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Presorted Marketing US Postage Paid Permit 1893 Albuq.NM

1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 www.nmsd.k12.nm.us

Volume 108 / Issue 2 / Winter/Spring 2017-2018

DREAM! EXPLORE! ACHIEVE!

TEAMING UP FOR SUCCESS: NMSD’S WHOLE CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES

NEW MEXICO'S FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL

THE NEW MEXICO PROGRESS since 1909 USPS #381-500 / ISSN #0896-6478 Vol. 108 / Issue 2 / Winter/Spring 2017-18

Published twice during the school year at the New Mexico School for the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505. Distributed to parents of students presently enrolled at NMSD and staff. POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE NEW MEXICO PROGRESS, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Staff: Editor/Keri-Lynn McBride; Associate Editors/Bay Anapol & Kathy Glyer. Designed by Hollie Fleming.


2017 -2018 RETIREES & YEARS OF SERVICE RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

Priscilla Coriz

Mary Dykstra

Jose Gonzales

Gary Valencia

Michael Vigil

Dream! Explore! Achieve! 2010-2017

Vision

Beliefs

Children and students in New Mexico who are deaf/hard of hearing will become lifelong learners and contributing, well-rounded successful individuals in an increasingly global society.

In an environment of respect, trust, and safety, we believe in…

Mission The mission of the New Mexico School for the Deaf (NMSD), New Mexico’s first public school, is to provide for the unique needs of children and students who are deaf/hard of hearing, their families, and professional partners by providing a comprehensive array of school and statewide programs. As a school, NMSD provides an American Sign Language and English bilingual learning environment that includes direct, ongoing access to language and communication in and out of the classroom with a wide range of peers and adults. The students are interactive learners who receive dynamic high quality standardsbased instruction in a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities. As a statewide service agency, NMSD collaborates with families, school districts, agencies and communities throughout the state to meet the critical language, communication, and learning needs of children and students in New Mexico who are deaf/hard of hearing, birth through high school.

viewing people who are deaf/hard of hearing from a cultural and linguistic perspective

having high expectations that positively affect self-esteem, identity and whole person development

providing early, ongoing, and fluid access to communication through natural language models

developing proficiency in American Sign Language and English which is critical for fluent communication, literacy and academic achievement

supporting the development of auditory skills and spoken language as appropriate to the strengths and needs of the individual child/student

providing high quality early intervention and involvement services designed to help families give their children the earliest possible on-going opportunities for language, learning and meaningful relationships

fostering strong partnerships with families through learning and social opportunities

identifying each student’s unique strengths and using them as the foundation for learning and development

ensuring the child/student is a consistent and active participant in planned and incidental learning experiences in and out of the classroom

embracing ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity

developing competence in the use of advanced technology

having high quality and committed staff who possess and maintain expertise in their respective area

supporting all students in the pursuit of their personal and professional aspirations

February 2013

30 YEARS

Shelly Lily

2002-2017

2010-2018

20 YEARS

25 YEARS

Keri-Lynn McBride

2009-2017

1997-2017

Patrick Ercolino

Sylvia Serrano

Jaqueline Martinez

Judy Vigil

15 YEARS

Danny DeAguero

Gary Hand

Kim Hand

Heather Huizar

Stephanie Loya

10 YEARS

David Anderson

Laurie Anderson

Dean Krohn

Elizabeth Sandoval

Lena Stavely


VOLUME 108 ISSUE 2 WINTER/SPRING 2017-2018

FEATURE

DREAM! EXPLORE! ACHIEVE!

TABLE OF CONTENTS

UP FOR SUCCESS: 3 TEAMING NMSD'S WHOLE CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES

2 3 8 15 19 20 22 26 30 31 34 36

Superintendent’s Update Feature Early Intervention & Involvement Main Campus Knowledge Fair International Studies Performing Arts Athletics Graduation Center for Educational Consultation & Training Community Relations Construction

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SUPERINTENDENT’S UPDATE

DEAR NMSD COMMUNITY & FRIENDS A favorite quote of mine is by John Dewey, an influential educational reformer. It is taped to my desk so that I can read it every morning. It says: “The purpose of educational pedagogy (science) is to figure out how to release potential and propel individual talents, not to foreordain predicted trajectories”. What that means to me is that it is our responsibility as educators to consider the “whole” child. In seeing the child as a complete complex person we can discover how each child learns best and free that child to express their talents and potential. What is Whole Child Education at NMSD? Picturing the child at the center and fanning out, NMSD considers the big areas of a child’s growth including intellectual development, language and communication development, physical development, social development, and emotional development. All of this occurs within a bigger circle of the child’s family, community, and culture.

NMSD has built the resources to implement the science of Whole Child Education. This Progress Magazine will highlight these resources by showcasing our Whole Child Support Team and also take you through the many activities and projects available to students where they may discover and unleash their talents and push themselves to new heights. As you enjoy the stories in the magazine see if you can identify which areas of the framework above relate to that article. Here’s an adage we have probably all heard growing up, “You never know until you try”. At NMSD we provide boundless opportunities for children to “try” so they can find their talents, skills, and abilities in the many facets that comprise them as a whole person. Yours in education,

Rosemary J. Gallegos 2


FEATURE

PARTS OF THE WHOLE: INTRODUCING NMSD’S WHOLE CHILD SUPPORT TEAM NMSD’s Whole Child Support Team (WCST) was established in 2016 in an effort to better incorporate all of NMSD’s support service staff. The team includes four speech language pathologists (SLPs), three occupational therapists (OTs), one physical therapist (PT), an ASL specialist, a diagnostician, an evaluation coordinator, two in-house audiologists, the Student Support Team, and the Health Center staff. The Student Support Team (SST) includes two counselors, one behavior specialist, an art therapist, and two social workers (SWs), and the Health Center staff includes our school nurses. Together, the members of this team work to support NMSD’s students in school and at home. We bring a variety of perspectives to better meet the needs of not only the student, but the student’s family as well. The WCST conducts comprehensive student evaluations, as well as extends support to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students statewide through our work with NMSD’s Early Identification and Intervention Department and Center for Educational Consultation and Training to provide evaluations and consultation.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE BY SCOTT VOLLMAR, ASL SPECIALIST American Sign Language (ASL) plays a critical role in communication and language access for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students at NMSD. As an ASL specialist, I work closely with our ASL teacher, Jimmy Litchfield, to provide additional support to our students by conducting ASL evaluations and curriculum/language development. We work with students at an Early Childhood Education (ECE) level to build their language skills. Older students attend ASL classes that focus on vocabulary development, as well as receptive and expressive ASL skills. New students who do not know ASL when they transfer to NMSD often receive one-on-one or small group ASL services. The ASL department also provides research-backed professional opinions and recommendations for a variety of situations related to ASL language development.

AUDIOLOGY BY DR. SHEREE HALL, AUDIOLOGIST NMSD has two staff audiologists. Dr. Gayle Mohorcich and I regularly conduct comprehensive hearing tests adhering to state and national standards. We routinely perform hearing assistive device checks, cleaning, and repairs. The devices used at NMSD include traditional hearing aids, bone anchored hearing aids, as well as cochlear implants. As audiologists, we make earmold impressions, fit new ear molds, replace broken tubing, and provide listening therapy to students. We educate families about the effects of hearing loss and technology options, and assist families in navigating through the identification and diagnostic process with their child. NMSD staff members are also supported through training and education. We regularly attend Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, Individual Family Service Plan (IFS), and other meetings regarding student progress. We communicate with outside audiologists and other professionals in the community, such as primary care physicians, pediatricians, and ear, nose and throat physicians. We support statewide initiatives through consultation, training, and serving on various groups and committees. We serve students on the main Santa Fe campus, as well as all satellite preschools. Top right: The Whole Child Support Team come together on a regular basis to discuss students and programming. 2nd from right: Scott Vollmar having fun with Daniel Mendoza and Pisces Luna-Smith fun with Legos in a language-rich ASL activity. 3rd from right: RJ Armenta and Dr. Hall completing a listening check on his hearing aids in the classroom. Bottom right: Dr. Mohorcich and Dr. Hall testing Pamela Kayonnie’s hearing using fun listening games!

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FEATURE

DIAGNOSTICS BY KATE LEE, EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSTICIAN I serve on the Whole Child Support Team (WCST) as an Educational Diagnostician. My role combines my classroom teaching experience and knowledge of child development with my qualifications for administering valid educational assessments. My job is to give students special “standardized assessment” tests. Standardized assessment results are used to help students, parents, and staff understand how each student learns best. Those results and the results from various assessments given by WCST members help determine if the student is eligible for special education services. Results also support the student’s educational needs. Typically, I work with students every three years, but this changes according to need. I also collaborate with the WCST members to write a comprehensive evaluation report, detailing the student’s strengths and areas of needs, states eligibility determination, and recommendations for effective instruction.

