions. Half the structure collapsed recently due to heavy rainfall. It is currently being reconstructed.

HOTEL IVORIES The distinct white tower of the Hotel Ivories in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, looks somewhat like a spaceship ready to launch. Built in the 1960s and renovated in 2011, its decor still reflects the hotel’s original fantastical colours and African wood carvings and motifs.

EKO ATLANTIC Currently under construction, this massive urban project is already being called the ‘African Dubai’. Set to be a metropolis of luxury shopping, residential and building sites, it will be completed in 2020. Located on Victoria Island and stretching for 10km2, it aims to become the commercial and financial epicentre of West Africa.

SHANTY MEGASTRUCTURES Combining the fields of design and architecture to think about the present and the future, Olalekan Jeyifous’s Shanty Megastructures project looks at the future of slums in Lagos, Nigeria, through the lens of Afrofuturism. His work also interrogates the divide between rich and poor and examines the economic divisions in a country like Nigeria.

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 25


PEOPLE

DESIGN FOUNDATION AWARDS

Date: 25 November Venue: Guild, Cape Town Caro de Waal

Nonhlanhla Mditshwa and Athi-Patra Ruga

DECO Ed-in-Chief Leigh Robertson and Juliette Arrighi De Casanova

A Krone representative and Tracy Lynch

Nicolò Pudel and Penny Tinker

Stanislaw Trzebinski (right) and friend

Tracy Lynn Chemaly and Trevyn McGowan

Date: 23 November Venue: Kramerville, Johannesburg

Directors of Roche Bobois South Africa Sandrine and Bernard Fanchette

ROCHE BOBOIS SHOWROOM OPENING

Creative Director of Roche Bobois International Nicolas Roche

Artist Siyabonga Mlambi Roche Bobois showroom

Director of Mimshach Hospitality Lovemore Chinga

French Ambassador to South Africa Christophe Farnaud and Nicolas Roche

Artist and gallery owner Catherine Timotei


singh&sons 4TH/7720/NDALO

GO 4th & CONNECT

www.4thstreetwines.com

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18.


NOKS NXUMALO: AT WORK The banker-turned-designer invites DECO into her moodily stylish Kramerville studio TEXT NTOMBENHLE SHEZI PHOTOGRAPHS GRAHAM WYLLIE

this page The Queen swivel chair and blue Casa ottoman are Hush Interiors. The coffee table is from Comfort Creations opposite (clockwise from top left) The display unit is Hush Interiors. The blue armchairs are Wunders; the coffee table is from Anatomy Design and the couch is Hush Interiors.The mushroom lamp is Mezzanine Interiors


STUDIO VISIT

‘We are passionate about identifying and supporting South African product designers who appeal to us’

As a prime location to find the best in home furnishings and assorted decor, as well as stylistic diversity, it is no surprise that Noks Nxumalo’s Hush Interiors design studio is located right off Desmond Street in Kramerville, Johannesburg. Nxumalo’s love of interiors is something she says goes back to when she was a child rearranging furniture in her mother’s house, as well as moments spent soaking in all the work that her father did as an architect. With an MBA, Nxumalo started off in the banking industry before deciding to focus on running her business full-time, seven years ago. Her interior design aesthetic has changed over time. ‘When I started I was very classic, but when you start travelling you see new things and that has an influence on your taste,’ she says. Now, she includes a hybrid of styles in her work, ranging from clean-lined and contemporary to Gothic. When it comes to her clients, Nxumalo has observed an interesting trend of more people migrating from typical suburban spaces to apartment living in city centres, which is why Hush Interiors is cognisant of the need to scale different pieces of furniture to suit each client’s style and space. ‘We have a lot of clients who are part of the high-end market, but we are finding that people are coming to us, asking us to work on smaller spaces,’ says Nxumalo. Her main clientele comprises individuals who have multiple homes and are not unversed in interiors; the rest are a mixture of commercial projects and new clients with little experience in decor. ‘Younger clients are realising the value of interiors,’ she notes. Hush Interiors also design and import furniture, and being based in a location like Kramerville allows clients to have access to a range of other suppliers with whom Nxumalo has great relationships. The importation part of the business sees Hush Interiors bringing in products from all over the world, and Nxumalo has a strategic office in Como, Italy, for international projects, which they share with one of the country’s finest architects. Inspired by a recent trip to Morocco, Hush Interiors will be adding a few exciting, authentically Moroccan products to their catalogue this year. Nxumalo decided on a smaller space for the studio because she was keen for the business to grow organically and wanted to understand the market before expanding. The studio has a specific mood, which comes through in the exposed concrete ceilings and the dark oak-panelled walls. Furniture and screens divide the open-plan studio into different sections. The work of young local designers, from Gold Bottom and Ndibale, who work with the studio, is on display, as well as two original Alf Khumalo prints. ‘ We are passionate about identifying and supporting South African product designers who appeal to us,’ says Nxumalo.

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 31


STUDIO VISIT AN AVERAGE DAY… starts between 9am and 9.30am. I check my

emails and go through briefs from our factory, which is working on a few prototypes. July to December is our busiest time. THE MOST EXCITING PROJECT SO FAR… was a project that we did for

Her Royal Highness in Swaziland. She bought a beautiful home, which we turned into a boutique hotel. THE MOST TREASURED ITEM IN THE STUDIO... is an Italian coffee table from Comfort Creations. It has a clean design with brass and glass details and none of the joints show. MY COLOUR OF THE MOMENT... is black. I love its masculinity and how

it works with anything. IF MONEY WERE NO OBJECT… I would buy an original print by Andy Warhol – he was so ahead of his time. I would also purchase an original Eames lounge chair. MY FAVOURITE CITY IS… Rabat, Morocco. There is something very

beautiful about its history. It has a bit of Paris in it and I enjoyed learning more about the calm and serenity of Muslim culture.

The wallpaper is Hertex

These gold paper bowls are from Swaziland

is the Four Seasons in Paris. I love how eclectic it is with an old-world gilded ceiling and crystal chandeliers.

MY FAVOURITE HOTEL…

MY FAVOURITE RESTAURANT… has to be Miss Ko. I love what

Philippe Starck has done with the interior. It has a Japanese feel and the food is amazing. 2018 WILL SEE MY BUSINESS PARTNER AND I... finalising the release of Hush La Maison, which will be homeware and furniture. We would also love to appeal to a younger clientele – people we can grow with and help grow their interior tastes from the time they leave university.

The macramé pendant light and Zawadi oak dining table are Hush Interiors. The pots are Gold Bottom

hushinteriors.co.za


this page The yellow Paris dining chair, blue Casa ottoman, macramĂŠ marine screen divider and Josephine glass dining table are all Hush Interiors THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 33


Vahl cushion R699, Country Road Spotlight series designed by ANDlight R12 600, Establishment

Facet in Argent from the Architectonique collection by Boussac R5 499/m, Mavromac

THIS PAGE GIVENCHY RTW SPRING 2018; OPPOSITE TALBOT RUNHOLF SPRING/SUMMER 2018 PARIS FASHION WEEK

Oud Noir Eau de Parfum R1 284, Charlotte Rhys

Flat Bar chandelier R3 495, Weylandts

Gueridon Bas table R23 200, Cube Gallery

Brimstone Butterfly Chair R3 895, Block & Chisel

Faro HAN LED Black wall lamp coat rack R3 898, Newport Lighting

Petite NOI R

Magical fabric in Phantom R353/m, U&G Fabrics

Plumb the depths of a dark mood and bring the inspiration you discover into the light. These sable staples prove that black is back

The Mali bag from R3 000, Thalia Strates

Black Magick mirror R12 000, Stay Evil Kids

081 Réaction Poétique by Jaime Hayón R31 423, True Design

Round clock in black R399, Native Décor


TREND ALERT Guild copper ceramic pot R495, La Grange Interiors

Solitude bangle R530, Matter of Fakt

Fontainebleau fabric in WE7191/099 by Soleil Blue R4 167/m, Home Fabrics

Butterfly stool R7 184, Cube Gallery

Unity stone choker R1 480, Matter of Fakt

TG 3.0 ring from R29 850, Kirsten Goss

Thank You Night Repair Treatment Oil R200 and Detox + Renew Body Balm R280, both WASS

S OF T

Industrial Factory-feel finishes transform when made into undulating, intricate and unexpected shapes, or are paired with supple leather, billowing cotton or silk

The Bell table R33 300, Paul Alexander Collective

Faro WHIZZ black-and-satin-gold portable lamp R2 596 and Floor stand accessory R2 276, both Newport Lighting

Indochine small swivel armchair by Charlotte Perriand for the Maestri Collection R59 970, True Design

Rio table by Charlotte Perriand for the Maestri Collection R193 950, True Design

Valeria black frosted small glass vase R440, La Grange Interiors Sonar fabric in Copper from the Tonic collection R730/m, Home Fabrics

Acoustic Fabric in White R251/m, Hertex

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 35


Porcelain tiles from R12/tile, Douglas Jones

Floral 2 ginger jar R3 000, SHF

Delft 3 RPDEL3300 rug R16 165, Voke Rugs

Bluebird Marble mug R210, soup bowl R280, side plate R260 and dinner plate R320, all Liam Mooney

131 Zh One Armchair by Zaha Hadid for Cassina R60 380, True Design

Majolica large jug R389, Mervyn Gers

DE L F T

Revival

THIS PAGE PAUL & JOE SPRING/SUMMER 2018 PARIS FASHION WEEK

TREND ALERT

True Dutch blue and glazed white are old hues newly reimagined in modern shades, shapes and designs Crystal Rose rug by Marcel Wanders for Moooi R53 479, Créma Design

The Cape Willow Pattern dinner plate R300, Chandler House

Long-neck Zig-Zag vase R1 200, Clementina

Delft Blue rug by Marcel Wanders for Moooi R62 292, Créma Design

Bakhoven bag in Blue and Natural R999, Chapel

Bel Ombre Ocean scatter cushion R1 150, SHF Delft 1 RPDEL rug R24 728, Voke Rugs

Heritage sideboard by Boco do Lobo from R300 960, Establishment


Well-known international reality TV show

is coming to SA.

12 DESIGNERS, 1 BIG BREAK! Do you have what it takes to be SA’s next hot fashion designer? Do you have a flair for design and the sewing skills to back it up? Do you dream of showing your work on the Project Runway catwalk?

We want YOU! To be a part of this iconic production, you will need to be a skilled designer and seamstress (able to design and make your own creations) and you will be required to submit a portfolio of designs as part of your entry. You will also need to be available during all stages of production and be willing to travel. Don’t miss our March 2018 issue for full entry details, dates, terms and conditions.

On sale on 26 February 2018.

Brought to you by

In association with

Ts&Cs apply. No under-18’s.


SHORTLIST 1. THE MBURU BAG

It’s our signature piece, because of the story behind it. The name of the bag is inspired by the Dakar youth’s hustling spirit. 2. PASHA DE CARTIER

My mother gifted me a Pasha de Cartier watch when I turned 25. I don’t wear it every day, but it’s definitely my most cherished accessory. x @dioufsarah

tongoro.com/shop

3. THE CONSTELLATION SERIES BY LINA IRIS VIKTOR

I love her work and the symbolism it holds; there are a lot of antique African references, from the Malian Dogon to Egyptian hieroglyphs, and the combination of black and gold really brings the work to life. 4. THE ALCHEMIST BY PAULO COELHO

I had an epiphany reading it years ago. I like books that give you goosebumps, and hope.

