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P R E V I E W S O F W O R K S F O R S A L E AT U P C O M I N G S H O W S C O A S T T O C O A S T

ISSUE 134

DECEMBER 2016

WATCH V IDEO S IN THIS IS S U E

AMERICAN

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ARCADIA CONTEMPORARY

“12 BY 12 IN 12” A Major Exhibition of Paintings All Measuring 12 by 12 Inches December 10 -31, 2016

Our New Address and Phone Number

TOWN PLAZA

© 2016 Arcadia Contemporary

9428 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656

www.arcadiacontemporary.com info@arcadiacontemporary.com


EDITOR’S LETTER

DECEMBER 2016 / MONTHLY VINCENT W. MILLER / Publisher EDITORIAL JOSHUA ROSE / Editor editor@americanartcollector.com ROCHELLE BELSITO / Managing Editor rbelsito@americanartcollector.com MICHAEL CLAWSON / Deputy Editor ERIN RAND / Associate Editor JOHN O’HERN / Santa Fe Editor FRANCIS SMITH / Contributing Photographer ADVERTISING 866 6190841 LISA REDWINE / Senior Account Executive lredwine@americanartcollector.com CHRISTIE CAVALIER / Senior Account Executive ccavalier@americanartcollector.com ANITA WELDON / Senior Account Executive aweldon@americanartcollector.com TRAFFIC AMY ROSENBERG / Traffic Manager traffic@americanartcollector.com PRODUCTION ADOLFO CASTILLO / Multi Media Manager TONY NOLAN / Art Director AUDREY WELCH / Graphic Designer KEVIN KING / Junior Designer SUBSCRIPTIONS 877 9470792 EMILY YEE / Subscriptions Manager service@americanartcollector.com JAIME PEACH / Accounts Receivable jpeach@americanartcollector.com JESSICA HUBBARD / Subscriptions Coordinator admin@americanartcollector.com Copyright © 2016. All material appearing in American Art Collector is copyright. Reproduction in whole or part is not permitted without permission in writing from the editor. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be accompanied by a stamped self-addressed envelope. All care will be taken with material supplied, but no responsibility will be accepted for loss or damage. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the editor or the publisher. The publisher bears no responsibility and accepts no liability for the claims made, nor for information provided by advertisers. Printed in the USA. American Art Collector 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Telephone (480) 425-0806. Fax (480) 425-0724 or write to American Art Collector, P.O. Box 2320, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-2320 Single copies $6.95. Subscription rate for one year is $36. To place an order, change address or make a customer service query, please email service@AmericanArtCollector. com or write to PO Box 2320, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-2320. Periodicals postage rates paid at Scottsdale, AZ, and at additional mailing offices.

Facing the Figure S

ince our early days, American Art Collector has been synonymous with painting the figure. Obviously, our magazine enjoys covering all forms of painting, from landscape to still life to interiors, but it is showing figurative art, in all its manifestations, that we have become particularly known for. We have been at the forefront of covering artists such as Jeremy Lipking, Jeremy Mann, Jamie Wyeth, Kehinde Wiley, Bo Bartlett, Brad Kunkle, Casey Baugh, Logan Maxwell Hagege, Mia Bergeron, Robert Lange, Alex Kanevsky, Serge Marshennikov, Pamela Wilson, Kent Williams, Jason Shawn Alexander, Lu Cong, Candice Bohannon, Julio Reyes, Andrea Kowch, Michelle Dunaway, Ignat Ignatov, Joseph Todorovitch, Daniel Greene, Robert Liberace, Zack Zdrale, Carl Dobsky, Michael Carson, Max Ginsburg, Aaron Westerberg, Kris Lewis, Sean Cheetham, Cesar Santos, Dorian Vallejo, Malcolm T. Liepke, Anna Wypych, Korin Faught, Mary Jane Ansell, Zoey Frank, Katie O’Hagan, Margaret Bowland, Natalia Fabia, Vincent Xeus, Greg Mortenson, Kate Lehman, Mario Robinson, Michael Bergt, Juliette Aristides, Daniel Sprick, Lee Price, Jacob Collins, Patricia Watwood, Wade Reynolds, Daniel Maidman, Will Wilson, Erin Currier, David Larned, Amy Lind and Erin Cone. So, as you can see, American Art Collector has been there, on the frontlines of this always-advancing art form, talking to galleries, finding new artists, previewing shows of new work—whatever it takes to get the best and newest figurative work being created in front of the top collectors active today.

Joshua Rose Editor P.S. Nothing gets us more excited than covering an artist whose work we’ve never seen before. If you have someone you think would be a good fit for the pages of this magazine, just email me at editor@americanartcollector.com

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Hats Off To You and Yours This Holiday Season From John Pence Gallery

Steven J Levin Plumage II, oil on linen, 40 x 64 in., 2014

JOHN PENCE GALLERY 750 Post Street • San Francisco • California www.johnpence.com • art@johnpence.com Phone (415) 441 - 1138 Established 1975


Regina Lyubovnaya

“Best Friends,” 14 x 11", Oil on Canvas

Vakhtang, “Red Lilies,” 14 x 28", Oil on Linen

ChaRLes Lotton

“Sunset Cypriot, Pink Multi Flora Lamp,” 28 x 13", Blown Glass & Bronze


Vakhtang

“Early October,” 36x 36", Oil on Linen

Lotton gallery

900 north MiChigan aVe. leVel 6, ChiCago, il 60611 (312) 664-6203 www.lottongallery.CoM


ANATOMY OF THE MAGAZINE Use this magazine to help you become the first to acquire new works for sale at upcoming shows coast to coast COASTTOCOAST COVERAGE Find out what’s happening across the nation. This is the first magazine to provide coast-to-coast coverage of upcoming shows from artists and galleries specializing in traditional fine art paintings and sculpture—the art that collectors want.

PREVIEWS

COLLECTOR HOMES

In the Preview pages, we reveal new works about to come available for sale by the country’s leading galleries.

Our nationally recognized interior design consultants take you inside the homes of major art collectors to show how the collections have been hung.

ART SHOW LOCATIONS ART MARKET INSIGHTS

At the top of each Preview page you’ll see the destination where the upcoming exhibition is showing, the dates, and the gallery address and contact details so you can make inquiries about new works— before they go on sale to the general public.

Find out everything the discerning collector needs to know. Each month a group of art experts share their behind-thescenes knowledge of how the art market works.

ARTIST FOCUS PAGES These one-page articles are bonus Previews and focus on additional exhibitions taking place each month. Artist Focus Pages also show new works available for purchase, providing another valuable resource for finding more one-of-a-kind works of art.

SOLD! Read our monthly SOLD! pages to find out who’s buying whose art they first saw in this magazine.

ART LOVER’S GUIDES Broaden your horizons by reading about the fabulous new art to be shown in some of the country’s most exciting and stimulating art destinations.

VIRTUAL ART WALK Visit www.AmericanArtCollector.com to see our sensational Virtual Art Walk. When a show announcement catches your eye, click on it and the art image will enlarge. Click again, and you will be linked directly to the gallery hosting the upcoming show.


David Shevlino Upside Down 29 x 29” oil/canvas

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Morgan Samuel Price 2017 Raffle painting


GUEST FEATURED ARTIST

Joseph McGurl


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58

CONTENTS DECEMBER 2016

UPCOMING SOLO & GROUP SHOWS

88

Los Angeles, CA

JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER Poisoned paper

90

New York, NY

ARON WIESENFELD

Unwind the winding path

92

New York, NY

TOM GREGG Stories to tell

CALIFORNIA • Culver City • Los Angeles • Santa Barbara

014

COLORADO • Denver

ILLINOIS • Chicago

FLORIDA • Hallandale Beach

NEW YORK • New York

www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

• Sag Harbor VIRGINIA • Alexandria

94

Los Angeles, CA

SARAH ELISE ABRAMSON Déjà vu


SPECIAL SECTIONS FIGURATIVE FORMS

40

THE ART LOVER’S GUIDE TO COLLECTING FINE ART IN FLORIDA

72

THE ART LOVER’S GUIDE TO COLLECTING FINE ART IN THE SOUTHERN STATES

84

The Figure in Art By John O’Hern

64 96

104

112

LATIN EXPRESSION

SIZE MATTERS

MINUTE MASTERPIECES

Hallandale Beach, FL

Paintings and poetry combine

98

Sag Harbor, NY

BELIEVE

Showcase of new works

100

Los Angeles, CA

JOE SORREN From inside

Culver City, CA 12 by 12 in 12

106

Denver, CO

THE SNOW SHOW Winter-themed works

108

Denver, CO

HOLIDAY TRADITION

The 26 edition th

A NEW BEGINNING

CHERISHED TREASURES

Three-artist exhibition

Chicago, IL

Annual small works event

114

Santa Barbara, CA

32 YEARS AND COUNTING

Anniversary showcase

FE AT U R E S DESERT DWELLING AS WE SEE IT By John O’Hern

58 64

116

D EPA R T M EN T S

Anatomy of light

UNVEILING

34

120

CALLING COAST TO COAST

38

JESSE LANE

DAUD AKHRIEV

ARTIST FOCUS PAGES

122

The human spirit

015

110

Denver, CO

Paintings on an intimate scale

CO N TE N TS

102

Alexandria, VA


Hernan Miranda

INTERVALO II

Oil on canvas

20"x 24"

hernanmiranda.com

sixartgallery.com

hernanmiranda1@gmail.com 561 860 1626

Maria Ines Vasconsellos-Director 954 232 8748


Doug Kacena - CrossOver 11.05.16 - 01.14.17

THIS RON HICKS MASTERPIECE WILL BE PAINTED OVER.

As well as works from: Quang Ho, Jill Soukup, Don Stinson, Robert Spooner, Kevin Weckbach, David Santillanes, Edward Aldrich, Terrie Lombardi, Ed Kucera, Mikael Olson and Jeff Legg

MIKE WRIGHT GALLERY M I K E W R I G H TG A L L E RY. C O M / C R O S S OV E R | 1 4 1 2 WA Z E E S T. D E N V E R C O 8 0 2 0 2 | 3 0 3 . 5 9 0 . 9 8 0 0


Elaine G. Coffee A MASTER OF HUMAN ATTITUDES IN ALL SITUATIONS-SITTING IN RESTAURANTS, gathering in bars, wandering in museums-her paintings, portraits and commissions have found their way into major collections throughout the United States and abroad.

“Lingering in the Louvre” oil on canvas 30 x 40

The Red Piano Art Gallery

Tree’s Place

Hilton Head Island, SC

Orleans, MA

T.H. Brennen Fine Art Tilting at Windmills Gallery Scottsdale, AZ

Manchester Center, VT

Studio Visitors Welcome…please contact Elaine at egcstudio@yahoo.com or call 480-227-3690.

www.ElaineCoffee.com “All That Jazz” oil on canvas 20 x 24


the power of color and figure

proudly representing: DANIEL BETHUNE, JOHANNES BOEKHOUDT, PAIGE BRADLEY, JOSEPH BREZA, FANNIE BRITO MARGRET CARDE, CAROLINE CARPIO, MARTIN EICHINGER, CAROL HARTSOCK, JAMES HOYLE TOBIN KARICHER, LANGE MARSHALL, ABRAHAM MOHLER, MIGUEL PEIDRO, CAP PANNELL JANE RADSTROM, DENNIS SMITH, DONALD WEBER, RICHARD WEINSTEIN, ALICE WILLIAMS 205 Canyon Road Santa Fe NM 87501 | www.canyonfineart.com | (505) 955-1500 #yourpassagetoart


JOSHUA SMITH “AURA” 86X60" OIL ON CANVAS

JOSHUASMITHFINEART . COM JOSHUASMITHART@SBCGLOBAL.NET


Water, Acrylic on Canvas Water, Acrylic on Canvas

36”x48” 36”x48”

I CHHEELLLL E E C MMI C COOUURRI EI ERR WestwardGallery Gallery Westward 4400 Tennyson Street, Denver, Colorado 80212

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WWG

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Elizabeth Chapin 1 2 0 2 w. 6 t h st . aust in, tex as 7 8 7 0 3 5 1 2 . 4 7 2 . 7 4 28 wal ly wo rkman.co m i mage : The New Wh itne y / R aft of the Medu sa, ac r y l i c o n canvas , 48 x 108 in ch es

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HEARTBEAT OR CRUSHED ORCHID  

HEARTBEAT OR CRUSHED ORCHID  

Acrylic on canvas

24x24"

24x24"

Acrylic on canvas

E. L.Stewart Versatile Expressive

Have you ever held your ear to your lover’s chest, and just listened? www.elstewart.com

painter@elstewart.com

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Discover New Art Available For Sale T he new art of today’s major artists is in big demand, and if you’re serious about acquiring, it you need to know about it sooner. When you subscribe to American Art Collector magazine you’ll be the first to know because each

month we’ll email you the link to the latest issue online. You’ll have instant access to the latest issue immediately when it is published. You’ll see the art coming available for sale before the shows even open.

Coast-To-Coast Coverage See new art being created by major living artists from the East Coast to the West Coast and everywhere in between. Many readers travel across the country to acquire pieces from galleries showing new work in this magazine.

Covering The Major Art Destinations Our Art Lover’s Guides alert you to the peak season for art destinations around the nation. You’ll find details of all the major shows opening around the country with images of new work and dates of upcoming shows. Our user-friendly Art Walk Maps help orient you before you visit and show you where the major galleries are located.

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Videos in each issue let you take part in all the art action—starting from inside artists’ studios to gallery openings and right through to auctions on the go.

See Inside the Homes of Major Collectors Paintings & Sculpture • Glass • Ceramics • Wood

12 Issues of the Monthly Magazine

Our nationally recognized interior design consultants and photographers take you inside the homes of major art collectors to show how the collections have been hung.

A visual feast of large-format images and articles previewing new paintings and contemporary decorative art objects from upcoming shows on major living artists coast to coast.

2015 EDITORIAL CALENDAR Continued

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Unveiling spotlights a recently completed portrait, figurative work or museum opening from some of our best and most active members of the Portrait Society of America. This month Stephanie Vivirito, Portrait Society’s Program Coordinator, interviewed Leslie Adams about her recent ArtPrize Eight work at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum.

Unveiling

Leslie Adams: A Little Girl’s Dreams Come True BY STEPHANIE VIVIRITO

F

rom a very young age, artist Leslie Adams was encouraged to dream. Her artwork now inspires us to do the same. As a child, the Toledo Museum of Art was Adams’ playground. It was where she spent countless hours viewing the museum’s collection and where she started her formal education. The museum sparked Adams’ dream to be an artist, and the memories she made there affect her work and life today. However, her time at the Toledo Museum of Art was only one component of Adams’ childhood that compelled her to follow her dream to be an artist. Learning cursive in school in the 1970s taught Adams the value of writing by hand and the beauty of a line. As a little girl, she was determined 1

1 Handwritten Dreams, largescale triptych and installation

2

034

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to document her dreams with perfect penmanship on paper because to her, it made dreams real. Adams believes, “the very 2 act of recording a dream, Self Portrait at handwritten on paper or Eight, charcoal chalkboard, opens the and white chalk on paper, 28 x 22" door to possibility.” It is these feelings of possibility and encouragement that Adams conveys with her recent artwork, Handwritten Dreams. This interactive, large-scale triptych and installation was on display at the annual international art competition, ArtPrize Eight, held September 21 to October 9, 2016, at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Adams says, “Handwritten Dreams is an extremely personal statement yet a work that celebrates the hopes, aspirations and dreams that we, as children and adults,

universally share. The drawing on the left depicts a child reaching to write her list of hopes and dreams on the chalkboard. In the center, an empty 1970s classroom provides evidence of the day’s lessons in cursive, and then on the right, at present, the list lives and grows. The story continues in front of the work where seven vintage school desks provide the space and time for ArtPrize visitors—children and adults—to pause, reflect and write their own dreams on paper. Each visitor then pins their hopes to the ever-growing ‘wall of dreams.’” Adams is using her dream come true to make her voice heard, to encourage us to be curious, and to urge us to dream.

The 19th annual The Art of the Portrait conference will be held April 20-23, 2017, in Atlanta. www.portraitsociety.org


“The Dare”

Richard Stravitz Master Sculptor Virginia Beach, VA


ART SHOW 2 0 1 7

JANUARY 11-15, 2017 LA CONVENTION CENTER | WEST HALL

L A’s p re m iere event for experi enci ng, c ol l e c t i n g , sh a r i n g & p urchas ing ar t. Featuri ng over 100 pro m i n e n t ga l l e r i e s f rom o v e r 2 0 d iff erent countri es - exhi bi ti n g p a i n t i n g , sc u l p t u re , wor k s o n p ap er, i nstal l ati on, photogra p h y, v i d e o & p e r f o r m a n c e .

L A A RTS HOW.COM


Calling Coast to Coast

We ask leading galleries from coast to coast what their thoughts are on the market and where it might be headed.

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PRESIDENT

A S S I S TA N T D I R E C T O R

Steve Diamant

Michelle Walton

Michael Donovan

Arcadia Contemporary Culver City, CA

R Alexander Fine Art Atlanta, GA

The Gallery at Tree’s Place Orleans, MA

Since relocating Arcadia Contemporary from New York City to Los Angeles at the beginning of this year, the old expression, “the more things change the more they stay the same” could not be more appropriate. While “the change” has certainly been noticeable, what has “stayed the same” is the enthusiasm for the artists we represent and the fact that Arcadia tries very hard to  exhibit the works of painters who are not easily “defined” by a genre or “movement” of art. Southern California is the hotbed of many different art movements such as the extraordinary “Lowbrow/Pop Surrealism,” and the graffiti movement…For Arcadia however, what we  have always tried to feature are works by painters who feel that they are not part of any “art movement.” The response as we’ve moved cross country seems to  reflect the fact that artists want to create work that cannot be “labeled.” They want those works to be appreciated 50 years from  now. Pun intended, but let’s be real here: “representational” painting is the only art that has survived the test of time. This all being said, there’s room for every artists’ works on the walls of homes and museums around the world. We hope that in the years to come, people recognize Arcadia Contemporary for trying to “keep it real.”

Atlanta has a strong design community that extends into the arts where we tend to see a heightened interest in highquality works that often set the tone or create the atmosphere for the rest of the home. We frequently see a more experienced buyer who is looking for something unique and eye-catching. Compelling figurative paintings and sculpture continue to bring collectors to the gallery. Examples include Valencian impressionist artists Giner Bueno  and  Eustaquio Segrelles  who have both been strong sellers. The figurative sculptors of Paige Bradley  and  Mark Yale Harris  attract buyers that appreciate both traditional and contemporary styles.  We are very excited to now be carrying the works of Spanish realist artist  Juan Cossio and Rosana Sitcha. Cossio uses a variety of techniques to redefine figurative photorealism and often mixes this style with abstract expressionism. Sitcha is a young realist artist out of Madrid, Spain, whose cityscapes recall the rhythms of the city while reminding us of the beauty in the mundane. Shadow, light and reflection are key features to each of her works. We can’t wait to introduce these artists to our collectors with exhibitions in planning for 2017.