EVALUATIONS BY GARY HAND, STUDENT OUTCOMES SPECIALIST As a Student Outcome Specialist, I pay close attention to PARCC, SBA, EoC, DRA, MAP, 6+1, NMAPA, and many more acronyms. I work as a liaison between the Public Education Department and our school to insure students complete their graduation requirements. Each year, students are assessed in many different ways. We have a short-cycle assessment three times a year to monitor growth in Language Usage, Mathematics and Reading. We also assess our students with the statewide Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC). This assessment measures academic growth. In addition to PARCC, we also administer the Science Based Assessment (SBA) to grades 4, 7, and 11 to measure science knowledge. We also monitor reading progress through the Developmental Reading Assessment (up to 8th grade) and Brigance Reading Inventory (9th grade and above). We collect writing samples to monitor student writing skills through the Six Plus One Traits Rubrics. When students reach high school, they take End of Course assessments designed by the New Mexico Public Education Department. These assessments are available in all content areas. Finally, we use the New Mexico Alternate Performance Assessment (NMAPA) tool to monitor the growth of students with additional cognitive disabilities.

HEALTH CENTER BY MATTHEW SMITH, REGISTERED NURSE NMSD has Public Education Department (PED) licensed registered nurses who staff the Health Center 24 hours a day during the school week. Nursing services provide a wide array of services, such as medication administration, vision screenings, illness intervention, sports physicals (after completion of the initial enrolment physical) wellness education, and a host of other activities meant to promote and maintain optimal student health. In addition, a licensed pediatrician is on campus twice a week and is available 24/7 for telephone consultation. This service is available to all students free of charge. It means minor illnesses and medical situations can be addressed at school without loss of class time.

Top right: Huda Nargees being evaluated by Kate Lee. 2nd from right: From left: Angela Corona, SLP, Gaby Guerrero, student, Amy Guerrero, parent, Trish Rich, Diagnostician-Intern, and Dr. Sheree Hall, Audiologist, meeting to share the outcomes from the diagnostic evaluations that were conducted during an Outreach evaluation. 3rd from right: Gary Hand conducting an assessment on Julio Portillo. Bottom right: From left: Head Nurse Matt Smith, Jean Scotten, and Gail Williams, NMSD’s nursing team in action.

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FEATURE When appropriate, some health services can be obtained locally. The Health Center has a good relationship with local agencies such as Children’s Medical Services, University of New Mexico, Santa Fe Indian Hospital, Eye Associates of NM, and a number of pediatric dentistry offices. Through the Health Center, students with special medical needs can have those needs addressed with Individualized Health Plans. The Health Center team is fully integrated in the school’s WCST.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY BY ELLEN STONE, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST Occupational Therapists (OTs) work to ensure that a student can participate in the full breadth of school activities. OT services are provided in a variety of settings on campus depending on the students’ needs. Although OT often resembles play, it is skilled and structured support designed to enhance the students’ functional performance in the learning environment. We constantly consider each factor making a student unique, and tailor services to fit those needs. We support academic and non-academic outcomes including social skills, math, reading and writing (i.e., literacy), behavior management, recess, participation in sports, selfhelp skills, self-regulation, prevocational/vocational participation, and more. We offer services along a continuum of prevention, promotion, and intervention, and serve individual students, groups of students, entire classrooms, and whole school initiatives.

PHYSICAL THERAPY BY MONICA PREROVSKY, PHYSICAL THERAPIST In Physical Therapy (PT), we work on improving how students use their bodies to perform school related activities. Some students struggle with tripping or falling when walking or running on campus due to low balance abilities. We practice balance exercises like walking on a balance beam, standing on one foot, or using a balance board. Other students may not have enough strength to open doors, sit well in chairs, use playground equipment or perform work duties. In this case, we do exercises to make the muscles stronger. This might look like pushing/pulling heavy things, holding one’s body up against gravity for an extended time using different equipment, or practicing lifting progressively heavier items using safe body mechanics. Sometimes students struggle with learning foundational motor skills that allow them to play well in Physical Education or recess. These students work on coordination tasks like skipping, hopping, tossing, or catching balls. Depending on the situation, the physical therapist may practice these things in the PT/OT gym or during regular class time. Other times the physical therapist will make modification recommendations that does not require the physical therapist to work with the students on a consistent basis. All therapy intervention must support a student’s participation in school related activities, and solely demonstrating a decrease in skill or ability does not qualify one for services.

SPEECH & LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY BY MELISSA LAMB, SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST You might wonder what role the four Speech Language Pathologists (SLP) have at NMSD. We work with teachers and the ASL specialist to create and implement plans to support and improve communicative ability in both ASL and written and spoken English. SLPs address language development, social Top right: Nurse Gail Williams applying ice to Antonia Martinez’s injured finger. 2nd from right: Kieran Ercolino working with Kristina Keenan on developing core strength using the T-Swing. 3rd from right: With support from Monica Prerovsky, PT, Roman Cope is learning to hop on one foot using a trampoline with a bar. Bottom right: Occupational Therapist Ellen Stone supporting Chanelle Hobbs’s fine visual motor skill development during a fun art activity.

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FEATURE skills for language, speech sound development, listening skills, and reading and writing skills. When needed, we can also implement augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) options, which may include communicating with pictures. We also work closely with audiologists to implement and support amplification use for access to sounds and language, as appropriate. At the ECE level, students learn through play. Speech and language therapy focuses on the language of play, in either ASL, spoken English, or a combination of both. Speech and language therapy often happens in the classroom and students work on expanding their vocabulary, learning turntaking skills, and growing their play skills. Sometimes, when ECE students are working on their spoken English and listening skills, they have individual or small group therapy outside of the classroom. At the elementary, middle school and high school levels, the focus of speech and language therapy shifts towards academic skills. Often Deaf and Hard of Hearing students lag behind their hearing peers in reading and writing skills, and this can be linked to poor vocabulary knowledge. Speech and language therapy focuses on the acquisition of academic vocabulary and improving the reading and writing skills of our students. We help students bridge the gap between concepts in ASL and written and spoken English. Speech and language therapy happens in the classroom or in individual/small groups in the therapy room and in ASL or spoken English, depending on the needs of the student.

STUDENT SUPPORT TEAM BY PAT ERCOLINO, LEAD COUNSELOR NMSD’s Student Support Team (SST) is proud to provide a range of support services to our students. SST providers support the social/emotional needs of our students through provision of individual/group counseling and art therapy, prevention programs (workshops), student mediation, new student groups, staff consultation, parent contact/home visits, bullying prevention for students and staff, and staff training on child abuse and neglect. The SST also consults with a psychiatrist once every two weeks and contract with a dialectical behavior therapist who works with our students. The SST works with various agencies across the state to ensure that all students have the support they need. Interesting fact: The law states that children fourteen years of age or older can request counseling services/treatment without parental consent, and that children fourteen years of age and older can consent to psychotropic medications (medications to support mental health), and the parents must be provided with relevant information.

DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY SKILLS TRAINING BY JENNIFER HARRISON, LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER A student walks into 5th period math and realizes he forgot to study for the midterm exam. He panics, but quickly asks the teacher if he can go get a drink of cold water and walk around for a few minutes to calm himself down enough to do his best. Alternatively, he might practice how to ask the teacher for extra time to study before taking the test. Before Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Skills Training, this student might have behaved as if he did not care about his grade and failed the test, resulting in a low overall grade and being benched at the basketball game finals. Sometimes children become overly emotional and act out impulsively. If they are overwhelmed with homework or chores, they might slam a door or yell at their sibling. They might lack the skills in coping with their stress and making decisions.

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Top right: Missy Lamb, SLP and Sierra Woosley, 3rd grader, reading a book together and focusing on multiple meaning words. 2nd from right: Anna Cook supporting Angel Cabrera in building confidence with expressing emotions through reading. 3rd from right: Joi Holsapple and Mark Ramirez conducting a workshop about safety with elementary students. Bottom right: High school students brainstorming ideas about leisure time activities with Joi Holsapple.


FEATURE DBT is a skills training curriculum for emotional problem solving in the schools. NMSD is committed to teaching our students the skills they need for successful emotion management, interpersonal and decision-making. This curriculum is being introduced to some of our middle school and high school students this year by the school social work and school counseling departments.

SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES BY JENNIFER HARRISON, LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER School social workers provide a link between school, home, community and work to make sure children are receiving equal education opportunities. If a child’s basic needs are not being met; if a child is physically unwell and not able to attend classes; if a child is grieving the death of a loved one; or does not have the social skills to make friends, a school social worker can help support this child by communicating and linking services between the family, school staff, and the community. NMSD has two school social workers who provide individual counseling, group and classroom workshops, parent and family support and community agency networking.

ART THERAPY BY JOSIE ABBENANTE, ART THERAPIST Art Therapy provides an additional way for NMSD students to express themselves. Students make use of art materials to show feelings, to be understood, to access language, to relieve stress, to find ways to resolve conflicts, to build learning skills, to work through difficult situations, and to feel good about themselves. While it often seems they are simply making art or constructing art projects, there is more happening than meets the eye. When a student succeeds in solving a problem in an art project, they are succeeding in solving the same kind of problem with their emotions. When a student learns a new skill, they are building self-esteem. When students work together to figure out how to create something, they are building relationships with each other. If a student is overwhelmed with emotion and begins to paint it out, pound it out in clay, or tear up paper for a collage there is often a transformation of the emotions. The feelings become more manageable and solutions are found. When students are feeling ungrounded or off center, clay offers them a way to become grounded and find center again on the pottery wheel. Sometimes, only the actual art making is necessary, as the art making is a metaphor for the difficulty a child may be experiencing. Sometimes discussion is part of the art therapy process. Students talk about what is happening in the art materials, and what is needed to solve the art problem as well as what is needed to solve the emotional or behavioral problem. We describe what we see in the art making process and the artwork as a way of understanding feelings, behaviors, and struggles. The students at NMSD are thriving in the school environment today because they benefit from having access to the services provided by the amazing NMSD Whole Child Support Team.