SAR AH DIOUF

5. NEW YORK

I love the energy, and the people. Every time I feel down or stuck, New York has this thing that fuels me up and makes me go harder.

The Dakar-based entrepreneur explores the stories and reasons behind her 10 favourite things Sarah Diouf, 28, is the owner of luxury fashion brand Tongoro, a label conceptualised and made in Africa. Diouf was born in Paris, but grew up between France and Côte d’Ivoire before moving to Dakar, where her atelier is based, last year. A near-fatal car accident marked the start of Diouf’s entrepreneurial journey. ‘It really changed my perspective on life,’ she says. ‘It left a scar on the right side of my face, which reminds me that the worst is in the past.’ In addition to quality craftsmanship, the story behind each Tongoro product adds to its value. ‘Mburu means “bread” in Wolof, a Senegalese dialect,’ explains Diouf. ‘Youth unemployment in Senegal is a real issue. We have all these young guys on the streets trying to sell everything they can to make a living, earning their “bread” every single day, because there aren’t enough jobs. To hustle is to keep going and preserve your dignity. The Mburu bag embodies the ability to wake up, get out and fight for your penny. It’s the hustler woman’s statement accessory.’

7. GALERIE CÉCILE FAKHOURY, ABIDJAN

The selection is one-of-a-kind. I always discover new African artists, and the space is wonderful. 8. ZAHA HADID

She was a phenomenal architect and woman. She left a tangible legacy behind. I have a lot of admiration and respect for her. 9. ONLINE SHOPPING

I don’t really shop in physical stores – I haven’t in years; I prefer online shopping. Maybe it’s the feeling of receiving a beautiful package – it feels like Christmas. 10. A JEEP WRANGLER

It’s bold, a bit boyish and it screams adventure.

Arcadia, 2014, Lina Iris Viktor

38 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE

Tongoro label Zaha Hadid’s Heydar Aliyev Center

PORTRAIT AND TONGORO IMAGES COURTESY OF SARAH DIOUF; GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/ALAMY

6. LA SULTANA, MARRAKECH

This hotel is a real piece of heaven. The setting, decor and food are truly amazing and it is such a unique, intimate experience staying there.


SHOPPING ENGESVIK FOR GEORG JENSEN DAMASK BY ANDREAS ENGESVIK ANDREASENGESVIK.NO

DE TAILS • DECOR • TRENDS • TIPS • PALE T TE • SURFACES

Sit up and take note of these beautiful seats (p44) and get a digital advantage with these gadgets designed for city living (p46). Surfaces can have endless appeal if you adhere to this showcase of trends, inspiration and expert advice on the topic of walls and floors (p50)


PLEASE BE SEATED

Armchairs, stools, seats, benches and pouffes – chairs come in a delightful variety of contours, colours and coverings PHOTOGRAPHY SARAH DE PINA PRODUCTION AND STYLING SANRI PIENAAR ASSISTANT ELLIETTE FRANSMAN

this page (from front left) Charles Ghost Stool by Philippe Stark for Kartell R3 068, True Design; Another Rug by All The Way To Paris R14 920, Créma Design; Wiener Stuhl by Gebrüeder Thonet R11 800, Generations; Ilot low stool by Amuary Poudray R7 520, Ligne Roset; B7-A1-2 Blue Violet Ray paint, Plascon; Stairs (to hire), Props of the Stars; Offcut Stool by Tom Dixon R4 015, Créma Design; Monkey resin standing lamp R7 200, Generations; Polygon large ceramic vase R2 608, Ligne Roset; Zig-Zag chair by Gerrit T Rietveld R36 465, True Design


ETCETERA

Sussex dining chair, R1 899, @home

Bowden chair, R4 000, SHF

Darado stool in Signal Blue, R1 250, Dokter and Misses

The Crimson bucket chair, R9 500, Liam Mooney

Nora chair by Bross, from R16 800, Casarredo

Ronin chair by La Chance, from R24 000, Establishment

Clifton chair, R2 632, Woodbender

Smith chair, R4 700, Studio 19

Betty chair in mustard velour, R7 999, sofacompany.com

The Lady armchair by Marco Zanuso, R94 565, True Design

The Mr Roper chair, R3 200, Dark Horse

Ketch chair by Bonaldo, from R10 800, Casarredo

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 45


TECH

URBAN ADVANTAGE These designs and gadgets seamlessly integrate technology into everyday city living vertical sign age ino OX Arp

XSTREET FURNITURE ARPINO’s OX and Urban Furniture collections, which launch in South Africa in February, combine art, technology, sustainability and contemporary design. A collaboration between Portuguese industrial designer Carlos Pereira and Angolan architectural studio CiproGroup, the 16-piece range includes lights and wayfinders, pergolas, multimedia kiosks, bollards, bike racks, bins and benches made from environmentally friendly and recyclable materials and which are made to be adaptable to urban environments. The ‘Office’, a solar powered cellphone-charging and Wi-Fi station allows the public to recharge and connect online, free of charge. arpino-design.com Arpino OX bike rack

X PHOTOBOOTH FUN The portable, pocket-sized HP Sprocket instant printer prints 5cm x 7,6cm smudge-proof, water-resistant and tear-resistant photos from your smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth. Its companion iOS and Android-compatible app allows you to customise pics pulled from your camera roll, Instagram or Facebook with filters, frames, emojis, stickers, text and more. It’s a fun accessory that could be used to great effect at parties or with friends for creating photos for the fridge. The Sprocket is rechargeable through a Micro USB and is available in white with rose gold accents and black with silver accents. It comes with a 10-pack of HP ZINK Photo Paper. hp.com

WAHEAD OF TIME Fossil’s Q range of hybrid smartwatches combine the brand’s classic analogue design with touchscreen technology and connectivity. The watches are Android- and iOSenabled and connect to your devices via Bluetooth and can be used to take photos (via your smartphone), keep you updated with your device’s notifications, track your health stats with connected fitness apps and more. The Q range comes in a variety of styles, with customisable straps and is battery-powered, meaning that it does not need to be charged. Ever. The watch will also automatically update time zones, making it a handy travel accessory. fossil.com

46 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE


For All Our Beauty Exclusive to

Kelso Colour from R99.95

Kelso Bath & Body from R39.95

Shop online at Edgars.co.za


Mastered Fibre Technology.


DECO PROMO

THE ART OF SOFT

SOFTOLOGY™ MASTERED FIBRE TECHNOLOGY Belgotex has mastered a new fibre technology to create the irresistibly tactile Softology™ carpet range The art of soft is defined in Belgotex’s cut-pile carpets, devoted to delivering toe-scrunching satisfaction. Softology is made using an increased number of finer filaments, like a feather, in a carpet pile created for those seeking the ultimate comfort in their plush pad. Softology is a broadloom carpet range that offers truly distinctive, luxurious colour with brand-new hues that deepen the trend appeal of soft floor solutions. Swoon, Dahlia, Suave and Regis break the staple grey and beige colourways so common in the carpet industry. Another first for Belgotex is that the range is available in three grades of pile height: 8mm, 11mm and 13mm, designed to suit each customer’s unique lifestyle needs. Softology is made with a superior high twist set for advanced memory performance and stainproof colour fastness. At Belgotex, we don’t just care about our customers, we care about the world they live in too. Softology is a product of waterless yarn manufacture so, while soft to the touch, it’s also gentle on the environment. Visit belgotexfloors.co.za  facebook.com/belgotex |  @belgotex Left (clockwise from top) Brunia, Faun, Suave, Dahlia, Downy, Abyss, Mink, Zephyr


Palazzo Fendi VIP Apartment in Rome by Dimore Studio photography by Andrea Ferrari, dimorestudio.eu


TOOLBOX

WALLS & FLOORS:

Surface allure From underfoot to overhead, find out how to make the best of a room’s surfaces with these expert opinions, styling tricks, paint trends, tiling tips, advice for wallpaper, rugs, flooring, and more

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 51


DECO TIP >>> Concrete floors with either a polished or matte finish pair particularly well with metal accents, especially brass. The combination creates a modernism-inspired mood that works well in bathrooms or spacious living rooms. Shenzhen Exclusive Penthouse by Dariel Studio, darielstudio.com

THE NEW CLASSICS The fills, finishes, tiles, floors and wallpapers that are emerging as go-to contemporary classics that read as both time-tested and ultra-modern – the perfect foundation for new ideas


TOOLBOX

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LIAM MOONEY LIAM MOONEY STUDIO liammooney.co.za Flooring material of the moment? I love using an exterior brick inside. Tips for tiling walls? Play with unusual tiling layouts. The tiles don’t need to be costly if you’ve got a creative pattern.

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PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

What is the paint colour for 2018? A dusty baby blue. Ideas for painting walls? Consider hiring a colour designer, like Freya Lincoln, to custom-design a colour for your walls. I quite like to paint the wall, mouldings, cornices and skirtings one colour.

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Groundbreaking material for walls? Padded fabric is a great idea to explore. What are the biggest trends in wallpapers? I like a natural fibre wallpaper that adds depth and warmth to a room but isn’t overwhelming. You get some amazing grasscloth wallpapers.

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How to create statement flooring? Stripes are bold and classic.

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Best value for money when choosing flooring? A concrete screed is never a bad idea. It’s hard-wearing, practical, cost-effective and a great starting point from which to layer. Concrete screed has more soul to it than a porcelain tile does. What to know when renovating walls and floors? Never paint an imperfect wall in gloss paint. Unless you’re going to plaster and burnish a wall three times over to achieve a perfect finish, the imperfections will just make it look cheap.

1. Precolour in Urban Grey and Oil Plus 2C in Super White from R67/20ml, Rubio Monocoat 2. Tunica Basket in Navy by Thibaut R3 651/roll, St Leger & Viney 3. Precolour in Black and Oil Plus 2C from R67/20ml, Rubio Monocoat 4. 100x100mm Sand Tile R10/ tile, Factory Tile Shop 5. Midnatt by Karolina Kroon for Sandberg R4 389/roll, Silk & Cotton Company 6. King Grey granite slab R3 306/m2, WOMAG 7. Bombato Preston Matt Glazed Ceramic Wall Decor tile R790/m2, Italtile 8. Sisal Jacquard Chunky Marble R980/ m2, Rebtex 9. Soho Indigo rug by Designers Guild R46 495, Home Fabrics 10. Moorland Fog tile from R2 451/linear m, Caesarstone 11. Blue Agata 20mm Granite Slab R7 980/ m2, WOMAG 12. Glass Mosaic in Dark Blue R54/sheet, Union Tiles 13. Belgium Linen wallpaper in Navy by Thibaut R3 494/roll, St Leger & Viney 14. Kissimmee in Green by Thibaut R4 669/roll, St Leger & Viney 15. Multicolour mosaic tile POA, Italtile

CEMCRETE RECENTLY INTRODUCED A SUPER-MATTE SEALING OPTION FOR CEMENT FLOORS. AS BEAUTIFUL AS POLISHED CONCRETE IS, THERE IS SOMETHING CAPTIVATING ABOUT A MATTE-FINISH CONCRETE WALL OR FLOOR. Nadine Prinsloo, Marketing Manager at Cemcrete cemcrete.co.za

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 53


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The big trends in walls are Eighties-inspired strong, earthy tones: sienna, terracotta and ochre, and handmade wallpaper. Floor trends include organic or recycled materials, terrazzo, laser prints and graphics, as well as carpets inspired by traditional flooring.