This past summer season has been a roller coaster ride for the Gallery at Tree’s Place. We’ve had months of very good sales mixed with periods of slow sales and low traffic. There seems to be no real explanation for it, aside from the uncertainty created by the presidential election, and perhaps changing demographics. We are constantly marketing our artists, either by magazine advertising, email blasts or online marketing, which we believe has kept our profile high and allows us to introduce new up-andcoming artists who display the kind of talent that Tree’s is noted for, along with promoting our more well-known artists. It’s exciting to see our customers react to the high quality of our gallery artists. In a time where sales are sometimes hard to find, it is comforting to know that quality at all price points resonates with our clientele. We show a variety of representational art. One highlight has come from adding a sculptor who produces highquality bronzes. This has been a terrific addition. It is our strategy to consistently keep new and interesting work in front of our audience. We do this by holding openings every two weeks during our peak season that showcase our artists. We believe that working with our artists to maximize their appeal allows us to do what we do best.

Arcadia Contemporary Culver City, CA | (424) 603-4656 www.arcadiacontemporary.com

R Alexander Fine Art Atlanta, GA | (770) 609-8662 www.ralexanderfineart.com

The Gallery at Tree’s Place Orleans, MA | (508) 255-1330 www.treesplace.com

www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

OWNER


“Like a Grain of Sand” Acrylic on Linen 48x48”

CATHRINE EDLINGER-KUNZE facebook.com/ CathrineEdlingerKunzeFineArt RepResented By: GALLERY RUSSIA Scottsdale, AZ 7103 East Main Street 480-596-9533 galleryrussia.com

JONES & TERWILLIGER GALLERIES Palm Desert, CA 92260 73-375 El Paseo, Suite A 760-674-8989 Carmel, CA 93921 6th Avenue between San Carlos & Dolores 831-626-9100 jones-terwilliger-galleries.com

SATISFY YOUR PALETTE! Showcasing new work by today’s best artists at galleries across the country. www.AmericanArtCollector.com The only monthly resource dedicated to the entire western art market. www.WesternArtCollector.com Covering the entire market for historic American art. www.AmericanFineArtMagazine.com An exclusive look inside the studios of the world’s best artists. www.InternationalArtist.com

Adver tising (866) 619-0841 • Subscr iptions (877) 947-0792


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n inscrutable bronze sculpture of a draped figure marks the grave of Clover Adams in Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Marian “Clover” Hooper Adams (1843-1885) was the wife of Henry Adams (1838-1918), the great-grandson of President John Adams (1735-1826). Adams commissioned Augustus SaintGaudens (1848-1907) to create a memorial for Clover, advising him to consider the ideas of Buddhist thought and, especially, the figure of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara who embodied compassion. Avalokitesvara is often

represented in Chinese art as a woman robed in white. The sculpture is in a setting Stanford White (1853-1906) designed as a place for contemplation. Sunlight casts a shadow over the figure, rendering it genderless. The figure itself is androgynous when it becomes visible. The drapery appears as a funeral shroud, refers to Avalokitesvara, and adds to the aura of mystery. The public calls it Grief and Saint-Gaudens referred to it tortuously as The Mystery of the Hereafter and The Peace of God that Passeth Understanding. Adams wrote to the artist’s son, “Do

By John O’Hern

not allow the world to tag my figure with a name! Every magazine writer wants to label it as some American patent medicine for popular consumption— Grief, Despair, Pear’s Soap, or Macy’s Mens’ Suits Made to Measure. Your father meant it to ask a question, not to give an answer; and the man who answers will be damned to eternity like the men who answered the Sphinx.” Drapery in art can refer to many things, it can indicate modesty and it can be used as the subject itself as in extraordinary drawings by Leonardo da Vinci and the contemporary glass

1 Adams Memorial, Rock Creek Cemetery, Section E, entrance at Webster Street & Rock Creek Church Road Northwest, Washington, D.C. Historic American Buildings Survey, Engineering Record, Landscapes Survey. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 2 Serge Marshennikov, In the Twilight, oil on linen, 22 x 15". Courtesy T.H. Brennen Fine Art, Scottsdale, Arizona.

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sculpture of Karen LaMonte. LaMonte casts dresses in glass, an accomplishment her glass studio collaborators in the Czech Republic initially called impossible. She sought to make a “figurative representation that was not literal.” She frequented Czech thrift shops and bought dresses that expressed not only beauty and fine craftsmanship but a connection to periods of history. The sleek, elegant modernism of the period between the wars is captured in Deco Dress Impression, 2006. Her first casts were solid and she knew immediately she wanted to work with the absence of the body, addressing “the interplay between the inner layer of the body (the individual) and the exterior layer of the clothing, which is society.” Allan Houser (Chiricahua Apache, 1914-1994) merged the inner and the outer in many of his sculptures, especially in Reverie, 1981. The figures, a mother and child, become one with the blanket wrapped around them, only their faces emerging from the sensual curves of bronze. Houser said, “I work with clay and pull it around and see what I can do with experimental forms. When 3

3 Allan Houser (1914-1994), Reverie, 1981, bronze, ed. of 10, 24½ x 23 x 12½". ©Estate of Allan Houser/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph courtesy ©Glenn Green Galleries, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa FeTesuque, New Mexico. 4 Karen LaMonte, Deco Dress Impression, 2006, cast glass, 59 x 24 x 20½". Courtesy the artist. 5 Augustus SaintGaudens (1848-1907), Adams Memorial, modeled 1886-1891, cast 1969, bronze, 697/8 x 397/8 x 44½". Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. 6 Kevin Francis Gray, Temporal Sitter, 2011, Carrara marble, 94 x 60 x 60 cm. Courtesy Kevin Francis Gray Studio ©2016. Photo by Tara Moore.

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gown. In the soft light she appears about to melt into the background. Kevin Francis Gray’s figures are anonymous beneath their veils. The Temporal Sitter, 2011, is in contrast to Saint-Gaudens’ meditating bodhisattva. He is, indeed, temporal, in and of this world. His hands slacken from the traditional mudra of meditation and he distractedly turns his head. Rather than seeking the non-self, he actively hides from us and from himself.

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creation of an image that shows emotion and that transfers the painter’s feelings to the viewer.” The young women in his paintings are draped in diaphanous materials or their own clothing, revealing their physical bodies in poses the artist finds unique to them as individuals. Their calm composure reveals something of their inner selves. The figure in the painting In the Twilight clutches a thin wrap at her breast, appearing to be wearing an Empire

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I’m creating something, I’m there with the clay, and after a while something begins to build. One of the good things is creating something that you’ve never seen before.” Serge Marshennikov is also concerned with his materials and strives to make something “real” out of paint. “To praise a photorealist painter that he copied nature well is like praising an oil painting for being made with oil. An artist’s goal is always the same—the


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1 Lotton Gallery, Dreams, oil on linen, 24 x 34", by Marina Marina. 2 Lotton Gallery, Stunning, oil on canvas, 36 x 20", by Marina Marina. 2

3 RJD Gallery, Gigilo, oil on canvas, 48 x 48", by Pamela Wilson.

RJD GALLERY

90 Main Street, Sag Harbor, NY, 11963 (631) 725-1161, www.rjdgallery.com RJD Gallery presents the work of artists offering unique and exemplary examples of contemporary figurative art. Salvatore Alessi creates complex artworks spanning parallel universes within time and space. Phillip Thomas captures a transition of conflict and a shift of idealism, of sincerity in both art and politics. He states, “It stands to reason that art would mirror the same sort of cynicism found in politics today…a call to action, in art has

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www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

4 RJD Gallery, The Small Dancer, oil on linen, 78 x 58", by Margaret Bowland. 5 Lotton Gallery, Peaceful Moment, oil on canvas, 28 x 32", by Aydemir Saidov. 5

now resulted in corresponding action, found in political movements such as ‘BLM,’ black lives matter, and the like.” Andre Zadorine is a Soviet realist painter of implied photographic imagery that captures souls, and provides

us creative Class Reunions of past times, of emotional weight and dramatic light. Pamela Wilson continues to bring a tantalizing time of male beauty, a dreamlike figurative, yet real, narrative fantasy.

LOTTON GALLERY

900 N. Michigan Avenue, Level 6 Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 664-6203 www.lottongallery.com Lotton Gallery in Chicago is recognized for its talented stable of figurative artists.


Awake Yet Dreaming, 24 x 30, Oil on Linen on Panel

William A. Schneider, AISM, OPA REVEALING THE SOUL

SchneiderArt.com

Available at Reinert Fine Art 843-694-2445 Jason@reinertfineart.com


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On their roster, attracting a global audience, are Russian masters Marina Marina and Aydemir Saidov. Both Marina and Saidov have standing contracts with Christie’s of London auction house, providing them several impressive auction records and international recognition. An unmatched skillfulness for both figurative and detail of fabrics, paired with a keen and distinctive sense of light, make their paintings tell a story, while setting a mood. Their paintings take the viewers to a time of great art, when quality and expertise were of the utmost importance. In Serenity and Peaceful Moment by Saidov and Dreams by Marina, they depict reclining seminudes in repose. Additional pieces by Marina are A Soft Touch and Stunning, which highlight her mastery of detailed fabrics on the figure. The elaborate embroidery and delicate fine silks of the

models’ scarves are luscious and rich, giving the viewer an illusion to reach out and touch.

PAIGE BRADLEY

information@paigebradley.com www.paigebradley.com Paige Bradley’s inspiration comes from her connection to the world, her relationships with others and with herself. “I don’t need to travel the planet or hire dancers to find a muse. My individual

journey is inspiration enough,” Bradley says. “The figure to me is the perfect vehicle to communicate the human condition. My definition of success is to be a visionary through truthful and courageous artwork— work that communicates what it feels like to be alive in the world today. My goal is to make what feels real, not necessarily beautiful, in order to impact people and create lasting fine art.”

6 RJD Gallery, Hour Glass, oil on canvas, 78½ x 59", by Salvatorre Alessi. 7 RJD Gallery, Shades of Blue, mixed media and oil, 47½ x 36", by Phillip Thomas. 8 Lotton Gallery, A Soft Touch, oil on canvas, 40 x 24", by Marina Marina. 9 RJD Gallery, Class Reunion II, oil on canvas, 63 x 63", by Andre Zadorine. 10 Paige Bradley, Bow, bronze (shown in clay), 39 x 21 x 12"

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Teresavito.com

PAIGE BRADLEY “trust� - suspended series bronze (39 x 20 x 16 in)

California Florida Charleston Atlanta New Jersey Santa Fe New Orleans Houston Singapore London

HOPE 54"x24" oil & metal leaf

Studio - Stamford CT

This is my expression of HOPE

Private tours by appointment.

a painting which celebrates the wonders of beauty and light,

www.paigebradley.com

of a world filled with infinite possibilities, and with the belief that hope is the sacred prayer that sustains us.


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11 Paige Bradley, Fashion was created to keep us out of politics, No. 3, graphite on canvas with shellac, 24 x 36" 12 Teresa Vito, Over The Rainbow, oil on linen, 30 x 40" 13 Principle Gallery, The Long Fare, oil on panel, 24 x 26", by Joseph Lorusso. 14 Richard Stravitz, V-Seat, bronze, 20½ x 11 x 7" 15 Richard Stravitz, Grace, bronze, 20 ½ x 10 x 8" 13

RICHARD STRAVITZ

(757) 305-9411 richardstravitzsculpture@cox.net www.richardstravitzsculpture.com Richard Stravitz is a native of Manhasset, Long Island, a former Marine and retired chairman of Boar’s Head Provisions in Brooklyn, New York, who pursued a growing interest in art, painting with oils and sculpting wood in his spare time. In 1983, Stravitz moved to Richmond, Virginia, and took early retirement in 1990 to pursue his lifelong love of art and sculpting. These days, he has the joy of devoting himself to creating marvelous bronze pieces with 048

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the technique used by the sculptors of ancient Rome. His pieces remain true to their subject, with muscle and sinew realistically wrought, magically revealed; the soul of the subject emerges as well. A compliment to his ability to capture movement and detail, Stravitz is widely recognized for his distinctive ability to sculpt emotion.

TERESA VITO

teresavito@juno.com www.teresavito.com Teresa Vito’s figurative oil paintings express her love for storytelling. Her images

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span from genre paintings influenced by her travels to allegorical scenes of friends and contemporaries. Yoga, in conjunction with a spiritual practice, is the inspiration for her series Sacred Moments. Her paintings, though personal, embody universal truths that are relevant to all people throughout time. “The belief that music has the power to permeate our creative vibration and transport us outside ourselves while simultaneously anchoring us to our internal rhythm is the inspiration of Into The Mystic,” says Vito. “Over The Rainbow is a visual

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prayer, painted for a friend as she embarks on a new adventure in her life.”

PRINCIPLE GALLERY

208 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, (703) 739-9326 Info@principlegallery.com www.principlegallery.com

“Figurative art has a unique ability to communicate with the viewer. As different as we people may be, we all know in our own way what it is like to experience the world as a human being,” says Pamela Sommer, lead gallery assistant at Principle Gallery. “Therefore, as soon as even the hint of


ARTHUR EGELI

“Against the Current” 30 x 40, oil on canvas

“Afloat”, 24x24, oil

www.

micheleusibelli . com 206-999-7558

E G E L I G A L L E RY 382 Commercial Street, Provincetown, MA 02657 (508) 487-0044 • www.egeligallery.com

MISSING AN ISSUE? VISIT AMERICANARTCOLLECTOR.COM/PASTISSUES OR CALL 1 877 9470792 TO PURCHASE PAST ISSUES

Create a library of fine art in your home by purchasing past issues of American Art Collector. Enjoy timeless works of art, follow artists’ careers, and explore gallery and museum exhibitions and coast-tocoast art destinations that continue to define the nation’s art market. Collectors of Contemporary art rely upon American Art Collector to stay informed on the latest works from the country’s top contemporary artists as well as artwork from historic Western masters. Our magazine allows collectors to get a real sense of art that is coming available for sale—and opportunity to buy it right off our pages. Stay informed on the latest exhibits across the country, subscribe today online at

WWW.AMERICANARTCOLLECTOR.COM

Tropic of Cancer,Oil on Linen, 73x 64"

Benjamin F. Long IV www.BenLongFineArt.com


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a figure is present in a work of art, it is an instant entry point for the viewer to make a connection to it and begin to understand the artwork and the feelings it evokes. Figurative art is a celebration of what we all experience as human beings—the beauty and complexity of human body we occupy as well as the vast myriad of experiences and emotions that we go through.”

SCOTTSDALE ARTISTS’ SCHOOL

3720 N. Marshall Way, Scottsdale, AZ 85251, (888) 333-5707 www.scottsdaleartschool.org Scottsdale Artists’ School offers a variety of workshops and weekly classes creatively geared toward artists of all ages, levels and interests including figurative and portrait painting. In January, David Shelvino will host an alla prima figure painting workshop that will highlight techniques used to create a fresh, direct response to the figurative subject. In March, Susan Lyon will lead 050

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16 Scottsdale Artists’ School, Mel Dressing, oil on panel, 19 x 17", by David Shevlino. 17 Principle Gallery, Firelight Sonata, oil on linen, 40 x 30", by Gavin Glakas.

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a workshop that will focus on painting the costumed model in a scene. Join these instructors, and many others, at Scottsdale Artists’ School during the 2016-2017 season. For additional upcoming workshops, visit the school’s website.

GEORGE MAMOS

New York, NY www.georgemamos.com “A great portrait painting goes far beyond merely capturing a faithful likeness. It must be a work of art,” says George Mamos. “It must show emotional appeal, sensitivity and spontaneity. It must reflect the child’s personality, energy and uniqueness.

18 Principle Gallery, Blackness, oil on canvas, 35½ x 23½", by Anna Wypych. 19 Scottsdale Artists’ School, Hannah, oil on canvas, 24 x 30", by Susan Lyon.

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“To me the genius painting is the one that preserves the spirit of the child,” he continues. “Lines must be fluid and paint cannot be flat. My son’s portrait has been with him in his room since he was a young child as a constant reminder of being loved and valued. He’s now all grown up. What a difference between that and a painting of flowers.”

20 George Mamos, Leo’s Locomotive, oil, 20 x 24" 21 Teresa Vito, Into The Mystic, oil on linen, 36 x 24"

CANYON FINE ART

205 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501, (505) 955-1500 www.canyonfineart.com

CANYON Fine Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico, represents a number of figurative artists


ALEXANDER BOSTIC A Friend For Life

Bronze & Stainless Steel 82"h x 42"w x 20"deep, with base Edition of 4

Syd Sleeping, oil, 34 x 34"

Starkville, MS 804-502-3151

Betty Branch Sculpture Studio & Gallery 123 Norfolk Ave, Roanoke, VA 24006 bettybranch.com (540) 344-4994

WWW.ALEXBOSTIC.COM LSR Art Collector Ad2 v1.1.pdf

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Lori S Robinson

www.lorisrobinson.com

@lorisrobinsonpaintings

SCOTTSDALE

ARTWALK

I SPY SANTA Clouds Over Sea Ranch Bay

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Oil 18x24

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December 8, 2016 6:30 - 9:30 pm

Downtown Scottsdale is alive with Christmas and holiday fun. Downtown streets are adorned with festive lights and merchants are more than happy to spread a little cheer! If you find yourself in town for the holidays, the I Spy Santa Gold Palette ArtWalk is a must see. Besides the outside decorations, performers and hot chocolate stand, the art galleries are more stuffed with great art than Santa’s bag! And for all of the little kids and excited grown ups, Santa is wandering the streets! Take a selfie with Santa. Ho, ho, ho!

TH(e)Gallery E

Every Thursday Night 7pm – 9pm

10/27/16 12:26 PM

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491 Greenwich Street San Francisco CA 94133 T 415 767 9794 www.telegraphhillgallery.com

Sponsored by the City of Scottsdale and the SCVB. www.scottsdalegalleries.com


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including Jane Radstrom, who creates contemporary realistic works in paste and mixed media, and realistic sculptor Paige Bradley. In Radstrom’s paintings, the human form moves with layered poses, as if it’s printed with lenticular lenses depending on how it’s viewed. Her double-exposure figures showcase complexity and emotion, with a nod to classical figure painting, in contemporary realization. Of her work, Bradley explains, “As much as I try to avoid labeling myself, I am a figurative artist in everything I do. The figure to me is the perfect vehicle to communicate the human condition. My definition of success is to be a visionary through truthful and courageous artwork, work that communicates what it feels like to be alive in the world today.”