Top right: From left: Matthew Smith, Head Nurse, Monica Prerovsky, Physical Therapist, and Pat Ercolino, School Counselor, taking a moment from their busy day supporting students to socialize for a bit. 2nd from right: Jill Tiedemann, hired last year to train our students in DBT, leading a discussion with middle school students on how to navigate the roller coaster of emotions teenagers experience. 3rd from right: Josie Abbenante, Art Therapist, coaching Precious Jones as she turns a clay bowl on the wheel. Claire Stephens working hard on hers in the background. Bottom right: Sierra Cisneros learning how to create the details, using markers during art therapy as Josie Abbenante, Art Therapist, provides her support.

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EARLY INTERVENTION & INVOLVEMENT DEPARTMENT

LOBBYING FOR LITERACY! BY JOANNE CORWIN, DIRECTOR, EIID Early literacy is such an important part of infant and toddler development. Both the Deaf Mentor and the Parent Infant Child programs focus many of their home visits on promoting early literacy. The focus is on concepts like book sharing, environmental print and, through the Shared Reading Project curriculum, the 15 principles of reading to young children who are Deaf. When families begin services with both Early Intervention and Involvement Department's (EIID) Deaf Mentor and Parent Infant Child Programs, they are given a board book from each program as a way to start, or supplement, their child’s home library. This year, the Civitans have graciously decided to once again support NMSD’s goal of educational excellence by supporting EIID’s work in early literacy with a Baby Board Book Drive. Numerous clubs, from El Paso to Colorado, collected over 220 books and provided a $75 cash donation as well. We are so grateful! The benefits of their efforts will be farreaching, as research shows that Deaf children do markedly better in school when they have both early access to books and a nurtured love for reading. In addition to the Book Drive, Civitan members helped fold brochures and stuff informational folders for EIID’s new families. Thank you, Civitans!

DETECTING CHANGE BY JOANNE CORWIN, DIRECTOR, EIID This year’s Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Conference took place in Denver, Colorado. The location allowed for a large group of agencies and providers from New Mexico to attend this premier conference for issues related to newborn hearing screening and early intervention. New Mexico stakeholders had the rare opportunity to meet and discuss the trends in demographics finally available due to the new database system at Children’s Medical Services. These will help with current and future services to families. Additionally, Bettie Petersen, UNM doctoral candidate and EIID Early Development Specialist, presented a poster session in relation to her doctoral studies. In order to dispel a commonly held myth, her research focused on the reality that hearing parents can sign well enough to be adequate language models for their Deaf or Hard of Hearing child. We’re looking forward to more learning and participation at future conferences.

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Top right: Civitan members and Keri-Lynn McBride with some of the baby board books collected during the book drive. 2nd from right: Some of the many books collected! 3rd from right: In addition to the Book Drive, Civitan members also helped fold Early Intervention brochures for informational packets Bottom right: Bettie Petersen, UNM doctoral candidate and NMSD Early Development Specialist. Bottom left: New Mexico's Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Advisory group at the EHDI Conference.


SANTA FE TODDLERS

FISH TALES! BY EMMA LOZADO Our Santa Fe toddlers recently read and loved Dr. Seuss’s One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish. The book spurred discussion and hands-on activities that had our youngest students setting sail to explore the world of fish. First, the toddlers created colorful fish, played guessing games about whether an animal lived on land or sea, counted fish, pretended to go fishing, and discussed why fish live in water and not in trees. Next, we went on a field trip to PetSmart to visit their fish tanks. Our toddlers were so excited they signed “FISH! FISH! FISH!” over and over again. We surprised them by purchasing fish and equipment to set up in our classroom! Don Wilding, a fish-experienced staff member, came to our classroom to help. He explained the equipment and why the fish needed a tank with power and an air filter. The toddlers assisted by putting rocks and marbles in the bottom of the tank. They watched as water was added and the fish were released into their new home. Each morning when the toddlers arrive, they race to the tank. They LOVE their fish!

Top right: Aniella Wilding, Zoe Pedersen, Juan IV Tapia and Wesley St. Clair pretending to fish. Middle right: Zoe Pedersen and Juan IV Tapia having a closer look at the fish we bought at PetSmart for our classroom fish tank. Bottom right: Liam Mohan-Litchfield, Juan IV Tapia and Damian Quinonez helping put colorful glass marbles in the bottom of the fish tank. Top left: Aniella Wilding puts a toy fish on the projection of a fish tank to show that it lives there. Bottom left: Reading the book Swimmy by Leo Lionni.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD - ALBUQUERQUE PRESCHOOL

ALL AGLOW! BY HEATHER HUIZAR In my Spoken Language and Listening (SLL) class at our preschool, we use Spoken English as our primary language, while still supporting the curriculum, when needed, with ASL. This year we’ve engaged in an ongoing study of light. We’ve discussed daylight, colors, rainbows, prisms, and most importantly: What glows in the dark? To explore this curiosity, we created a dark room with black walls and glow in the dark lights. We decorated headbands and glasses using highlighter markers, and painted rocks with fluorescent paint. We made glow in the dark slime and used fluorescent paint on the black paper wall in our ‘glow’ room. We also added plates, cups, and other items to our sensory bin, which is filled with glow in the dark rice. And bowling with “glow in the dark” pins was a huge hit! During this study, students would enter the dark room daily to see if their clothes, shoes, earmolds, or other accessories glowed. Some of our SLL students began their science-learning by asking, “Will my shirt glow today?” Over time, our students were able to hypothesize whether or not things would glow, and then began to wear clothes that they predicted would glow in our dark room. This study continued for months without students losing interest and fostered lots of new vocabulary and concepts for students. We are hoping to add a fish tank with neon fish to our classroom soon!

Top right: Inside the dark room after students added a variety of items to the wall. Middle right: Ashlee White Hawk & Susannah Rittenhouse look through the “glow in the dark” cups before entering the glow room. Bottom right: Nicolas Cruz scoops glow rice into a cup in the sensory bin. Top left: Students paint pumpkins with glow in the dark paint - Beautiful! Bottom left: Heather Huizar introduces Madalyne ‘Maddy’ Weeks and Nicolas Cruz to the glow in the dark sensory bin in the dark room.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD - FARMINGTON PRESCHOOL

WE ALL SCREAM FOR ICE CREAM! BY MARY HELEN PEREZ Thanks to the generosity of local business owner Jeremy Yarbrough, our students had a chance to tour Cold Stone Creamery and enjoy a free bowl of ice cream! It began after NMSD preschool student, Antarious Natoni signed: "Ice cream!” We looked up the phone number of a nearby ice cream shop – Cold Stone Creamery. We discussed our favorite flavors and proper restaurant behavior. We made a countdown strip of ice cream cones to help us remember how many days until our ice cream shop tour. We also made a thank you card to give the Cold Stone staff. The staff showed us the freezers - it was so cold inside, we shivered! We also watched in amazement as the machine mixed up a fresh batch of ice cream, and ice cream orders were made right before our eyes. Finally, we each picked our favorite ice cream flavor, and enjoyed a bowl! When we returned to school, we decided to try to make our own ice cream. We poured heavy cream, vanilla, and sugar into our ice cream ball, and then added ice and rock salt to another compartment. We rolled the ball all over school until it finally thickened enough to scoop out. We made a chart to predict which type of ice cream we’d like better: homemade or store bought. All of the students guessed that they would like store bought ice cream best, while the teachers guessed homemade. We were all right because we finished all the ice cream. Ice cream is delicious any way you scoop it!

CAR TALK! BY MARY HELEN PEREZ Since cars are a source of wonder and curiosity for students of all ages, we decided to create a play auto shop repair center. We fashioned a car and a fire engine out of cardboard boxes and duct tape big enough for the children to sit in and be pushed around the room. We also made a sensory tub into a car, and outfitted it with a pretend engine with movable clamps and wires. Students crawled beneath the car to “repair” it. We also explored safety goggles, toolboxes, and plastic tools. We’re planning a field trip to a local car dealer and service shop to learn even more!

Top right: From left: Dawn Ward and students Bryson Atencio, Micah Gutierrez and Antarious Natoni watching as soft-serve ice cream comes out of the machine. 2nd from right: Micah Gutierrez, Bryson Atencio, and Antarious Natoni enjoying ice cream together. 3rd from right: Micah Gutierrez adding heavy whipping cream to the ice cream ball. Bottom right: Antarious Natoni waiting patiently for his car to be serviced by Micah Gutierrez. Bottom left: Micah Gutierrez inspecting the 11 undercarriage of a car.


EARLY CHILDHOOD - GALLUP PRESCHOOL

GETTING GALLUP-NMSD PRESCHOOL ALL FIRED UP! BY ANNA CHAVEZ Our Gallup-NMSD Preschool class has enjoyed learning about community helpers, most recently, firefighters. We studied putting out a forest fire with a helicopter, lighting candles, and using a toy hose on an orange and yellow paper “fire.” We also made a “fire” of shaving cream and red and orange food coloring, and "putt it out" with water. Plus, we learned what to do if your clothes catch on fire – stop, drop, and roll! After our studies, we went on a field trip to the Fire Station across the street from our classroom. The firefighters gave us all a tour, including entering the back an ambulance and observing the gurney and various medical equipment. Students had a chance to sit in the driver’s seat of the fire truck, and pretend to drive! We saw big ladders, fire hoses, protective clothing, helmets, fire extinguishers, axes, and shovels. After the tour, the firefighters gave the children water bottles and firefighter coloring books. We all had a great time, and we thank the firefighters for helping “spark” more learning!