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PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA

– Mpho Vackier, Urbanative

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TOOLBOX

DECO TIP >>> One 2018 flooring trend to follow is hexagonal shapes in ceramics and carpet tiles, says FloorWorx marketing director Theresa Venter

RETRO GRADE From Sixties patterns to Seventies-inspired tones and materials, here’s the lowdown on retroinfluenced accents for all your living spaces Downtown Mexico by Cherem Serrano Architects, designhotels.com

SEAMLESS INTEGRATION BETWEEN INDOORS AND OUTDOORS IS A TREND WE PREDICT WILL MAKE HEADWAY IN 2018. THIS WOULD LEND ITSELF TO HAVING THE SAME COLOUR TILE INDOORS AND OUTDOORS. THE TERRACOTTA-LOOK TILE HAS A SMOOTH, MATTE SURFACE FOR INDOORS AND A ROUGH, SLIPRESISTANT FINISH FOR OUTDOORS. Tarina Mohan, Marketing Manager at Malls Tiles mallstiles.com

NICKY GOLDSTONE DESIGNS BY DAY designsbyday.co.za Ideas for a statement wall? Dark, moody walls create depth and focus. They also provide a punchy backdrop for accessorising with woods, foliage and lighter accents. Wallpaper: how do you mix things up? Wallpaper is a great feature in a room. It doesn’t just have to be applied to a wall. Add a printed wallpaper to cupboard door fronts. Groundbreaking material for walls? Leather or brass sheeting. Wall divider ideas? Create a shelving screen that functions as a bookshelf or feature, as well as a room divider. Flooring material of the moment? Terrazzo. Where to use carpet? Use carpet as a zoning tool, especially in open-plan areas to demarcate the lounge from the dining area, for example. How to create statement flooring? Add brass edging strips into your tile layouts to create detail. Must-have rug? Brabetz wool pile custom rug with an abstract print.

1. Carta Granite tile R569/m2, WOMAG 2. Glass Mosaic in Orange R32/sheet, Union Tiles 3. Spot On Waves Wallcovering in Teal by Kirkby Design R3 437/roll, ROMO South Africa 4. Zig-Zag Birds Wallcovering in Ink by Kirkby Design R3 437/roll, ROMO South Africa 5. Terra Rossa Terracotta tile R91/m2, Union Tiles 6. Verde Guatamala 20mm marble slab R3 306/m2, WOMAG 7. Glass Mosaic in Violet R46/sheet, Union Tiles 8. Domino wallpaper in Hyacinth by Turnell & Gigon R3 020/roll, St Leger & Viney 9. Slim Mos Toz Gran in Grey R40/sheet, Union Tiles 10. Mountain Grass carpet in Heavy Panama R600/m2, Rebtex

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 55


DECO TIP >>> Treat walls and floors like a backdrop, utilising a range of subtle hues that will best accentuate statement decor. Ashy woods, pastel tones and shades of cream through grey are a good starting point. Lemon Locke in London by Grzywinski+Pons, gp-arch.com

SUBTLE PALETTE The counterbalance to bold trends and feature walls and floors is a selection of muted tones and understated finishes that will act as a backdrop for statement furniture


TOOLBOX

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YANIV CHEN MASTER STUDIO

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Tips for tiling walls? Spanish architectural firm Arquitectura-g are doing some very interesting things here. They are using mosaic tiles in muted tones and tiling bathrooms from floor to ceiling. This is something I find quite interesting – one solid, muted tone throughout a space.

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What are the big trends in walls? Not only walls, but ceilings are being covered in graphic wallpaper. A few companies are getting these graphics right, such as Lemon.

Ideas for statement walls? Avoid them. Rather, paint the entire room the colour you had in mind – it’s a lot more impactful and really creates a mood.

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Flooring material of the moment? French oak. 5 6 1. Ashford Toiles wallpaper in Seasons Tolle AF2001 from R1 724/roll, Hertex 2. Dado Rails DR029 R110/3m, Dudley Mouldings 3. Gem Blocks wallcovering in Pearl by Kirkby Design R5 198/roll, ROMO South Africa 4. Kozmus 20mm granite slab R3 876/ m2, WOMAG 5. Polished Tundra Grey marble R2 190/m2, The Tile Gallery 6. Marble Mosaic tiles R66/sheet, Union Tiles 7. Dado Rails DR027 R110/3m, Dudley Mouldings 8. European FSC Oak Ona Prefinished Living Brushed Greymist flooring R918/ m2, Oggie Flooring 9. Dado Rails PM028 R91/3m, Dudley Mouldings 10. Medici Marble Wallpaper by York Wallcovering R2 510/roll, Halogen International

FLOOR COLOURS FOR 2018? TIMELESS, NATURALLOOKING WOOD, NEUTRALS AND CLASSIC BLACK. THE BIGGEST TREND IN FLOORING IS BETTER QUALITY VINYLS – RIGID CORE TECHNOLOGY HERRINGBONE LAMINATE IS QUICK AND EASY TO INSTALL. Shannon Tchetchik, Marketing Manager of FINFLOOR finfloor.co.za

How to create statement flooring? Using a patterned inlay in the same tile creates a nice demarcation of space. What are the biggest trends in wallpapers? Strong, Italian Sixties graphic colours. See: Dimore Studio. Best value for money when choosing your flooring? Engineered oak. Wall cladding: what should you get? I like travertine as wall cladding. It’s soft and textured. What to know when renovating walls and floors? Always get references from a number of people for the contractor or sub-contractor doing the work. It’s one thing to have a beautiful tile, but it could be ruined with bad workmanship. THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 57


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UNCOMMON TOUCH Clever mixing and matching produces distinctive looks reflective of a sophisticated eye. Consider coupling powdery-hued mosaic tiles and polished granite accents, or leather-look and patterned wallpapers. To create a unique look, go beyond expected pairings

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TOOLBOX

JANE WILSON COVET DESIGN covetdesign.co.za

BRIDGEVEST OFFICE IN ROTTERDAM BY STUDIO MOOST

What are the paint colours for 2018? Ochre is making a comeback and pastel colours will be big. Must-have rug? Overdyed traditional rugs are amazing. Wallpaper ideas: how do you mix things up? Apply wallpaper to larger areas instead of just a feature wall. It’s a great feature in a small bathroom to have all the walls wallpapered. Groundbreaking material for walls? There are some amazing products made out of bamboo, which can create really interesting finishes. Wood panelling: what to get and where to get it? BestWood Flooring have a great range. The lighter timbers are popular at the moment. Innovations in flooring? Wood-look tiles. What to know when renovating walls and floors? Choose something that is fairly neutral for the larger areas and bring pattern and interesting finishes into the smaller areas so as not to overwhelm the space. Tips for tiling walls? Make use of patterned feature tiles, or lay the tiles in an interesting way; for example, rectangular tiles laid in a herringbone formation.

DECO TIP >>> A distinctive look can still be subtle. Wooden floor tiles in different hues can be arranged in an interesting design, for example. Bridgevest Office in Rotterdam by Studio Tomorrow, studio-tomorrow.com

LARGER FORMAT TILES ARE IN HIGH DEMAND ABROAD AND THERE IS AN INCREASE IN AVAILABILITY OF THESE TILES IN SOUTH AFRICA. LAYING LARGER FORMAT TILES RESULTS IN FEWER GROUT LINES AND A MORE CONTINUOUS LOOK. Tarina Mohan, Marketing Manager at Malls Tiles mallstiles.com

1. Domino wallpaper in Opal Green by Turnell & Gigon R3 020/roll, St Leger & Viney 2. Peacock Green granite slab R2 850/m2, WOMAG 3. Sena wallpaper by Jim Thompson R1 663/roll, T&CO 4. Chaparrel wallpaper by Jim Thompson R1 894/roll, T&CO 5. Venice Red marble slab R6 840/m2, WOMAG 6. Electro Maze Wallcovering in Powder by Kirkby Design R3 437/roll, ROMO South Africa 7. Kissimmee wallpaper in Pink by Thibaut R4 669/roll, St Leger & Viney 8. Porcelain Mosaic tiles in Dusty Pink R20/sheet, Union Tiles 9. Lilac ceramic tile R20/tile, Factory Tile Shop 10. Giallo Veneziano granite tile R1 440/m2, Union Tiles

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HOMES

HOME MABONENG BY ELSA YOUNG

MABONENG • CAPE TOWN • PARIS • JOHANNESBURG

A swish penthouse in a hip Maboneng address is home to luxury and considered design (p62), while a charming home in De Waterkant reveals a different take on city living (p74). This Parisian apartment is a masterwork of reinvention (p84). In Johannesburg, an architect’s home is filled with reminders of different places and spaces (p94)


this page A slice of Joburg’s skyline to the north features Ponte Tower opposite Interior designer Aimee Henning makes her way down a staircase of black glass and steel. The pair of armchairs was an auction find


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DOWNTOWN AERIE This swish inner-city penthouse brings luxury and considered design to one of Joburg’s most of-the-moment urban locales TEXT MILA CREWE-BROWN PHOTOGRAPHS ELSA YOUNG STYLING SANRI PIENAAR

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this page The library on the south side of the apartment is a locus of calm. It features a set of cane loungers the owners bought at Worn Store in Australia. Each chair is draped with an Icelandic sheep skin from Weylandts opposite from left The cityscape stretches towards the CBD in the west. Aimee Henning sits in front of a poster print of Banksy’s Exit Through the Gift Shop


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ising 17 floors above the frenzied streets of New Doornfontein in the east of Johannesburg, Hallmark House is the much anticipated newcomer to the Maboneng portfolio of trailblazing developer Propertuity. With the eminent London-based architect Sir David Adjaye on board, the former diamond polishing factory turned CMT base, built in the early 1970s, is Maboneng’s bright new luxury offering. Situated high above the building’s boutique hotel, restaurant, underground jazz club and coffee shop, a double-storey penthouse surveys downtown Joburg’s famous and infamous landmarks from almost 70m up. ‘As a committed urbanist, I would find it difficult to live in Johannesburg’s gated suburbs,’ says the homeowner. He and his wife travel often and the lockup-and-go aspect of apartment living, as well as the building’s vibrant mixed-use lifestyle, appeals to them. Having bought a capacious white box within which to conjure a family home, the owners turned to interior designer Aimee Henning, whose string of sophisticated interiors and ‘rare ability to design in line with the broader context’ were a pull factor. Aimee was tasked with designing a space that was comfortable, well-planned and answers to the demands of family living. Since the unit was created from two neighbouring double-storey apartments, steel staircases fitted with black glass link its levels. Upstairs is dedicated to public life, with a light, bright open-plan layout, which includes a dining room, living room and streamlined kitchen with views to kill for. Downstairs, however, the pace is decidedly slower, with heavy piled carpeting, upholstery in velvet and silk and an almost reclusive cosiness to rooms like the library and cinema room, to which one can retreat. To celebrate its unique context within an urban jungle that refuses to rest, the apartment is open on the southern, western

and northern facades, by way of expansive glazed windows and doors and a number of balconies, cleverly designed by Adjaye to be set back, affording shelter from harsh sunlight. The interior manages a balancing act that’s sophisticated, and yet also bold and unrefined thanks to the building’s palpable industrial past. Raw concrete columns and ceilings and original screed floors keep company with marble counters, sheer linen drapes and noteworthy designer pieces. An inventory of prominent artists’ works lines the walls, including the likes of Marcus Neustetter, Enrico Daffonchio and Rodan Kane Hart. Aimee sourced and custom designed a number of pieces for the clients including all the joinery. Perhaps the most striking is the vast, walnut library unit, which brings warmth and purpose to a subtly toned room. Elsewhere, contemporary design rubs shoulders with vintage furniture, much of it bought on auction, from heavyweights such as Finn Juhl, Sigurd Ressell and Percival Lafer. In the plush main bedroom, Aimee opted for a retro aesthetic, hence the palette of smoky grey, gold and black paired with a show-stopping set of Worn Store loungers, whose curved cane and webbed rattan frames look right at home. From their lofty position, the owners can see the Ponte City Apartments, Sentech Tower, Ellis Park stadium, and the MetroRail Line carving its daily route past the stadium. In amongst them, murals such as Belgian street artist ROA’s slumbering animals and Freddie Sam’s iconic depiction of a shadow-boxing Mandela all form part of the vibrant city canvas laid out before them. In contrast to the chaos of a day in the city, early morning, when all is quiet and the light is gentle with a pinkish filter, is the homeowners’ favourite time of day to be here. It’s this contrast that’s not unlike the refined sophistication of their home against the grind of the metropolis that frames it. Q Aimee Henning 082 877 1777 THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 65


this page The living room shows off a selection of works by the owners’ favourite artists, among them Marcus Neustetter, Enricho Daffonchio and Rodan Kane Hart. The red armchairs are original Percival Lafer designs, the white set and side table are by Finn Juhl and the coffee table is one of Aimee’s own designs. The wool rug is from Argentina