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WESTWARD GALLERY

4400 Tennyson Street, Denver, CO 80212, (720) 483-1046 www.westwardgallery.com

Michelle Courier, a Michigan native, moved to the mountains of Colorado to pursue her passion of Western landscape painting. Her life spent hiking and painting impressionistic acrylic landscapes throughout the United States, Courier has captured Miami’s architecture, Michigan’s woods, Lake Tahoe, California’s waterscapes, and now, has moved on to her next venture. Westward Gallery, located in Denver is co-owned by Courier and Patti Klapish who together, both Midwesterners, have begun their next frontier. As artist in residence, Courier now has the gallery and studio she’s been traveling and searching for, a place where she finally has the mountains and ready-to-paint landscape right in her own backyard.

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22 Elaine G. Coffee, Appreciating Western Art, oil on canvas, 20 x 30" 23 CANYON Fine Art, Soar, bronze, ed. of 18, 48 x 19 x 16", by Paige Bradley. 24 Elaine G. Coffee, Divas in Training, oil on canvas, 12 x 16" 25 George Mamos, Tina, oil, 40 x 24"

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26 CANYON Fine Art, Sam Study, oil on canvas, 8 x 8", by Jane Radstrom. 27 Paige Bradley, represented by CANYON Fine Art, works on one of her ballet sculptures. 28 Westward Gallery, Portland Babes, acrylic, 36 x 36", by Michelle Courier. 29 Westward Gallery, Miami Models, acrylic, 54 x 36", by Michelle Courier. 30 Westward Gallery, Venus De Miami, acrylic, 54 x 36", by Michelle Courier. 31 The John C. Doyle Art Gallery, Masquerade, oil on canvas, 60 x 36", by John Carroll Doyle. 32 Elaine G. Coffee, Santa Card 2013, oil on canvas, 16 x 20" 33 The John C. Doyle Art Gallery, Poetry Lover, oil on canvas, 48 x 60", by John Carroll Doyle.

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ELAINE G. COFFEE

(480) 227-3690, gcstudio@yahoo.com www.elainecoffee.com “The figure has always been my primary focus,” Elaine G. Coffee says, “whether in portraits or as part of an environment. I like to refer to my approach as contemporary ‘genre’ painting—capturing people moving through their daily lives, gathering in restaurants, wandering through museums, even riding subways.” Born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Coffee studied at the School of

Visual Arts in New York City, so painting urban life was a natural fit for the artist. A trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art even inspired her “slice of life” paintings. She found herself focusing more on the people looking at the paintings than the artwork. Coffee explains that she became interested in “how the visitors were engaged by the art and with one another, and how they related—or not—to each.”

THE JOHN C. DOYLE ART GALLERY

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BETT Y BRANCH

Betty Branch Sculpture Studio & Gallery, 123 Norfolk Avenue, Roanoke, VA 24006, (540) 344-4994 www.bettybranch.com Over a 30-year period, Betty Branch has focused her artwork on the female form and has defined female rites of passage

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The John C. Doyle Art Gallery has continued to thrive since John C. Doyle’s passing in 2014, as he specifically wished to continue his legacy by keeping the gallery open and adding new impressionistic artists to the vast inventory of pieces he left

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125 Church Street, Charleston SC, 29401, (843)-577-7344 www.johncdoyle.com

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behind. Doyle’s work includes a number of figurative oils and nearly 100 museum-quality giclées of sold works. The gallery says, “As Charleston continues to grow and the ‘Old Charleston’ that John knew is rapidly altered, he is one of the few native artists of Charleston whose art tells true stories of the times when we were still a sleepy romantic town that he wandered through as a curious child, and he clearly found inspiration at every turn. We are honored to tell his stories to new generations, and hope to honor him for years to come!”


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the model as the lead in a romantic movie or novel. I feel like a cinematographer attempting to catch exactly the right image that will reveal the soul of these characters.”

on figures, places in spatial tension rather than by a narrative.” Long strives to create works done only from life; knowledge of human anatomy, and appreciation of the emotional elements of composition, atmosphere and color.

in bronze, stone, fiber, ceramic, terra cotta, earthenware and straw. An award-winning artist, her pieces have shown internationally and been the subjects of television documentaries. Ranging from small to monumental, the works are found in private, corporate, university and museum collections. Branch has exhibited in solo and group shows, including the Brookgreen Gardens invitational.

“I count figurative masters like Sargent, Zorn and Fechin as influences. Although I respond to a dramatic landscape or still life setup, nothing is as intriguing to me as the figure,” says William A. Schneider. “The curves, lines and angles of the form are beautiful in their own right, but it is our humanity that demands to be painted. I often imagine

“I am interested in putting the figure in space in ways that are ambiguous but at the same time have a mysterious hold to it,” says artist Ben Long. “I do not look for a story line. My main focus is

36 Alexander Bostic, Ms. Betsy, acrylic, 36 x 24" 37 E.L. Stewart, Long Road, acrylic on stretched canvas, 48 x 60"

Represented by Gallery Russia, Scottsdale, AZ www.galleryrussia.com Jones & Terwilliger Galleries, Palm Desert, CA, Carmel, CA www.jones-terwilliger-galleries.com

www.schneiderart.com

BEN LONG

35 Cathrine Edlinger-Kunze, Where the land meets the sea, acrylic on linen, 50 x 34"

CATHRINE EDLINGER-KUNZE

WILLIAM A. SCHNEIDER, AISM, OPA, PSA-MP

B.F.Long IV Studios www.benlongfineart.com

34 Ben Long, Great Grandmothers Chair, oil on linen, 55 x 44"

38 The John C. Doyle Art Gallery, The South, oil on canvas, 40 x 30", by John Carroll Doyle.

Cathrine Edlinger-Kunze creates work of subtle elegance and quiet depth. The work simmers with brilliance and lingers with the viewer long after they have passed it. Although she is working and living in

39 Betty Branch, Emma, bronze, ed. of 12, 37" 40 Cathrine Edlinger-Kunze, See the road she goes down, acrylic on linen, 44 x 44" 41 William A. Schneider, AISM, OPA, PSA-MP , Moonlight Becomes Her, 40 x 30" 42 E.L. Stewart, Storm in Man, acrylic on stretched canvas, 30 x 30" 43 E.L. Stewart, Morning and Evening, acrylic on stretched canvas, 48 x 48" 44 William A. Schneider, AISM, OPA, PSA-MP, Platinum, oil on linen, 24 x 18" 45 Michele Usibelli, The Shore, gouache, 7 x 5"

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E.L. STEWART

(509) 327-2456, www.elstewart.com

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MICHELE USIBELLI

(206) 999-7558 www.micheleusibelli.com

“For me, the process of creating beings with a scene that I feel carries a certain energy and evokes an emotion. I find myself drawn to subject matter with rich colors or intriguing light. The vignettes of everyday life inspire me to paint, regardless of whether it’s a landscape, figurative work, cityscape or portrait,” says Michelle Usibelli. “It is my primary goal to have each artwork I create resonate with energy and the poetry of light.”

ALEXANDER BOSTIC

Starkville, MS, (804) 502-3151 www.alexbostic.com

A traditional portraitist, Alexander Bostic likes his

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works to be intimate paintings that tell a small story of the subject’s personality. “I would like to make a connection with the human condition,” he says. Bostic has always been drawn to fantasy art, which is a combination of myth and reality. “I am interested in using this style to create portraits of genre scenes. I use color and light source in my compositions to depict an imaginative environment and existence for the figures,” he says.

EGELI GALLERY

382 Commercial Street Provincetown, MA 02657 (508) 487-0044 www.egeligallery.com “I was looking for a modern figure motif, one that showed

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E.L. Stewart says her current figurative work is a homecoming of sorts. “Early

on, I painted much more of a realist figure, partially because of my anatomy training to be an illustrator. In my mid-career, I immersed myself in expressionism and experimentation,” she says. “The painting that I do now is a convergence of these. I find that my desire is more intense, coupled with my painting experience, to convey social commentary, intimacy (very nearly unbearable) and significant parts of our relationships through my ultimately physical and thought-provoking paintings. To find out more about Stewart, visit her website, and “don’t be shy about sending a note,” she says. “I would love to hear from you.”

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the United States, she was trained by her father and other masters in Germany; this dual consciousness and international identity allows her work to transcend culture. Her paintings have many layers of forms, washes of color and traces of geometric objects. Her work is extremely pleasing to the senses and intense at the same time. She is represented by Gallery Russia and Jones & Terwilliger Galleries, which will have a solo show for her in February.

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figures in action in a realist setting. Something more than a sporting event, where the human body was being used as a tool in tasks that only a human could do. I was painting a portrait on a beach in North Carolina when a group of young men starting fishing with a seine net. It was an activity meant for a painting. They welcomed me to take photos of them and out of the 1,000 photos or so I took that day, I painted this series,” says Arthur Egeli, whose work March to the Sea is among those pieces.

GRENNING GALLERY

17 Washington Street, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, (631) 725-8469 www.grenninggallery.com Celebrating 20 years in business in 2017, the Grenning Gallery has nurtured many classically trained painters so they can pursue their passion. Since the beginning, Grenning has had an interest in figurative paintings. Ramiro has been with the gallery since it first opened its doors in December on Greene Street in SoHo, NYC. His sophisticated figurative paintings are a cornerstone to the gallery’s rich spectrum of work. The most recent

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works, Hymn and Allegory to Chopin (Nocturne), offer two examples of poetic realism. Ben Fenske’s current series, the Bea Nudes, are examples of what a great living painter can create within the figurative realm. Grenning also shows the work of many living figurative painters including Anthony Ackrill, Stephen Bauman, Rob Bodem, Marc Dalessio, Kate Lehman, Kristy Gordon, Dan Graves, Travis Schlaht, Patricia Watwood, and more.

CHRISTIANE DAVID FINE ART GALLERY

112 N. Prince Street, Lancaster, PA 17630, (717) 293-0809 www.christianedavid.com While Christiane David describes her painting style as free and spontaneous,

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technique is the tool she always keeps in mind. She paints without fear and follows her instinct. Sometimes magical things happen. When David paints either a landscape, a floral or a model, she likes to capture the very soul of the subject, translating life and emotion into colors and movement. “The human body is a beautiful landscape and the perfect balance of strength and fragility,” she says. David’s paintings can be seen on her website and also in her gallery in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She welcomes commission works as well.

46 Grenning Gallery, Allegory to Chopin (Nocturne), oil on canvas, 29½ x 41½", by Ramiro. 47 Egeli Gallery, March to the Sea, oil on canvas, 24 x 48", by Arthur Egeli. 48 Grenning Gallery, Hymn, oil on canvas, 57 x 35.43", by Ramiro. 49 Christiane David Fine Art Gallery, The Interpreter, oil, 36 x 24" 50 Christiane David Fine Art Gallery, Louise, oil, 30 x 24", by Christiane David. 51 Christiane David Fine Art Gallery, Possessed, oil, 24 x 30", by Christiane David.


DECEMBER 1 - 4 2016 / 6625 INDIAN CREEK DRIVE / MIAMI BEACH

MIAMI-PROJECT.COM


COLLECTOR HOME

D ES E RT DW E L L I N G A N E C L E C T I C A N D A E S T H E T I C A L LY PLEASING COLLEC TION FILLS THIS MODERN HOME IN TUCSON, ARIZONA. BY JOHN O’HERN

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n the foothills outside of Tucson, Arizona, is a contemporary home skillfully fitted into the landscape by architect Kevin B. Howard, AIA. Part of his mandate was to design a “modern, minimal home: a box that seemed to have landed in the desert,” and to accommodate a large and eclectic collection of art amassed by his clients. The couple met in Cincinnati when he was an art director for a greeting card company and she was studying for her degree in pharmacy at the University of Cincinnati. He had begun collecting art by his college classmates in graphic design at Miami

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University in Oxford, Ohio. “During our courting and early marriage,” she admits, “I didn’t get it at first. All of the walls of his efficiency apartment were covered with art. He introduced me to his passion and I began looking at art, furniture and architecture. I enjoyed decorative arts and soon I became interested in collecting.” She became so interested, in fact, that she decided she didn’t need an engagement ring and chose to put the money into art for their new home. They began buying signed multiples by artists such as Robert Indiana that, at that time, 2

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1 Architect Kevin B. Howard, AIA, designed this contemporary home that skillfully fits into the Tucson, Arizona, landscape.

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2 The bronze study on the coffee table is by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973). On the desk is a small bronze Head of Balzac, 1897, by Auguste Rodin (1840-1917). The bookcase contains a collection of Benin bronze figures and African masks from the 1950s. To the left are a Benin bronze rooster and two small oil paintings by Michael Nakoneczny, 1982. To the right is a painted wood Gospel Singer, 1987, by Johannes Maswanganyi.


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could be found for about $125. Since their home was near the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Art Academy, they began to collect the work of friends who worked there. They graduated from their shotgun house in Mount Adams and bought a large Victorian house in nearby Covington, Kentucky, where they lived for 40 years. In a 1985 magazine article on their home, she said that when they saw the house on a house tour “My husband immediately thought it was wonderful. I thought it was a big, ugly monster.” He advises, “You do it one room at a time. After six, eight, 10 years, you have a wonderful house.” She notes, “The aesthetic of some of the houses we’ve lived in made us collect certain kinds of art.” Their home in Covington was filled with art of the period, some of which has found its way to a special place in their home in Tucson. The “Salon des Refusés” is a wonderful Chinese red lacquered powder room off the entry. Among other things, it houses a gilt Chippendale mirror, two Goya etchings, a Picasso, two Taos paintings by Joseph Henry Sharp, a Worthington Whittredge and a Thomas Cole. She explained that it took her husband six or seven hours to arrange and hang all the art in the small room. The collection of primarily contemporary art contrasts with a large collection of African art in their study. That collection is complemented by an extraordinary sculpture by Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973) and a small Head of Balzac by Auguste Rodin (1840-1917). She explains, “We went to a show of African art at Closson’s, a furniture, interiors and art store in Cincinnatti. A dealer was selling a large collection of African art he had purchased in the ’70s. We bought a few things and eventually began buying more. We went to Closson’s almost every Saturday to look at their model rooms and to look through their art. We almost starved to death, but we always paid cash.” She continues, “In the ’90s, my husband had friends who were art dealers. They told him about a company that had put together a collection of contemporary art with the help of Marlborough Gallery in New York. The new owners didn’t want the collection and it was being sold. We walked into the offices and there was fabulous art everywhere. We bought three Auerbachs, the Katz, a Larry Rivers.” He notes that they have donated about 25 percent of their collection to the Miami University Art Museum and have been able to take advantage of the tax benefits of its


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3 In the front entrance is Thomas Bacher’s acrylic and luminous paint, 1959 Porsche with portraits of the owners at the Zip Dip, 1998. On the stand to the left is a bronze Selfportrait - Oviri, 1891, by Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). 4 On the table behind the couch is a bronze broccoli form sculpture from 1965 by Harry Bertoia (1915-1978). Against the far wall to the left of the fireplace is John Dickinson’s tin and brass faux draped table, 1978, with a Robert Hasselle bronze sculpture of a cake, Slice of Life, 1970, on top. Over the fireplace is a Robert Barber abstract oil painting,1964. On the stand by the fireplace is Hasselle’s bronze doll head with machine guns, World Bank, 1971. 5 Over the buffet is Alex Katz’s oil Ada in the striped sweater, 1981. The large painting near the table is Thomas Bacher’s acrylic and luminous paint work Times Square with Fujifilm neon ad, 1981. To the right of the opening is Jan Albers’ bronze abstract wall sculpture, 2013. At the end of the table behind the couch is a Superstudio: Misura Series Infinity Box, 1971.

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7 By the outdoor fireplace is the owner’s limestone sculpture Oxford Christ, 1963. The long hall wall on the main floor features works hung salon style including pieces by Thomas Bacher, Victor Skrebneski, Jasper Johns, Thomas Hart Benton, Edgar Yaeger, the owner and several other. To the right of the doorway is a mixed media collage Cigarette, 1998, by Tom Wesselmann (1931-2004).

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6 In the stair hall adjacent to the study is Chen Guang Ming’s oil painting of a Chinese Coal Miner, 2008.


8 The large oil painting in the master bedroom is of a Parisian girl at her toilette by Reginald Grooms (19001989). The bookcase is filled with bibelots from the owners’ previous Victorian home, including a French bronze by Denys Puech (1854-1942), Le Syrene, 1920; and a Benin bronze of a seated queen figure with child, circa 1950s. 9 The large painting on the lower right of the red lacquered powder room is an Indian painting by Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953). Directly opposite is an 1860 view of the Hudson River Valley by Thomas Cole (18011848). In the hallway on the upper left is a lithograph, Photographing the Bull, 1970, by Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1965). Beneath it is a 2001 photograph of smoke rings by Donald Sultan. At the bottom right is an oil and mixed media portrait by Edgar Yaeger. Next to it is a portrait plate by Piero Fornasetti (1913-1988). 10 Sitting on the chest of drawers in the master bedroom is a painted steel Falling Man sculpture, 1964, by Ernest Trova. On the facing wall are, left to right, a 1939 oil painting of a Mexican woman by Grace Martin Taylor (1903-1995) and an oil painting of three Jamaican women, 1934, by Reginald Grooms (1900-1989). On the left wall is a Taylor oil painting of Marguerite Smoking, 1943, and a carved wood African mask, circa 1950s. 11 Beneath the stairs are Nacho Rodriguez Bach’s painted fiberglass pool balls, #8, #4 & #3, 2015. On the near wall is Alan Rath’s electronic A Million a Day, 2007. On the far wall is Thomas Bacher’s acrylic and luminous paint work Times Square with Taxi, 1998. The painting to the right is David Rodman’s oil Bird/Plane, 1995. In the center of gallery is one of six Donald Judd (1928-1994) stained plywood chairs, 1991.

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was under construction and we were able to change the wiring to be able to hang it where we wanted it.” They were also able to have a wall reinforced during construction to bear the weight of a small but heavy wall sculpture by Jan Albers. She confides happily, “Art is our religion and we tithe to it on a regular basis!”