Top right: From left: Jennifer Enreka, Seth Joe, Tahliah Joe, Anna Chavez and Caden Lee standing in front of a firetruck. Middle right: From left: Anna Chavez, Seth Joe, Caden Lee, Tahliah Joe and Jennifer Enreka checking out the inside of an ambulance. Bottom right: Tahliah Joe in the driver’s seat! Top left: From left: Jennifer Enreka, Seth Joe, Tahliah Joe, Caden Lee and a firefighter at the local fire station. Bottom left: Caden Lee likes sitting in the firetruck!

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EARLY CHILDHOOD - LAS CRUCES PRESCHOOL

THINGS ARE LOOKING UP IN LAS CRUCES! BY KIM BOYKIN Our Las Cruces students love building with everything from traditional blocks to cardboard boxes and recycled materials. They create structures from just about anything they can get their little hands on! The younger students are very interested in making, and knocking over, very tall horizontal structures. Some are curious about how high they can build with adult supervision and a wall for support. All this exploration leads to discussions about stability and proper support for larger structures. This knowledge can then be generalized when discussing skyscrapers, seeing how long we can make a block “road,” or how to make a road straight or curved. All these building experiences influence how we see the world around us. Our budding engineers build very elaborate structures incorporating design planning and symmetry. They use their knowledge of support and scaffolding to create buildings with multiple bridges and weight sharing, and experiment with height, strength, size, and aesthetics. They use items from other areas of the classroom to include dramatic play and storytelling into their creations, adding levels of dimension as they move through the stages of building blocks. It’s exciting to see them grasp the larger concepts of support, structural integrity, dimension and beauty!

Top right: Shepard Butler uses bristle blocks to add a letter "S" to his building. Middle right: One of our beautiful wood block structures! Bottom right: Kim Boykin and Bear Gerard use toothpicks and heart jellies to make structures. Bottom Left: Karlee Chavez’s toothpick structure. Bottom middle: Samuel Romero and Shepard Butler use the wall and long wooden blocks to build a tower to the ceiling.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD - SANTA FE PRESCHOOL

PLAY TIME BY SHA REINS “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” ~ Helen Keller NMSD’s Early Childhood Education (ECE) department, embracing the spirit of Helen Keller’s famous quote, regularly holds biweekly playgroups for students, families, teachers, and professionals. These playgroups provide precious opportunities for families to connect with their children and other families as well as with ECE staff and professionals. Families, ECE teachers and professionals are invited to participate in workshops (including Positive Discipline, Loose Parts, Nutrition, and Reggio Emilia), information and experience sharing, hands on activities, games, and more. Families also join school activities, like Pep Rally, Visiting the Superintendent house, Knowledge Fair, and Trickor-Treating. We’ve also shared fun hands-on activities such as making pinch pots, weaving, yoga, and sculpture. Martha, a preschooler parent enthused, “It’s a great way to experience the culture and community that your kids experience all day!” It’s also a great way to come together and explore! Exploration hour includes investigations into Loose Parts, Wires, Wood, Wax, Winter Wonderland, Wool and Our Bodies. During this time, families are able to get a glimpse into the many things their children explore on a daily basis, such as the Reggio Emilia approach in the classroom. They are able to take these ideas home. Families also experience how their children interact with each other. For families that are new to ASL and Deaf culture, they can get assurance and support from other families and staff. Jenny, a preschooler mother adds, “I like the communication, and that parents come together and see how the children interact with others.” The playgroup is open to any family members with Deaf or Hard of Hearing children. It is often a struggle for hearing families of Deaf / Hard of Hearing children to build relationships with the Deaf community. Playgroup is an opportunity to support families in becoming more comfortable with their children’s hearing losses, and understand the importance of full language access. We hope we can continue to build communication through play!

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Top right: Parents having fun weaving with yarn through recycled CD's! 2nd from top: Rebecca Funk and Jesse Jimenez creating a body silhouette with blocks around Daniel Mendoza. 3rd from top: Daniel Mendoza, Liam Mohan-Litchfield, Lupe Lucero, and Angel Sanchez making stories come alive using wood, wire and wax during the “loose parts” themed playgroup. Bottom right: Arlene Galindo, mom Carla Guillen, and Gabriella Rodriquez practice math patterning through play. Bottom left: Uriah Costner, sculptor in training, gets a hand from his dad, Sam Costner.


ELEMENTARY

INCREDIBLE EDIBLES! BY MEGAN MONTOYA My students recently enjoyed the story of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. We especially loved imagining Willy Wonka’s chocolate room, where everything is edible. Therefore, we decided to explore the idea of an entire room made out of yummy things by making a cake! First, we put together a hands-on vision of what an edible room might look like. We decided on a “sheet cake” floor, and trees made out of pretzel sticks and colored marshmallows. We took turns digging a river through the cake, and filling it with chocolate frosting to create Willy Wonka’s chocolate river. Students used different types of candy for bushes and flowers and even added Augustus Gloop as a gummy bear. The project really brought their imagination deliciously to life!

Top right: A view of the cake from the top! Middle right: Leilani Crespo and Megan Montoya discuss Violet’s love of chewing gum! Top left: Gabby Rodriguez and Amador Corral make trees out of pretzel sticks and marshmallows. Bottom: From left: Josiah Smith, Levi James, Leilani Crespo, Amador Corral, Megan Montoya, Aidan Lopez, Gabby Rodriguez, Serenity Hardy, and Zeriah Baca with their completed “edible room” cake.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL

SCIENCE MATTERS! BY DANIEL HEINZE NMSD students are always encouraged to explore STEM-related (Science-Technology-Engineering-Math) activities. Recently, students from the University of New Mexico Outreach Program set up hands-on work centers. The STEM centers included learning about microscopes, structures, nanotechnology, metal memory, hydrogel, and much more! Our middle school students even had the opportunity to make solar cars! NMSD also offers after-school robotics club for middle school students, sponsored by Daniel Heinze. Students have the opportunity to program robots to complete an increasingly challenging series of obstacle courses. VegitoBot (Kieran Vollmar and Kieran Ercolino) and Majin Buu Bot (Adrien Ercolino, Alex Wilding, and Bruce Brewer Jr.) have spent a month working on their robotics project. They learned BASIC programming to program their robots to move forward, backward, left and right. They learned to code microcontrollers to control multi-colored LED lights at certain interval periods. Our Majin Buu Bot made it to the top 30 in the state of New Mexico and attended the Robotics Expo at Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, NM. Every year, The National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology hosts a national mathematics competition for middle school students. For the second time, NMSD middle school math team participated in NTID’s math competition. We cheered the four math whiz students who participated: Adrien Ercolino, Kieran Vollmar, Bruce Brewer Jr., and Dustin Hand. The students had the opportunity to participate in challenging individual, team, and target rounds, as well as enjoying a Math Amazing Race around RIT. In the end, our team made it to the top six and received the opportunity to compete against the other top schools, where we ranked 5th place out of 39 teams with 156 participants. Kieran Vollmar even made it to the top 16 to compete in the individual competition. Congratulations to all our math-aletes!

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Top right: Zachary Nichols looks through a microscope at a carbon print in the Nanotechnology activity center. 2nd from right: John "LJ" Hernandez tries to build a Lego house while wearing oven mitts at the "using the right tools" center! 3rd from right: Students wait for the team round competition to start. From left: Dustin Hand, Kieran Vollmar, Bruce Brewer Jr., and Adrien Ercolino. Bottom right: Majin Buu Bot team give a presentation about our robotics club to the NMSD community. Bottom middle: Adrien Ercolino from the Majin Buu Bot team test their Boe-Bots on the figure 8 course. Bottom left: NMSD team at NTID’s Math competition. From left: Daniel Heinze (Coach), Adrien Ercolino, Bruce Brewer Jr., Dustin Hand, and Kieran Vollmar.


HIGH SCHOOL

“FAIRE” THEE WELL! BY HEATHER COSTNER AND MEGAN KLUSZA

Educators agree that cross-curricular teaching is a wonderful way to engage students. Since NMSD high school students were studying the Renaissance in Literature and World History classes, principal Heather Costner decided to create a Renaissance Faire. Teachers and support staff eagerly came together to host this successful event this past December 1. The faire featured multiple booths related to the Renaissance era including jousting, woodworking, and calligraphy. Students were also able to experience candle making, weaving, and hair wreath making. Students clearly enjoyed these activities. Other highlights included high school teachers performing a short reenactment of William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet to uproarious laughter from the audience, and a troll who gave students riddles to unravel. These riddles unveiled the final activity created by our Job Preparation Program students. They created a trebuchet (a Renaissance era catapult). Students and staff took turns to see who could “throw” the farthest - students won the toss. Overall, the event received great reviews from students and staff members. Not only was this our first Renaissance Faire, but it was also our first time hosting a cross-curricular educational event including hands-on learning activities for our high school students. We look forward to hosting our next Renaissance Faire, as well as other cross-curricular events!