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As a committed urbanist, I would find it difficult to live in Johannesburg’s gated suburbs

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HOME JOHANNESBURG

The interior manages a balancing act that’s sophisticated, and yet also bold and unrefined thanks to the building’s palpable industrial past

this page The kitchen barstools are Tulip chairs from Guideline MNF; the Falcon chair is by Sigurd Ressell. The painting is by Enrico Daffonchio opposite (clockwise from top) The kitchen is understated, with countertops in Volakas marble. The walnut library unit doubles as a display case. The hanging chair on the balcony was designed by Aimee in collaboration with Pichulik. The private lounge has a more subdued palette and features a modular sofa and walnut unit, designed by Aimee THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 69


this page The main bedroom has a retro feel and features a panelled backboard in silk by Kelly Wearstler, gold Flowerpot table lamps from CrÊma Design, black cane loungers from Worn tore, a Tonic coffee table and vessels by ceramicist Madoda Fani opposite In the guest bathroom, illustrator Laura Berger’s Falling design has been made into wallpaper. Smoky marble and brass faucets complete the moody aesthetic


HOME JOHANNESBURG

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Early morning, when all is quiet and the light is gentle with a pinkish filter, is the homeowners’ favourite time of day to be here


HOME JOHANNESBURG this page The cinema room is all about escaping; burgundy Easy Velvets from Mavromac and aubergine walls mingle to lavish effect. Above the sofa is an artwork by Fred Clarke opposite The scallop bed was designed by Aimee and is covered in a velvet from ROMO South Africa; the bedside tables were an auction purchase; on top of them are a set of Flowerpot table lamps

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HOME CAPE TOWN

MOOD Creative Director of The Guild Group Tammy Tinker and her fiancé, wine merchant Nicolò Pudel, own a charming home in De Waterkant. It’s an ongoing creative adventure, setting the tone for stylish city living TEXT JULIA FREEMANTLE PHOTOGRAPHS HENRIQUE WILDING/PERFECT HIDEAWAYS

this page The beautifully paved firepit area, sheltered and surrounded by trees, is the ideal post-dinner party nightcap spot, or just a great place to read a book. Tammy and Nicolò grow their vegetables in the raised beds around the perimeter THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 75


this page The scene-stealing pendant light by Southern Guild, and a photograph by Daniel Naude are all the adornment the spacious kitchen needs opposite (from left) The verandah looks out over the neighbourhood and harbour beyond. Tammy’s role as creative director at The Guild Group sees her putting her love of fashion, design and the creative arts into fostering local talent and furthering South Africa’s profile as a high-art and collectable design destination


HOME CAPE TOWN

t’s not often that buyers look at one house, and one house only, so sure are they that it’s the one. But for Tammy Tinker and her fiancé, Nicolò Pudel, a property in the desirable suburb of De Waterkant in Cape Town was the first and last option they looked at before deciding to buy it. ‘It was literally our dream home,’ says Tammy. The period house is situated in a quiet cul-de-sac in an area of cobbled streets, terrace houses and characterful cafés. ‘We love city living, walking to our local coffee shop, walking to work, and the culture in De Waterkant,’ says Tammy. Tammy and Nicolò have lived in their home for just over two years. Since their first night in an empty house in early 2015, sleeping on a mattress, it’s gradually been filled with local artwork, books and trinkets bought on trips. There is a sense that the spaces reflect the couple’s story rather than a specific style strategy. From a DIY bookshelf on a wall, to a charming carved tiger from Ghana, the pieces in this home are signposts in a journey. ‘We love beautiful things and unique pieces. We have a rule that we only buy things together, so everything in the house has been chosen by both of us, with a lot of thought. It’s taken a while, but we’re gradually making our house a home,’ Tammy explains. Cleverly renovated over time, the home is compact, but feels spacious. An open-plan central living area is a modification that has made all the difference, while beautiful light-filled rooms and a verandah give it a holiday feel year-round. It’s perfect for the couple who are avid travellers – they recently went on a road trip through the United States, staying at lighthouses and exploring redwood forests. But, when they’re at home, it’s all about simple pleasures – hosting friends, gardening, walking the dogs

and long lie-ins. ‘We really enjoy going on adventures together, but if we are at home on the weekend we usually have a lazy breakfast on the verandah and then take the dogs for a walk on the mountain,’ says Tammy. Rosie the Jack Russell and Bruno the Vizsla are central to all activities, so much so that Nicolò’s mother commissioned a pair of pet portraits, something that comes across as cool rather than kitsch in this stylish couple’s home. A former fashion editor, Tammy now works for The Guild Group. Her great taste is evident in her home and a testament to the connections she’s made along the way. Being consummate socialites, the couple have a penchant for regular dinner parties and the spacious, but intimate feel of the home is perfect for this. The outdoor spaces are particularly ideal for long lunches under the vines or drinking around the outdoor fire. A lot of the couple’s downtime revolves around planning for long, festive meals. ‘We love to entertain, so on a Saturday we’ll usually make a trip to Oranjezicht city farm for the week’s ingredients, followed by a feast at home with friends,’ says Tammy. This usually rolls on to a big Sunday roast with the family. The wine is always excellent – Nicolò’s business, Port2Port, is a curated online wine store. The selection ranges from renowned South African and choice international wines to special releases and award-winning vintages, and even artisanal spirits – to encourage exploration and cater to an enthusiastic and discerning palette. No dinner party is ever the same as Tammy and Nicolò enjoy trying new things. ‘We usually cook together and serve together. But we don’t often repeat wine or dishes,’ explains Tammy. For this couple, their mutual interest in new places and flavours will see their home evolving and growing along with their story. Q Ormonde House, perfecthideaways.co.za THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 77


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There is a sense that the spaces reflect the couple’s story rather than a specific style strategy


HOME CAPE TOWN

this page Glossy black metro tiles and white screed floors make a contemporary statement in the spacious kitchen. A vine-covered pergola shades the veranda leading off the living area by way of stacking French doors. For one week of the year, the wisteria turns the trellis into a fragrant, mauve roof opposite A compact plunge pool is lined on one side with weather-faded decking and a well-cultivated hedge

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HOME CAPE TOWN this page The living room has been cleverly designed so that a partial wall keeps the spaces slightly separate. A fireplace in the central wall warms both lounge and kitchen areas opposite Folding shutters add character and filter light. They open onto the verandah

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We both love beautiful things and unique pieces. Everything in the house has been chosen by both of us, with a lot of thought


HOME CAPE TOWN

this page (from left) Tammy’s dressing room houses beautiful pieces, collected during her years working in fashion. Louvred wooden doors divide the bedroom from the bathroom and dressing room beyond and are a striking feature in the space opposite Tammy and Nicolò added tropical palm-print wallpaper in the en-suite dressing and bathroom areas

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this page The Don Juan sofas are from Christian Liaigre; the black bronze Aes coffee table is by Barber & Osgerby for Hermès Maison; the Jardin rug is by India Mahdavi for Cogolin and the armchairs are by Pierre Jeanneret. The painting above the fireplace, titled Style Wars 2014, is by Stepan Krasnov opposite Charlotte Macaux Perelman in the living room. The framed photograph is by Philip Lorca di Corcia


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REIMAGINE THAT

Interior designer Charlotte Macaux Perelman is known for transforming spaces. The remodelling of this Parisian apartment is a masterwork in reinvention TEXT IAN PHILLIPS PHOTOGRAPHS STEPHAN JULLIARD STYLING SARAH DE BEAUMONT THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 85


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There’s always a soul, something to preserve. I like to take inspiration from what I find

this page The framed photographs on the oak partitions are by Philip Lorca di Corcia. The Don Juan sofas are from Christian Liaigre and the cushions are from Elitis. The orange lacquer box was designed by Pierre Charpin for Hermès Maison and the multicoloured Shuffle MH1 occasional table is by Mia Hamborg for &Tradition THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 87


this page The dining chairs are by Arne Jacobsen. The Marseilles lights are by Le Corbusier, reinterpreted by Cassina. The carafe on the table is by Tom Dixon and the photograph, titled Les Lions, is by Jean-Pierre Khazem. The dining table and shelving are both custom-made


HOME PARIS

rench interior designer Charlotte Macaux Perelman normally likes to respect the history of the spaces she transforms. ‘There’s always a soul, something to preserve,’ she explains. ‘I like to take inspiration from what I find.’ There is, however, an exception to every rule and what interested her in this 230m2 apartment, which overlooks Paris’s Parc Monceau, was precisely the fact that there was nothing to salvage. ‘It was so contorted that I was certain everything had to be demolished,’ she recalls. The former owner of the apartment had lived in it for 42 years and had redecorated different rooms at different times, each in the tastes and fashions of the specific period. ‘It was all over the place stylistically, a real hotchpotch,’ remarks Macaux Perelman. In the master bedroom, there was a Seventies-style mezzanine with a large free-form brown leather sofa and huge silver balls. The entry hall was a homage to the Memphis design movement of the Eighties, with a black marble triangle in the middle of the floor and an Egyptian bust on a pedestal. The sitting room, meanwhile, was covered with coffered panelling and there were long, narrow corridors with trapdoors in the ceilings and retractable ladders that dropped down to give access to a cramped second level. For Macaux Perelman, the project represented the biggest demolition job she has ever carried out. ‘Nothing was left in place,’ she asserts. ‘Not a floor, not a wall, not a ceiling.’ Or rather, almost nothing: during the work, a ceiling with majestic mouldings was uncovered in the living room after the removal of simple plaster panels, which had concealed it for decades. ‘We didn’t expect to find anything like that,’ she says. Although it was painted brown and covered with dirt, Macaux Perelman decided to celebrate it and to modify her original plan, which had been for a number of smaller reception rooms. In their place, she created a large, open living space, tailored specifically to the ceiling’s dimensions. The sitting area at one end is separated from the graphic sculptural kitchen at the other by a pair of oak shelving units, which are something of a technical marvel. Each incorporates a door that slides back and forth without the aid of a rail. ‘There is an incredibly complex mechanism hidden inside,’ she points out. ‘There are few craftsmen who could have created them.’ For the past 20 years, Macaux Perelman has developed a career on both sides of the Atlantic. Her style is quite recognisable. She favours white walls, clean lines, a rigorous architectural approach and natural materials, especially oak and marble. ‘It has a classicism I like,’ she says of the latter. ‘She is the queen of details, which are often imperceptible but make all the difference,’ adds the owner of this apartment. ‘There is a sense of perfection in everything she does.’ Both the owner and her husband are firm fans of art. He is the grandson of an antique dealer; she formerly worked in the legal department of a well-known art foundation. She still clearly remembers visiting Jeff Koons’s Manhattan studio in the course of her job. For Macaux Perelman, the works the couple have in their apartment bring a form of fantasy to the space. They include photos by Vik Muniz and Philip Lorca di Corcia in the living room, a Bernard Frize painting in the entry hall and two large, colourful canvases by the Russian artist Stepan Krasnov in the style of Roy Lichtenstein that ‘impart vitality and a good spirit’, according to the owners. In contrast, many of the furnishings are typified by a certain restraint. They include a pair of Christian Liaigre sofas and numerous pieces from the Hermès Maison collections. Among them are the bronze Aes coffee table designed by Barber Osgerby and a couple of Rafael Moneo’s Oria chairs. There is one space, however, where Macaux Perelman decided to let loose – the guest powder room, where the walls are covered in brightly coloured, angular geometric motifs. ‘I always allow myself a bit of freedom in decorating toilets,’ she says. ‘It’s somewhere you can have a bit of fun aesthetically.’ The intervention may be bold, but the owners would have it no other way. ‘We loved the idea of entering a completely different world,’ they note. ‘Our guests always come out with a little smile of wonder on their faces.’ Q