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first museum show for the then-92-year-old artist. (“92½!” he corrected an interviewer.) Although the couple actively looks for pieces for their collection, she admits, “a lot of things were by chance. We went to Wright auction house in Chicago and went to their Wright Now department that has works on consignment. We saw Frank Gehry’s Cloud light. The Tucson house

COLL E C TOR HO M E

appreciated value to acquire more art. She explains, “Everything we’ve bought has been an aesthetic decision. We haven’t thought about artists becoming famous or their work becoming valuable. When we were in Covington we went to auction houses, the Art Academy in Cincinnati as well as wonderful estate sales.” “We bought what I call Cincinnati impressionists,” he adds. “I worked 40 years in product development and have been able to use my art aesthetic throughout my career.” There are, in fact, several pieces of his own creation featured around their home. Their friend Thomas Bacher was born in Cincinnati and went to the academy as well as to Yale and Pratt. “We began collecting him when he was a student at the academy,” he recalls. “Ivan Karp represented him at O.K. Harris in New York. When he was in New York, Chuck Close had divided his studio with drywall and let him use the other side.” There are a number of Bacher’s paintings in the collection including one featuring the collectors themselves. They have become active in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tucson. It’s ironic that I recognized a painting by Robert Barber in their collection that I had seen in an exhibition at MoCA last year. It was the


AS WE SEE IT

NEW BRITAIN MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART DISPLAYS MORE THAN 80 CONTEMPORARY REALIST PAINTINGS FROM THE COLLECTION OF GAIL AND ERNST VON METZSCH. By John O’Hern

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he exhibition As We See It: The Collection of Gail and Ernst von Metzsch continues at the New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, Connecticut, through January 8. It showcases more than 80 of the couple’s 200 paintings collected over 40 years. They have actively supported and befriended primarily regional artists. A highlight of the catalog to the exhibition is their reminiscences of the artists, their acquiring particular pieces and their development as proponents of contemporary realism. I was told about the exhibition by Janet Monafo, two of whose giant pastels are in the exhibition. One of her small 1 pastels greets me each time Janet Monafo, Open I walk into my living room. Heart, 1994, pastel I cherish the Monafo but, on paper, 46 x 58" 064

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2 George Nick, Joe’s American Bar and Grill, 2008, oil on linen, 50 x 40" 3 Paul Rahilly, Still Life with Bread and Water, 1993, oil on canvas, 18 x 22"

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symphony in the key of white. Gail and Ernst von Metszch are not wedded to a particular period of their artists’ work nor are they averse to their artists changing directions. Ernst says, “We try to follow it, but our heart essentially is into the art you can relate to—if it’s interesting to us.” Gail explains, “It’s fascinating to see the artists evolve. I like watching them grow—that’s particularly interesting to me. I think once we support an artist we get some understanding of what they’re doing and what they’re accomplishing we want to continue that.” Eric Aho comfortably straddles representation and abstraction. Ernst writes, “I don’t remember how we discovered his work, but what immediately attracted me was his ability to paint clouds in a believable way. Clouds are abstract forms. They reflect the light around them in a variety of ways, depending on the time of day and the character of the land or sea surfaces below them. It appears rather straightforward to put them on canvas, as it looks like you can get them right without too much effort at drawing. The opposite is true, as it is very hard not to make them look awkward…Without being able to explain why, I think Aho is successful in moving toward abstraction because of his ability to come up with interesting skies in a representational manner.” He describes Wilderness (Summer 1903), 2008, as, for him, “the point when abstraction got the upper hand.”

AS WE S E E I T

until now, secretly coveted a painting by her husband Paul Rahilly. His large, complex scenes with figures are stunning and several are in the exhibition. It is a small painting, Still Life with Bread and Water, 1993, that caused me to break one of the commandments. The crusty, flour-covered bread begs to be split open, not sliced, to reveal the soft, warm, aromatic center. For me, Rahilly’s loaves of bread not only evoke “breadness” but they are made with a thick, luscious impasto of paint. His paintings, such as The Violinist, 1980, are often full of unexplainable “stuff,” perhaps relating to the figure, but perhaps more for the fun of arranging them and painting them. As Katherine French writes in her essay for the catalog, “Rahilly is in love with the tactility of material. Well-painted objects do not interpret the world, but rather allow us to see it through an aesthetic lens that Rahilly holds up.” Monafo revels in the arrangement of objects in her still lifes. She once dumped a pile of silver items on the floor and resolved to paint them. But she couldn’t resist the urge to do a little rearranging and then painted the grouping from several directions. One of them, Silver Cluster (North View), is in the von Metzsch collection. Open Heart, 1994, is a careful arrangement of white objects, some with blue rims. Known for her vibrant color, she has composed here a


Aho recalls John Constable (1776-1837) who knew the landscapes he painted so well that he painted from memory, suggesting the essence of the scene rather than recording its detail. “When you relax, the way you look out at the subject and the way your eye takes it in and the hand that makes the mark are all in harmony.” Ernst approaches clouds from the viewpoint not only of a collector but as an artist. Both he and his daughter Julia von Metzsch Ramos are painters and have paintings in the exhibition. His wife, Gail, writes about a more visceral response to clouds. Her family didn’t have art in their home but she studied art and music appreciation in college. “They opened up a new world to me,” she recounts. On one of their first dates, Ernst and Gail went to the opening of an exhibition of paintings by Jacob van Ruisdael at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. “Upon entering the gallery I was welcomed by landscape paintings of infinite Dutch skies and piles upon piles of dramatic clouds. To me they were alive. Clouds have always 4

4 Eric Aho, Wilderness (Summer 1903), 2008, oil on linen, 40 x 50" 5 Joseph McNamara, Shreveport Scrap and Salvage Depot, 20102011, oil on panel, 42 x 58" 6 Bernard Chaet, Dusk, 2002, oil on canvas, 15 x 30" 7 Paul Rahilly, The Violinist, 1980, oil on canvas, 60 x 40" Artwork courtesy Gail and Ernst von Metzsch.

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been important to me. As a child, I would lie in the grass and study them. I told people I could see the molecules that composed them. Clouds gave me great solace and calm during distressing times. At that exhibit I began to understand how representational paintings were also involved in harmony and balance, composition and color, and held their own sense of geometry.” In her foreword to the catalog, the museum’s director, Min Jung Kim, writes about the collector’s closeness to the artists whose work they collect. “Rather than collecting encyclopedically, Gail and Ernst have acquired the work of select artists in-depth, a practice that reflects their dedication to nurturing and developing personal relationships with artists. They have been consistent with their encouragement and support throughout artists’ oeuvres, but perhaps most importantly at crucial moments in artists’ careers.” I ask them about their concentration primarily on New England artists. Ernst replies, “When you live somewhere you see the atmosphere all the time. In a way, you can relate better to people who work in the same environment. I grew up in Holland and can recognize Dutch paintings pretty quickly. It’s more interesting to be living in the area where the artists are.”

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When: Through January 8, 2017 Where: New Britain Museum of American Art, 56 Lexington Street, New Britain, CT 06052 Information: (860) 229-0257, www.nbmaa.org

AS WE S E E I T

AS WE SEE IT: THE COLLECTION OF GAIL AND ERNST VON METZSCH


VACATIONS 2017 We have put together a calendar of the best workshops with a group of world-famous artists as your tutors. We’ll paint and sketch, go sightseeing, explore out-of-the-way places as well as the legendary sights of each country we visit. All our tutors will give you helpful and friendly advise on how to improve your painting to make sure you come back with a sketchbook full of memories.

Greg Allen “In the footsteps of Hans Heysen” FLINDERS RANGES, CLARE VALLEY AND HAHNDORF, AUSTRALIA

Sunday 12 March - Friday 24 March, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in spectacular South Australia. Highlights include the rugged scenery of the Flinders Ranges, one of Australia’s oldest wine regions, the Clare Valley, and historic Hahndorf in the Adelaide Hills.

John Lovett

CENTRAL AUSTRALIA

Sunday 14 May - Friday 26 May, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in the spectacular Australian Outback. Highlights include exploring Australia’s Red Centre from Alice Springs, the spectacular Uluru and the outback oasis of Glen Helen, situated in the West MacDonnell Ranges. For all the colour and rugged beauty of the Australian Outback laid out before your easel, who better to lead this tour than John Lovett, one of Australia’s most respected painters. If you want to experience adventure and the best of teaching, don’t miss this workshop.

Amanda Hyatt

SICILY & TUSCANY, ITALY

Monday 21 August - Saturday 2 September, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure in the beautiful Tuscan town of Bagno Vignoni and Sicily in Italy. You will paint the beautiful towns in Tuscany as well as the historic towns on the island of Sicily. For all the color and beauty of Italy laid out before your easel, who better to lead this tour than Amanda Hyatt, one of water colourists’ most respected painters. If you want to experience adventure, and the best of teaching, don’t miss this workshop.


Charles Reid

COTSWOLDS & ST IVES, UK

Thursday 24 August - Tuesday 5 September, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and adventure around the beautiful quaint villages of the Cotswold’s and the coastal town of St Ives. Paint some of the very best sights to be found in England and experience the outstanding blend of historic locations, authentic village atmospheres and exemplary teaching from one of the world’s finest watercolor artists.

Greg Allen

CINQUE TERRE & RADDA IN CHIANTI, ITALY

Monday 4 September - Saturday 16 September, 2017 Paint some of the very best sights to be found in Italy. Cinque Terre is an artist’s dream where you will be able to paint the dramatic views of the five villages along the Italian coast. We then travel to Tuscany to experience the stunning scenery of the Chianti region. This 13 day painting workshop with Greg Allen gives members the opportunity to truly experience ‘la dolce vita’, the sweet life.

John Lovett VIETNAM

Thursday 5 October - Tuesday 17 October, 2017 This workshop offers 13 days of painting and sightseeing in Vietnam. From bustling cities and charming towns, to the picturesque countryside where you can see the stereotypical image of Vietnam, of a smiling farm worker wearing a coneshaped hat and standing in a rice paddy. This is your opportunity to paint some of the most amazing scenery in Vietnam. This is a wonderful tour for non-painting partners or friends as there is so much to see and do.

USA: 866 552 4278 (Toll Free) AUSTRALIA: 1800 033 436 (Toll Free) ALL OTHER COUNTRIES: +61 3 9729 8722

VACATIONS 2017

Website: www.paintingworkshops.net Email: sales@paintingworkshops.net


NAPLES, FLORIDA. PHOTO: LMSPENCER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The Art Lover's Guide to Collecting Fine Art in

FLORIDA A

s temperatures being to cool off in Florida, the state prepares for the kickoff of its peak art season. During the month of December, and those following, there are countless must-attend art events taking place, making it a hotbed of cultural activity. From fine art fairs to plein air paint outs, gallery shows and museum exhibitions, there is something to experience around every turn. One of the most prominent art events is Miami Art Week, taking place this year from November 28 to December 4. As part of the week, approximately 20 fairs will take over Miami and Miami Beach, offering access to thousands of galleries and dealers specializing in all different styles of fine art. Art Basel Miami Beach, from November 30 to December 4, features more than 260 modern and contemporary art galleries displaying work by over 4,000 artists. The fifth

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annual Miami Project, from December 1 to 4, will have 50 galleries exhibiting and includes a VIP Preview on December 1 from noon to 4 p.m. Happening at Indian Beach Park from December 1 to 4 is PULSE Miami Beach, which displays the work of emerging to mid-career artists from 75 local and international galleries. Art Miami, held November 29 to December 4, showcases important 20th- and 21st-century artworks in collaboration with a selection of galleries from around the globe. Other art fairs happen throughout the state, such as Art Palm Beach, which will celebrate its milestone 20th annual edition from January 18 to 22. There are a number of events produced by Palm Beach Show Group to attend, including Palm Beach Jewelry • Antiques • Design from December 1 to 5; Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show from February 15 to 20; Palm Beach Fine Craft Show, February 16 to 19; and the


SARASOTA, FLORIDA. PHOTO: JO CREBBIN/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

St. Augustine Apalachicola

Sarasota

F L O R I D A

Naples

Coral Gables Hallandale Beach

Key West

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Naples Art, Antique & Jewelry Show, February 24 to 28. Old Town Naples’ Third Street shopping district is home to Gallery Row Naples, located on Borad Avenue South. For 2017, the art district will host three special art walk events on January 18, February 15 and March 15—the third Wednesday of each month. The galleries on the street will open for extended evening hours, feature new works and have art openings and artist receptions. The city also boasts events like the Naples National Art Festival, which will hold its 38th edition on February 18 and 19. Within the pages of this destination feature are a sampling of the leading artists, galleries and events that are found across Florida. Among them are Ella Frazer, Hernan Miranda, Jeff Ripple, Light Chasers, Quidley & Company Fine Art, Sally Painter, Sirona Fine Art, Susan Romaine and Terry Arroyo Mulrooney.


DESTINATION / FLORIDA

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QUIDLEY & COMPANY FINE ART 385 Broad Avenue South Naples, FL 34102, (239) 261-4300 joe@quidleyandco.com www.quidleyandco.com

1 Quidley & Company Fine Art is located on Gallery Row in Naples, Florida. 2 Quidley & Company Fine Art, A Skirmish off the Florida Coast, oil on canvas, 16 x 20", by Tim Thompson.

Quidley & Company Fine Art, with locations in Boston and 3 Nantucket, Massachusetts, Quidley & Company and in Naples, Florida, offers Fine Art, Common work by leading artists from Snook, watercolor, 29 x 41", by Flick Ford. the United States and Europe who are renowned for their period and genre. The Naples location opened last year, with Joe Panarelli serving as the gallery director. Found on Broad Avenue South, the gallery is in the heart of the city’s Gallery Row district. To kick off its 2017 exhibition season, Quidley & Company will host a new collection of artwork in conjunction with the Gallery Row season-opening art walk from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on January 18. The next two art walks will happen February 15 and March 15, with the gallery opening their next two events on those dates. The show opening on February 15 will be titled Marine Painting 19-21st Century will work by Montague Dawson, Michael Keane, Tim Thompson and other masters of the genre. The detailed and exacting paintings of fish by watercolorist Flick Ford will be on view beginning March 15 in the show Flick Ford: Painting to Scale.

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SALLY PAINTER www.sallypainterart.com Pretty Palms, Oil on Canvas, 30” x 40”

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ELLA FRAZER Naples, Florida www.ellafrazer.com govegy@aol.com

Siesta, Ikea, 16" x 20", egg tempera

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DESTINATION / FLORIDA

LIGHT CHASERS www.lightchasersinc.com Light Chasers is a plein air group with more than 500 members. The group paints all across Sarasota, Florida, and visitors to the city can arrange workshops, demonstrations, lessons and more with the group’s featured artists. Among those artists is Morgan Samuel Price, who the group explains “has technical skills few artists possess” and that she has “more repeat students than any artist we know.” In 2017, Price will host a five-day workshop from January 30 to February 3 and a three-day workshop from February 9 to 11. Other featured artists in the group include Dominic Avant, Hodges Soileau, Katie Dobson Cundiff, Michelle Held, Louise Pond,

Cory Wright, Kathleen Crane, Joseph Melancon, and Mary Erickson. A guest artist of the group is Joseph McGurl. Light Chasers will host its gala shows in March 2017

at Edson Keith Mansion in Phillippi Estate Park. This includes the Light Chaser’s Quick Draw Contest at the estate Farmers Market on March 8; the Paint Sarasota Paint Out from March 9 to

15; the sixth annual Member Show and Featured Artist Show on March 17; the Paint Sarasota Paint Out Show on March 18; and the open gallery event on March 19 from noon to 5 p.m.

1 Light Chasers, Strokes Brothers Pride & Joy, oil, 16 x 20", by Morgan Samuel Price. 2 Light Chasers, Ablaze in Bright Lights of Red and Teal, oil, 16 x 20", by Morgan Samuel Price. 3 Light Chasers, Croquet at Wildcat Cliffs, oil, 12 x 16", by Morgan Samuel Price. 1

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SIRONA FINE ART 600 Silks Run, #1240 Hallandale Beach, FL 33009 (954) 454-9494 info@sironafineart.com www.sironafineart.com Sirona Fine Art was created with the intention of bringing some of the best contemporary representational artists to South Florida, utilizing the gallery director’s three decades in NYC experiences and relationships. “The aesthetic climate of Florida can match the atmospheric climate, that of a breezy, endless summer holiday,” the gallery notes. “While there is certainly nothing wrong with that, our intentions were to create a place to promote consummate skill-based works of art that are timeless in their qualitative achievements.” Sirona Fine Art tries to support artists who pour not only their hearts and soul into their creations, but produce indisputable results of their lifetime dedication to their chosen medium. “There is more interest in realistic-based work; however, abstract still maintains a hold for people who want something original on their wall. This can make up a large portion of the

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“The local Florida art market is growing, but is undergoing the changes that all galleries are seeing, with much attention going to virtual connections and presentations. However, none of this will ever supersede the experience of viewing art in a gallery situation, and so we concentrate on a museum-quality showroom to highlight these paintings and sculptures.” —Timothy Smith, director, Sirona Fine Art buying public who are not necessarily serious or informed collectors,” says Timothy Smith, director of the gallery. “The local Florida art market is growing, but is undergoing the changes that all galleries are seeing,

2 Sirona Fine Art, Woman in Black, oil on canvas, 40 x 30", by Irvin Rodriguez.

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3 Sirona Fine Art, Night Water Butterfly, bronze with patina, 18 x 11 x 4", by Gary Weisman.

Also, no Wikipedia listing or online statement of an artist or their work can replace a passionate presentation of a caring art consultant.” The gallery has an ongoing exhibition of Gary Weisman’s classic and majestic bronze figures. Two of his 7-foot figures greet visitors at the doors, which the gallery says are “exemplar ushers to the excellence we try to present.” Opening on December 3 is Chévere, a collaboration with PoetsArtists Magazine with 50 artists. This exhibition will also integrate original poetry on the walls to reflect the artistic purity and intentions of both PoetsArtists and Sirona Fine Art.

D ESTI N ATI ON / F LOR I DA

1 Sirona Fine Art features contemporary representational work by artists who have a lifetime of dedication to their mediums.

with much attention going to virtual connections and presentations. However, none of this will ever supersede the experience of viewing art in a gallery situation, and so we concentrate on a museumquality showroom to highlight these paintings and sculptures.


DESTINATION / FLORIDA

HERNAN MIRANDA (561) 860-1626 hernanmiranda1@gmail.com www.hernanmiranda.com Hernan Miranda was born in Paraguay and he has lived in Miami since early 2006. He was a professor of the National Fine Arts School of Asunción from 1993 to 1997. Since 1993 his artwork has shown continuously in exhibitions in the United States. As a realist painter, Miranda wants his artwork to be closer to the codes of painting and not of photographic representation. He finds that “contemporary realism is based on the classic school, but more pragmatic, so every artist has more freedom in the proposal and execution of their works.” Miranda adds, “There are always new challenges, new issues and pending proposals as I am working for different markets, but always keeping my style and language.” Miranda has worked with the Asian market for 18 years, and is currently focused on more exhibitions in the United States. In 2017 his work will show in Berlin, Taiwan, Soeul, and in Coral Gables, Florida, and Los Angeles. His artwork is permanently on exhibit at Six Art Gallery in Miami, which is directed by Ines Vasconsellos.

