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year book 08

Civitella retailmarket


LAB.INT_08 laboratorio di progettazione degli interni 1 LS orientamento interni facoltĂ  di architettura e societĂ  politecnico di milano editor Michela Bassanelli with Gennaro Postiglione layout Michela Bassanelli Gennaro Postiglione


civitella retailmarket interiors as active-actions


INDICE 1_introduzione 1.1_”active-actions” 1.2_“the architecture of interiors as re-writing of space:centrality of gesture”

2_programma 2.1_”civitella del tronto come cittadella del consumo critico” 2.2_retail park 2.3_studio di fattibilità:Civitella 2.4_masterplan 2.5_re-action

3_rilievo 3.1_location “territoriale” 3.2_location “urbana” 3.2.1 descrizione 3.3_rilievo via Mazzini

4_progetti 4.1_non intervenire sull’esistente 4.2_vestire l’esistente 4.3_costruire nell’esistente 4.4_aggiungere all’esistente 4.5_costruire l’esistente

5_ worckshop innsbruck 5.1_letture 5.2_gruppi di lavoro bibliografia credits


“[...] Ma inutilmente mi sono messo in viaggio per visitare la città:obbligata a restare immobile e uguale a se stessa per essere meglio ricordata, Zora languì, si disfece e scomparve. La terra l’ha dimenticata [...]” Italo Calvino, Le città invisibili


Introduzione


Alison and Peter Smithson,Upper lawn,Tisbury,1962


1.1_”Active-actions” Il progetto d’interni come pratica di ri-attivazioni architettoniche urbane e di paesaggi gennaro postiglione

Dalla conservazione alla promozione, dalla valorizzazione attraverso la fruizione alla valorizzazione attraverso il ritorno nelcircolo attivo della vita (ri-appropriazioni attraverso “profanazioni”) Dalle linee strategiche della Commissione Cultura dell’EU per il periodo 2007-13 “From now on, the concrete task of any programme for Cultural Heritage promotion has to be centred on active-actions of reappropriation by people themselves. This new way of taking care of involves in particular a real meeting of the people concerned with their own successive memories: a true reconciliation, in certain cases, between tangible and non-tangible heritage. To this end, architectural heritage, museums and all cultural areas must become places of life for the local populations. Synergies between past cultural heritage and contemporary creations, live arts and crafts should be promoted in order to encourage the dialogue between generations and the integration of cultural heritagein local daily life.” 8


Guido Guidi, Gesture, 1970 (courtesy the author)


1.2_“the architecture of interiors as rewriting of space:centrality of gesture gennaro postiglione, eleonora lupo in thinking inside the box,Glasgow 2008

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Culture of interiors has been often forced to coincide with the architecture history or with the furniture one, misunderstanding that the specificity of inner-space is shared among both of them. This paper aims to contribute to the definition of the discipline of interiors and proposes an interpretation of its specific character, establishing and grounding its ethic and methodology of design, by discussing some theoretical issues. Main focus will be addressed to those human inhabiting activities, like relations between objects, their use and space, which are basic for the creation of the meaning of places and therefore central in a so called ‘interior design approach’. The centrality of the subject experience is relevant (both in the teaching strategy and in the professional practice) because it becomes the parameter to design uses and shapes and determinates those cultural meanings where objects can be properly set. The interiors approach in fact, stresses the importance of these cultural relations between objects and context as possibility of really using and understanding the places, and therefore to design or re-design them, like in the intervention on the existent. Keywords: Interiors Theory, Identity and Design, Social and Cultural human factors. 10


CENTRALITY OF GESTURE “[…] He looked at the bedroom furniture placed in the garden. […] Everything was arranged just as it had been in the room: side-table and lampon his side, side-table and lamp on her side. […] The chest of drawers stoodnear the foot of the bed. Beside the chest of drawers was an electric stove. Atthe foot of the bed there was also a small bamboo armchair with a print cushion. The gleaming aluminium kitchen furniture occupied the path, instead. The table was covered by a yellow muslin tablecloth. The cloth, too big, hung down at sides almost to the ground […]. He had also brought an extension wire into the garden and all the household appliances were connected to electricity. It worked, just as when they had still been inside the house”.(Raymond, 1999) With a specific tradition of studies within Interiors, from the very early beginning of my teaching activity in Architecture, I have always tried to identify and focus some characteristic elements of Interior discipline which I would use also working within other frameworks: as my courses in Architectural design, where there was no express request for interior themes. With this specific task in my mind, I tried to transform practice into methodology, identifying design behaviours able to give deeper meaning to architectural space and bringing what I had always thought to be the core of Interiors. In this framework, a fundamental parameter to recognize whatever project as characterized by an approach within the field of Interiors is the evidence of human presence in the design process. Not only in terms of human scale metrics, from the use of inches and foot to more sophisticated golden section and so on, but in terms of the project to be capable to show existing relationships between space, that we prefer to call “place”, gesture use and meaning. Space is an abstract term coming from the ancient Greek word stadio used to define the parameter for measuring; therefore space is objective and abstract and never related to the subject: it is a quantitative way to count the world. On the other side, “place” is a subjective way to refer and describe spaces: it is always related to the subject. There is no place without a subject, while there is always a space(Farinelli, 2003). With this knowledge in mind, practice and teaching architectural design had to keep in account the subjective dimension of life: no interest for abstract geometric compositions, because a correct project always involve use and gesture, objects and subjects, defining/describing places. This also explains why, working with Interiors at school, the self-dimension is often called in evidence: the reflexive action of involving “yourself” in the design process