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I favour white walls, clean lines, a rigorous architectural approach and natural materials


HOME PARIS

this page The walls in the bedroom are covered in linen. The pillow cases and blanket are from Society Limonata; the chequered throw is from Hermès Maison. The vintage wall lights were designed by Robert Mathieu and bought at a Paris flea market; the pink lamp is from Haos. The photograph above the bed is by David Levinthal THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 91


HOME PARIS

The artworks in the apartment bring a form of fantasy to the space

this page The master bathroom is fitted with Carrara marble. The Butterfly stool is by Sori Yanagi and the screenprints are by Takashi Murakami opposite (clockwise from left) The elephant in the owners’ young son’s bedroom is by Charles & Ray Eames; the custom countertop is made from Corian; the Oria chair is by Rafael Moneo for Hermès Maison; the teak and cane bench is by Pierre Jeanneret. The portrait of Picasso was taken by André Villers and the drawing is by Gérard Garouste

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this page Professor Lesley Lokko in her apartment, which is on the first floor of a historic building in Braamfontein opposite This enclosed space was originally a patio. Lokko has a collection of photographic prints by various artists, including British-Asian photographer Inzajeano Latif


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Architect and academic Professor Lesley Lokko’s apartment is filled with furniture and mementos that have travelled with her through different cities, ending up here, in a building on the corner of one of Braamfontein’s most vibrant strips TEXT NTOMBENHLE SHEZI PHOTOGRAPHS SARAH DE PINA STYLING SANRI PIENAAR

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this page (clockwise from top left) The rooftop garden; Lokko likes a space that is not fussy. The built-in seating looks onto the street; the side table is from La Grange Interiors opposite The view on one side of the apartment sweeps over the Mandela Bridge


HOME JOHANNESBURG

he sounds of the trains running from early morning to late evening, the neon lights that bounce off billboards, and the Mandela Bridge that is illuminated in different colours at night have become synonymous with Braamfontein. This is the part of the city that architect and Head of the Graduate School of Architecture at the University of Johannesburg, Professor Lesley Lokko, calls home. Lokko, who has lived in several cities, including Accra, Los Angeles and London, has two very distinct careers: one as an architect and the other as the writer of sex-and-shopping novels. Originally from Ghana, she studied at the Bartlett School of Architecture at London’s University College. ‘I left architecture for the first time because the issues that I was interested in – issues of race, identity and gender – were quite marginal back then. I decided to find another medium to speak about those things. It just so happens that I found a good agent and publisher and 11 books later, here I am.’ Lokko spent 18 months in Namibia and South Africa in the early Nineties and has been coming back to South Africa for the past 20 years. This is the second time she has called Johannesburg home and this time around, she came back to take up a professorship in 2014. ‘I think this was a good moment to return. The students I have at the graduate school are the smartest I have taught and the upsurge in student activism around decolonisation and transformation is really interesting,’ she says. The magnitude of the apartment is what sold the space to her. ‘To find an apartment of this scale in London or Accra is near impossible,’ she notes. Her apartment has had several owners and was at one point an urban cinema. The original building, like most buildings in the city, was an office block. With only eight floors, the building houses a close-knit community of artists, filmmakers and architects. ‘Africa is the world’s youngest continent, so there’s a lot of innovation, use of old materials and a huge amount of energy,’ she says of the building innovation in African cities. Lokko’s home is uncluttered. ‘A lot of people expect architects to be outrageous, but I have quite a complex job and stressful life, so it is important for me that I get back here and don’t have to think about anything,’ she says, describing her design taste as safe and ‘girly’. Most of the items she owns, like the two long tables surrounded by a mix of chairs from Weylandts, have travelled around the world with her. The built-in closets and bookshelves were made by an Irish carpenter. Light streams through the wide windows and a mix of chandelier and pendant lights from @home are fixed to the high ceilings. Lokko’s home in Accra, to which she often returns, has a very similar interior. Other small collectables in her home in Braamfontein include quirky calendars picked up on the streets of Accra, fertility dolls given to her by her grandmother and stovetop coffee pots. A little cupboard that she bought in London almost 20 years ago houses eclectic Royal Albert china cups. The bedroom is where Lokko likes to zone out. The one wall is painted black and is complemented by a moody image shot by BritishAsian photographer Inzajeano Latif. Two enlarged images of Johannesburg, shot from Ponte Tower by German photographer Carolina Schmidt, have been with her everywhere she’s lived. In her reading corner, you will find two vintage sofas, and images of Namibia by French filmmaker Delphine de Blic. This corner of the apartment gets the most warmth. A picture of herself and Prince Charles sits among sentimental images of her family. ‘My father, a Ghanaian who was a staunch independence person, had that image reprinted several times and displayed in almost every room of my parents’ house in Accra,’ she laughs. There are still some things Lokko would like to do to the space; for example, redoing the bathrooms and cultivating an outdoor garden. ‘I had to let go of the fact that the apartment has skirting boards, as opposed to concrete floors. Most of my previous apartments have had concrete floors. I would have also preferred more exposed brickwork,’ she says. ‘There is something about the materiality of things that I love.’ Q THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 97


this page The dining area is anchored by a long table surrounded by multiple chairs from Weylandts. Lokko loves to entertain. This is the first thing that people see when walking into the apartment and it helps magnify the size of the space. The vase on the table is from Egg Designs


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The sounds of the trains, the neon lights that bounce off billboards, and the Mandela Bridge have become synonymous with Braamfontein

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this page The spacious open-plan living area opposite (clockwise from top left) Some of Lokko’s collectables can be found in the kitchen, including Ghanaian fertility dolls, wooden bowls and stovetop coffee pots. Custom-made bookshelves help divide the apartment. Lokko has a large collection of books that have travelled with her around the world. The couches in the spacious living room have also travelled with Lokko from home to home

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Africa is the world’s youngest continent, so there’s a lot of innovation, use of old materials and a huge amount of energy


HOME JOHANNESBURG

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this page (clockwise from top left) Two vintage chairs and a carpet bought years ago in London decorate the reading corner; a framed Ghanaian calendar stands on the windowsill. Lokko‘s bathroom is filled with a collection of her favourite fragrances and cosmetics; the black mosaic tiles make a statement in the guest bathroom. The vase and towel are from Weylandts. Another view of the main bathroom opposite Original brickwork is framed by a window. The cushion on the bed is from Egg Designs


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To find an apartment of this scale in London or Accra is near impossible THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 103


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1. (from left) Bianco Alice marble R699/m, WOMAG; The Classic in Off-White tiles R2 050/box, Op Design; Accord in Flame fabric R435/m, Hertex 2. Tiro pourer R139, Country Road 3. Tiro bowl (set of 4) R399, Country Road 4. Nicci Steel chair excl. fabric R32 599, Okha 5. Rangee rug from R80 43 Roche Bobois 6. Ring table lamp R1 295, Weylandts 7. Oak Voe TV unit with tattoo engraved slidin door and drawers on mild steel legs R22 990, LIM 8. Maya end table from R25 560, Roche Bobois 9. Dixie footrest R5 199, sofacompany.com 10. Velvet scatter cushion R130, MRP Home 11. Mondo coffee table from R35 010, Okha 104 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE


HOME CAPE TOWN

shop the look . 1

Create a viridescent retreat in an urban environment with natureinspired patterns and materials

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1. (from left) Nottingham in Amazaque vinyl flooring from R597/m2, Belgotex Super White ceramic tile R120/sheet, Douglas Jones Bali Leaves AT 7050 wallpaper R2 098/roll, Hertex 2. (clockwise from left) Pito cushion R499, Woolworths; Superweave Carpet in Sago from R223/m2, Belgotex; Equatorial aloe cushion R1 000, SHF 3. Sprayed cabinet with two doors on solid raw oak R9 250, LIM 4. Colorado coffee table R8 995, Block & Chisel 5. Metal frame leaning mirror R3 599, @home 6. Fish Scale metal stool R6 995, Weylandts 7. Reader brass table lamp R2 995, Weylandts 8. Glass tumbler with raised design R90, Zara Home 9. Round shiny placemat R239, Zara Home 10. Tray with handles R829, Zara Home

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HOME PARIS

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Take a subjective stance and choose chic pieces that spark your interest in their unique design

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1. (from left) La Traviata Teal Alhambra range fabric R477/m, St Leger & Viney; White storm polished silestone quartz R3 420/m², WOMAG; Sofia Matelasse col Dijon fabric R1 108/m², St Leger & Viney 2. Small stoneware vase R149, H&M Home 3. Black epoxy coated galvanised mild steel tube frame table and shelf R8 890, LIM 4. Stained Glass rug from R44 910, Roche Bobois 5. Vilmar three-seater cool grey couch R16 999, sofacompany.com 6. Magical Peacock scatter cushion R550, SHF 7. Molecule 8 light in gunmetal R14 500, Hoi P’loy 8. Atela clock R899, Country Road 9. Paris paname magazine rack from R25 690, Roche Bobois 10. Afternoon lounge chair by Menu from R20 500, Establishment 108 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE


DECO PROMO

ZODWA KUMALO: SHOP HER STORY This summer, Zodwa Kumalo partnered with Visa Checkout to redecorate her new home Moving into a new apartment can be overwhelming, especially if you have limited time to shop around for your new space. Zodwa took on the challenge to prepare for a flat-warming for her new home and redecorate the living room for the occasion, all in one week. Her biggest concern? Time. The ideal situation would’ve involved Zodwa going on a bargain shopping spree with her two daughters who share her space, but the luxury of time is a rare commodity, especially for a super career mom like her. During the challenge, she spent her downtime relaxing and pinning her favourite spaces on a Pinterest mood board she’d created called ’Wherever I lay my hat‘ as she explored her first online-only decor expedition. Zodwa shared the reluctance of many consumers to shop online – the fear of fraud or being bounced off merchant sites being her biggest stumbling blocks to a happy shopping experience. But, to her surprise, the experience turned out to be smoother, more secure and user-friendly once she registered with Visa Checkout. After swiftly entering her card details, Zodwa was able to screen shop through a selection of over 300 000 registered merchants on the app, which finally saw her bringing her Pinterest mood board to life. Register for Visa Checkout on https://secure. checkout.visa.com/createAccount to take back your weekends and fulfil your own shopping challenge.