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1 Hernan Miranda, Showered with Light (Bano de Luz), oil on fabric, 52 x 70" 2 Hernan Miranda, Taking a Break, oil on fabric, 54 x 36" 3 Hernan Miranda, Young Model, graphite, 24 x18" 2

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Jeff Ripple, Coriopsis in Spring, 8x6 oil on board

S U S A N ROMAINE

RIPPLE EFFECT STUDIO & GALLERY “Earthbound”

GALLERY

30x36, oil

REPRESENTATION

jeff@jeffrippleart.com JeffRippleArt.com

Armand Bolling Fine Art, Jupiter, FL Sugarman-Peterson Gallery, Santa Fe, NM Walker Romaine Gallery, Delray Beach, FL

843-693-0468 341 NE 3rd Ave. ssusanromaine@gmail.com Delray Beach, FL 33444 w ww. s t u d i o r o m ai ne .co m

To purchase

an Romaine.indd 1

$8.95 ea

112 NE Hunter Ave. Micanopy, FL 32667

239-398-3375

Terry Arroyo Mulrooney Vaniyo, Watercolor on Paper, 45” x 30”

past issues visit

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AmericanArtCollector.com/pastissues or call 1.877.947.0792

TerryMulrooneyStudios.com Terry@TerryMulrooney.com

Cell: 305-479-3448 Studio: 305-387-5351

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DESTINATION / FLORIDA

ELLA FRAZER Naples, FL, govegy@aol.com www.ellafrazer.com Born and educated in Scotland, Ella Frazer began taking art classes at an early age, progressing from crayons in kindergarten to watercolor in high school. Traveling in Europe for years allowed her to visit galleries and museums, which was instrumental in her later studies, particularly the materials and techniques of the Old Masters. She later received a bachelor’s degree in fine art from the University of Toronto and then settled in Florida. “I tried other mediums early on, but now paint in egg tempera and acrylic—egg tempera for the glowing, translucent effects possible and acrylic for its versatility,” Frazer says, noting she is currently exploring egg tempera over gold leaf. Frazer’s main subjects are portraits and figures, and she prefers to capture a moment in the life of the subject and give a sense of atmosphere rather than a formal pose. For example, Siesta, Ikea was derived from a photo she took of her son Grant in “one of the rare, quiet moments in the life of a busy teenager and where our cat, Chubby, was always available to join in.” Another work, Interlude after the Storm, has a similar feel, as she “captured this quiet moment between father and son after a lake storm.” Another example of Frazer’s work is Machrihanish, Mull of Kintyre. “This beach on the Mull of Kintyre is one of my favorites and expresses the beauty and solitude of this part of Scotland,” she says. “It is easy to see why Mull of Kintyre was home to the McCartney family for many years.”

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1 Ella Frazer, Machrihanish, Mull of Kintyre, acrylic, 24 x 48" 2 Ella Frazer, Interlude after the Storm, egg tempera, 24 x 36" 3 Ripple Effect Studio & Gallery, An Afternoon in Autumn on the Waccasassa, oil on board, 24 x 36", by Jeff Ripple.

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I create in the field help me make an emotional connection, and they refresh my memory of that connection once back in the studio. A studio work may or may not be of a precise location or moment in time, but it is always believable and true to the spirit of a place.” Ripple is devoting more attention to southern landscapes, in particular those in Florida and the Appalachians. Rivers hold a special fascination for him,

RIPPLE EFFECT STUDIO & GALLERY 112 NE Hunter Avenue, Micanopy, FL 32667, (239) 398-3375 jeff@jeffrippleart.com www. jeffrippleart.com Jeff Ripple is a self-trained artist dedicated to a poetic realism in landscape painting. He paints exclusively in oil on either board or mounted linen in a style reminiscent of the 19th-century Hudson River School and luminist traditions. Ripple often sketches or paints small studies on location, believing these references crucial for creating good work in the studio. He says, “I try to infuse my paintings with my emotional response to the light and atmosphere on that landscape. The references 3

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especially the Waccasassa River on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Ripple’s paintings have won numerous awards, including Finalist in the 12th International Art Renewal Center Salon and winner of the 2016 ArtPop Central Florida People’s Choice Award. He exhibits at select art festivals and through his Ripple Effect Gallery & Studio in Micanopy, Florida. The gallery leads into Ripple’s studio, so visitors can see him at work and view works in progress.


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SALLY PAINTER www.sallypainterart.com Growing up on a farm and co-owning a nursery for most of her life, Sally Painter has always been surrounded by the beauty of the natural world. It’s not surprising that she turned to nature for inspiration when she took up painting and has since become a painter of bold botanicals. The fascinating shapes, delicate textures and vibrant colors of flowers and other plants and trees are her favorite subjects. Painter says she strives to paint something more than simply a realistic depiction

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of these subjects. She notes, “I interpret the subject with brush in hand, allowing my imagination to select colors and forms.” Like one of her artistic heroes, Georgia O’Keeffe, Painter invites viewers to enter into her subjects, to experience them and to have a visceral reaction to them. Above all, her oil paintings allow people to see as she sees, what she describes as “God’s amazing way of creating each so uniquely and beautifully.” Rapidly gaining national recognition, in 2016 Painter has participated in the Oil Painters of America Juried Salon Show; the 26th annual All Florida

Juried Arts Show; and the Art of the Heartland juried exhibition, among others. Painter and her husband currently divide their time between their homes in Florida and Wyoming.

TERRY ARROYO MULROONEY (305) 387-5351, studio (305) 479-3448, cellphone terry@terrymulrooney.com www.terrymulrooneystudios.com Originally from Caracas, Venezuela, Terry Arroyo Mulrooney has lived in Miami since early childhood. Her family has an extensive 1 Sally Painter, Morning Bloom, oil, 16 x 20"

3 Terry Arroyo Mulrooney, Pretty in Pink, watercolor on paper, 26 x 35"

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2 Sally Painter, Pretty Palms, oil on canvas, 30 x 40"

history in fine arts, both in Latin America and in the United States. She is mostly self-taught with the goal of exclusively mastering transparent watercolor. She has gained widespread recognition and received multiple awards for her paintings in solo and group exhibits and at professional galleries. Her traditional yet unique style has become recognizable, with her works being selected for local festival posters, published in magazines, and displayed in private and public collections worldwide. Though South Florida is her favorite theme, Mulrooney’s subjects are varied. She specializes in paintings of her patron’s favorite people, pets, events or places. “My art is a collaboration of my vision that touches the heart of the viewer,” says Mulrooney. “Transparent watercolors entice an emotional connection with my audience. The content of these paintings transform into a conduit of color, design, light and shadow. They are in my own realistic style, communicating luminosity and richness. It was precisely this affinity for these qualities that led me to choose transparent watercolor.”


DESTINATION / FLORIDA

SUSAN ROMAINE 345 NE 3rd Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33444, (843) 693-0468 www.studioromaine.com “Painting is an artist’s way of practicing alchemy,” says Susan Romaine. “Oil, mineral spirits, brushes, medium and canvas mixed together produce matter of an entirely different nature, and in the process emerges as a translation of the emotional impact an image I come upon into a solid presence. I have an idea of what the image will be but as I go about the process of laying down paint, each takes on a life of its own. Each, as it emerges, acquires a distinct voice. If I listen, I hear, ‘get rid of that telephone pole, that car, that static’ in the real-life scene. This is my inspiration:

that aha moment when a painting grows beyond my initial idea of it and I cast aside all my resource material and just paint what the image tells me to paint.” In 2014, she relocated to Delray Beach, Florida,

to develop a series on the vanishing soul of old Florida. Romaine is represented by Armand Bolling Fine Art, Jupiter, Florida; Sugarman Peterson Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Walker Romaine Gallery, Florida.

1 An in-progress photo of Susan Romanie’s JP’s Legacy, oil on linen, 24 by 36 inches, in her studio.

MISSING AN ISSUE? VISIT AMERICANARTCOLLECTOR.COM/PASTISSUES OR CALL 1 877 9470792 TO PURCHASE PAST ISSUES

Create a library of fine art in your home by purchasing past issues of American Art Collector. Enjoy timeless works of art, follow artists’ careers, and explore gallery and museum exhibitions and coast-to-coast art destinations that continue to define the nation’s art market. Collectors of Contemporary art rely upon American Art Collector to stay informed on the latest works from the country’s top contemporary artists as well as artwork from historic Western masters. Our magazine allows collectors to get a real sense of art that is coming available for sale—and opportunity to buy it right off our pages. Stay informed on the latest exhibits across the country, subscribe today online at

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Where Is Your Favorite Art Destination?

Throughout our 12 monthly issues we invite you to see the many talented artists and high-quality galleries in these major art destinations coast to coast. OCTOBER ISSUE

» Art Lover’s Guide to CANADA

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» Art Lover’s Guide to the MIDWEST

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» Art Lover’s Guide to CAPE COD & THE ISLANDS

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Downtown Chattanooga, Tennessee. PHOTO: ROB HAINER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The Art Lover’s Guide to Collecting Fine Art in the

Southern States

he Southern States is one of the most culturally rich and diverse regions in the United States, and is highlighted by must-see destinations throughout Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee. There is even a specific term for art of, about and from the region, aptly called Southern art. This specialized genre was heavily influenced by the history of the area and is comprised of multiple art movements: Southern expressionism, folk art and modernism. Museums, such as Huntsville Museum of Art in Huntsville, Alabama, and Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia, even feature collections of Southern art. Locales throughout the area have thriving art districts with galleries and museums, as well as annual and monthly events. The monthlong May Festival of the Arts is a highlight in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, while Paducah, Kentucky’s Lower Town Arts District is home to the city’s Artists Relocation Program. More than 20 artists live and work in Lower Town, and many have regular operating hours so that

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visitors can stop by their studios. Chattanooga, Tennessee, is home to the Bluff View Art District, which spans more than 1½ city blocks and includes galleries, restaurants and shopping. The Hunter Museum of American Art is also located in the area, which boasts group exhibitions of historic and contemporary art as well as solo shows. The city also hosts the 4 Bridges Arts Festival, next happening April 21 to 23, 2017. The juried art festival features 150 artists working in clay, glass, painting, photography, mixed media and sculpture. Atlanta is another art-centric city, with Midtown’s Art District, Castleberry Hill Historic Arts District and the downtown area being among the spots to visit. Castleberry Hill hosts the 2nd Friday Art Stroll each month beginning at 7 p.m., and downtown there is also is the First Thursday Downtown Art Walk from 5 to 8 p.m. the first Thursday of each month. Among the galleries and artists calling the region home are Gallery 1401, M. Camille Day and Stephanie Jeanne Hardy.


GALLERY 1401 1478 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37408, (423) 265-0015 info@gallery1401.com www.gallery1401.com Located in the heart of Chattanooga, Tennessee’s Southside, Gallery 1401 is dedicated to the exhibition of fine art. Established in 1998, Gallery 1401 represents more than 40 nationally and internationally acclaimed artists. The gallery’s beautiful collection reflects a full spectrum of contemporary, realism, impressionism and classical styles of works. Artist exhibits are held monthly throughout the year. In addition to exhibitions, the gallery offers residential and commercial art consultation, professional assistance in frame selection, art delivery and hanging. To find out more about when gallery events will take place, follow Gallery 1401 on Facebook or Instagram.

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M. CAMILLE DAY Ellijay, GA, (706) 972-8011 mcd@studiocamille.com www.studiocamille.com

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2 M. Camille Day, Watersound, oil on canvas, 24 x 32"

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1 Gallery 1401 represents more than 40 nationally and internationally acclaimed artists.

D ESTIN ATI ON / SO UTH E R N STAT E S

M. Camille Day is an artist from North Georgia committed to capturing the people and places of her southern homeland. She is continuously inspired by the varied landscapes of the natural world, its people, animals and common places, where beauty is sometimes overlooked. Day is currently preparing a solo show for early next year called Where the Heart Is, a collection of local scenes, both nostalgic and representative of much of her painting inspiration.


DESTINATION / SOUTHERN STATES

STEPHANIE JEANNE HARDY Nashville, TN, stephanie@artful-equestrian.com www.artful-equestrian.com A graduate of Seattle University, Stephanie Jeanne Hardy began her artistic career as a graphic designer and illustrator before fulfilling her dream to be a full-time painter. After 25 years in the Pacific Northwest, Hardy found a home in Nashville, Tennessee, where she devotes her time to painting and riding her horses. Hardy has made her way to some of the top galleries in Franklin and Nashville with her equestrian collection of artwork. Her horse paintings embody her absolute love of the majestic animal and her personal connection to them. She is also a soughtafter animal portrait artist, capturing the likeness of beloved pets, bringing them to life on canvas. Her new 1 series The Camargue Stephanie Jeanne Horses will be available Hardy, Camargue at Bennett Galleries in Horses II, acrylic on Nashville. canvas, 48 x 48"

C O M I N G I N F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 7

Winter Lands Special Feature Join American Art Collector in the

To find out how your work can be included, call us at (866) 619-0841 or email coordinator@americanartcollector.com

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Painting by Josh Elliott

February 2017 issue for our first-ever special section devoted to winter scenes. The Winter Lands Special Feature will present new pieces by some of today's leading artists painting all the sights of the season. Subjects will span from snowcapped mountains to cities and towns blanketed in white, allowing collectors to experience the variety and timelessness of the genre.

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KRISTA EUBANKS

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Cow, Mixed Media, Watercolor, India Ink & Found Bee Specimen, 34” x 56”

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GEOFFREY JOHNSON

Study of Grand Central, Oil, 52” X 52”

1478 Market Street Chattanooga, TN 37408 423.265.0015

The Neighbor's Shed II, oil, 18" x 24"

M. Camille Day studiocamille.com 706.972.8011 mcd@studiocamille.com

MISSING AN ISSUE? To purchase past issues visit www.AmericanArtCollector.com /pastissues or call 1.877.947.0792 Create a library of fine art in your home by purchasing past issues of American Art Collector. Enjoy timeless works of art, follow artists’ careers, and explore gallery exhibitions and coast-to-coast art destinations that continue to define the nation’s art market. STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION 1. Publication Title: AMERICAN ART COLLECTOR. 2. Publication No. 1547-7088. 3. Filing Date: 9/30/2016. 4. Issue Frequency: Monthly. No. Issues Published Annually: 12. Annual subscription price: $36.00. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 USA. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher: 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 USA. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Vincent W. Miller, American Art Collector, 7530 E. Main St. Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251; Editor: Joshua Rose, American Art Collector, 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 USA; Managing Editor: Rochelle Belsito, 7530 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 USA. 10. Owner: Vincent W. Miller, International Artist Publishing, Inc., 7530 E. Main St., Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ 85251. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities: None. 12. Tax Status (for Completion by Nonprofit Organization Authorized to Mail at Special rates): Not Applicable. 13. Publication Title: American Art Collector. 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: October 2016. 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation. a. Total Number of Copies (Net Press Run): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 14,521; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 12,789. b. Paid and/or Requested Circulation 1. Paid/Requested OutsideCounty Mail Subscriptions Stated on Form 3541: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 5,301; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 4,929. Paid In-County Subscriptions: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. 3. Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Non-USPS Paid Distribution: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 4,897; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 4,755. 4. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. c. Total Paid and /or Requested Circulation [(Sum of 15b. (1), (2), (3), and (4)]: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 10,198; No. Copies of Single Issue Publishes Nearest to Filing Date: 9,684. d. Free Distribution by Mail (Samples, Complimentary, and Other Free) 1. Outside-County as Stated on Form 3541; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. In-County as Stated on Form 3541: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. 3. Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0.e. Free Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 350; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 318. f. Total Free Distribution (Sum of 15d and 15e): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 350; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 318. g. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15f): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 10,548; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 10,002. h. Copies Not Distributed: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 3,973; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 2,787. i. Total (Sum of 15g. and h.): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 14,521; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 12,789. j. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (15c. divided by 15g. times 100): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 97%; No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 97%. 16. This Statement of Ownership will be printed in the December 2016 issue of this publication. 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner (Signed) Vincent W. Miller, Date: 9/30/2016. I certify that all the information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including multiple damages and civil penalties).

10/27/16 12:12 PM


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / LOS ANGELES, CA

Through December 17, 2016

101/EXHIBIT 668 N. La Peer Drive | Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 259-9668 | www.101exhibit.com

JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER

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ngoing now at 101/EXHIBIT in Los Angeles is Glorious Poison, Jason Shawn Alexander’s new exhibition, his fifth at the California gallery. The show will mark a departure for the artist, whose works have previously been oil on canvas. For this exhibition he will make a significant shift to ink-based paintings on canvas and paper. Alexander, who began his professional art career as a comic book artist and writer, is widely known for his stylistic expression of

figure, mood and also existential dread as his figures seem to absorb into and out of the paper or canvas, their life forms in a state of chaotic flux as his brushstrokes wander purposefully around the composition. Works in the show include Seaton, featuring a male figure reclining into a cascading strip of gold, with his hands and face full of detail but his arms and body rendered simply in black ink. The Red Queen is more ordered, with a nude female figure turned away from the viewer

but glancing backward with a raven mask hanging from her face. Contrasting her dark skin and Alexander’s inks is a red shawl loosely hanging from her hands and drawn in with rusty red linework. Many of the pieces are done quite large, creating an almost life-size quality to their bodies and, most importantly, their facial features that peer back from the paper. 101/EXHIBIT director Kevin Van Gorp says Alexander is a sure-footed artist. “For Glorious Poison, he has a struck a

1 Jason Shawn Alexander in his California studio. 2 Seaton, ink, pastel, polyurethane and acrylic on paper, 44 x 30" 3 The Red Queen, ink and polyurethane on paper, 44 x 30" 4 Glorious Poison, ink, coffee and acrylic on paper, 44 x 30" 5 Patron Saint of the Downtrodden, ink, acrylic and gold leaf on paper, 44 x 30"

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harmonious balance of concept and beauty for beauty’s sake,” he says. “Further, by embracing his roots as a consummate draftsman, Alexander has liberated himself to make some of the most honest work he’s ever produced: at once direct, unbridled and resplendent.” Collector and publisher Keith Fox says he’s purchased older pieces by Alexander and treasures their presence in his home. “Our most recent acquisitions of Alexander’s works were two pieces from his No Good at Exits exhibition from 2014,” Fox explains. “Hung in our home, we pass by these paintings daily. His highly expressive figures and faces are an enduring joy to look at, and the salient brushstrokes and marks are remarkably congruous with the abstract elements.”


Jonathan LeVine Gallery 529 W. 20th Street, 9th Floor | New York, NY 10011 (212) 243-3822 | www.jonathanlevinegallery.com

UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / NEW YORK, NY

November 19-December 17, 2016

ARON WIESENFELD

Unwind the winding path

1 Picnic (diptych), charcoal on paper, 25 x 40" 2 Offering, charcoal on paper, 38 x 50" 3 Bunker, oil on canvas, 32½ x 44½" 4 Canoe, oil on canvas, 23 x 42" 1

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he Irish poet William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) once wrote, “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” The word “education” derives from the Latin word meaning “to draw out” or “to lead out,” implying that knowledge exists and, in the case of Yeats, is the fuel for fire. Yeats was drawn to the mystical and that interest occurs throughout his work. An exhibition of Aron Wiesenfeld’s latest drawings and paintings at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York draws upon a Yeats poem for its title. Unwind the Winding Path opens November 19 and continues through December 17. “In his poem Byzantium,” Wiesenfeld explains, “Yeats goes on a journey, starting in a physical, material place, and ending in a spiritual place. That’s the greatest thing any artwork can do. I take the quote ‘Unwind the Winding Path’ to refer to finding personal meaning in the progression from the physical to the spiritual, unwinding the chaos of a meaningless environment.” Wiesenfeld’s work is personal in its conception and resolution. He encourages the viewer to go beyond 2

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I may put an idea on the back burner and another idea will appear that works with the initial idea to make something different. I can be working on a painting and I’ll come across something that will send it in a different direction. Sometimes,” he continues, “in the process of formal

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the physical elements of a composition to find his or her own story. He says, “I want my paintings to be neutral enough, open enough, that others can have an interpretation.” He explains that he doesn’t always “have a concept. It comes to me piece by piece.

problem-solving I may decide the painting needs an added element compositionally and the story will change again.” His painting Bunker brings to mind the paintings of the 19th-century English Pre-Raphaelite painters known for their scientific veracity and abundance of fine detail. The occasion of the painting was his discovery of World War II bunkers in northern Italy, now poignantly overgrown with vegetation. The figure, exposed and vulnerable atop the bunker, is threatened by a lowering sky, which he describes as having “an oppressive weight.” He recalls a conversation with F. Scott Hess who advised him that a merely “clever” painting isn’t going to hold anyone’s interest for long. Multiple layers reveal themselves over time. He says, “I began to think of paintings as an expression of the unconscious, or that they can be objects of meditation, speculation and much more.” His paintings can be “the lighting of a fire.”