Giotto, Annunciazione ad Anna, 1303-04


is almost the only strategy both to avoid extreme generalization and to give depth of meaning to design choices. According to these statements, interiors own a specific character that connects dwelling with life, needs and desires of the people they have been thought and realized for . Shape and gesture in the interior are strictly connected and this topic represents the basic specificity of interior culture. Therefore, Interiors represent, rather than an operative field in itself, an approach to design focused on the relevance of gesture, considered as the action building the place (Cornoldi, 1994). Moreover, in opposition to the aesthetic and technologic drift towards spectacularisation of some contemporary architecture, The Architecture of Interiors leads to over come the concepts of dimension, context and building typology: no matter if you are inside or outside, in a open or closed space, in a room or in a shopping mall, since they are all considered as “place of the gesture”, produced and signified by the action of inhabiting (De Certau, 1990). Interiors as discipline makes architecture concentrate on the crucial question of “dwelling through actions”, transforming the abstract space into a “placeto-be” (Basso Peressut, L., Postiglione, G., 2005). This theoretical interpretation underlines the role of Interiors in contemporary architecture debate as the discipline whose validity relies in the methodology of shaping spaces, building relations and meanings between man needs and the places where they live.

AROUND OBJECTS There is a semantic polarity between the physical nature of objects and their capacity to nullifying themselves in deference to the activities to which they are linked; and even more drastically, between their features and the settings that their simple use creates. It is a dichotomy that shifts attention from the product to the spatial phenomenon that is produced through its use: this determinates a new semeiological figure in which the object, its use and the space that is generated by this use, appear indissolubly liked to one another. And so, despite the fact that product is the locus of designing and exchange, it is elsewhere that the significance linked to the goods appears: for instance in that spring from the way in which the objects are used, from their intrinsic capacity to construct precise spatial situations. Mario Praz called them Stimmung, in his “Filosofia dell’Arredamento” (NorbergSchulz, C., 1985). He notes with scrupulous precision that a discourse on the subject of furnishing


Sverre Fehn, Verdensende Art Gallery, project, 1988 (courtesy Sverre Fehn)


Alison and Peter Smithson, Small pleasure of life (from: Smithson, A. and P. Changing the Art of Inhabitation, London, 1993)


– and on its indispensable complements – cannot be held without grasping the presence of a broader, more complex phenomenon that, starting expressly from objects, arrives at the spatial dimension determined by them through the way in which they make themselves available for use. The character and the quality of an ambient is defined by the system of objects and of actions this system can give rise to: they construct precise settings, suggest models and lifestyles, support cultural endeavours. This is the reason why everywhere we go, museums of material culture are obliged to mend the fracture that always exists between objects and context, through hypothetical reconstructions, through a plethora of information, through communication strategies, through – in a word – the “exhibition setting up”. That is again a discipline within the field of Interiors. All those efforts are due to the attempt to close the gap that makes objects mute once they have been torn out of their space, of real life: the only place where they have and keep a meaning. The same silence, the same privation, is at times the fate of a contemporary furnishing product when, uprooted from its settings and its use, it becomes incapable of any performance that is not self-referential and autistic, whether it relates to performance, to aesthetics, to technologies, materials or other. The practice of interiors, in this view, is addressed and suitable both to new design and to intervention on/around existent since it takes care of relationship between gesture and space, with the help of objects. However, “working on the existing” is paradigmatic for the discipline: the already existing constructions are the place where space has to be thought around the subject, where new gestures need to “find home”. It is the place where investigation between actions and shapes are more deeply developed because of the reduced freedom connected with the existing boundaries.

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WORKING ON/AROUND THE EXISTENT AS A RE-WRITING OF SPACE It is also the extension of a methodology developed from “human dimension” to “being-things”: the attention devoted to gesture and use can be easily extended to context: to what is on site when/where we are going to work. The design turns into the art of negotiating realities through the built form: everything comes into the account and needs to find a place, that is the project answers, that is the final construction. In this concern, Roland Barthes theory about text2 product and production (Banham, R., 1982), can be very helpful lighting the typical process undergoing every wellplanned interior design work. If we undertake his assertion “Every meaningful activity can generate text“and metaphorically we can transpose it from the field of literature to the one of architecture to gain a possible operative method, we should define the scope in which this model could be useful and valid. Although the equality between the reading and the writing of a text appears a clear and logic fact in literature, it is much more complex to transfer the procedure of decoding/creating to the field of architecture were we immediately encounter the physicality of the matter, the weight of the third-dimension and the oddity of the concept of void. Of course every text contains a specific physical dimension, since it is written (or printed) on ‘physical’ pages, but it establishes a different relation with the user: it is the book, we might say, that enters and inhabits the reader, when by reading fragments of text temporarily move ‘into’ the user. On the other hand, every act of understanding or ‘reading’ an architectural artefact implies the action of entering/inhabiting a physical space. Nevertheless, with all the diversities of the case and with a (necessary) specific knowledge of the discipline, the comprehension of an architectural work is the result of a ‘reading’ that becomes productive through a constant process of separating/rejoining. Reading a building implies ‘deconstruction’ in order to recognize the fundamental elements and seize the design principles to achieve new level of understanding. In the same way as in the textual practice of language, the point is not to discover the meaning that text/work is supposed to contain, an univocal meaning crystallized into the work/product, but the production of a new ‘significance’ that “emancipates the signification’s statute and makes it plural”. There’s not actual distinction between the identity of the author and the one of the reader, and it is precisely this need to define the two roles that fall-off in the practice of text, refusing a


places are ‘colonized’ by the aggressive violence of univocal gestures. Many places have been built with no care for their distinctive characters, with no interest for their specific fundamental elements, with no concern for their form, but only with the stub-

Superstudio, Camp: fundamental acts, 1971-72 (from Area: designing actions, 2005(79+), p. 25


Le Corbusier, BesteguĂŹ Apartament, Paris 1929-31 (from Rassegna: Cemento, 1992(49), p. 34