HOME JOHANNESBURG

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Achieve a sophisticated, muted modernism with contemporary decor shapes and finishes

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1. (from left) Drama in Pumice fabric R365/m, Ponti in Mustard fabric R460/m, both Hertex; Smokey grey (antique finish) granite R699/m², WOMAG 2. Punto chair in leather R5 995, Weylandts 3. Shaun rug R75 480, Roche Bobois 4. Track desk R60 700, Roche Bobois 5. Stilted tall brass-plated side table with beaten top R1 999, @home 6. Ustra knit cushion R499, Country Road 7. Jacquard colour block floor cushion R300, MRP Home 8. Black Jack lamp R2 400, The Artisan 9. Big Easy sofa from R56 887, Okha 10. Earth oval serving platter R495, Weylandts 11. Alana vase R380, Woolworths 12. Earth pitcher R495, Weylandts 110 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE


BRUTEST NE Grecian Marble

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LIVING THE WILLASTON BAR AT THE SILO HOTEL

TR AVEL • FOOD • DRINKS • GARDENS • PEOPLE

Beijing is the new it destination (p114), while Muldersdrift is serene on the outskirts of Johannesburg (p118). Three chefs share their recipes for the Littlegig 24-hour Festival (p120), and The Yard is a hit in the Silo district (p123). DECO features two ultra-urban hotels (p124), Gregor Jenkin’s iconic decor (p126) and ideas for greening a city space (p128)


BEING IN BEIJING Discover the visually exciting push-pull between old and new in the Chinese capital and experience a lively cultural scene in the making TEXT FILIPPO ROMEO AND PIERA BELLONI PHOTOGRAPHS BORIS SHIU CONTRIBUTIONS FRANCESCA BENEDETTO

Hotel Conrad, designed by Ma Yansong/MAD


TRAVEL

Inside Green T House, a tea house redesigned in a contemporary style by musician and tea connoisseur JinR

Ai Weiwei exhibition at Galleria Continua Mesh bar redesigned by Neri&Hu

HOSPITALIT Y AND FOOD Beijing’s functional, but modest hotels have made way for those with contemporary comforts – top-quality linen, wellness centres, swimming pools and architectural design. In the centre of Beijing, close to the Forbidden City, The Temple is a hotel and restaurant situated in the chambers of an ancient house of worship, while the ultramodern Conrad hotel (conrad.hilton.com/Beijing), designed by Ma Yansong/ MAD, is wrapped in a network of organic forms. Even the cuisine is a product of the city’s transformation. No other place in China can be regarded as more of a culinary hotspot than Beijing. Classic dishes such as ravioli with radicchio and spicy Sichuan spaghetti can be found here, as well as the best sushi and specialities from various provinces, from dim sum to Uighur mutton. Traditional tea houses have reduced in number but those that remain, such as the modern Green T House (green-t-house. com), which is also a restaurant and spa, have retained their excellence. New bars and cafés are frequented by a younger set. Inside Opposite House (theoppositehouse.com), a hotel designed by Kengo Kuma, is Mesh, an ultra-cool lounge bar newly redesigned by Neri&Hu. Club 8MM is an event venue with a creative kitchen helmed by chef Wallace Liu. Capital M (m-restaurantgroup.com/ capitalm) serves drinks and has an international menu, with a terrace that boasts an incredible view of Tiananmen Square. THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 115


FASHION AND DESIGN SHOPPING Many young local design talents travel abroad to hone their skills before returning to China with experience to take on a leading role in both the entrepreneurial and creative scenes. A new generation of fashion designers have found Beijing to be a reference point for exploring fusion, developing new personal styles and establishing dedicated boutiques. There is no shortage of concept stores, such as Triple Major in the Dashilan district, where independent fashion labels are brought together from all over the world. This neighbourhood, one of the oldest, is following a different path from other areas that have survived widespread demolitions, thanks to architects and designers who promote sustainable gentrification. In Dongcheng, visit Lost & Found for great vintage finds. lostandfound.cn

Beatrice Leanza, Creative Director of Beijing Design Week

Beijing plays opposites, alternating small craft workshops and neon-lit mega stores housing luxury brands. One example is Shang Xia of the Hermès group, a leading international brand store designed by Kengo Kuma and located in the China World Mall. shang-xia.com/space Minsheng Art Museum

CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF BEIJING DESIGN WEEK (BJDW) BEATRICE LEANZA SPEAKS ABOUT THE CITY What is the goal of BJDW? Over the past four years, the goal has been to give life to a place of critical encounter, creating a space for design in the social, economic and cultural scenes of contemporary China. This can be achieved by investing in its ability to evaluate common goals and solutions for the urban future of Beijing. What novelties were introduced this season? BJDW has been introduced into the lesser-known areas of the city or emerging neighbourhoods, regardless of whether they are artistic villages, creative or commercial areas. We are working with alternative areas like the hutong historical district of Baitasi, to broaden the debate on whether or not the city is liveable. At the same time, we are turning our attention to new public spaces such as Indigo and Parkview Green, exclusive shopping destinations that are popular with consumers of all generations. What sets BJDW apart from other current events in the East? It attempts to create a sustainable methodology that goes beyond enthusiasm for the latest design trends and purely commercial operations. bjdw.org

Shang Xia Maison designed by Kengo Kuma


TRAVEL The first level exhibition gallery of the Minsheng Art Museum designed by Studio Pei-Zhu. In the foreground is a work by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone

Designer Lulu Li

Silky Concrete by Laboratory for Creative Design, installed at Beijing Design Week

ART & ARCHITECTURE After years of intense urbanisation in Beijing, architects and designers are looking at smaller scales and seeking intervention strategies to offer benefits and inspiration to communities. Contrasts are evident in the juxtaposition of ultra-modern suburban buildings and small museums; historic temples and the exhibitions of the Dashanzi 798 Art District. Do not miss out on the new Minsheng Art Museum (minshengart.com) designed by Pei Zhu, and the Ullens Centre for Contemporary Art (ucca.org.cn/en). On the periphery beyond 5th Ring Road, view experimental art in less modish spaces. Designed by artist and architect Ai Weiwei, the Three Shadows Photography Art Centre (threeshadows.cn) is the first Chinese photography gallery where works that are a direct expression of contemporary culture can be seen. If progress in art dominated the first decade of the Chinese global century, the second has opened the country up to a multidisciplinary fusion. Beijing is the focus of a unique historical eclecticism. Here, traces of the past and great transformations that are the result of pure contemporariness continue to co-exist.

Hotel Conrad lounge

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Nirox Sculpture Park

WEEKEND GETAWAY: MULDERSDRIFT Enter the historic home of all humanity located in the belt between urban Gauteng and its rural surrounds TEXT ZANELE MAKHUBO

Set in a transitionary zone between urban and rural on a band of dolomite rock, Muldersdrift claims its space in Gauteng as perhaps the most serene 4,66km2. A brief 30-minute drive west of Johannesburg’s city centre towards Muldersdrift guarantees a mindful escape, as you watch the cityscape disappearing in your rear-view mirror. Stretches of grassland unfold and sporadic hills are interjected by the Crocodile River, which makes for a stunning view when floating above in a hot-air balloon. Muldersdrift easily replenishes a traveller’s energy and stimulates the curious mind, offering a vast array of sights, including trout farms, fossil sites and, more famously, the neighbouring Sterkfontein Caves. With a selection of impressive restaurants and thrilling experiences, Muldersdrift continues to prove itself as more than just the location of one of South Africa’s most monumental excavations, holding within its grasp the entire history of humanity as we know it.


GETAWAY

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES/GALLO IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/ALAMY

STAY Misty Hills Country Hotel Nestled in the serenity of the Zwartkops Mountains, the stone-walled and thatched-roof rooms give the hotel a character that distinguishes it as a space of both comfort and luxury. On display in each of the modern rooms are works of African-inspired art and handcrafted furniture. The hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spa, the perfect place to relax, offers various treatments including reflexology, aromatherapy and skin treatments. mistyhills.co.za

Sterkfontein Caves Oevermeer Bistro

VISIT Nirox Foundation Sculpture Park This extraordinary park forms part of the nature reserve of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site. The Nirox foundation offers a residency to artists from around the world. The Winter Sculpture Fair, which takes place every year in May, is a major attraction, drawing a huge crowd and providing the best in food, wine and art. Jazz in the Cradle, set in the beautiful Nirox amphitheatre, is a biannual music festival that celebrates the music of both legendary and contemporary jazz artists. niroxarts.com Ngwenya Country Market The market is not to be missed if you are in search of the the perfect countryside picnic with music and activities for the family. Expect to see crafts such as glass blowing; buy fresh produce and stroll through the market while an ambient and vibrant live music performance takes place. facebook.com/ ngwenyaglassvillage Kloofendal Nature Reserve In keeping with the historical theme of the Kromdraai area, the Kloofendal Nature Reserve is located on the edge of the first gold mine in the district, yet has impressively maintained and conserved the biodiversity in the area. Take a walk on the reserveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trails while taking in the views from its natural dam and bird sanctuary. jhbcityparks.com EAT Oevermeer Bistro The view of the sweeping mountains is one that will take your breath away when visiting the Oevermeer Bistro at Kloofzicht Lodge, situated on a private reserve. Choose from an impressive selection of their craft beers and delectable pizzas cooked in a wood-fire oven. oevermeerbistro.co.za Roots This award-winning fine dining restaurant is a classic that uses locally grown produce in the preparation of its uniquely South African cuisine. Each meal can be enjoyed alongside an exquisite local wine pairing. The restaurant can be found at the Forum Homini Hotel, on a game estate. Bookings are essential. forumhomini.com

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FESTIVAL FARE At Littlegig 24-hour Festival in February, top female chefs and winemakers will join forces to create a paired food and wine tasting experience. Here, the three chefs, Ash Heeger, Jenny Ward and Vanie Padayachee, share their recipes for the event. TEXT LITTLEGIG PHOTOGRAPHS AND STYLING CLAIRE GUNN

‘Food is linked to memory. It has the power to take you back to happy places.’ - Jenny Ward


FOOD AND DRINK ASH HEEGER (ASH RESTAURANT) ASH - BAKED SWEET POTATO WITH NUT DUKKHA , BUFFALO FETA , HONEY- GL A ZED PEAR AND CRISPY GINGER 1 medium sweet potato · 4 rounds of feta (we used buffalo milk and made our own) · 2T olive oil · 1 small thumb of fresh ginger · 100g cashew nuts · 20g cumin (toasted) · 100g almonds · 100g macadamias · 1 pear · 4T honey · 1 handful pea shoots · 500ml oil (for deep frying) For the dukkha, toast all the nuts separately in a 200°C oven, then place together in blender and pulse 6 times. Add cumin and mix well. Set aside until plating. Get a few lumps of charcoal on the go in your braai, set them alight and crush into small pieces. Rub the sweet potato with olive oil, wrap in foil and roast in oven until cooked. When the sweet potato is cooked, remove the foil and set the potato in the charcoal dust for 5 mins (remember that the charcoal is still hot, so watch your hands). The sweet potato skin should char, absorbing all that flavour. Peel and quarter the pear, blowtorch, or place the quarters on the braai until they are warm, then place them in the bowl with the honey, toss and leave to cool. Thinly slice the ginger with a veg peeler, then roll the slices into a cigar shape and deep fry until golden brown. To plate, place a spoon of dukkha, the feta, the ginger and a quarter of the pear on each plate. Add the sweet potato and serve. Paired with Newton Johnson Southend Chardonnay 2016