Top right: Jesse Woolsey explaining how the catapult works to Deven Thompson. Middle right: John Jarrett and Megan Klusza performing a scene from Romeo and Juliet. Bottom right: Alex Lucero and Dennis Catron woodworking. Top left: Joi Holsapple making candles with high schoolers. Bottom left: Pamela Kayonnie having fun jousting with Jesse Woosley. Bottom middle: Jade Cruz and Jeremy Dan weaving with yarn.

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COMMUNITY BASED INSTRUCTION

BE THE CHANGE! BY SUZANNE BONO Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once stated, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, what you are doing for others?” Community Service is something NMSD takes seriously. The importance of service is instilled in all of our students through various projects throughout their school career. The High School Community Based Instruction (CBI) staff and students strive to do for others on a regular basis. This year our students volunteered at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society. They travel across town with an instructional aide to provide a wide variety of support to the shelter staff - including doing laundry, folding towels, cleaning pet rooms, filling water bowls, and interacting with the animals. They especially love petting the dogs and cats, and the love exchanged between the animals and our students is visible and heartwarming! Shelter staff love when our students volunteer, and they recognize and appreciate all that they do to care for animals in need. NMSD also takes part in a community service project for Kitchen Angels, a non-profit organization providing daily nutritious meals for chronically ill and homebound individuals who struggle to shop and cook for themselves. For the past twenty-four years, students have provided beautifully decorated heart-shaped cookies. Students and staff also deliver the cookies to the Kitchen Angel’s headquarters where they help package the cookies for delivery. This year, students were also given a tour of Kitchen Angels newly renovated building. They toured the storage area, prep kitchen, community meeting and event space, offices and Kitchenality, the Kitchen Angels store that re-sells gently used kitchen items - sales provide meals to eighty clients for an entire year! Our students’ truly embody Mahatma Gandhi's sentiment: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” We are all very proud of their spirit of service!

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Top right: A group shot from left: Angel Cabrera, Pamela Kayonnie, Jade Cruz, Devin White, Volunteer Coordinator at the Shelter, and Antonia Martinez. 2nd from right: While at the shelter, students ran into Antonia Martinez, another NMSD student who is employed by the shelter. Antonia is telling Pamela Kayonnie that the dog they are looking at is deaf! 3rd from right: Students get into the action during feeding time! Bottom right: From left: Tony McCarty, Kitchen Angel’s Executive Director, Antonio Lopez, Joe Cates, Kitchen Angel’s Director of Food Services, Lauren LaVail, Kitchen Angel’s Community Liaison, Johnathan Ludwigs, Suzanne Bono, and Justin Bryant show off the stunning cookies made with love. Bottom left: From left: Johnathan Ludwigs, Antonio Lopez and Justin Bryant package up the colorful cookies.


KNOWLEDGE FAIR

LOOKING BACK TO THE FUTURE BY SHIRA GRABELSKY As Carl Sagan once put it: “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” A group of NMSD-based “starstuff” settled in the RAC on March 1st & 2nd for the annual Knowledge Fair, exploring this year’s theme: Leaping Back to Look Ahead. The theme focused on thinking about how past conflicts could have been addressed that might have changed the trajectory of events. Students discussed what alternate solutions could change the course of history, working together to capture that essence through films many of them shot and edited themselves. The RAC was temporarily transformed into a theatre and film space, complete with a popcorn concession stand! ECE students were featured in films capturing everyday conflicts such as sharing toys. Elementary students created skits or short films retelling the Trail of Tears or the Mexican-American War from different viewpoints. Middle School students produced short films about topics such as Jim Crow laws in the South and Islamophobia in post 9/11 America. High School students presented live and published academic ASL texts on topics like immigration regulations over the years or the 1885 Berlin Conference as a response to imperialism. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed the “arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” The Knowledge Fair demonstrated NMSD is committed to exploring the past to create a future that always bends toward justice!

Top right: From left: Jodie Haley, Isac Velo-Tarin, Sierra Woosley, Wendy Fuentes, Donovan Etheridge, and Kimora Vollmar reenacting the Trail of Tears. 2nd from right: Middle School students watching a movie about the Civil Rights Movement and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., produced by Angelica Baldonado, Zachary Nichols, Stacy Vargas, and Alex Wilding. 3rd from right: Dustin Hand and Kieran Vollmar in a scene from the movie that Olivia Haley and they made about the Jim Crow South and the right for Black Americans to vote. Bottom right: Ezrah Pacheco and Angel Sanchez in the Kindergarten’s film about compassion. Top left: From left: Rhiannon Reynolds, Jacob Lopez, Sam Boyd, Jacob Stephens and Ty Tahe debating about the role of the Berlin Conference in the Scramble for Africa, the European colonization of Africa. Bottom left: From left: Makayla Chavez, Adrian Fernandez, Julian Aranda-Sotelo, and Angelique Quinonez signing the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo during their reenactment of the Mexican-American War.

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INTERNATIONAL STUDIES TRIP

LAND OF THE INCAS BY INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CLASS This past April, NMSD’s International Studies Program had the chance to embark upon a once in a lifetime adventure to Peru! We spent a year studying the rich heritage and culture of Peru in preparation for this exciting trip, learning that Peru was the nucleus of the highly developed Inca civilization. We also learned it is the 3rd largest country in South America, with a vivid terrain of arid coastal plains, rugged Andean mountains, and lowlands with tropical forests that are part of the Amazon basin. Peru’s climate is just as diverse. It is arid and mild in the coastal area, temperate to frigid in the Andes, and warm and humid in the jungle lowlands. During our trip, we traveled from the lively coastal city of Lima to the southern Andes region. We experienced everything from old world Peru in Cusco to spending a chilly night at a lodge on Uros’s floating Reed Islands. We visited the lost city of the Incas with amazing views of the mountains. We explored the hot, humid amazon jungle with vast numbers of animals, plants, trees, and flowers. We literally experienced three geographical shifts in our trip when we visited each regional zone — the coast, the jungle, and the mountains. The highlights of our trip included our visit to Machu Picchu, the lost city of the Incas; the floating Uros community islands at Lake Titicaca; and our boat ride down and up the Amazon River. We’ll never forget the culture, traditions, food, and natural beauty of this amazing country. We would like to thank everyone involved in helping make this trip possible for us. Please visit our travel blog at http://nmsdisc.blogspot.com for more stories and pictures of our adventures!

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Top right: NMSD students and students from the school for the Deaf in Lima. 2nd from right: Boating on the Amazon River. 3rd from right: Front kneeling from left: Lindsay Hand and Jacob Stevens. Standing from left: Sam Boyd, Jacob Lopez, Mya Malone, Vergena Chee, hiking tour guide, and Andrea Leyba during a hike through the stunning Amazon Jungle. Top left: The bright colors of Peru and NMSD! Bottom left: In front of Machu Picchu. Front row: Lindsay Hand. Middle row from left: Jacob Lopez, Jacob Stevens, Vergena Chee, Mya Malone, and Sam Boyd. Back row from left: Scott Mohan, Briean Burton, Andrea Leyba, and their tour guide. Bottom middle: Touring Lima on the first day. Bottom right: Jacob Stevens trying out a local Amazon hunting tool – Darts!!


TRANSITION

HARVESTING OUR VISION BY JESSE WOOSLEY Have you wondered about the shiny new 33-foot greenhouse domes on the north side of campus? Have you noticed students and staff from our Job Preparation Program entering and leaving the domes? Have you wondered what this is all about? We are excited to reveal the NMSD Aquaponics Program! Thanks to the perseverance of Don Wilding, Dan Timlen, Dr. Jennifer Herbold, and other staff members, we are nearly ready to “harvest� our new research and work training program. Aquaponics is the practice of symbiotically raising fish and plants, utilizing both hydroponic and aquaculture practices. Fish waste is pumped to plants that feeds them nutrients in a closed-loop system. It is particularly alluring in climates like New Mexico because it uses 98% less water than conventional farming methods, it can produce more food in a shorter growing period, and it is scalable to large commercial or small home systems. Demonstration areas of aquaponics fish systems on campus are located in Hester Hall, Connor Hall, and the Student Life office. Feel free to stop in and check them out. The possibilities of utilizing aquaponics in research, learning, and work training at NMSD are endless! Students from grades kindergarten through 12 will all be able to participate in hands-on experiential learning, engage in scientific research to incorporate Science Technology Engineering Mathematics (STEM) standards, as well as practice using sustainable technologies and systems. High school students can participate in work training opportunities. They can learn to care for fish, monitor temperatures, record data, plant, harvest, deliver produce, and more. These are all skills that can be applied towards pursuits in higher education, gainful work opportunities, self-employment, and sustainability practices. We hope to have the Larson Gym's Aquaponics systems ready for the NMSD community to use for learning purposes at the greenhouse domes this fall. Please stop by to take a peek and learn more about what is happening with the Aquaponics Program at NMSD!

Top right: Don Wilding showing Victoria Rose Baca how to use cables to help level off the support frames. 2nd from top: Ricardo Salmon-Medina organizing and moving PVC pipes. 3rd from top: Sherrena Bob and Jeremy Dan cutting pieces of wood using a miter saw as Don Wilding supervises. Bottom right: Joshua Armendariz and Sherrena Bob work on moving gravel and sand to prepare the growing beds areas. Bottom left: The dome greenhouses!