‘metaphysic of the classic subject’ sustained by the traditional philology. This way of understanding things doesn’t discharge or deny the traditional scientific methods but it rather consider them as a starting point for the production of significance. When dealing with projects that are related to ‘the existing’ this new approach produces a positive and powerful effect whose consequences overcome the ones of the plain comprehension. Every act of building, by evidence, deals with an existing condition which must establish a dialogue with, for all the reasons that provoked the act itself. A careful analysis and reading of the existing context enables the architect to recognize and underline the elements characterizing the form and the space which the new structure will be put in relation with. This process of knowledge shouldn’t try to discover or ‘unveil’ hidden meanings but rather remain a semantic activity that become, therefore, ‘production’. By breaking off the ‘monological state’ of the architectural work, the comprehension becomes wider and the authenticity as unique/original can start to be dismantled. This idea arises from a profound critical revision of the Kantian aesthetic where the artwork and the spectator are counter-posed and stranger to each other. In the textual practice, and then in the thinking about ‘difference’, subject and object loose their ‘stability’ and the same borders that used to mark their ambit become uncertain, as transitory elements, introducing a ‘practice of representative perception that presupposes the mutual imbrication’ (Barthes, R., 1973) of the one and the other. In a similar way, Bhabha talks about the ‘third space’ as a new semantic and relational place that originates from the impossibility of defining in an exact and fixed way both the object and the subject as well as their reciprocal boundaries. “[…] This implies an inevitable weakening of every abstract interpretation of the idea of the authentic. The pure and uncontaminated concept of the other (the work) has been crucial for the anti-capitalistic critic of the cultural economy of the western world in modern age. […] But who can define authenticity then? Once again (someone) stands for the observed assigning him a position”3 andan universal value in accordance with the western order of things (Bhabba, H.K., 2003). In this way the idea of a ‘moving significance’, immerse in the circumstances, originates and demolishing the basis of the monolithic authenticity that was traditionally accepted. A fuzzier notion focuses on the productive action of the subject and on the productive condition of the object introducing an intermediate space where subject and object are overlapped and where their meanings become plural. 2 “Every meaningful activity can generate text: painting, composing music, filming, etc..[…] If the theory of the text tends to abolish the separation between the different art disciplines it is because their artworks are not anymore considered as simple ‘messages’ […] but as perpetual products,statements, which the subject keep on debating on: this subject is certainly the one of the author, but also the one of the reader”. Excerpt from: Barthes, R. Le Plaisir du texte, (Èd. du Seuil,

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Although it is more difficult to define, this concept is not less reliable of the (counterposed) idea that used to build a system of power and justify the action through the invention of the authentic and the original. In this way the reader becomes profoundly responsible, the old beliefs provided by the myth of the authentic are left behind and a new relationship with the work is established. The reader is eventually a direct and active author in that productive process of significance he has been always excluded from. By ‘discoverer’, or even just ‘spectator’, the designer becomes, as well as the author, ‘craftsman’ in a continuous confrontation with his work that, as we already stated before, evolves from product into production. Moving the discussion onto the specific field of architectural, it is necessary to remark that working on ‘what is built’, acting within a given space, arises the issue of the attitude of place to give hospitality. Every project that ‘finds its home’ inside an existing realm, measures and challenges the ability of the space to welcome the gestures and the structures that are necessary acts to give new use to the same space. Researching to what extent a place is able to host is a fundamental passage in a design process that is not willing to be ‘colony’ of space, but guest (Chambers, I.,1996). This way of designing could – ultimately – happen as the mere, simple insertion of furniture and objects into a space and this might be the perfect challenge for the designer’s ability to understand the hospitality of the built matter and to perform in a built environment (Flora, F.,Giardiello, P.,Postiglione, G., 2000). There’s no dwelling (inhabiting) without hospitality and dwelling is – to say it with Norberg-Schulz – an existential phenomenon more than a physical need. There is no gesture without a place willing and available to receive it and the place has always welcomed the gesture, and the life. Some places – either natural or artificial – have been destroyed by intense exploitation or abandoned in decay for the ineptitude of someone to inhabit them; some places are ‘colonized’ by the aggressive violence of univocal gestures. Many places have been built with no care for their distinctive characters, with no interest for their specific fundamental elements, with no concern for their form, but only with the stubborn superimposition of an alien, foolish design act. This has been very true every time the architectural process was carried on ‘running after’ the myth of the authentic as an ontological legitimation of the design through a continuous search for the origin and the primitive state. It is not possible to ‘get back home’ since we must now deal with progressively complex negotiations and interactions that are dissolving and hybridising the original state of the work that survive only in the movement, in the transit and in the incapacity to stand still.


Guido Guidi, Villa dei sogni, 1980 (courtesy the author)


C O N C L U S I O N Freed from the obsession for authenticity, and from the utopia of ‘return to the roots’, driven by a healthy will to research, read and understand an existing space as it is (with its imperfection, with its history of transformations and transitions), Italian architects of the second generation of Modern Movement managed to combine the attention for the context without giving up that necessary productive attitude that should sustain every project. To these architects and to ones that successfully followed their path – in Italy as abroad - we should look at today. The work as text, the space as place for gesture, the project as ‘re-writing’ and the search for hospitality are then the fundamental elements of a praxis that expresses itself through a conscious manipulation of the existing that is continuously transformed as its authenticity is disintegrated.

Farinelli, F. Geografia. (Einaudi,Torino, 2003), 16-21. Cornoldi, A. L’architettura dei luoghi domestici. (Jaca Book, Milano,1994). De Certeau, M. L’invention du quotidian. (Gullimard, Paris, 1990). Basso Peressut, L. and Postiglione, G. Il progetto di Interni. In Cornoldi A., Architettura degli Interni. (Il Poligrafo, Padova, 2005). Norberg-Schulz, C. Dwelling. (Rizzoli Int, New York, 1985). Praz, M. La Filosofia dell’arredamento. (Longanesi, Milano, 1981). Banham, R. Scenes in American Deserta. (The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1982). Barthes, R. Le Plaisir du texte. (Èd. du Seuil, Paris, 1973). Bhabha, H. K. The Third Space. In Rutherford, J. (ed.), Identity, Community, Culture, Difference. (Lawrence& Wishart, London, 2003). Chambers, I. Paesaggi migratori. (Costa&Nolan, Genova, 1996). Flora, F., Giardiello, P., Postiglione. G. Legittimità degli interni. Area, 2000(50), pp. 2-3. Jabés, E. Le livre de l’hospitalité. (Gullimard, Paris, 1991).