‘I’d say most people know me for cooking over a fire. The misconception is that I only cook meat. I’m passionate about sustainable seafood and organic veggies too.’ – Ash Heeger

JENNY WARD (CHEFS RESTAURANT) CREAMY YELLOW TAIL TARTARE WITH GREEN APPLE SALSA VERDE AND CRISPY FRIED BOQUERONE, SERVED WITH WOOD - FIRED LEMON AND THYME FL ATBREADS 2 egg yolks · 15ml Dijon mustard · Juice of 1 lemon · 250ml canola oil · 8 anchovy fillets · 50ml capers · 50ml gherkins · 10ml chives · 10ml parsley · 2ml tabasco · 20ml olive oil · 1 green apple, finely chopped · 400g fresh chopped yellowtail Make a mayo by whisking the egg yolk, mustard and lemon juice and slowly adding oil until thick. Blend the mayo, gherkins, capers, and anchovy together. Place the hand-chopped yellowtail in a bowl, add about 4 tablespoons of the mayo mixture to coat the fish, season with parsley, chives, olive oil, salt, tabasco and extra lemon if needed. Add the diced apple and serve straight away. 4 boquerone · 1 egg white · 1 cup cornflour · 1 cup cake flour · 5ml baking powder · 250ml sparkling water Whisk the egg whites lightly before adding the flours and baking powder. Add sparkling water until a batter is formed. Just before serving, dip the boquerone into the batter and fry until golden brown. Serve the tartare topped with warm boquerone and wood-fired flatbreads. Paired with Waterkloof Circumstance Sauvignon Blanc

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VANIE PADAYACHEE (MARIGOLD RESTAURANT) PAPDI CHA AT ALOO SERVED WITH CHICKPEA CURRY, CORIANDER, MINT AND YOGHURT CHICKPEA CURRY ‘I went back to India last year to work in a few kitchens in Delhi and to recruit staff. Indian cooking is specialised and takes many years to perfect. It’s like sushi – you can’t just give it to anyone.’

2 medium onions · 1 x 400g tin chickpeas · 1-2 fresh green chillies · 2T sunflower oil · 1t mustard seeds · ½ 400g tin of tomatoes · 1t fresh ginger paste · 1t garlic paste · 1t green chilli paste · 1t red chilli powder · 1t turmeric · 1t dhana jeera powder · 1-2t sugar (optional) · plain yoghurt · mint

- Vanie Padayachee Peel and finely chop the onions, drain and rinse the chickpeas and finely slice the green chillies. Heat the oil in a saucepan over a medium heat and add the mustard seeds. Once they’re crackling, stir in the onions and fry until transparent and turning golden at the edges. Chop and add the tinned tomatoes, then cook for another 5 minutes before adding the ginger, garlic and green chilli pastes, the red chilli powder, dhana jeera, sugar (if using) and a pinch of sea salt. Keep stirring and cook for further 5 minutes. Stir in the chickpeas. Add 250ml water to make a thick sauce. Place the lid on the pan, lower the heat and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Finely chop the coriander, then sprinkle on top along with the garam masala, finely sliced green chillies, yoghurt and mint.

PAPDI 1 cup flour · 2,5g celery seeds · 5g salt · 50g oil · 120ml water Sieve the flour and salt. Add the celery seeds and mix well. Make a well in the centre and add the oil. Slowly blend the oil into the flour and salt mix with your fingertips. Add the water slowly and mix with the flour until it forms a semi-smooth dough (there is no need to use all the water). Knead well and then cover with a clean wrap and rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Portion the dough into 15g balls and roll into 5cm discs. Bake discs for 8 to 10 minutes at 180°C until light and crispy. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack. Paired with Hogan Divergent 2016

Twenty-four hours, no queues, premium brands and fun pop-ups all included in the ticket price – Littlegig is a fresh spin on a modern music festival. This year, the festival will take place on a wine farm in Stellenbosch and will favour foodies with a special Chef’s Table, as well as a paired food and wine tasting.

LITTLEGIG 24-HOUR FESTIVAL Date: 17 to 18 February 2018 Venue: Wiesenhof farm, Stellenbosch Tickets: From R2 300. Basic camping tents from R1 450. Glamping tents range from R2 950 to R6 450 per tent. Ticket prices include all standard food and drinks. Paired food and wine tasting: R150 per ticket Chef’s Table: R750 per ticket littlegig.co.za

Ash Heeger, Jenny Ward and Vanie Padayachee


FOOD AND DRINK

THE YARD Bistro bar and concept store The Yard in the Silo District at the V&A Waterfront features a deli (stocking preserves, charcuterie, fine chocolates, cheeses and homemade pasta) with a food-on-the-go section and buffet, as well as a restaurant (open for lunch and dinner), and a retail zone with curated displays of urban-centric homeware and accessories. The hybrid concept merges several experiences, catering to local and international visitors. Stop for a fine dining experience during your lunch hour or relax at the marble and brass bar with a cocktail after work. The restaurant menu pays homage to Mediterranean, Eastern, Middle Eastern and Indian cuisines and, once you’ve partaken in this cosmopolitan fare, there’s an opportunity to view art at the nearby Zeitz MOCAA. Silo 4, Silo District, South Arm Road, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town 082 945 4686

FARM FRESH Sustainability is at the heart of celebrated Johannesburg chef James Diack’s latest culinary foray, Il Contadino, in Parktown North. Joining his trio of popular eateries – Coobs, The National and The Federal – the new kid on the block dishes up farm-totable fare with a nod to classic country-style cooking from Spain, France and Italy. Meaning ‘the farmer’ in Italian, Il Contadino makes lavish use of seasonal produce sourced from the Diack family’s Magaliesburg farm. And that’s not only the herbs, veg and ricotta, but also the acorn-fed wild boar and duck that feature prominently on the menu. The wide range of tasty, hearty dishes (think: wood-fired pizzas topped with wild boar and mozzarella, and marmalade-glazed duck breast served with confit duck thigh) caters just as well for vegetarians, and everyone will be ordering extra sides of Parmesan risotto and Tuscan beans. The restaurant’s tastefully rustic interiors perfectly complement the menu, providing a relaxing setting for indulgent dinners, lunches and breakfasts, all matched with a considered wine list. Cnr 4th Ave & 7th Ave, Parktown North, Johannesburg 010 900 1363

COCKTAIL HOUR: Iceplant Negroni at The Willaston Bar 30ml Infused Bombay sapphire 30ml Aperol 30ml Antica Formula This is a twist on the classic Negroni. We have infused Bombay Sapphire gin with dried Turkish figs and cinnamon to give it more character and then mixed this with equal parts sweet vermouth (Antica Formula) and Aperol. Campari is also normally used in a Negroni, but we have decided to add Aperol instead as it pairs well with the infused gin and balances the drink. This is served on the rocks with the zest of an orange and a cinnamon quill. The Silo Hotel, Silo Square, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town 021 670 0500 THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 123


11 HOWARD This 213-room boutique hotel in New York City’s fashionable SoHo neighbourhood combines cutting-edge Scandinavian design with socially conscious hyper-localism. The design of the property, executed by Anda Andrei and Danish firm Space Copenhagen, focuses on ‘conscious hospitality’ with an intuitive, discreet flow of service that incorporates technology for self-check-in and smart room service, as well as partnerships with local businesses and non-profits to benefit the community. An impressive art collection displayed throughout the hotel features standout contemporary artists, such as Alexander Calder, Katie Yang, Nobuyoshi Araki, Dan Attoe and Hiroshi Sugimoto. 11 Howard’s multifunctional co-working space, the 11H Collective, is housed in the library on the second floor and provides guests and locals with a creative location for working and networking during the day. In the evening, visit the popular Le CouCou restaurant and sample world-class cuisine by famed restaurateur Stephen Starr before experiencing nightlife at The Blond, 11 Howard’s nightclub, bar and lounge. 11howard.com


HOTELS

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF 11 HOWARD; THE FLEMING

LIVING FOR THE CITY Experience ‘conscious hospitality’ at the on-trend 11 Howard in New York where smart features extend to a creative co-working space, or head to Hong Kong where The Fleming recreates a sense of the port city’s heyday with references to its iconic cross-harbour ferries THE FLEMING This recently remodelled 66-room boutique hotel located in Hong Kong’s lively Wan Chai district, evokes the port city’s industrial heyday. Breathe in the old-world scents of sandalwood and amber, immediately reminiscent of the lines of trade between Hong Kong and the world. The cornerstones of The Fleming’s design aesthetic, executed by A Work of Substance, are the iconic century-old cross-harbour ferries, symbolising travel, heritage and community, and the city’s maritime heritage. A colour palette of bottle green, navy and brushed brass, and watercraft-style details (take time to notice the seaworthy levered lighting controls and prow lanterns) mimic the feel of the ferries, while bamboo scaffolding-inspired outdoor lighting and gleaming red lacquer elevators and bathrooms promote a sense of place. Visit the hotel’s all-day dining concept, Osteria Marzia, which extends the maritime narrative by bringing coastal Italian flavours to the table, before heading to The Lounge, a communal space where you can enjoy complimentary teas. Back in your room, sample the bespoke ‘Shen Nong’ bathroom amenities, which are made in accordance with the principles of Chinese apothecary. The Wan Chai district historically attracted business travellers because of its convenient location near the harbour; the hotel building, built in the 1970s, used to stand on the Wan Chai pier before land reclamation. These facts are echoed throughout The Fleming, where Hong Kong’s city’s spirit and urban identity are evident. thefleming.com THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 125


DECO ICON: GREGOR JENKIN Award-winning designer-maker Gregor Jenkin challenges concepts of what furniture can be, while shaping a unique dialogue with steel

above Gregor Jenkin opposite Sculptural furniture from Jenkin’s collections

t was artist William Kentridge who bought the first Gregor Jenkin steel table. ‘At the time, selling anything meant something to me,’ Jenkin muses, still genuinely appreciative that people wish to have his now-iconic furniture pieces in their personal spaces. Having won the inaugural Design Foundation Icon Award in 2012, Jenkin was again bestowed the 2017 title. In recognition of work produced in the preceding 12 months, the award was a nod to his recent accolades, which included Feature Designer at 100% Design South Africa, where he won Product of the Year for his boldly pared-back fireplace, as well as a monumental solo exhibition of over 20 limited-edition pieces at Southern Guild gallery in Cape Town. Appreciation for Jenkin’s work has been global. Just two years into starting his studio in Johannesburg in 2005, the UK’s Conran Shop began placing orders, his pieces becoming top-sellers, while his turned-leg tables continue to be interior staples at ABC Carpet & Home in the US. The attraction is often credited to the unexpected evocativeness of his day-to-day furniture items. Unusually long, heavy dining tables, supported by just four ultraskinny legs in Jenkin’s signature woodturning style, create an illusion that questions physics, gravity and, oftentimes, reality. Much of his work alludes to a soft fragility that belies its robust durability and strength – a space Jenkin revels in exploring, where preconception does not exist and anything is possible. Although he’s dabbled in woven cotton, enamel, military hardware, ceramics and raw diamonds, it’s mild steel that is his biggest ally. ‘I know how to work with it, express it,’ he attests. It was at the start of his career, after completing architectural studies at the University of Cape Town in 1999, that Jenkin became enamoured of the material. His fascination was piqued during a job as a prop-maker at Ralph Lauren in London, while working on an architectural cladding project that required waxed black steel. It’s been 17 years since then, and the designer-maker continues to be drawn to the tectonic aspects of the material, exposing it for what it is, celebrating its patina and patterning. Shaping it into seemingly flexible forms, it can be said that Jenkin holds a unique ability to express the abstruse versatility of steel. His studio is a hardworking engineering environment, where he and four men he has trained explore new ways of doing old things, and it’s in this workshop that you’ll find Jenkin most at ease – heating, bending, bashing and shaping. ‘I revel in making,’ he confirms, unwavering enthusiasm evident as he polishes a Quaker chair that has been part of his portfolio for over 10 years. ‘It never dulls on me.’