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PERFORMING ARTS

MAGICAL VARIETY! BY MEGAN KLUSZA On December 22, we hosted our annual Winter Variety Show at New Mexico School for the Deaf. We enjoyed a wonderful show filled with a variety of performances by students and staff members , including storytelling, dancing, songs in ASL, and videos. The biggest treat of the night was a group performance of students demonstrating the circus skills they learned from Wise Fool of New Mexico. It’s always a pleasure to witness how our students light up after their performances. It’s an amazing opportunity to bring the community together and give our students a boost of self-confidence!

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Top right: Jesse Jimenez, the green crayon, shows frustration because it's used only to color alligators, trees, or frogs while Angelyna Santistevan, the pink crayon, looks on in support during Kris Eaton’s classes adaptation, "The Day the Kindergarten Crayons Quit,” based on the book, The Day the Crayons Quit. Middle right: Olivia Haley and Dustin Hand do a fantastic job keeping the Winter Variety Show moving! Bottom right: Mya Malone and Lindsay Hand perform the song “Firework” by Katy Perry. Top left: From left: Megan Montoya, Ashley Collins, Jackie Martinez, Lupe Lucero, Margarita Garcia and Laurie Evans throw paper snowflakes during the Early Childhood and Elementary staff’s skit about how to make it snow. Middle left: From left: Sierra Woosley, Donovan Etheridge and Jesse Crespin rock the stage with their “Backpack Dance.” Bottom left: Front row from left: First and second graders, Kane Wilding, Tavian Plonski, Huda Ali, Ulises Aranda-Sotelo. Back row fro left: Greyson Lobato and Devon Burrows perform a synchronized dance/clapping act to celebrate the many holidays celebrated around the world during December and January.


PERFORMING ARTS

A BIG TOP STOP AT NMSD! BY RICHIE MOSES Santa Fe’s Wise Fool New Mexico is on a powerful mission to ignite imagination, build community, and promote social justice through performances and handson experiences in circus, puppetry and theatre arts. NMSD was fortunate enough to have this inspiring troupe provide eight weeks of classes to NMSD students, coordinated with the assistance of Joi Holsapple. The Wise Fool troupe taught three different age groups of Upper Elementary and Middle School students’ circus skills such as walking on stilts, juggling, and acrobatics. The classes and activities were hands-on, and students practiced and mastered a variety of skills. Although the skills were circus arts, the focus was on boosting self-confidence, enhancing self-esteem, building teamwork, and increasing safety awareness. Students were thrilled to highlight their impressive skills during the Winter Variety Show, but more importantly, everyone had tons of fun with Wise Fool! As Makyla Chavez shared, “I like working with Wise Fool because it is so much fun.” Bruce Brewer, Jr. added, “Wise Fool helped every student learn many different skills. Students really worked together as a team.” Special thanks to Wise Fool members Amy Christian, Fantina Becker, David Nieto, and Dee Anaya for putting their heart and soul into working with our students!

Top right: Stacy Vargas and Adam Rylee high-five on stilts during the Winter Variety Show. Bottom right: Alex Wilding and Angelica Baldonado perform a balancing trick during the Winter Variety Show. Top left: From left: Mateo Perez, Arlene Galindo, Sierra Woosley, Kane Wilding, and Wise Fool members David Nieto and Fantina Becker juggle scarves during the Wise Fool performance. Bottom left: Julian Aranda-Sotelo and Wise Fool member Dee Anaya work together on balancing. Bottom middle: Wise Fool member Fantina Becker and Antonio Lopez have fun with the cow costume during the Wise Fool performance.

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PERFORMING ARTS

THE TRUTH COMES OUT BY SHIRA GRABELSKY The James A. Little Theatre stage recently became the Piggsylvania courtroom as The True Story of the Three Little Pigs unfolded. The hardheaded prosecutor, Julia, would not let A.T. Wolf testify. Much to her chagrin, in the end, his story was told! The audience, who watched the story come to life, were jurors. They were shouldered with the decision whether the wolf would go free or be locked up forever - he explained that he was baking a cake for his grandmother and had a cold, and so he huffed and puffed at the little pigs’ houses! At the close of the trial, the audience’s verdict was “not guilty!” Everyone enjoyed this year’s Spring Play immensely.

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Top right: A.T. Wolf cross-examines Martha (Antonia Martinez), a so-called witness. From left: Antonia Martinez and Bruce Brewer, Jr. Right 2nd from top: Outside the Piggslyvania courtroom, the protesters cry wolf. From left: Vergena Chee and Mya Malone. Right 3rd from top: Judge Prudence allows reporter Magill to question A.T. Wolf. From left: Lindsay Hand, Julio Portillo, Mya Malone, Bruce Brewer, Jr. Bottom right: A.T. Wolf is “Not Guilty” as deemed by the audience! From left: Lindsay Hand, Mya Malone, Julio Portillo, Bruce Brewer, Jr., and Vergena Chee. Top left: The cast and crew of our spring play. Front from left: Julio Portillo, Dustin Hand, Lindsay Hand, and Vergena Chee. Middle row: Bruce Brewer, Jr. and Antonia Martinez. Back row from left: Mya Malone, Director Shira Grabelsky, Assistant Director Julie Nagle, Jesus Rios-Pena, and Deven Thompson. Bottom left: A.T. Wolf tries to blow down Maxwell’s brick house. From left: Deven Thompson and Julio Portillo.


STUDENT LIFE

THE WORLD IS OUR CLASSROOM BY RODDY CABBAGE Learning doesn’t stop at 3 pm! Our students also have access to the many educational and social activities in our residential program. Here’s a few recent activities they’ve enjoyed. The Student Life and Nutrition Services invited Renee Zisman from the NMSU program Ideas for Cooking and Nutrition (ICAN). Renee came in twice monthly to provide lots of great information and tips on quick and nutritious meals, cooking skills, and other hands-on nutritional activities. Each cottage took turns choosing an entrée to prepare, and students were responsible for side dishes to go with the entrée. The food and healthy information has garnered a very positive response from the students! January’s Super Blue Moon’s total eclipse led to a unique and unusual activity! Dan Timlen brought REI’s “No Buts Night Run” event to the NMSD community as a fundraising effort to help the American Hiking Society’s National Trails System 50th Anniversary. For every participant, REI donated $1 to the American Hiking Society. Every residential student, Student Life Educator, and 73 teachers participated in the walk behind the NMSD campus. They traveled through the new tunnel crossing the busy St. Francis Drive intersection and all the way to the Railyard Park water tower and back in the dark! Everyone had a great time on this beautiful moonlit walk. We also recently held our sugar cookie decoration competition. Each cottage made and decorated beautiful cookies. The plates of cookie art were displayed and photographed for the competition. NMSD staff cast their votes in three categories: Most Creative Bunch, Most Delicious Batch, and Most Realistic Looking Crew. Juniper Cottage (Middle School girls) won the “Most Creative Bunch”, Sunflower Cottage (High School ILSP – Independent Living Skills Program) took “Most Delicious Batch category”, and Aspen Cottage (Middle School boys) were honored as the “Most Realistic Looking Crew” category! Our students and Student Life Educators (SLEs) had a sweet time!

Top right: All set for the “No Buts Night Runners!” 2nd from right: Renee Zisman discussing different food types and their nutritional values with students. 3rd from right: Victoria Baca chopping up some delicious looking lettuce for a healthy salad. Bottom left: Enjoying the outdoors under the full moon! Bottom middle: Jay Vacher proudly displaying his colorful creations. Bottom right: Makyla Chavez and Alex Gonzalez-Lopez decorating their sugar cookies.

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ATHLETICS

WINTER/SPRING SEASON

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VARISTY BOYS BASKETBALL

VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL

Front row from left: Waylon Lopez, Julio Portillo, Antonio Lopez, Deven Thompson, Jonathan Garcia, Bruce Brewer Jr., and Johnathan Ludwigs. Back row from left: Jeremy Baldonado, Jeremy Dan, Jacob Lopez, Assistant Coach Leo Gutierrez, Coach Letty Perez, Jacob Stevens, and Dustin Hand.

From left: Olivia Haley, Andrea Leyba, Lindsay Hand, Sofia Martinez, Mya Malone, Sherrena, Victoria Baca, and Antonia Martinez. Not pictured: Coach Roderick Stickley, and Assistant Coach Caitlin Velasquez.

MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL

ELEMENTARY VOLLEYBALL

From Left: Assistant Coach Levi Anderson, Precious Jones, Adrien Ercolino, Lathaniel Williams, Kieran Vollmar, Jesus Rios, John “LJ” Hernandez, Stacy Vargas, Alex Wilding, and Coach Mitch Curtis. Not pictured: Kieran Ercolino and Ben Hernandez.

Front row from left: U9/10 Team: Coach Briean Burton, Greyson Lobato, Tavian Plonski, Henrick Catron, and Arlene Galindo. Not pictured: Wayde Van Guten, Mateo Perez, and Neeva Goff. Back row from left: U8 Team: Jesse Haley, Makayla Chavez, Kimora Vollmar, Jodie Haley, Soniya Vigil, and Coach Dominic Harrison. Not pictured: Sierra Woosley, Wendy Fuentes, and Joseph Rodriguez.

VARISTY COED TRACK & FIELD

MIDDLE SCHOOL COED TRACK & FIELD

From left: Coach James Litchfield III, Andrea Leyba, Lindsay Hand, Julio Portillo, Antonio Lopez, Waylon Lopez, Deven Thompson, Marlin Toledo, Dustin Hand, Mya Malone, Bruce Brewer, Jr., Victoria Baca, and Assistant Coach Daniel Timlen.