George Billis Gallery 525 W. 26th Street, Ground Floor | New York, NY 10001 (212) 645-2621 | www.georgebillis.com

UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / NEW YORK, NY

December 4, 2016-January 7, 2017

TOM GREGG

Stories to tell 1 Martini and 8 Ball, oil on panel, 27½ x 27½" 2 Martini and Apples, oil on panel, 31 x 31" 3 Lemons and Water, oil on panel, 29½ x 29½" 4 Limes, Wine, and Oranges, oil on panel, 36 x 37" 1

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rhan Pamuk, the Turkish winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature, wrote, “If objects are not uprooted from their environs and their streets, but are situated with care and ingenuity in their natural homes, they will already portray their own stories.” The objects in Tom Gregg’s paintings are themselves, grown to be eaten, manufactured to be used. “It is the existence that they possess of their own, their own life in the universe of objects and the world itself, that is…mysterious and beguiling,” he writes. “This respect for and connection to objects and their perceived world underlies my pursuits as a still life painter. At the same time, the things in the paintings are there primarily to fulfill the demands of the painting itself, much the way actors are in a play to fulfill the demands of the script. Any symbolic or metaphoric intention is subservient to the formal demands presented by the specific needs of each painting.” Once Gregg selects his objects and arranges them against colored paper backgrounds, and once he has arranged the lighting, the objects establish their own relationships and begin conversations. 3

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presence, while the shadow, an absence, has a presence of its own. Gregg’s objects have “their own stories” and are ready to play a role in ours as we wander visually among them, interrupting their shadowed and reflected relationships, imposing our own. When we step back, they resume. Gregg’s recent paintings can be seen at George Billis Gallery in New York, December 4 through January 7.

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together. They make sense.” He plays with light and shadow as well as the relationship of the objects and then does a full-scale, detailed drawing on thin paper. He then transfers the drawing to a gessoed panel. When the painting feels like “This is what I’m seeing” he is finished. In Martini and Apples the solidity of the apples is balanced visually by the shadow of the martini glass on the right. The glass itself is nearly centered, creating an iconic

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They reflect, pick up one another’s color and cast their own. They may imply human, temporal relationships—two martinis, two cigarettes, two people gone away for a moment, or forever. He comments, “In a funny way the absence of the people implies their presence.” When he is setting up the still lifes, Greg says he’s “not thinking literally. Generally, the things seem like they all belong


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / LOS ANGELES, CA

December 3-30, 2016

Coagula Curatorial 974 Chung King Road | Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 480-7852 | www.coagulacuratorial.com

SARAH ELISE ABRAMSON

Déjà vu T

here’s a romance that comes with a Polaroid camera. For many people, the boxy cameras—with their plastic frames and retro appearance, and that mechanical whirr-clunk of the ejecting picture—were what captured their childhoods, one square, now-yellowed image at a time. Today, the cameras are kitschy links to the past, curious novelties that perplex the iPhone generation; or, alternatively, the camera of choice for hipsters who brag about their old-timey shaving kits and Smith Coronas. Yes, Polaroid the company has seen better days and is still fluctuating somewhere between endangered and extinct, but a number of artists are still using the instant cameras to create mesmerizing one-ofa-kind artwork that is transcending the format nearly 70 years since its creation. One such artist is Sarah Elise Abramson, a Los Angeles photographer who has taken the Polaroid camera and given it fresh life

Abramson gets her film from the Impossible Project, a company that scooped up all of Polaroid’s machinery and photographic equipment when it went bust in 2008. They are helping keeping the format alive, for which the artist is grateful. “There’s such an instant gratification to it,” she says. “It’s awesome to watch the image appear. It takes me back to being in the dark room.” This show will mark a significant return for Abramson, who was in an accident on the set of a short film she was directing this summer. “I fell from 15 feet up. Broke both kneecaps, my left elbow, cracked my jaw, bit through my bottom lip, chipped my tooth. It was pretty bad,” she says. “Not being able to use a camera was killing me. I get irritable if I can’t shoot often enough. It’s a very meditative experience for me. I just get into that zone and I feel a huge relief come over me, like I just did yoga or something. I realized then that I’ll be shooting until the day I die.” She’s all healed up and not wasting any time getting back into the swing of things. For Déjà Vu in General, she will be showing the 200 Polaroid originals as well as enlarged reproductions and a book with the same title. Works in the show include Astrid, featuring a nude female on a square slab meant for cannons at a military fort, and Brennan as a Daydream, which is part of a photo collaboration with French photographer Sarah Seené. Abramson chose the word “daydream,” photographed this picture, and then sent the word to Seené to offer her own interpretation—a photographic call and response. On the next round, Seené chooses a word and Abramson responds. They call it I’ll Be Your Mirror. Abramson, who studied under the great David LaChapelle—he has since called her the future of photography—is excited to show her work, but admits that she’s hesitant to let her works go out into the world. After all, Polaroids have no negatives. It’s not like she can make new prints. “These are my negatives. It’s my entire body of work,” she says. “They’re like a part of me.”

inside her evocative, cerebral and hauntingly beautiful images. Her new show, Déjà Vu in General, opening December 3 at Coagula Curatorial in Los Angeles, will feature more than 200 Polaroid images that she whittled down from thousands of images she’s taken over the last decade. “I learned photography on an all-manual Minolta 35mm—I learned depth of field, aperture, shutter speed, all that. The next couple years I only shot 35mm until my parents bought me my first Polaroid camera before Polaroid shut down,” she says, adding that she quickly branched out into new kinds of films and photographic processes. “I was shooting on 600 [film], but then I got into Time Zero, this really cool film that has this awesome blue hue to it. It’s really rare now. Polaroid film is so unpredictable, which is what I love about it. Sometimes it’s a bummer when the image doesn’t come out at all. But you end up really appreciating the magic of the film.”

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1 Untitled, Polaroid, 23 x 23" 2 Brennan as a Daydream, Polaroid, 23 x 23" 3 Daylin at Angels Gate, Polaroid, 23 x 23" 4 Astrid, Polaroid, 32 x 32" 2

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UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / HALLANDALE BEACH, FL

November 28-December 28, 2016

Sirona Fine Art 600 Silks Run, #1240 | Hallandale Beach, FL 33009 (954) 454-9494 | www.sironafineart.com

Latin expression “C

hévere’s intention is to break stereotypes,” says Suzanne Smith of Sirona Fine Art in Hallandale Beach, Florida, of their upcoming group exhibition. The show, displaying works inspired by the Romance languages of Latin America, is in collaboratation with PoetsArtists Magazine, which will provide a companion publication. The show offers artists an opportunity for extreme self-expression, according to participant Yunior Hurtado Torres. “[It] is a project that seeks the freshness of the Latin, of how we are and how we express ourselves without hiding anything,” he says. “It is a representation of how diverse and

colorful we are, how we express ourselves.” Torres will bring his oil on canvas painting Esperando La Luz to the show. “Being a Hispanic-American, I also feel a personal connection to the show’s theme,” says Elizabeth Ospina, whose painting Corinne was inspired by the mystique of the feminine form. Some participants don’t shy away from the political. Gig Depio’s oil painting Party Pooper features Donald Trump, wearing a Yankees uniform along with a Mexican luchador costume and swinging a pool noodle to hit a grenade. He says the piece expresses how it takes “a spectacle of Trump to wake us up in panic, only to

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realize that we don’t have the tools nor the strategies to readily deal with these kinds of problems at hand.” Figurative painter Omalix takes a more personal approach to the Latin American theme. His painting Hasta la Raíz [To the Root], “is a nostalgic yet hopeful visual metaphor about my origins, my identity, where I’ve been and where I want to be, the ones I love, and all those memories and emotions I carry underneath my skin, embedded within me and deep to my roots.” Chévere will open on November 28 and run until December 28, with an opening reception on Saturday, December 3.


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1 Jules Arthur, Havana’s Finest, oil on wood panel with constructed wooden box frame, fabric, leather, 23k gold leaf lettering, brass hardware, authentic humidor, cigars purchased in Havana, Cuba, 60 x 39 x 4"

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2 Suzy Smith, Bananas, oil on canvas, 24 x 18"

4 Yunior Hurtado Torres, Esperando La Luz, oil on canvas, 60 x 60"

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5 Erica Elan Ciganek, Miguel II, oil on canvas, 48 x 72"

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3 Omalix, Hasta la RaĂ­z [To the Root], oil on linen, 36 x 64"


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / SAG HARBOR, NY

November 26-January 8, 2017

RJD Gallery 90 Main Street | Sag Harbor, NY 11963 (631) 725-1161 | www.rjdgallery.com

Believe B

elieve, a new group show at RJD Gallery in Sag Harbor, New York, opens November 26 and will present new works from many of the gallery’s most popular artists, including pieces by Katie O’Hagan, Andrei Zadorine, Pamela Wilson, Margo Selski, Armando Valero and others. For Zadorine, who will be presenting Girl on the Stool, the theme of the show hits close to home. “In most of my works I address the reminiscences of my childhood, the impressions and sensations of that time. The further the childhood is away, the happier it appears…” the artist says. “I spent my childhood in a small town close to a large city, in a tiny flat where every single

object had its own history, its own life: the chair, the table or the closet, the lowest shelf of which was mine. It was always a mess there no matter how desperately my parents insisted to fix it. When I pulled out one toy from the shelf, I started playing with other toys one after another. It is not different today: fishing out a story or an object of some kind from my memory. I am not hastening to put them back in order; figuratively speaking, I am not reaching out my hand to pull another one out of the shelf—one cup, one paper horse or a wicker chair is enough to tell a story in my painting.” In Valero’s The Cracker of Fire, the painter explores the idea that “we are made out of atoms (stardust, a scientific

way to describe fire), every time we think or speak or move we are exciting our own fires; imagination is another way to ‘produce’ fires and it is the key to my work,” Valero says. “I do not believe in inspiration because that idea makes artists look like mere laborers. Creation for me requires imagination that is nurtured by the discipline of working every day—not

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waiting for inspiration.” The title of the work refers to a poem, which the artist writes for each new piece. The poem reads, in part: To let go the sparkling cracker / flying in a sudden debacle / is like propelling a thought to the heavens / to engulf the stars in a battle / To stand there sketching a smile / looking a far inside of my mind / is like digging close to my heart / to find my soul so close by. Wilson’s works in the show include Spiraling of Hexes and The Keeper, both of which feature young female subjects looking out upon the viewer. “I think my work is such that it can be interpreted in many ways. When I paint darkness, there is a small spark of hope imbedded, and vice versa,” Wilson says. “I keep my titles a bit loose and poetic so that they lend to any interpretation, without telling someone how to feel, or what to see. My work holds stories that must be deciphered by the viewer, and this is by design. Art that I cannot ‘make my own’ is boring to me. It is so important to allow and encourage the viewer to participate—and Richard at RJD Gallery is very good at encouraging the viewers’ imagination!”

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1 Pamela Wilson, Spiraling of Hexes, oil and 24k gold leaf on canvas over birch panel, 18 x 18" 2 Armando Valero, The Cracker of Fire, oil on canvas, 25 x 31" 3 Andrei Zadorine, Girl on the Stool, oil on linen, 47 x 47"

5 Margo Selski, The Land of Plenty, oil and beeswax on canvas, 16 x 12"

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6 Pamela Wilson, The Keeper, oil on canvas, 48 x 48"

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4 Katie O’Hagan, Refuge, oil on linen, 60 x 48"


KP Projects 170 S. La Brea Avenue | Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-4408 | www.kpprojects.net

UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / LOS ANGELES, CA Through December 3, 2016

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JOE SORREN

From inside N

ow open at KP Projects in Los Angeles is from Inside, a new solo exhibition for artist Joe Sorren. The exhibition will feature Sorren’s playful, imaginative works often depicting stylized figures in states of calm joy and peaceful reflection. His new works, and the title of the show, came to be as a response to the mood and intensity of the world. “During the creation of this body of work, so many 100

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upsetting things have been happening involving current affairs,” Sorren says. “The deeper my research, the deeper my sadness. It became important to me that I create a body of work that generates more questions than answers; to create spaces inside of the viewer that can allow the light of introspection in a little.” He continues, “I was interested in playing with the dichotomy between application of paints as well as the

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imagery that evolves from application. Because brushstrokes are tiny recordings of energy and intent with that energy, I became fascinated with the push-pull that this can establish. Once you begin to work with this dynamic, you find that the work can display another level of communication that, in all but the most aggressive passages, remains a subconscious informant.” Works in the show include pieces such


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pointing into the picture and various smaller items decorating the edges. “All of the paintings have fallen into place to create a sort of narrative for this show,” the artist says. “[conduct] is the second in the story, where the main character finds herself presented with the beautiful gravity that our memories often carry.” Sorren’s show continues through December 3 in Los Angeles.

1 rememory, oil on canvas, 29 x 23½" 2 there you go (looks like it’s just us for a while, flowers), oil on canvas, 43 ¹⁄₃ x 43¹⁄₃" 3 conduct, oil on canvas, 32¼ x 39 ¹⁄₃" 4 there you are, oil on canvas, 31½ x 31½"

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frogs until the narrative begins to present itself. It is a slow process that feels more like an adventure than a ‘rendering,’ if you know what I mean. As a result, everything is in play, trying hard not to rely on preconceived notions, which often leads to distortions in concept as well as form.” In conduct, Sorren paints two joyful figures amid the details of a room, including a piano, a light

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as rememory, All during the MapleLeaf Rag, and you in there?, all of which showcase his exaggerated figure design and his sumptuous colors. “The distortions my figures find themselves in is a result of my working method. When I paint, I never come to the canvas with a preconceived idea, let alone sketches,” he says. “I just begin and follow and hunt, turning over stones and turning shovels into


Gallery 1261 1261 Delaware Street | Denver, CO 80204 (303) 571-1261 | www.gallery1261.com

UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / DENVER, CO

December 9, 2016-January 7, 2017

A new beginning T

he Mann – Gandy – Wilson: Three Person Exhibition at Gallery 1261 represents an artistic reemergence for the participating artists. Jeremy Mann recently returned after a month of traveling through Europe and Russia, and stopped briefly in Portugal for a workshop with some of the art world’s greatest minds. “I’ve taken a new approach to my work...One thing I’ve always been passionate about is the importance of the reference, more importantly, the days, weeks, months and years spent leading up to the moment before the act of painting actually begins is a weighty 70 percent of the piece itself,” says Mann of his new work. “I’m putting more heart, importance and ingenuity into

the obtaining of these references before beginning a painting, while stressing self-focus and ignoring most social media.” The three-artist show marks the beginning of a new series for Timothy Wilson. “In somewhat of a self examination, I have been investigating my varying and disparate approaches to different subjects; plein air painting, figure painting, expressive abstractions and interior spaces,” Wilson says. “Some pieces veer more toward the memory of the figure, while others more directly reference the experience of the external realm.” His oil painting Maelstrom, among others, will be featured in the exhibition. For Greg Gandy, the show will be a culmination of

1 Greg Gandy, Looking Down Post Street Towards Downtown, oil on panel, 18 x 18" 2 Jeremy Mann, Note in Pale Yellow, No. 3, oil on panel, 8 x 10" 3 Timothy Wilson, Dusk (study), oil on canvas, 16 x 16" 4 Jeremy Mann, Note in Pale Green, No. 6, oil on panel, 12 x 12"

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his career thus far rather than a change, and he will show the cityscape Looking Down Post Street Towards Downtown. “What makes this show a bit different for me is that I have allowed myself to work a bit looser on a few pieces. I am trying to find what I feel is a good balance. I want the accuracy that I have been striving for, but I wanted to introduce a few abstract elements,� Gandy says. The show will open at the Denver gallery with a reception on December 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. and will continue until January 7, 2017. PR E V I E W

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UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / CULVER CITY, CA

December 1-31, 2016

Arcadia Contemporary 9428 Washington Boulevard | Culver City, CA 90232 (424) 603-4656 | www.arcadiacontemporary.com

Size matters A

s the holiday season arrives, many galleries host small works exhibitions featuring new pieces by their roster of artists. Culver City, California-based Arcadia Contemporary will present a new twist on the theme with their exhibition 12 x 12 in 12. Gallery President Steve Diamant explains, “The 12 x 12 in 12 came about as we wanted to create an end-of-year exhibition that we thought would be challenging to our roster of painters. By limiting their ‘talents’ to just one square foot, we think we will be seeing many ‘surprises’ of creativity.” On view will be work by gallery artists such as Michael Chapman, Johannes Wessmark, Carlo Russo, Nicolás Uribe and Dan Quintana. There also will be special guest artists participating in the show. The mediums, styles and subject matter will vary from figurative to landscape to still lifes. Among the pieces is Wessmark’s pool painting Ripples, which is an underwater view looking up at a woman in a red bikini—her head above water and her body submerged. “My inspiration was the rippling water making a realistic painting quite abstract,” says the artist. There also will be Chapman’s Luminous Morning that shows an everyday scene nearby a beach. Chapman explains, “I’m always searching for the poetry of Hopper and de Chirico in the early morning and late afternoon sunlight of Southern California.” In his still life Cool Yarns, Russo pairs three skeins in varying 1

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1 Carlo Russo, Cool Yarns, oil on panel, 12 x 12" 2 Johannes Wessmark, Ripples, oil and acrylic on canvas, 12 x 12" 3 Michael Chapman, Luminous Morning, oil on canvas, 12 x 12" 4 Dan Quintana, Untitled, oil on panel, 12 x 12" 5 Nicolás Uribe, Untitled, oil on canvas, 12 x 12" 4

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blues—simple yet complex with the twists and turns of the material. “Yarns are always enjoyable to paint once you get past all the detail,” Russo says. “I have a large bag of yarns that I have collected over the years and every once in a while I like to dig them out and see what happens. I think I painted my first yarn painting eight years ago, and have made three or four since, so there is a sense of going back to something familiar. And since I paint them infrequently, I always feel like I have to rediscover how to do it, to some degree. Like any subject, I try to find ways to express these things in a way that is sympathetic to my manner of working and learn a bit from each one to the next.” Quintana has been exploring dual imagery and parrallel spaces, which is why he’s incorporated transparent hands in his untitled work for the show. “The viewer may interpert the shadow hands as a possible invader towards the female character, but may also be a thing conjured up by the subject,” he says. 12 x 12 in 12 will be on view throughout the month of December.