Carlo Scarpa, Museo di Castelvecchio Verona 1958-75 (ph.: Arno Hammacher, courtesy CISAAP)


“[...] Zora ha la proprietà di restare nella memoria punto per punto,nella successione delle vie, e delle case lungo le vie, e delle porte e delle finestre nelle case, pur non mostrando in essa bellezze o rarità particolari. [...]” Italo Calvino, Le città invisibili


Programma


2.1_Civitella del Tronto come cittadella del consumo critico gennaro postiglione

La sfida che il laboratorio ha deciso di intraprendere quest’anno è quella di verificare la possibilità di elaborare un progetto di recupero per il Borgo medioevale di Civitella del Tronto. Come già in altre occasioni, la prima sfida del laboratorio consiste nell’inserire la proposta progettuale all’interno di un quadro generale che ne legittimi la fattibilità. In questo caso, uno studio di larga massima ha permesso di dare solidità ad una ipotesi operativa preventiva, quella di trasformare Civitella del Tronto nel primo centro del Consumo Critico in Italia. L’obiettivo del programma era infatti di determinare della “azioni” in grado di “attivare” quei processi di rigenerazione indispensabili a garantire durata e stabilità a qualsivoglia progetto di valorizzazione e recupero (nell’ottica appunto delle indicazioni redatte dalla EU). Dunque, l’ipotesi di un così singolare Retail Park nasce si sviluppa e si consolida come stratagemma operativo: il nostro compito di progettisti infatti non è e non sarà quello di elaborare programmi di gestione e/o di marketing territoriale e/o urbano ma quello di dare risposte concrete alle domande che la committenza pone. A Civitella, l’elaborazione di un piano generale di intervento (non solo funzionale) in grado di soddisfare le richieste connesse allo specifico programma e alle azioni ad esso collegate, ma anche la formulazione di linee guida a cui attenersi per salvaguarda re il rapporto tra identità dei luoghi e nuova funzionalizzazione (tema tipico degli interventi in contesti caratterizzati da edilizia storica), per giungere alla redazione di un ben determinato (e dettagliato) progetto di Interni in grado di esemplificare il 28


rapporto tra Programma di rigenerazione Urbana e specificità del contesto su cui si interviene (in relazioni alle linee guida elaborate). Alcune attività saranno svolte collettivamente, come il rilievo la lettura e la conoscenza dei luoghi, l’elaborazione di un Masterplan complessivo, la progettazione degli spazi aperti e la redazione di linee guida per gli interventi di recupero veri e propri. A piccoli gruppi, invece, si provvederà alla stesura di specifici progetti di interni. Al tema “commerciale” del Negozio dovrà sempre essere affiancato quello della Residenza (dei proprietari/gestori, in una tradizione tipica della città medioevale) –nello stesso lotto o in lotti contigui in relazione alle disponibilità. Oltre al tema commerciale, però, sarà possibile affrontare temi di diversa natura funzionale: quello dell’Accoglienza (B&B), della Ristorazione/Degustazione, ecc. così come emergeranno dal Masterplan. L’intervento progettuale sarà concentrato solo su una spina stradale (via Mazzini), come esemplificazione di una modalità di intervento: lungo quest’asse stradale si concentreranno le attività di lettura, mappatura, rilievo e quelle progettuali.


2.2_”retail park”

“La Città del Consumo: il Retail Park Negli ultimi decenni, si è assistito a un progressivo cambiamento nelle definizione degli spazi urbani in forza dell’evoluzione del rapporto dell’individuo con il proprio tempo libero, che ha portato a una progressiva diminuzione dell’importanza del centro storico a favore dei luoghi dedicati al consumo ed in particolare di quello che comunemente chiamiamo Galleria Commerciale, Retail Park o Centro Commerciale. Tuttavia merita fare un piccolo passo indietro e una breve considerazione di ordine storico sociale; quando comunemente usiamo l’espressione città facciamo mentalmente riferimento a un’entità unitaria e coerente che in realtà non sussiste più, sia da un punto di vista urbanistico che sociale e culturale. La città ha da tempo abbandonato la struttura di insediamento compatto e racchiuso da mura ed anche dal punto di vista sociale si presenta non piu’ come un qualcosa di omogeneo, ma al contrario diventa incontro di forme culturali diverse per storia religione e cultura. Indiscusso protagonista di questa nuova società e dei rapporti che essa genera tra i suoi membri e con i suoi luoghi è il consumo, che diviene la componente centrale dei comportamenti collettivi. Il consumo di massa oggi sposta la sua attenzione da prodotti di utilità e di basso costo, da una dimensione tangibile, come definita dai sociologi moderni, ad aspetti sempre più simbolici.