IMAGES COURTESY OF GREGOR JENKIN

TEXT: TRACY LYNN CHEMALY


ICON

Although unquestionably a designer, it’s this production and manufacturing process that is the beating heart of his studio, giving the term ‘designer-maker’ an authentic definition. It’s while working on his production furniture range, repeating predictable process after process (he calls this his ‘mental downtime’), that Jenkin’s creative energy is heightened. ‘Work promotes more work, and ideas promote ideas,’ he explains of this state of inspired productivity. ‘Ideas don’t come to me when I’m sitting around doing nothing. My creativity comes through observation.’ His 2007 Infrastructure series, paying homage to the heritage of civic engineering, reshaping commonplace public-realm pieces for domestic use, typifies Jenkin’s approach. ‘I noticed that people were complaining about the infrastructure in Johannesburg, but had stopped seeing the banal things that are taken for granted visually.’ The result was a pedestrian streetlamp turned into a rendition befitting a home (one version called ‘Arrive Alive’ bent out of shape, as if hit by a vehicle, an indication of the designer’s spontaneous sense of humour). Having relocated his studio to Cape Town in 2008, with roadtrips through the Karoo between both cities, Jenkin’s influences became less informed by urbanity, turning rather towards agricultural, rural ideas. ‘Engrained’, a birch plywood wardrobe resembling a grain silo, and ‘Acacianal Shade’, referencing an acacia tree, with open umbrellas as branches, became signature pieces in the studio’s repertoire. Migrant/Migrate, a series of 24 wildebeestlike pieces, produced with Peter Gerber, echoed the idea of migrant workers moving from one place to another, the steel tables coming to life in captivating gestures. Pieces from this series were exhibited with Southern Guild at Design Miami in 2011, marking Jenkin as the first African designer to show at the esteemed international design fair. Other signature works – from a collaborative series with first-time buyer William Kentridge – form part of the permanent collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Modern Art. Equally at home in restaurants, manor houses, fairs and museums, Jenkin’s body of work has amassed a diverse following. ‘People have so many choices for furniture, and they still choose mine?’ he says incredulously. Yes, Jenkin, they do. Q

Highveld

Kaapentry

Setalight

Foundrie table

THE URBAN ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 127


GARDENS

WALL FLOWERS

Vertical gardens and verdant walls are inspired ways to green an urban enclave

Plant wall made by Patrick Blanc, Quai Branly Museum, Paris

Greenery can be cleverly used to enhance a feature. Here, an entranceway is framed with a spectacular bougainvillea, accentuating the doorway and enticing and welcoming visitors. Greening walls is really about knowing which surfaces to leave blank and which to celebrate with greenery.

In any urban setting, spaces are defined by walls. As cities densify, we have less horizontal space. Yet, by gardening vertically, walls offer endless opportunities to green confined spaces. In some instances, it is appropriate to leave walls untouched, as features in themselves â&#x20AC;&#x201C; think of the architecture of Louis Baragan or Tadoa Ando, where surfaces are kept blank so that they show the passage of time via the shadows on them. Very often, though, an ordinary wall is not a beautiful thing and you may want to disguise it. What better way than covering it in greenery? In doing so, a wall will blend into its surroundings and seem to disappear. Greenery also softens angular corners and can ground an otherwise imposing facade. Sophisticated vertical gardens, like those synonymous with Patrick Blanc, have developed in response to a desire to accentuate walls and envelop buildings with foliage. Green walls can be achieved quite simply by training a creeper onto a facade. Trachelospermum (star jasmine) is a favourite â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is evergreen, so its glossy leaves offer consistent coverage throughout the year. It will require cables to train it, however, while Ficus pumila (Tickey creeper) or Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy) attach themselves with suckers to a wall.

A system of shelves or bars provide an opportunity to place or hang potted plants.

While high-tech vertical greening can be costly and difficult to create, there are several ways to achieve this effect more simply. A gabion steel structure can work as a cradle for planted terracotta pots; the structure and the pots are both features in themselves.

Capri Suite Resort Hotel Anacapri, Italy

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES/GALLO IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/ALAMY; HOTEL ANACAPRI BY ZATASTUDIO CAPRISUITE.IT DESIGNHOTELS.COM

TEXT MARY MAUREL


NOTES

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1. @HOME 086 057 6576 | home.co.za 2. BLANDAT 011 781 7932 |

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blandat-studio.com 3. BELGOTEX 011 380 9300 | belgotexfloors.co.za 4. BLOCK & CHISEL 011 442 0809 | blockandchisel.co.za 5. CAESARSTONE

011 822 1350 | caesarstone.co.za 6. CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 021 702 2280 | investeccapetownartfair.co.za 7. CASARREDO 011 786 6940 | casarredo.co.za 8. CEMCRETE 011 474 2415 | cemcrete.co.za 9. CHANDLER HOUSE 021 424 4810 | chandlerhouse.co.za 10. CHAPEL 061 426 4270 | chapelgoods.co.za 11. CHARLOTTE RHYS 021 702 1338 | charlotterhys.co.za 12. CLEMENTINA 021 447 1398 | clementina. co.za 13. COUNTRY ROAD 0860 022 002 | woolworths.co.za 14. COVET DESIGN  082 560 8691 | covetdesign.co.za 15. CRÉMA DESIGN 021 448 775 | cremadesign.co.za 16. CUBE GALLERY 011 463 7869 | cubegallery. co.za 17. DARK HORSE 021 510 0810 | dark-horse.co.za 18. DESIGNS BY DAY INTERIORS 031 763 1359 | designsbyday.co.za 19. DESIGN BY INI designbyini.com 20. DESIGN INDABA 021 465 9966 | designindaba.

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com 21. DOKTER AND MISSES 011 403 1024 | dockterandmisses.com

22. DOUGLAS JONES 086 166 7242 | douglasjones.co.za 23. DUDLEY MOULDINGS 011 452 7071 | dudleymouldings.co.za 24. DULUX 0860 330 111 | dulux.co.za 25. ESTABLISHMENT 021 462 6492 | establishment. co.za 26. FACTORY TILE SHOP 011 791 0451 27. FLAUNT CONCEPTS  083 562 7602 | flauntconcepts.co.za 28. FINFLOOR 0860 346 356 | finfloor.co.za 29. GENERATION 011 325 5963 | generationdesign.co.za

30. H&M HOME 0860 690 707 | hm.com/za/department/HOME 31. HALOGEN INTERNATIONAL 011 448 2060 | halogen.co.za 32. HERTEX

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 021 461 7420 | hertex.co.za 33. HOI’PLOY 021 447 1433 | hoiploy.com 34. HOME FABRICS 011 262 3492 | homefabrics.co.za 35. KIRSTEN GOSS 021 007 3317 | kirstengoss.com 36. KONNECT 087 820 0050 | blok.co.za/design/konnect 37. ITALTILE 011 510 9002 | italtile.co.za 38.

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LA GRANGE INTERIORS 021 447 3508 | lagrangeinteriors.co.za 39. LIAM MOONEY liammooney.co.za 40. LIGNE ROSET 011 262 5055 | ligne-roset.com/za 41. LIM 021 423 1200 | lim.co.za 41. LIMELINE 

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021 424 8682 | limeline.co.za 42. MALLS TILES 031 207 6451 | mallstiles.

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com 43. MASTER STUDIO 084 525 0020 | masterstudio.co.za 44. MATTER OF FAKT matteroffakt.com 45. MAVROMAC 021 797 4739 | mavromacandthegatehouse.co.za 46. MERVYN GERS 021 510 2385 | mervyngers.com 47. MIELE 086 006 4553 | miele.co.za 48. MOBELLI  021 512 2662 | mobelli.co.za 49. MRP HOME 011 728 2168 | mrphome.com

50. NATIVE DÉCOR 011 783 9600 | nativedecor.co.za 51. NEW PORT LIGHTING 021 447 0049 | newport.co.za 52. OKHA 021 461 7233 |

1

okha.com 53. OGGIE FLOORING 021 510 2846 | oggieflooring.com 54. OPIA DESIGN 079 050 4741 | opiadesign.co.za 55. PAUL ALEXANDER  074 924 5115 | paulalexander.co.za 56. PLASCON 0860 20 40 60 plascon. com 57. PROPS OF THE STARS 082 904 5453 | propstarsjhb.co.za 58. REBTEX  083 616 0535 | rebtexrsa.com 59. ROCHE BOBOIS 021 286 0793 | roche-bobois.com/en-za 60. ROMO SOUTH AFRICA 011 262 4167 | romosouthafrica.com 61. RUBIO MONOCOAT 011 466 0273 | rubiomonocoat.co.za 62. SILK & COTTON COMPANY 031 208 9520 | silkco.co.za 63. SHF 010 492 5455 | shf.co.za 64. SHF 033 330 6610 |

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shf.co.za 65. SOFACOMPANY.COM 021 200 5904 | sofacompany.com

66. ST LEGER & VINEY 011 444 6722 | stleger.co.za 67. STAY EVIL KIDS

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stay-evil-kids.com 68. STUDIO19 010 023 0071 | studio19.co 69. T&CO  011 262 4718 | tandco.co.za 70. THALIA STRATES thaliastrates.com 71. THE

ARTISAN  082 451 4738 | the-artisan.co.za 72. THE ROMO GROUP 

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011 262 4167 | romosouthafrica.com 73. THE TILE GALLERY 011 312 5038 | tilegallery.co.za 74. THE STORER 011 679 2962 | thestorer.co 75. TINSEL

GALLERY 011 782 4051 | tinselgallery.com 76. TRUE DESIGN 010 594 5109 | truedesign.co.za 77. U&G FABRICS 0011 444 6162 | ugfabrics.

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com 78. UNION TILES 011 791 4924 | uniontiles.co.za 79. VOKE RUGS

083 297 0589 | vokerugs.co.za 80. WASS 078 059 6703 | wassskin.com 81. WEYLANDTS 021 914 1433 | weylandts.co.za 82. WOMAG 021 447 6161 | womag.co.za 83. WOODBENDER 021 854 6034 | woodbender.co.za

84. WOOLWORTHS 0860 022 002 | woolworths.co.za 85. ZARA HOME zarahome.com/za


LAST LOOK

WONDER WALL Les Étoiles de la Mer 2 wallpaper by Versace Home Kick off the new year in maximalist style with couture brand Versace’s third collection of luxury wallpapers. ‘Les Étoiles de la Mer 2’ takes the concept of statement walls an opulent leap further with its eye-popping, more-is-more layering of the brand’s signature neoclassical medallions and nautical flourishes. The collection is exclusively distributed by Home Fabrics. homefabrics.co.za

130 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE URBAN ISSUE


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2018 rất hay

tạp chí nội thất tháng 1  

2018 rất hay

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