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / DENVER, CO

December 1, 2016-January 3, 2017

Visions West Contemporary 1715 Wazee Street | Denver, CO 80202 (303) 292-0909 | www.visionswestcontemporary.com

The snow show D

ecember 1 through January 3, Visions West Contemporary will host The Snow Show, featuring sculpture, paintings and works on paper that highlight the sights and colors of winter. The group exhibition will be on view concurrently at the gallery’s locations in Denver, Colorado; Jackson, Wyoming; and Bozeman, Montana. Participating will be Dave White, Crystal Morey, JenMarie Zeleznak, Tracy Stuckey, Zemer Peled, Chris Maynard, Mike Weber, Theodore Waddell, Rocky Hawkins and William Sweetlove. While common in theme, the works displayed are diverse in style and subject matter. There will be everything from sculptures of penguins to snow-covered landscapes included. Nearly all of the landscapes that Waddell paints refer to a geographic location; his piece Snowline Angus is no different. “Between Lima and the Montana-Idaho border, along the freeway, is a sign: Snowline. There are no towns there, only mountains and pastures on either side of the road,” says Waddell. “Cattle water at the small lake on the west side of the road, framed by the mountains in the background. The pastures are huge—the cattle recede to dots and the fences look like line drawings in the distance. One can understand this perspective in a palpable way. I have been on this road over a hundred times and I never tire of the vistas offered and I always learn more about this great land.” Stuckey began his painting A Man, a Woman, and a Horse last year when he was abandoning the traditional view of the southwestern landscape for the mountain west. “I wanted to explore a different region of the West, but use the same characters. This painting in particular started off with just the woman leading the horse over this frozen lakebed. I kept rearranging the elements while adding and subtracting other imagery,” Stuckey explains. “I decided to add the male character at the bottom and then the blanket in order

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1 Theodore Waddell, Snowline Angus, oil, 72 x 72" 2 Chris Maynard, Swan Burst, mute swan feather, 12 x 12" 3 Tracy Stuckey, A Man, a Woman, and a Horse, oil on canvas, 48 x 72" 4 Robert McCauley, It’s Just Over That Mountain, oil, 21 x 30" 5 Mike Weber, Ego, mixed media, 48 x 48 x 3" 2


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small) or eagles (not legal).” It’s Just Over That Mountain by McCauley also will be on view, and is from the artist’s series The Only West Left Is The One In Your Head, which he says “is a critique on the greed and sense of entitlement which motivated the juggernaut of westward expansion.” The title of the painting is borrowed from the children’s song The Bear Went Over the Mountain.

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to honor and appreciate the natural world. Like any artist, I strive to capture an essence of life; for me it is trying to find the spirit, the core of birds,” Maynard says. “Feathers already carry an essence of the bird I am trying to portray so in this regard, I consider myself fortunate to have chosen feathers for my art. I am especially pleased when I can portray a bird using its own feathers, like this swan. That is not always possible like with hummingbirds (too

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to contain them all in a space. I also liked how the blanket’s perspective played off of the mountains in the back. There isn’t much action in this painting, it is very stripped down and simplified, much like the landscape. That’s why I decided to title it A Man, a Woman, and a Horse; those three elements are the main ingredients of many of my paintings.” Another work in the show is Maynard’s Swan Burst. “I chose my medium, feathers,

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UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / DENVER, CO

December 2-31, 2016

Abend Gallery 2260 E. Colfax Avenue | Denver, CO 80206 (303) 355-0950 | www.abendgallery.com

Holiday tradition F

or the past 25 years, Abend Gallery in Denver has hosted its annual Holiday Miniatures Show with a wide array of small works available from its roster of artists. For this year’s 26th edition, the gallery will open its doors December 2 with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. The artwork remains on view through the duration of the month. One of the hallmarks of the show is the diversity of the work offered—figures, cityscapes, wildlife, still lifes and more—to entice new and established collectors alike. Alpay Efe will be represented by the painting Butterfly A.a., which shows a dark-hued butterfly against an abstract background. “In addition to the subjects and scenes depicted, I intend for my

paintings to meditate moods, feelings, atmospheres…But also to be pleasing and interesting from an aesthetic perspective,” says Efe. “I strongly believe that there is much more to a realistic depiction of the physical world than just painting something to be as lifelike or photo-like as possible. For me, this is where abstraction and realism can come together to create something greater than the sum of its parts. And, oddly enough, often something that is closer to reality than anything else.” Afternoon Sunset by Hsin-Yao Tseng also will be on view. The cityscape is one where the artist was playing with the design and abstract texture. “Focusing on how the light and shadow pattern lay

out on the building and the street, [and] simplify the bottom part of the painting by using more abstract elements and marks,” Tseng explains. Among the figurative paintings displayed will be Zack Zdrale’s Flinch. “I’ve been digging deeper and taking more risks in pursuit of a physical, emotional response from my work. The process and results have been exciting,” he says. “Flinch is an example of this effort.” Another in the genre is D’Apres Elle by Nadezda Kuzmina. The artist explains, “Human condition, a blurred line between the world of phantasm and reality, a place where one’s mind drifts when daydreaming or falling asleep, is one of the most

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1 Clinton Hobart, Popcorn, oil, 6 x 8" 2 Nadezda Kuzmina, D’Apres Elle, oil on panel, 8 x 10" 3 Hsin-Yao Tseng, Afternoon Sunlight, oil, 12 x 12" 4 Alpay Efe, Butterfly A.a., oil, 9.85 x 9.85" 5 Zack Zdrale, Flinch, oil on panel, 6 x 6" 4

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intriguing subjects for exploration in my artwork. My characters’ common state is dark or bittersweet melancholy, and, like in D’Apres Elle, my paintings show these moments as frozen stills of a short film from one’s skewed memory or a twisted dream” Clinton Hobart’s still life Popcorn also will appear in the exhibition, and is from his series of snack food-themed paintings. “The story behind the snack food series is that my brother and I were having a conversation about the history of art. He said they painted fruit and eggs 500 years ago because they ate fruit and eggs 500 years ago,” says Hobart. “If the Old Masters were alive today, they’d be painting Cheetos and Doritos because that’s what the world eats now. And as soon as he said it, we looked at each other and knew it had to be done.” Other artists participating in the Holiday Miniatures Show include Teresa Elliott, Mark Harrison, Yael Maimon and Nick Runge.


Lotton Gallery 900 N. Michigan Avenue, Level 6 | Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 664-6203 | www.lottongallery.com

UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / CHICAGO, IL

December 1-30, 2016

Cherished treasures

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ariety is key during Lotton Gallery’s annual holiday small works exhibition, as gallery artists present subjects that include wildlife, landscapes and figures in several different mediums. Gallery director Christina Franzoso adds, “Small works of art are little treasures during the holidays. Giving as a gift, even to yourself, is something to cherish for a lifetime.” Impressionist Vakhtang will display several landscapes in the show, such as Harmony and Early Morning. Both works showcase vibrant green colors and are bursting with life as flowers blossom from tree limbs and wind or fog sweeps across the land. “When I was studying fine art in the Tbilisi Academy, one summer we went to paint landscapes in St. Petersburg, Russia. We came to the border of Russia and Finland and I saw landscapes very different from what I was accustomed in my own country,” Vakhtang says. “They were not as rich as southern landscapes and very different in mood. One view in

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particular had my attention. The narrow lake was going into the horizon and it was impossible to see where it ends. Only a few trees were in view, with their reflections in the water. I suddenly felt a feeling of endless nature, endless world and I realized that beauty is not only in richness or variety of subjects or even how they are painted, I realized that the most important task of art is emotion that art produces in the hearts of the viewers. This is why I decided to paint Harmony. I wanted you, the viewers, to feel the same feeling I had when I first saw it.” Animal works are also prominent in the show, such as Frank Gonzales’ Burrowing Owl and dog-themed works by Regina Lyubovnaya. Among Lyubovnaya’s pieces is Double Trouble, depicting two puppies on a red pillow. “The story behind Double Trouble is one day I came across a photograph of a gray puppy, he looked like he really needed a friend, so I paired him up with the longhair Chihuahua,” she says, “and there were

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now two of them laying in a pillow looking like they just got in trouble but neither one was to take blame.” Mary Alayne Thomas combines


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1 Frank Gonzales, Burrowing Owl, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 16"

figures and wildlife in her fairy tale-like paintings, such as After March. “With After March, I wanted to create a scene that really celebrated the way the natural world interacts with and inhabits my own thoughts, as I see the increasing fragility of the natural world around me,” Thomas explains. “By having a woman lovingly interacting with the wilderness and wildlife that surrounds her, I hope to express the importance of connecting with one another, to preserve our kinship with nature, and the wildness in ourselves.” The small works exhibition will run from December 1 through 30, and will spotlight approximately 25 total pieces.

2 Regina Lyubovnaya, Double Trouble, oil on canvas, 11 x 14"

4 Vakhtang, Harmony, oil on linen, 14 x 14"

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5 Vakhtang, Early Morning, oil on canvas, 16 x 20"

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3 Mary Alayne Thomas, After March, encaustic on panel, 18 x 14"


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / ALEXANDRIA, VA

December 3, 2016-January 4, 2017

Principle Gallery 208 King Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 739-9326 | www.principlegallery.com

Minute masterpieces

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rinciple Gallery’s annual Small Works exhibition will feature a diverse group of artists with widely differing styles. “As grand and striking as largersized works can be, there is also something captivating about a small painting. It is intimate and inviting, and allows the viewer to disappear into it for a bit and revel in the details that might be overlooked in a larger work,” says Principle’s lead gallery assistant Pamela Sommer. Of crafting small works, participating artist Jacob A. Pfeiffer says, “I find it incredibly satisfying to work on a smaller-sized painting. The scale allows me to spend most of my time zeroing in on the tiny details in the composition.” His painting Hooked, which features a rusting fishing lure hanging over a whimsical sprinkled cupcake, is featured in the show. For Sara Linda Poly, miniature paintings are, “Like a sweet short story.” In her painting Dance of Light, she plays with the interaction of the sun, clouds and water to reach a poetic balance. Cindy Procious’ Strawberries in Silver features richly textured berries against a smooth, reflective background. Of her painting, she says, “I was struck by how much color I was seeing in all the white. I started adding more color, and in the end, was able to throw a veritable rainbow in there.” When painting miniatures, Elizabeth Floyd looks no further than her garden. “I paint yearround from life and harvest what is in season,” she says. Her painting Hellebore was a late-winter creation. The Small Works show at Principle Gallery will open December 3 and run until January 4.


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1 Cindy Procious, Strawberries in Silver, oil on panel, 6 x 11½" 2 Sara Linda Poly, Dance of Light, oil on canvas, 10 x 10" 3 Elizabeth Floyd, Hellebore, oil on linen, 12 x 10"

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4 Robert Liberace, Sprinter, oil on panel, 8 x 10" 5 Jacob A. Pfeiffer, Hooked, oil on panel, 12 x 6"

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6 Brian Martin, Snow at Calf Pasture, oil on panel, 6 x 12" 6


UPCOMING SHOW PREVIEW / SANTA BARBARA, CA

November 19-December 4, 2016

Waterhouse Gallery La Arcada Courtyard, 1114 State Street, Suite 9 | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 962-8885 | www.waterhousegallery.com

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a quiet energy.” In Hsin-Yao Tseng’s oil Chinese Old House Interior, the painter lets soft light cascade into two rooms that are joined by a door that frames the subtle presence of reflected sunlight. “It’s a depiction of my grandmother and my mom’s former home in Taiwan. I was visiting home this past winter, and my mom took me there to show me where she grew up. I felt really emotional once I walked into this nostalgic interior,” Tseng says. “This room used to be my mom and her brothers’ study room. That is exactly the meaning of the Chinese character showed above the door. I could see there were lots of stories in this house

aterhourse Gallery in Santa Barbara, California, is celebrating its 32 anniversary of bringing topquality contemporary landscapes, urban and figurative paintings to collectors in California and beyond. The show, which opens November 19 and continues through December 4, will feature artists such as Peter Adams, George Bodine, Suchitra Bhosle, James Crandall, Romel de la Torre, Casey Childs, Jeremy Lipking, Matt Smith, Albin Veselka, Kyle Ma and many others. As many as 90 pieces are expected to be on view. Michael Fitzpatrick will be bringing his painting Island Sounds, which was inspired from an idea of a model the painter hired. “She is a young woman who lives in rural Maui. She plays the ukulele— in this case a baritone ukulele—works as a farmer and chef and lives in a community that works mostly on barter,” Fitzpatrick says. “She came to Northern Cal to visit her father for the summer and answered an ad I ran for models. I was intrigued by her story so we staged this scene near my studio in Napa, California. The painting is done mostly with a squeegee to create nd

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even though no one was living there anymore. I looked beneath and painted the surface to reveal what’s hidden and painted the feeling.” Tseng continues, “I am super excited and grateful to be part of this great show. I think this is my eighth time showing in the Waterhouse anniversary show. I have always had a wonderful time meeting new artists and clients as well as catching up with some old, good artist friends.” In a portrait titled Pig Tails, Marci Oleszkiewicz paints a young girl in a pink overcoat with an oversized button. “My painting Pig Tails was inspired by a trip I took several years ago to China. It was


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1 Hsin-Yao Tseng, Chinese Old House Interior, oil, 12 x 9" 2 Karen Offutt, Seated Figure, oil, 24 x 20" 3 Michael Fitzpatrick, Island Sounds, oil, 24 x 36" 4 George Bodine, The Good Daughter, oil, 24 x 30" 5 Mian Situ, What’s the Next, oil, 20 x 30"

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Elena Carafa. All three portraits on view are by Degas. The painting was inspired by my time spent exploring the galleries and museums in London recently for the first time. The location of this scene is the National Gallery, London.” Roche adds that she is excited for the anniversary celebration and “very honored to be part of this prestigious show. The annual show at Waterhouse Gallery is always a very special event and this year I’m thrilled to take part in celebrating the 32nd anniversary with Ralph and Diane. It will be a wonderful exhibition with many fine artists invited to participate, and I am delighted to be counted amongst them.”

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into the new era. Their own tradition is vanishing bit by bit at the same time. Unlike their parent’s generation, these children dress not much different from the outsiders.” Pauline Roche will be bringing a scene from a museum, Discovering the Degas, in which a young woman ponders a painting on exhibit. “I love to capture those moments in grand museums, when a person comes across a piece of art that holds their rapt attention,” she says. “In this painting, I was intrigued by the moment where the woman is deep in thought and seems to be making eye contact with the lady sitting proudly in the Degas painting, Portrait of

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at this trip that I really discovered my love for painting children,” she says. “I revisited my reference photos and was so captivated by this sweet, endearing face. Her adorable pigtails, her gaze of curiosity, her pure innocence made me want to capture her in paint.” Mian Situ will be presenting a group of figures in What’s the Next. “I was visiting a village in Guizhou Province when I came upon this group of children. Visitors come to explore this area to get a feel of different cultures and lifestyles these villagers have. They are Miao people,” Situ says. “Life has been changed in the last decades, and the children are easily adapting themselves


INTERNATIONAL ARTIST MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER

JESSE LANE jesse@jesselaneart.com | www.jesselaneart.com

Anatomy of Light The colored pencil works of Jesse Lane are true to life and communicate emotions.

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s a teenager growing up in Houston, Jesse Lane began taking art classes in high school, and then earned a degree in Visualization from Texas A&M University. He spent a semester abroad in Italy, where he began studying past masters works and, in particular, made a connection with the work of Caravaggio. The Old Master’s use of light was even an inspiration in Lane’s series Anatomy of Light. “My figures emerge into light and disappear into darkness…both literally and figuratively,” says Lane about the series. “Black backgrounds isolate the figures and put them in their own world, the world of their thoughts. Nothing is there except what they’re feeling.” That communication of emotion is one of the most important aspects to Lane’s art. “The realism is the technique, but the emotion is the art, and the two work

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1 Reveal, colored pencil, 19 x 28" 2 Jesse Lane in his Texas studio. 3 Riptide, colored pencil, 30 x 20"

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4 Echoes, colored pencil, 20 x 30�" 5 Gravity, colored pencil, 18 x 29" 6 Drift, colored pencil, 18 x 29" 4

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moments,” he says. “I begin to tell a story, communicate an emotion, an intense emotion. The emotion is also somewhat mysterious and that gets the viewer to try to figure out what’s going on and sort of complete the story that I’m trying to tell. The experience can differ from viewer to viewer. In my series, I’m trying to take colored pencil to a new level. It’s an up-and-coming medium. I’m trying to take it and communicate a voice through it. It comes back to feelings; when you experience art, the most amazing thing is when you can feel something when you see it.” Lane is represented by RJD Gallery in Sag Harbor, New York, where he had his first solo exhibition, Face Reality, from October 10 through November 10. He also is a finalist in the 12th annual Art Renewal Center International Salon. Lane was the Grand Prize Winner in International Artist magazine’s Challenge No. 96, Favorite Subjects.

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green and created a vibrant, warm shadow partially covering one eye.” Other works, such as Drift and Echoes, are full of dramatic lighting changes. Of the former work, he says, “I drew Drift at a time when I was going through a transition and turning point in my own life, looking at the unknown, which can be a bit haunting. It is a transition from light into shadow. Controlling the dark tones was a particular challenge, especially creating the hint of a shoulder in shadow.” Echoes places the figure’s hands around their face to create a circular composition, and the tousled hair of the model adds to that circular movement. “The pose didn’t work until she turned her head to the side, casting one eye into shadow and adding drama,” Lane says. “In my work, I try to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary. What I mean by that is, these are very ordinary moments and I’m drawing their personal moments, the private moments, and I take that and create an open-ended story around those

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together in my pieces,” he says, adding, “I want people to feel something when they see my art, and not just see something. A lot of that is done using the lighting, the chiaroscuro I use, as well as the moments that I’m drawing, which are private moments.” Many of Lane’s pieces feature compositions focusing on the face and hands, as he finds them to be the most expressive. Water is also incorporated into the artist’s work in varying forms, such as steam in the piece Reveal. “It took a bit of experimentation to perfect the steam and the trails of water running through it,” he says. “I found the best technique was going over areas with white and gray pencils.” In Lane’s newest piece, Riptide, water also is found streaming down the figure’s face. “The woman in the portrait is pulled away by something mysterious we don’t see. Her mind is traveling,” he says. “The model has brown eyes. To make the eyes a stronger focal point, I changed them to


AMERICAN ART COLLECTOR AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

DAUD AKHRIEV daud@daudakhriev.com | www.daudakhriev.com

The Human Spirit Throughout the paintings of Daud Akhriev is an underlying theme of humanism.