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un articolo piuttosto che un altro, infatti, non passa più solo per la dimensione razionale di valutazione dei vantaggi svantaggi, di costo e soddisfazione ma per un coinvolgimento sempre più a carattere emotivo. Il consumo diviene, quindi, una pratica sociale. Ecco in breve cosa ha portato al successo i Parchi commerciali. La sempre crescente scarsità di tempo a disposizione da dedicare al tempo libero ha creato l’esigenza di poter concentrate in un unico luogo, le diverse e importanti attività che lo stile di vita contemporaneo tende a relegare necessariamente nel week end o in cubature di spazio – tempo. Il Retail Park abbandona, così, la struttura originaria estremamente semplice, essenzialmente incentrata intorno a un Ipermercato, all’interno di un edificio dalle forme architettoniche funzionali, scarne e poco attraenti, e si trasforma in un mondo complesso, una città nella città, ricca di servizi ed esperienze, al suo interno sempre più spesso troviamo, oltre ai negozi: cinema, centri benessere, agenzie di viaggi, punti di ristoro con bar e fast food, aree per conversare e rilassarsi, baby park. Anche la dimensione architettonica viene ripensata: esternamente acquisisce forme e materiali ispirati all’architettura postmoderna, mentre per gli interni la ricerca si discosta dalla semplificazione dello spazio articolato in corsie standard, volumi, controsoffitto, illuminazione e pavimentazione omogenei e piatti, per progettare ambienti unici che siano per il consumer rilas santi e stimolanti, con illuminazioni studiate per creare giochi e merci disposte in modo accattivante, dando grande risalto agli elementi di arredo dedicati a una promozione che si eleva e strizza l’occhio ai canoni della comunicazione pubblicitaria. I Retail Park rivestono, ogni giorno di più, la funzione di entertainment: al di là delle ragioni di consumo effettivo, sempre più individui vi si recano per il semplice piacere di passeggiare all’interno degli spazi climatizzati e confortevoli, isolati dai disagi e pericoli che caratterizzano le metropoli contemporanee, riproponendo, a distanza di secoli, il fascino dei passage parigini in cui nacque il concetto, prima, e la pratica, poi, delle vetrine. Così la socializzazione abbandona in massima parte gli spazi pubblici ed esterni per ritrovarsi negli ambienti interni a privati degli Retail Park che, se non sostituiscono del tutto la funzione del centro, sicuramente divengono importanti centri alternativi della metropoli postmoderna. Sicuramente in Italia la persistenza di un contesto urbano reso profondamente attraente dall’alto profilo architettonico e monumentale e, ancora in molti casi, il carattere eminentemente tradizionale delle forme sociali di interazione, rallentano questo processo, contrastato anche da iniziative rivolte viceversa a mantenere l’importanza e la vivibilità pubblica dei luoghi urbani.


Ma persino in un contesto cosÏ particolare come quello italiano, il centro storico e in particolare alcune sue vie pedonalizzate come, per esempio, via Condotti a Roma e via Montenapoleone a Milano, sono costrette al ripensamento della propria funzione, anche alla luce delle risorse generate dal turismo di massa, ripensando se stesse secondo una lettura mass-mediologica e orientata al consumo, trasformandosi in Mall Center storiche e cariche di fascino.�

http://www.assoimmobiliare.it/Retail_Park.asp 17/03/2008

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2.3_ studio di fattibilitĂ : Civitella matteo fugazza

1_la location Il Piano Territoriale Provinciale della provincia di Teramo (PTP) Capire le potenzialitĂ , le criticitĂ  e le aspettative di sviluppo del sito.


2_le componenti principali del territorio Il Mare a Est e Le montagne verso l’interno della provincia, in particolare i sistemi montuosi piÚ rilevanti sono quello del Gran Sasso e dei Monti della Laga con andamenti paralleli (nord-sud sia per i sistemi montuosi che per il mare). Perpendicolari a questi due sistemi si individua il sistema della valli fluviali tra cui quella della Vibrata a cui appartiene il sistema del Tronto. Gli interstizi di questi due sistemi (mari-monti e valli fluviali) sono occupati da complessi sistemi collinari con vario orientamento che formano un insieme di crinali e dorsali che connota forte-


3_ le attività Alla natura dei luoghi corrisponde una peculiare distribuzione delle tipologie di attività produttive prevalentemente relative alla industria manifatturiera. Si distinguono diversi sistemi territoriali ed in particolare va considerato il sistema della Vibrata e del Tronto (Civitella appartiene all’Unione dei Comuni della Val Vibrata) caratterizzate da un forte insediamento di attività che riguardano l’abbigliamento e la lavorazione del cuoio e recentemente l’arredamento.

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Le N.T.A. del PTP della Provincia di Teramo


Nuove opportunitĂ  di sviluppo

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via mazzini

edifici di progetto

gioielleria

ristorante

albergo diffuso

negozio d’olio

fruttivendolo

falegnameria

edifici su via mazzini


2.4_ masterplan

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2.5_ re-action

attivitĂ  e sviluppo locale attivitĂ  e turismo

_le attivitĂ 

RE-ACTION

prodotti del luogo

turismo sostenibile

commercio sostenibile

gioielleria

olio

coltivazioni di frutta e verdura

s.p.a.

legno cucina tipica

> popolazione del luogo

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“[...] Non di questo è fatta la città, ma di relazioni tra le misure del suo spazio e gli avvenimenti del suo passato: la distanza dal suolo d’un lampione e i piedi penzolanti d’un usurpatore impiccato; l’altezza di quella ringhiera e il salto dell’adultero che la scavalca all’alba. [...]” Italo Calvino,le città invisibili


R i l i e v o


civitella del tronto


3.1 location territoriale


Cartografia storica pianta del fortilizio 1732 (napoli, archivio di stato)


Cartografia storica pianta del fortilizio1806 (archivio di stato di vienna)