From left: Coach Nora Torres, Precious Jones, Bria Vigil, Angelica Baldonado, Claire Stephens, Stacy Vargas, Sophia Martinez, Kieran Vollmar, Adam Rylee, Jesus Rios, Kieran Ercolino, Alex Wilding, Adrien Ercolino, and Assistant Coach Adrianna Lucero.


ATHLETICS

ATHLETICS BANQUET

MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLAR-ATHLETE OF THE YEAR From left: Scott Mohan, Andrea Leyba, Dustin Hand, and Heather Costner.

MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL

MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE OF THE YEAR From left: Dr. Jennifer Herbold, Jesus Rios-Pena, Deven Thompson, and Stacy Vargas.

MIDDLE SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL

From left: Coach Levi Anderson, Adrian Ercolino (Most Improved Player), Kieran Vollmar (Most Improved Player), and Coach Mitch Curtis.

From left: Stacy Vargas (Most Outstanding Player), Coach Brie Burton, and Bria Vigil (Most Improved Player).

MIDDLE SCHOOL & VARSITY TRACK & FIELD

FANS OF THE YEAR

From left: Coach Jimmy Litchfield, Victoria Baca (Most Improved), Deven Thompson (Most Outstanding), Mya Malone (The Claw), Julio Portillo (Most Improved), and Coach Dan Timlen.

From left: Shelly Lily, Gary Hand, Kim Hand, Bruce Brewer, Sr., Julio Portillo, and Elizabeth Fry. 27


PROM 2018

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

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Top left: Prom-goers having fun posing in the new underpass tunnel behind the NMSD campus. Top right: Photo booth fun! Front row from left: Julio Portillo, Lindsay Hand, and Jacob Lopez. Back row from left: Andrea Leyba, Mya Malone, Megan Klusza, NMSD staff, Jacob Stevens, and Vergena Chee. Middle: From left: Waylon Lopez, Antonia Martinez, Jacob Stevens, Jacob Lopez, Janell Miller, Johnathan Ludwigs, Vergena Chee, Sherrena Bob, Jeremy Dan, Alexandro Lucero, Jeremy Baldonado, Mya Malone, Andrea Leyba, Deven Thompson, Lindsay Hand, Luis Villalobos, Ricardo Salmon-Medina and Julio Portillo posing by the train in the Railyard. Bottom left: Prom King Jacob Lopez and Prom Queen Vergena Chee. Bottom middle: Mark Valencia, NMSD Security, assisting Waylon Lopez with his tie. Bottom right: “Cutting a rug� on the dance floor!


HONOR NIGHT

CELEBRATING STUDENTS!

ELEMENTARY READING AWARD

DRAMA AWARD

From left: Kim Burkholder, Henrik Catron, and Jesse Crespin. Not pictured Brenna Gonzalez.

From left: Shira Grabelsky, Mya Malone, Julio Portillo, and Julie Nagle.

ANDERSON FAMILY SCIENCE AWARD

CITIZENSHIP AWARD

From left: Levi Anderson, Erickson Sierra, Sienna Woosley, Dustin Hand, and Kieran Vollmar.

From left: Wendy Fuentes, Alex Wilding, Andrea Leyba, and Dr. Herbold.

RESIDENTIAL STUDENTS OF THE YEAR AWARD

STUDENT OF THE YEAR AWARD

From left: Roddy Cabbage, John “LJ” Hernandez, Andrea Leyba, and Superintendent Gallegos. Not pictured: Twilah Joe.

Front row from left: Phenix Hastings and Melinda Johnston. Back row from left: Dustin Hand, Jonathan Ludwigs, Andrea Leyba, and Superintendent Gallegos. 29


GRADUATION

SENIOR CLASS OF 2018

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CLASS COLORS

CLASS MOTTO

CLASS SONG

CLASS FLOWER

Red and White

"Look forward to your future and never give up.” ~ Class of 2018

“Graduation (Friends Forever)” by Vitamin C

Rose

Top: Senior Class 2018. Sitting from left: Maria “Antonia” Martinez, Vergena Chee, Janell Miller. Standing from left: Mariah Martinez, Alexandro Lucero, Kimberly Sanchez and Ty Tahe. Bottom left: Vergena Chee, class speaker, reminds her fellow classmates that their “futures will be full of many unknowns and to never stop learning new things.” Bottom middle: The senior class gave NMSD two gifts this year – a disco ball for the Roadrunner Activity Center (RAC) and an engraved plaque to be placed near the Roadrunner sculpture on campus. Bottom right: Dr. Ronald J. Stern, graduation speaker, inspiring the graduating class of 2018 with his words of wisdom about making the most of lessons learned at NMSD going forward in life.


CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL CONSULTATION & TRAINING

SIGNS OF FUN! BY DEAN KROHN AND MARIA KLEIN NMSD’s ASL Service Corps places ASL Tutors in rural locations throughout New Mexico, providing ASL instruction to families and to school programs wherever Deaf children live, as well as planning and facilitating regional events. During the 2017-2018 school year, tutors hosted ten events, both increasing participant awareness of Deaf Culture and ASL and offering families an opportunity to meet and interact. It is inspiring to see families connect and communicate with each other, while allowing Deaf children to enjoy interacting with Deaf adults and their peers. Events included icebreakers, ASL games, storytelling, crafts, workshops, group discussions, presentations, and social time. Event themes have ranged from Spooooky ASL, ASL Boo-ling Social, Fall ASL Festival to Fun in Winterland, Be My Friendtine, and Earth Day. Families have enjoyed bowling day, family fun night, family weekend gatherings, and ASL classes. Each event includes interpreters to provide everyone with full communication access between family members, ASL Tutors, Deaf Mentors, and Educational Consultants. ASL Service Corps regional events are unforgettable, filled with great memories and great connections!

Top right: Practicing the sign for the word “wrestling” during Las Cruces’s Valentine’s Day gathering. Middle right: Cousins enjoying a matching activity at the Be My Friendtine event in Las Cruces. Bottom right: Participants playing “What’s your name sign?” during Albuquerque’s Fun in Winterland event. Top left: The Spooooky ASL Halloween party provided the perfect opportunity for these moms and their toddlers to share a moment together. Bottom left: Taiya Getman, ASL Tutor, and Lisa Rutland, Deaf Mentor, doing a read-a-loud at Santa Fe’s Family Fun Night.

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ALUMNI

ALUMNI IN ACTION! BY KERI-LYNN MCBRIDE Alumni hold a very special place in the heart of NMSD, and many alumni think of NMSD as their home. It is a place where they grew up, gained an education, made lifelong friends and share fond memories. NMSD reached out to two beloved alumni - Richard Pearson and Ronnie Milliorn - to ask them to share about their time as NMSD students, and beyond. Both are still very connected to the NMSD Community and campus. Richard W. Pearson What year did you enroll at NMSD? I enrolled at NMSD in 1961 when I was 5 years old. What town were you from? Ruidoso, NM. A few years later, my family moved to Santa Fe to be closer to me. Who were your best friends while at school? My best friend was Forrest McKinley. We were both very mischievous but Forrest was much more daring! We had a lot of fun growing up together. Later, we both worked in Los Alamos. It hit me very hard when Forrest passed away unexpectedly. I miss him to this day. What was your favorite subject when at NMSD? My favorite subjects were math, geometry, history, and reading. Who was your favorite teacher or staff person? There were many that I admired but my favorite was Gordon Kaufman, my Social Studies teacher. Mr. Kaufman had a lot of patience with us, and a great sense of humor. He was a CODA (Child of a Deaf Adult), and he was fluent in ASL and that made communicating with him easy and natural. What is your fondest memory while a student at NMSD? Wow! That is a tough one! I have so many great memories of my time at NMSD. I will never forget driving my 1955 turquoise Thunderbird to school everyday in my sophomore year! My friends and many staff admired my car. What year did you graduate from NMSD? I graduated in 1976. After you graduated, what profession did you go into? I went to Seattle Central Community College where I majored in Mechanical Drafting. After I graduated in 1979, I went on to work at Los Alamos National Lab for 27 years. In what ways have you stayed connected with NMSD? I’ve stayed involved in many ways. I volunteered to design the Alumni Memorial Plaza and Time Capsule for the NMSD 100th anniversary in 1987. I also serve on the NMSD Alumni Association board as Member at Large and NMSD Historian. Currently I’m volunteering at the NMSD Museum where I’ve been assisting with several exhibits. One of them is a window display called “A Long Time Ago” - it displays woodworking as well as sewing and embroidering projects and the alumni and current student’s art and photo wall. I’m happy I’m able to support NMSD in these ways. What are you currently up to in your life? I’m retired and enjoying my free time. I volunteer at the Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society and travel with my wife Linda in our RV. Top right: Richard Pearson’s senior class photo. 2nd from right: Richard’s pride and joy - his 1955 Thunderbird. 3rd from right: Richard Pearson working on the alumni art wall in the museum. Bottom right: Alumni Julio Ruiz and Richard Pearson chatting in the museum during the 2017 Homecoming Weekend.