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s a child growing up in the Soviet Union, Daud Akhriev began on his artistic path in the first grade when his teacher noticed he enjoyed drawing. Then, the director of his fine art elementary school became an important figure in the shaping of his career. “He was the one who introduced us to the standards of quality and thoughtfulness to which I hold myself today,” says Akhriev, who later studied at the Art Academy in Russia. “The way he treated the young students encouraged seriousness and achievement. He was the one who said to us—and we were under the age of 14— ‘You are the next building blocks in the construction of human culture. It’s your obligation to be the best quality.’” Working as a contemporary realist today, Akhriev says his work is influenced by the Art Nouveau style particularly in his dedication to detail and in his mosaic work. The subjects that populate his pieces are often drawn from his family and cultural history. “I find inspiration from music, poetry and film—my wife and

I are huge fans of the cinema. And many series of my work result from travel. It’s one of my most important inspirations. My formative destinations are Morocco, Spain, Russia, Italy and around the United States,” explains Akhriev. “Conversations with different people spark ideas, seeing different customs, new decorative forms. After establishing a studio in Spain, my wife and I were astonished at the beautiful customs even in our quite small Spanish village.” The underlying theme that runs throughout all of his works is humanism. He adds, “It is important to me to seek the human spirit at its best, in all its complexity. The subject is endlessly interesting. What does integrity look like? How does wisdom, enthusiasm, joy show in the human face and body language?” One such example is the artist’s painting His World, which evolved from his series Weathered People. The series “featured individuals, often people who labor intensively, showing their stoicism,” Akhriev says. “No matter how hard their

lives, they retain their integrity.” His World used reference materials gathered in Morocco “during a time when the media frenzy went crazy selling fear to the world,” recalls the artist. “Many people’s behavior is changed by the media selling ‘news.’ Fear was in people’s conversation and in their lives regarding the modern world. I realized that one has to disconnect from the direction of popular culture and decide for one’s self what is right, what is fair, what is decent. No matter what conditions there are in the situation, one should try to have dignity and do the right thing.” Akhriev further explains, “I did use the seagulls, which are often obnoxious and loud birds, to represent the chaos of the world not affecting the hero of the painting, who maintains a sense of calm and stays his path, despite the cacophony of the birds.” The artist works in many different mediums—oil, pastel, mixed media, sculpture—because he finds that each has qualities that are better in one than the 1 At Peace, pastel on paper, 23 x 43" 2 His World, oil on linen, 84 x 168" 3 Daud Akhriev with his 48-by-48-inch painting The Arrival. 4 Western Bride, oil on linen, 40 x 48"

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K.Art.Ina in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Akhriev received the American Art Collector Award of Excellence for the Silver Medal Award, Associate Signature Division at the Oil Painters of America 25th annual National Juried Exhibition.

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bounce lights on the figure from below. Simplifying the background brought the focus to the form, light and mood of the woman.” Akhriev is represented by Lovetts Gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Beverly McNeil Gallery in Birmingham, Alabama; and at Gallery

AME RIC AN AR T COLL E C TO R AWARD OF E XCEL L E N CE

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other. He also enjoys switching from one material to the next. “If I had to use one medium for the rest of my life, I would find that restrictive,” Akhriev shares. “Changing media from time to time is refreshing to all your senses.” At Peace is a brand-new pastel work the artist finished in October after working with a model in the studio. “One morning before she departed I asked if we could consider several compositions I had in mind. The time was early morning, very quiet, in a courtyard with white walls. Everything was perfectly calm. We made sketches and photos,” he says. “While reviewing our materials, I felt like the session reflected an awakening. Because the model was not actually levitating, obviously, I had to invent the


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Ready to Race, oil on Raymar canvas board, 11 x 14"

Still-Life with Tangerines, oil on canvas, 18 x 18"

La Rinconada Oak, oil on canvas, 16 x 16"

Andrew Ballantyne A

ndrew Ballantyne likens his approach to oil painting to that of a jazz musician’s interpretation of a standard tune. The subjects of his paintings are a starting point, but there is always room for improvisation and exciting new interpretations. Ballantyne is always careful and faithful to following the rules of drawing, linear and atmospheric perspective, light source and clear value structure, yet he continually finds room for creative improvisation, through enhanced color, shape, design and the interesting calligraphy of brushwork. 122

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Though many of his subjects may be seen as nostalgic, or as having a timeless quality, such as a grove of California Oaks, Ballantyne views his subjects through the modern lens and wants his paintings to be the product of a 21st-century artist. “To bring about a modern sensibility, I try to find a balance between faithful drawing, a strong sense of design, heightened color and a loose, spontaneous painterly style,” he says. “My loose brushwork is most successful when I have a thorough understanding of my subject. A preliminary sketch is a must.” Ballantyne finds that painting is much

more exciting when there is a strong sense of freedom and exploration in the process. He explains, “I love it when I find an accidental brushstroke that surpasses my original intention.”

Want to See More? (408) 293-3564 | adballantyne@earthlink.net www.adballantyne.com Represented by Gallery 24 24 N. Santa Cruz Avenue | Los Gatos, CA 95030 (408) 354 4530 www.lggallery24.fineartstudioonline.com


DAN REMMEL North Palm Beach, FL | (561) 385-6369 danremmel@gmail.com | www.danremmelartist.com

INTERNATIONAL ARTIST MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER

Monumental scenes

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at formal art schools, Remmel finds he has a solid foundation from which to work. “I work primarily from my own photographs. Sometimes I’ll do a sketch on site, but not a lot because I’m usually not in any place for very long,” he says. “I think it’s important to capture a scene at the right time of day. It makes a lot of difference. Usually [I paint] early morning light or the late afternoon. As far as scenes, whatever I consider beauty is what I like to paint.” Among the artist’s works is Iguassu Morning, which is his first painting of Iguassu Falls in South America. “I like the tiered effect of the water,” he explains. “Counterintuitively the falls actually become smaller as they

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advance toward the foreground.” Remmel also paints interior scenes, such as the work Café in Trieste. “It harkens back to M.C. Escher in the reflections in the mirrored bar,” the artist says. He adds that the composition was derived from the combination of three photographs he took, noting, “The James Joyce Café is a cool place to hang out. I try to keep my paintings fresh looking, so once they reach a certain level of technical competence I stop painting and call them finished.” Remmel was the Third Prize Winner of International Artist magazine’s Challenge No. 95, Seascapes, Rivers & Lakes.

1 Dan Remmel in his studio. 2 Iguassu Morning, acrylic, 60 x 40" 3 Café in Trieste, acrylic, 24 x 72"

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lorida-based realist painter Dan Remmel is recognized for his highly detailed landscape and neon sign paintings. His neon sign works are photorealistic while he describes his landscape pieces as a bit more intuitive and stylized. The latter artwork relates to his travels abroad to locations across Europe and South America. “They’re all kind of monumental scenes,” he says. “I’ve always been drawn to the immense. I like Hudson River School painters…They were painting large vistas.” Remmel’s painting, he explains, is rooted in Old Master techniques but updated for acrylics. Having done a lot of illustrations and work as a muralist, as well as training

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the kindred, oil on canvas, 48 x 48"

Aura (detail), oil on canvas, 86 x 60"

Destination, oil on canvas, 60 x 48"

Joshua Smith J

oshua Smith says that his earliest interest as an artist was to paint the recollection of his most vivid dreams. “Over the last decade I have returned to this interest. During the process of painting, I recall the memories of my dreams. I see my dreams as an illumination of a spiritual awakening and rebirth,” says Smith. “As I paint, I think of the experience as a journal or the writing of my own personal psalms. These visual psalms, as reflected in my dreams, conjure metaphors for the fears, challenges, triumphs and hopes of the awakening that I’ve experienced.” His current body of work incorporates the shape of the guitar as his muse, 124

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and he explains that as a metaphor the guitar “seems to represent the desire to harmonize all aspects of my life: physical, emotional and spiritual.” Smith’s painting process uses layers of color glazes to create implied surface texture. “I like to incorporate varying techniques using experimentation as a key component in my approach to painting,” he says. “The constant discovery and learning through the painting process is often exhilarating and liberating. I have spent my life on both the east and west coasts learning from the light and color of both landscapes.” Smith, who is currently looking for new opportunities to show his work in

the U.S. and internationally, will exhibit at LA Art Show from January 11 to 15 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Want to See More? (860) 670-1607 | joshuasmithart@sbcglobal.net www.joshuasmithfineart.com Represented by Contemporary Fine Arts Gallery 7946 Ivanhoe Avenue | La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 551-2010 www.contemporaryfineartsgallery.com

/joshuasmithfineart @joshuasmithart


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Whiskers, acrylic on board, 15 x 40"

Woodland Sphinx, acrylic on board, 21 x 40"

Maternal Manner, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36"

Ezra Tucker T

of his subject, Tucker prefers an impressionistic brushstroke as he wants to “create an impression of these creatures and not a photorealistic image.” He also leaves room for the viewer to use their imagination when they observe his artwork.

Want to See More? Southeastern Wildlife Exposition Charleston, SC (843) 723-1748 | www.sewe.com

Ezra Tucker Fine Art @sewechs

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contemporary. Inspiring his lifelong fascination have been his surroundings in the Rocky Mountains, national parks, zoological gardens, publications, nature films and museum collections. “To capture the essence of a creature in motion or in repose in a believable and naturalistic manner is my ambition,” he says. “A minimalist approach to my technique and style to depict texture, motion and personality is also a goal. I strive to breathe life into my subjects by capturing the dignity and elegance of each creature in pencil or in paint by experimenting with color and light to capture the distinct qualities of my subjects.” When painting the likeness

AR TI ST FOC U S

he 35th annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition will take place February 17 to 19 in Charleston, South Carolina. Artist Ezra Tucker has been selected as the Featured Artist for the show, with his featured painting being Maternal Mother of a doe standing protectively over her fawn. “To be chosen as the Featured Artist for the 35th annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition is an unexpected honor,” remarks Tucker. “It means to me that I have achieved a quality to my art that is worthy of highlight and inclusion in the legacy of SEWE and the exceptional world of wildlife art.” Tucker has researched and studied the history of wildlife artists and their work, from the early cave drawings to


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Sahar, oil on canvas board, 18 x 14"

Beauty Overhead, plein air oil, 6 x 6"

Meagan, oil on canvas, 24 x 30"

Jakeb Kristiansen S

ince Jakeb Kristiansen was young, he has always been drawn to the figure subject matter, especially portraiture. “For me it’s about capturing the subtle nuances, the small quirks we all have that make us unique,” he says. “In the last few years, I’ve branched out from focusing on people to pet and equestrian portraiture. These new subjects come with their own series of challenges, and this is where I find the most enjoyment.” Growing up with both parents being artists, Kristiansen was surrounded by volumes of inspiration. “I was always drawn to works by Alphonse Mucha and John Singer Sargent, and I think this is why I have such a passion for portraiture,” says Kristiansen. A specialist in oil paint, Kristiansen began painting after winning a scholarship to Parsons Paris in his sophomore year of college. He is currently located in and works out of Concord, New Hampshire.

Want to See More?

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Want to See More? (410) 200-3597 | www.jillbasham.com

(802) 287-0364 | www.jakebkristiansen.com

Jakeb Kristiansen Portraits

andscape artist Jill Basham says, “I am overwhelmed by the beauty of nature, in particular the atmosphere of an environment. While my home is on Chesapeake Bay, inspiration can arrive anywhere, from a bustling street in Manhattan to an isolated marsh. It’s the ‘feeling’ of the place that inspires me and I hope to translate.” When painting, Basham doesn’t have a specific set of rules and prefers to let a Jill Basham scene and her feelings for it to set the approach. “I see each painting as an experiment that is unfolding,” she says. “My initial goal can be interrupted by a new idea during the process, and I’m okay with taking a different path and veering from what might have been comfortable. It’s the safe paintings that I find less exciting. The truly moving pieces are the ones that I pushed a bit. There are stories to tell.” Basham’s work is on view in Root to Bloom: The Places Artists Call Home at Principle Gallery in Alexandria, Virginia, through December 13, and her work will be at Olmsted Plein Air Invitational in Atlanta from April 2 to 9, 2017. A full listing of gallery representation is available on her website.

@jakebkristiansen

Represented by Reinert Fine Art Charleston, SC and Blowing Rock, NC www.reinertfineart.com

PHOTO BY KIRK LARSEN ©2016

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CHECK OUT OUR OTHER ART PUBLICATIONS! A Day Slips Into Evening, pastel, 12 x 16"

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Linda Mutti T

he desire to paint and draw has been a part of Linda Mutti’s life since childhood. “Painting is my passion, it’s something that I am driven to do,” Mutti says. “I especially love to be in my ‘office,’ the out of doors.” Mutti finds that when she is painting in nature, the rest of the world drifts away. “It’s a spiritual experience, taking in the grandeur of our world and finding what it is that draws me to that particular scene on that particular day,” she says. “All of your senses are engaged, which leads to a deeper connection than one can find with photos. You feel the breeze and the sun, hear the birds, smell the ocean in the air. Trying to capture that feeling and convey it to the viewer keeps me going back day after day.” Mutti’s artwork can be found at Gallery Los Olivos, Bronze, Silver & Gold Gallery and Thomas Lee Gallery.

Want to See More?

AR TI ST FOC U S

In each 148 page bi-monthy issue, we take you inside the studios of the world’s best artists. They tell you the thought process behind their creative methods and reveal their painting techniques.

Sunrise In Bishop, pastel, 18 x 24"

www.lindamutti.com

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Linda Mutti Fine Art


INDEX

LOOK FOR VIDEOS IN THIS ISSUE

ARTISTS IN THIS ISSUE Abramson, Sarah Elise

94

Hobart, Clinton

Adams, Leslie

34

Houser, Allan

Aho, Eric

68

Kristiansen, Jakeb

126

Pfeiffer, Jacob A.

120

Kuzmina, Nadezda

108 42

Akhriev, Daud

108

O’Hagan, Katie

99

Tseng, Hsin-Yao

Omalix

97

Tucker, Ezra

125

113

Uribe, Nicolás

105

Poly, Sara Linda

112

Vakhtang

111

Procious, Cindy

112

Valero, Armando

116

Quintana, Dan

105

Waddell, Theodore

42

Alexander, Jason Shawn

88

LaMonte, Karen

Arthur, Jules

96

Lane, Jesse

Ballantyne, Andrew

122

Liberace, Robert

113

Rahilly, Paul

Basham, Jill

126

Lyubovnaya, Regina

110

Remmel, Dan

123

Mann, Jeremy

103

Russo, Carlo

104

Chaet, Bernard

69

Chapman, Michael

104

Ciganek, Eric Elan

97

Marshennikov, Serge

41

67, 69

108

98 106

Weber, Mike

107

Wessmark, Johannes

104

Wiesenfeld, Aron

90

Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

42

Wilson, Pamela

98 103

Martin, Brian

113

Selski, Margo

99

Wilson, Timothy

124

Zadorine, Andrei

Efe, Alpay

109

Maynard, Chris

106

Smith, Joshua

Floyd, Elizabeth

113

McCauley, Robert

107

Smith, Suzy

96

Gandy, Greg

102

McNamara, Joseph

68

Sorren, Joe

100

Gonzales, Frank

110

Monafo, Janet

65

Stuckey, Tracy

107

Gray, Kevin Francis

43

Mutti, Linda

126

Thomas, Mary Alayne

110

Gregg, Tom

92

Nick, George

66

Torres, Yunior Hurtado

97

Zdrale, Zack

98 109

ADVERTISERS IN THIS ISSUE Arcadia Contemporary / Culver City, CA

John Pence Gallery / San Francisco, CA

51

Bradley, Paige / Carmel, CA

47

LA Art Show / Los Angeles, CA

Branch, Betty / Roanoke, VA

51

Light Chasers / Sarasota, FL

Joshua Smith Fine Art / Rancho Santa Margarita, CA

3

R. Alexander Fine Art / Atlanta, GA

31

22

Richard Stravitz Sculpture

37

& Fine Art Galleries / Virginia Beach, VA

35

Ripple, Jeff / Micanopy, FL

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12-13

CANYON Fine Art / Santa Fe, NM

21

Long, Ben / Asheville, NC

49

RJD Gallery / Sag Harbor, NY

Christiane David Fine Art Gallery / Lancaster, PA

30

Lotton Gallery / Chicago, IL

6-7

Robinson, Lori S. / The Sea Ranch, CA

51

Coffee, Elaine G. / Cave Creek, AZ

18

Mamos, George / Garden City, NY

45

Romaine, Susan / Delray Beach, FL

79

Salamatina Gallery / Manhasset, NY

29

Day, M. Camille / Blue Ridge, GA

87

Miami Project / Miami Beach, FL

57

Schneider, William A. / Village of Lakewood, IL

45

Edlinger-Kunze, Cathrine / Carlsbad, CA

39

Michele Usibelli Fine Art Studio / Woodway, WA

49

Scottsdale Artists’ School / Scottsdale, AZ

26

Egeli Gallery / Provincetown, MA

49

Miranda, Hernan / Miami, FL

16

Scottsdale Gallery Association / Scottsdale, AZ

Frazer, Ella / Naples, FL

75

Mulrooney, Terry Arroyo / Miami, FL

79

Sirona Fine Art / Hallandale Beach, FL

Craig, Ron / Vallejo, CA

128

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Bostic, Alexander / Starkville, MS

Cover 3

Mary Martin Gallery / Charleston, SC

Cover 4

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Gallery 1401 / Chattanooga, TN

87

Painter, Sally / Delray Beach, FL

75

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition / Charleston, SC

20

Grenning Gallery / Sag Harbor, NY

19

Patchen, David / San Francisco, CA

36

Stewart, E.L. / Spokane, WA

28 25

Hardy, Stephanie Jeanne / Brentwood, TN

87

Portrait Society of America / Tallahassee, FL

26

UGallery.com / San Francisco, CA

Hohmann Fine Art / Palm Desert, CA

24

Principle Gallery / Alexandria, VA

17

Vito, Teresa / Pueblo, CO

47

John Carroll Doyle Art Gallery / Charleston, SC

27

Quidley & Company Fine Art / Naples, FL

Wally Workman Gallery / Austin, TX

24

Westward Gallery / Denver, CO

23

www.AmericanAr tCollector.com

9


RON CRAIG

Stands The Time, Acrylic on Panel, Â 24"x 36"

RON CRAIG FINE ART WWW.RONCRAIGART.COM


Duffy Sheridan

On a Soft Day, 24" x 48", Oil on Linen

103 Broad Street Charleston, SC 29401 365 Fifth Avenue South Naples, FL 34102

www.marymartinART.com www.MMGNaples.com 719-338-9000

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Tạp chí mỹ thuật nước ngoài 2017  

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