AccessibilitĂ  a livello regionale e locale


Civitella dal basso e dall’alto

50


Civitella si scopre poco a poco


3.2 location urbana


ACCESSI


SEZIONI URBANE


60


62


COSTRUITO


PERCORSI COSTRUITO


GIARDINI PENSILI COSTRUITO


TETTI COSTRUITO


MATERIALI COSTRUITO


RILIEVO FOTOGRAFICO


3.3 rilievo via Mazzini


4 5


1 2

3

76


10


6 7

8

78


14 15


11

12

13

4

80


RILIEVO ARCHITETTONICO


prospetto

prospetto via via mazzini prospetto mazzini

pianta

pianta

via mazzini


prospetto prospetto

prospetto via prospetto viamazzini mazzini

via mazzini

pianta pianta

84


prospetto prospetto via mazzini

prospetto via mazzini

prospetto

via mazzini

pianta

pianta


prospetto via mazzini

prospetto via mazzini

via mazzini

pianta pianta

86


prospetto

prospetto via prospetto viamazzini mazzini

via mazzini

pianta

pianta


prospetto

prospetto mazzini prospettoviavia mazzini

via mazzini

pianta pianta

88


“[...] Ma la città non dice il suo passato, lo contiene come le linee d’una mano, scritto negli spigoli delle vie, nelle griglie delle finestre, negli scorrimano delle scale, nelle antenne dei parafulmini, nelle aste delle bandiere, ogni segmento rigato a sua volta di graffi, segettature, intagli, svirgole.[...]” Italo Calvino, Le città invisibili


P r o g etti


non intervenire sull’esistente, ignorare l’involucro, collocare elementi di arredo


4.1 NON INTERVENIRE SULL’ESISTENTE casi studio progetti

Il tema del riuso di edifici esistenti ha come caratteristica principale il confronto con la presistenza quale elemento originario. Indipendentemente dal metodo progettuale adottato esiste sempre un confronto iniziale con la memoria dell’edificio e con le tracce che esso ha lasciato. Sebbene esistano approcci differenti a questo tema abbiamo pensato di suddividere i progetti rispetto a cinque categorie: - non intervenire sull’esistente - vestire l’esistente - costruire nell’esistente - ampliare l’esistente - costruire l’esistente. Il primo tema che abbiamo definito “non intervenire sull’esistente” racchiude quei progetti dove l’installazione di nuovi elementi è dettata dalla lettura delle caratteristiche dell’edificio esistente. Questi nuovi elementi non alterano né la struttura né le dimensioni ma semplicemente riattivano questo spazio.

90


CASO STUDIO 1 F R A N C O & V A N T E S L A A R ANTICO MATTATOIO LEGAZPI, MADRID 2006


CASO STUDIO 2 W E R N E R T S C H O L L CASTEL FIRMIANO, BOLZANO 2006


albergo diffuso


ALBERGO DIFFUSO Francesco Breganze_Elisabetta Scapin

98


BEDROO M

GREEN

CONNECTION

BEDROOM

E SUIT

PUBLIC RO M

BEDROO M

KITCHEN

BELVEDERE CON NECTION

STAIR

Dislodged elements Continued/added elements

100


102


_modulo stanza


S.P.A. Civitella


S.P.A. CIVITELLA

Erica Di Vizio_Valentina Martini

108


110


112


114


ri-scrivere la superficie, il colore, la tessitura , la decorazione, la luce


4.2 VESTIRE L’ESISTENTE

casi studio progetti

La definizione “vestire l’esistente” racchiude tutti quei progetti che lavorano con pattern, luce, materiali e colore. La struttura dell’edificio esistente non viene toccata ma cambia la sua superficie e l’atmosfera interna. Nuove sensazioni riguardano la vista e il tatto.

120


CASO STUDIO 1 L A C AT O N & VA S S A L CAFE’ UNA, VIENNA, 2001


CASO STUDIO 2 A I R E S M A T E U S LIVRARIA ALMEDINA, LISBOA, 1999


Laboratori Munariani


LABORATORI MUNARIAN I Michele Ignaccolo

126


132


ri-organizzare lo spazio, inserire una costruzione senza nascondere ciò che c’era


4.3 COSTRUIRE NELL’ESISTENTE casi studio progetti

Questo tipo di approccio stabilisce una relazione molto stretta tra l’edificio esistente e i nuovi elementi. I componenti che vengono inseriti possono contenere diverse attività: circolazione o stanze private. Il progettista può operare secondo modalità diverse. Può utilizzare la struttura dell’edificio esistente per supportare il nuovo interno o usare le esatte dimensioni di uno spazio per inserire il nuovo elemento. Questo tipo di approccio prevede in alcuni casi anche la possibilità di alterazione della struttura esistente, come nel caso dell’inserimento del corpo scale.

138


CASO STUDIO 1 A I R E S M A T E U S CASA AZELTAO, SETUBAL, 2003


CASO STUDIO 2 S T E V E N H O L L DEPARTEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY, NY, 2007


Falegnameria


FALEGNAMERIA

Federico Copelli_Giorgio Diegoli_Marco Diegoli

144


_pianta -1

146


_pianta 0


_pianta +1

148


_pianta +2


_sezione longitudinale


_abitazione livello +2


_sezione trasversale


_negozio


156


Negozio d’olio


NEGOZIO D’OLIO

Marta Ferrari_Serena Giribuola

158


_pianta 0


_pianta +1

160


_pianta +2


_sezione longitudinale


_negozio


_bed&breakfast


_degustazione


Bookshop enogastronomico


BOOKSHOP ENOGASTRONOMICO Francesca Alquati_Anna Pisani

168


_pianta -2


_pianta -1


_pianta 0

172


_pianta 1


_sezione longitudinale


_sezione longitudinale


_modulo stanza


Gioielleria


GIOIELLERIA

S.Corno_F.Di Giovanni_Ilaria Facoetti

182


_pianta 0


_pianta +1

184


_pianta +2


_sezione longitudinale


_sezione trasversale


_punti vendita

griglia in acciaio

profilo in acciaio

supporto in legno

pannello in noce

piano in noce


costruire verso l’esterno ‘a partire’ dall’esistente, collocare il nuovo in relazione a ciò che c’era


4.4 AMPLIARE L’ESISTENTE casi studio

Un altro approccio riguardo alle modalità d’intervento su un’edificio esistente consiste nell’aggiungere nuovi elementi come ampliamento di quello che già c’era. In questo caso è molto importante capire in che modo intervenire e attraverso quali mezzi perchè emerge in toni ancora più forti il rapporto tra il nuovo e l’esistente.

192


CASO STUDIO 1 ALISON AND PETER SMITHSON HEXENHAUS, HESSEN, 1986


CASO STUDIO 2 HERZOG&DEMEURON CAIXA FORUM, MADRID, 2007


sulle tracce dell’esistente, ri-scrivere la memoria, re-interpretare ciò che c’era.


4.5 COSTRUIRE L’ESISTENTE casi studio progetti

“Costruire l’esistente” è, come dice il termine stesso, la modalità più invasiva rispetto all’edificio. Non per questo però risulta essere la più “facile” o la meno attenta alle caratteristiche dell’esistente. Questo tipo di intervento nasce proprio da un’attenta lettura delle tracce e della memoria di quello che c’era che viene reinterpretato secondo nuovi modalità.

198


CASO STUDIO 1 ALISON AND PETER SMITHSON UPPER LAWN, TISBURY, 19662


CASO STUDIO 2 S V E R R E F E H N THE HEDMARK CATHEDRAL MUSEUM, HAMAR, 1967-1979


Fruttivendolo


FRUTTIVENDOLO

Michela Bassanelli_Marco Fattorini

204


COSTRUIRE L始ESISTENTE civitella del tronto

apprendere

maneggiare

guardare

giocare coltivare

muoversi

imparare

conoscere

toccare

attraversare

gustare camminare riposare

assaporare sostare

contemplare

scoprire


numero persone

1

RE-ACTION

365

mese

week-end

settimana

PERIODO DI SOGGIORNO

S

susino

pesco

pero

olivo

fragola

fico

ciliegio

albicocco

melo

FRUTTETO

cavolo verza

fagiolo

rucola

peperone

melanzana

spinaci

zucchine

porri

piselli

lattuga

carote

pomodoro

ORTI

GEN FEB

GEN FEB

CALENDARIO

4

MAR APR MAG GIU

MAR APR MAG GIU

spazi verdi

giardini pensili -

3

2

5

LUG

LUG

6

AGO SET OTT

AGO SET OTT

7

8

NOV DIC

NOV DIC

1

9

10

raccolta frutti

semina

PROGRAMMA


abitazione

negozio+abitazione

hall d’ingresso

packaging

raccolta

lavorazione

cucina


_pianta 1 livello

_pianta 2 livello


_pianta 3 livello

_pianta 4 livello


_pianta 5 livello

_pianta 6 livello


_sezione trasversale


PAR

_negozio


Dettaglio tecinco materico

_piano terra:ristorante prospetto scala 1 : 50

sezione scala 1 : 50

sezione scala 1 : 50

pianta Scala 1 : 50

216

dettaglio seduta esterna scala 1:20


_packging

sezione scala 1:50

pianta scala 1:50


pianta scala 1:50


Workshop Innsbruck 22-27 giugno’09


5.1_gruppi di lavoro5.1

gruppi di lavoro

Francesca Alquati Anna Pisani Michela Bassanelli Marco Fattorini Valentina Brianza Laura Elasi Barbara Interlenghi Federico Copelli Giorgio Diegoli Marco Diegoli Simone Corno Fabio Di Giovanni Ilaria Facoetti Erika Di Vizio Valentina Martini Marta Ferrari Serena Giribuola Michele Ignaccolo Filippo Olioso Rotem Jacobi Elisabetta Scapin Francesco Breganze

220


5.2 guest lectures

1 Bad Architects Group 2 Wurfbaum dantas architects 3 Silvia Boday 4 Triendl und fessler architekten 5 Daniel Fagenschuh Architekt

224


Bad Architects Group

ursula faix, studied architecture at the technical university of vienna, and at rhode island school of design, providence, rhode island, USA. prior founding her own office she collaborated with massimiliano fuksas (europark-salzburg, twin towers-vienna) in vienna and rome, as well as with architectural firms based in salzburg and innsbruck. she is a seniore researcher and assistant teacher at the institute for urban design and regional planning, university of innsbruck, and a permanent lecturer on urban design at the university for business and technology in prishtina, kosova. alongside her activities in the office and as a teacher, she is giving lectures, is member of juries and publishes texts in various magazines

paul burgstaller, studied architecture at the university of innsbruck. prior finishing his studies and founding the office together with ursula faix he collaborated with offices like behnisch & partner, west8 and OMA/rem koolhaas (flick collection - berlin, central business district - beijing) in austria, germany, and the netherlands. he is giving lectures and guest critics at various universities, and is a permanent lecturer on urban design at the university for business and technology in prishtina, kosova.


rojekte | bad.architects.group

di 4

http://www.bad-architects.gp/index.php?page=projects

invited competition, HONORABLE MENTION "new elpo HQ" industrial building, italy

comission, completed "/ apartments" housing conversion, austria

comission, completed "RED ZAC landlinger compactmarkt obertrum" shop conversion, austria

comission, completed "RED ZAC wierer mayrhofen" shop conversion, austria

comission, completed "i love diploma, south tyrol special" research project, austria

comission, completed "RED ZAC krautgasser sillian" shop conversion, austria

comission, design development "RED ZAC krautgasser leisach" shop conversion, austria

competition "flyscraper" skyscraper, peru + UAE

proposal "h lobby" hotel conversion, austria

2-03-2009 16:10

226


Wurfbaum dantas architects

Inês Dantas studied Architecture in DARQ, Universidade de Coimbra and in Politécnico di Milano (2001-02). Graduated in 2004 and was awarded the Prize for Best Student. Editor and collaborator of Revista NU (2002-04). From 2004 to 2006 worked as architect and project leader in Peter Haimerl Studio. Guest lecturer in Universitá di Camerino, in Rizvi College of Architecture, Bombay, in Lichtakademie Bartenbach and guest-critic in Unit 20 Bartlett School of Architecture. Since 2006 teaches Architectural Design at the Institute for experimental Architecture, Studio 3 headed by Prof. Volker Giencke, University of Innsbruck. Since 2006 is founding partner in WUDA* wurfbaum dantas architects.


wuda* wurfbaum dantas architects | Germany . Portugal

http://www.wuda.eu/news.html

27.02.09 Wuda* shortlisted for Austrian pavilion Shanghai Expo 2010! Exhibition coming up.

Š wuda*

In September 2008 Wuda* was selected as one of five teams to go into the final phase of the competition for the Austrian pavilion for the Shanghai Expo 2010. In December 2008 Wuda* became runner-up. The winner will be officially announced in the end of March in Vienna followed by an exhibition in Architektur Zentrum Wien. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

01.02.09 Publication "Zukunft Wohnen" about the future of housing features Wuda*´s project Tridom. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

228 1 di 8

16-03-2009 14:13


Silvia Boday


nextroom architektur datenbank

http://www.nextroom.at/actor_project.

suchen

Silvia Boday Innsbruck (A) Boznerplatz 2 6020 Innsbruck Tirol Österreich Kontakt eMail Karte anzeigen

Kontakt

Haus K. in Tramin, 2006, Tramin (I) Haus K. in Tramin, 12.06.2007 [newroom]

Architekt

FotografI

Weingut Manincor mit Walter Angonese, Rainer Köberl, 2004, Kaltern am See (I) Weingut Manincor, 23.10.2004 [newroom] Mit Blick aufs Barrique, 08.05.2004 [Spectrum] Im Einklang mit der Landschaft, 02.12.2005 [Neue Zürcher Zeitung] Betonkeller mit eingebauter Tradition , 15.05.2004 [Der Standard]

Wellnesshotel Jagdhof 5* luxuriöses und einzigartiges Spaund Wellnesshotel in Tirol www.hotel-jagdhof.at

Romantikhotel Innsbr. 4* zentral bei Altstadt,Messe,Kongress Super Angebote - exzell.Restaurant www.deradler.com

230


Triendl und fessler architekten

Karin Triendl 1973 geboren in Innsbruck 1993-96 Studium an der TU Innsbruck / UTA Arlington Texas (USA) 1997- 2000 TU Delft (NL) 2000 Designer bei WEST 8 Rotterdam (EXPO Yverdon Schweiz) 2003 Projektleitung Atelier Prof. A. Krischanitz 2004 T채tigkeit als freie Journalistin im Bereich Architektur und Stadt 2005 Triendl und Fessler Architekten Wien/ Innsbruck


:: triendl und fessler architekten ::

http://www.triend

aktuelles

aktuelles

projekte biographie texte

PUBLIKATION ZWEIFAMILIENHAUS NATTERS

kontakt links

´Nie wieder Einsamkeit´ von Sabine Lintschinger (Der Standard)

1. PREIS BEIM BAUTRÄGERWETTBWERB RAXSTRASSE Wohnbauprojekt in Zusammenarbeit mit A. Krischanitz Auftraggeber: Win4Wien Bauträger GmbH

ZWEIFAMILIENHAUS IN HADERSFELD ein Gemeinschaftswohnprojekt aus Holz Fertigstellung 2009

DACHBODENAUSBAU 2 Wohnebenen für eine Familie im 12. Bezirk Fertigstellung 2009

232


Daniel Fagenschuh Architekt


rojekte

http://www.fuegenschuh.at/seite_01_e.htm

234


docenti


Gennaro Postiglione is Associate Professor in Interior Design and Museagraphy at The Politecnico di Milano. His raesearches along the years have focused on the relationship between cultural traditions and modern architecture, with specific attention to Nordic countries and culture of dwelling. He is the leader of the first Modern European Architecture - Museum net ( www.meamnet.polimi.it) which aim is to preserve, promote and divulgate the cultural heritage represented by European architects’ own houses. Author of several books, he is promoting through publications the knowledge of the Nordic architecture in Italy. http://king.rett.polimi.it/~postigli/CVs/

Lorenzo Bini was born in Milan, Italy in 1971. He studied at the Politecnico of Milan and at the SHKS of Oslo and graduated in 1998. He has worked as an architect in different practices in Milan and in 2000 he has moved to Rotterdam to work as a senior architect with West8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture. In 2003 he has founded studiometrico with francesca Murialdo. He is member and co-founder of bad-architects.network. He’s currently teaching at Politecnico of Milan with Prof. Gennaro Postiglione, in 2005 the two have started a blog for architecture students called lablog.

Luciano Giorgi is an architect that studied with Achille Castiglioni (Milan), Michael Alder (Basel), Joao Luis Carrilho da Graca (Lisbon) and graduated with Cino Zucchi and Pietro Nicolini. He has collaborated with Ag Fronzoni in Milan and has opened his independent office in Pavia in 1999. In 2000 he has won (with Andrea Borlini e Marina Dallera) the 1st prize for a public building in Vigevano (Italy) which was opened in 2005. In 2003 he has been short listed for the ‘Italian architecture golden medal’ with a project for a private house on the Alps in Chiesa Valmalenco. 236


studenti


fra nc es c

aa

lq ua ti

lli ne a ss ba a l i e n ich isa m p i lli na ol pe g an o e c di ico er co r o d a o li fe rn m ieg co d o e rgi on gio is m i nn tti va oe o i c g fa di ia io ar l b i io fa viz i ad rik ri e a ni rr r ti fe a a t am ar ze m la tin o n an e u g l re va r ib gi ob a c s n e re nc se n ra i f bi co ap a c j s m ta te et ro b a s i el so i io as ol el o a p ur ip i la fil rin o t t fa a nz co ir a ar m ab tin n le va hi ng lr e te in a ar rb ba


...


090718 Civitella report 08