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ALUMNI Ronnie Milliorn What year did you enroll at NMSD? I enrolled at NMSD in 1962 when I was 4 and 1/2 years old. I started at the NMSD Albuquerque Preschool and then moved to the Santa Fe campus after one year. What town are you from? I am from Springer and Roy, New Mexico. Who were your best friends while at school? I had several best friends: Forrest McKinley, Sidney Haley, and Douglas McFarland. We had a lot of fun together. We were on the same soccer, basketball, and track teams. We also loved to ski together. We used to visit Forrest’s family ranch where we trained and cared for their horses. What was your favorite subject? My favorite subjects were math, science, language, and social studies. I especially loved history! Who was your favorite teacher or staff person? I had several favorites but I am especially fond of Ann Sleep who was my English teacher and Espie Latimer my math teacher - I always called her my “grandmother”! I was also fond of Bob Clingenpeel, my science teacher, and Gordon Kaufman who taught social studies. What is your fondest memory while a student at NMSD? From the time I was 8 years old, my friend Forrest’s dad brought bales of hay to the NSMD campus to allow us to practice our roping skills. I also went to basketball camp in Prescott, AZ during the summers of 1974, 1975 and 1976. In 1977, our varsity basketball team went on to win the championship at the California Basketball Classic, which was later renamed the Western States Basketball Classic. What year did you graduate from NMSD? I graduated in 1977. After you graduated, what profession did you go into? I went to Chemeketa College in Salem, OR where I majored in welding. I transferred to Seattle Community College where I continued to study welding. After graduating, I worked at Boeing for a short time and then I moved back to New Mexico where I worked at Mesa Welding for 4 1/2 years. Eventually I started working in the residential program at NMSD where I stayed for the next 27 years. In what ways have you stayed connected with NMSD? I stay connected with NMSD’s athletic programs and volunteer to be on various committees when needed. I also attend NMSD games when I can. I will always be a Roadrunner!! What are you currently up to in your life? I retired from NMSD in 2008, and I’ve been enjoying myself ever since. I still train horses and I’m also a football and basketball referee for the New Mexico Athletic Association, Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), and the Deaf International Basketball Federation.

Top right: Ronnie Milliorn’s senior class photo. 2nd from right: Ronnie Milliorn was an outstanding basketball player and is featured in the “Wall of Fame” display located in the lobby of the Larson Gym. Bottom right: After our varsity boys basketball team won the GPSD Championship, Ronnie came to a celebratory rally and shared his experience of winning the Western States Basketball Championship in 1977. Bottom left: Ronnie Milliorn’s All-American Plaque.

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PUBLIC RELATIONS

FULL HEARTS, FULL STOCKINGS! BY HOLLIE FLEMING NMSD’s Annual Winter Variety Show this past December was another huge success! The evening overflowed with winterrelated skits and ASL stories performed by NMSD students and staff. NMSD has traditionally collected donations at the door during the Show for the Santa Fe Community Foundation’s (SFCF) Empty Stocking Fund. This year NMSD collected $405, helping provide support for housing assistance, car repairs, home heating, utility bills, and more for those who are financially challenged at a time when the season should be merry and bright.

POSTERS FOR PEACE BY HOLLIE FLEMING Several middle school students participated in the International Peace Poster Contest through the Capital City Lion's Club. The 2017-2018 Peace Poster Contest theme was “The Future of Peace.” Last February, Lion's Club members came to NMSD to celebrate participating students, award prizes to winners, and acknowledge all the students who earned Honorable Mentions. For the last 31 years, Lions clubs around the world have proudly sponsored the Lions International Peace Poster Contest in local schools and youth groups. The art contest encourages young people, ages 11 to 13, worldwide to express their visions of peace. Congratulations to all the NMSD participants!

THE LUCK OF THE IRISH & NMSD! BY HOLLIE FLEMING On Saturday, March 17, Quota International of Santa Fe Charitable Trust sponsored the annual St. Patrick's Day Fundraising Dinner for NMSD. Proceeds from the event help college-bound NMSD students through the Betty Shockey Memorial Scholarship Fund. This year’s dinner was well attended by a mix of NMSD staff, Quota members, alumni, families, and friends, all of whom enjoyed their share of corned beef with all the fixings! It was nice to have NMSD alumni and previous Betty Shockey Memorial Scholarship Fund scholarship recipients Amy Lucero, Augusta Skoog, and Aaron Martinez with us that evening. Each of them expressed their gratitude to Quota for their support during the event. This year’s dinner took in close to $2,000 from ticket and raffle sales, and provided a huge collection of diapers for the Food Depot. Way to make a difference Quota and NMSD!

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Top right: Presenting the full stocking! NMSD staff Megan Klusza, SFCF staff Diane Hamamoto, NMSD students Mya Malone and Lindsay Hand, and SFCF staff Courtney Lopez, Albert Granados, and Ona Johnson. Middle right: Front row from left: Bria Vigil (1st place), Adrien Ercolino (2nd place) and Jovi Melendez (3rd place). Back row from left: NMSD Superintendent, Dr. Rosemary Gallegos, Mary Clyde, Capital City Lion's Club Peace Poster Contest Co-Chair, Buck Rackley, Capital City Lion's Club President and Rose Himrod, Capital City Lion's Club Peace Poster Contest Co-Chair. Bottom right: Some of the amazing St. Patrick’s Dinner team (from left): Hollie Fleming, Gina Federici, Holly Bostwick, Pat Sneesby, Mary Dixon, Ardell Van Mason, Tashima Wildrose and Susi Perry.


PUBLIC RELATIONS

2017 DONOR HONOR ROLL THANK YOU

THANK YOU

Gracias - Merci - Diky - Bedankt - Vielen Dank - Obrigado - Huala - Grazie HONOR ROLL OF DONORS The following donations were received from January 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017. Great care is given in preparing the Honor Roll of Donors. Any omissions and errors are unintentional. Corrections and/or questions should be addressed to Keri-Lynn McBride at 505-476-6399.

INDIVIDUALS Josie Abbenante Frank & Rebecca Anderson Patricia Anderson Steve Baldwin & Rosie Serna Andrew & Lynann Barbero Karl Barry Marcia & Ted Berridge Elspeth G. Bobbs & Margery Mariel Johnson Tommie Brasel Gloria Candelario & Harriet Waseta Andres & Melinda Carrillo Patricia Delaney Jennifer Disterhaupt Mary & Taras Dykstra Larry Evans & Betty Bounds Rosemary & Robert Gallegos Rosalyn L. & Jack R. Gannon Katharine H. Glyer Kathy Glyer Wendy Gordon Harold Grantham Gary & Kim Hand Julia Hecht Ronald M. Hirano Maxine Hickox, ABQ Book Club Alice Hong Raymond & Judy Hong Rose Hong Steve & Gladys Hong Maxine Hickox John Hooper Richard & Jacqueline Gluckman George C. Hurt, Jr. Timothy & Silvia Jaech

Eloy & Mary Jeantete Eugenia Kincaid Melvin & Anne-Marie Klapholz Ivan R. and Carol Litherland Paul & Elizabeth Lucero Keri-Lynn McBride Patricia McBride John C. Miller & Ausma L. Smits Paul & Judy Moriarty Gayle Mohorcich Raymond & Lily Mow Arthur & Barbara Mow Denis & Angela Munn David Myers Jane Norman Annamarie Pascoe Walter H. Plocher Margie Propp Randall Rael Pam & Bob Reed John Robertson Barbara Schmidt Bobbie Scoggins James Selby & Leslie Smith Frankie Serrano Leslie & Aurora Solomon Lena Stavely Ronald J. & Hedy Udkovich Stern Alicia Tacata Bob & Arlene Uemura Lisa Uemura Marc I. & Janet Uemura Gail Williams & Owen Kunkle Scott Uemura & Mengmeng Zhang Nancy & George Yankura

IN-KIND Elizabeth Fry Elise Nye Holliday Amanda Lujan Northern NM Quilt Guild Sam’s Club Ronald J. & Hedy Udkovich Stern Trader Joe’s Yana Novikova BUSINESSES & CORPORATIONS A-1 Lawn Maintenance & Service, LLC Blackbeards on the Beach Horizon Scripted TV, Inc. Sorenson Communications FOUNDATIONS Walter Scott Foundation CIVIC & COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS Duke City Sertoma Club Civitan International Old Town Optimist Club Quota International Santa Fe St. John’s United Methodist Women Santa Fe Civitan Club

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CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

Renderings showing the front view of campus including Cartwright and Delgado Hall, after renovation.

Renderings of the back view of Cartwright & Delgado Hall.

When the renovations are completed, Cartwright Hall, built in 1916 as the “Girl’s Dorm”, will house NMSD’s Family Housing Program apartments, as well as, several NMSD offices.

Delgado Hall, built in 1931 as the “Bakery and Domestic Science Building, will continue to house NMSD’s main reception area, Superintendent’s Office, Business and Finance, Human Resources and Interpretation Department.

Inside view of Cartwright Hall.

Inside view of Delgado Hall.

To view more photos of renovation, visit NMSD’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/NMSchoolDeaf. 36


2017 -2018 RETIREES & YEARS OF SERVICE RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

RETIREE

Priscilla Coriz

Mary Dykstra

Jose Gonzales

Gary Valencia

Michael Vigil

Dream! Explore! Achieve! 2010-2017

Vision

Beliefs

Children and students in New Mexico who are deaf/hard of hearing will become lifelong learners and contributing, well-rounded successful individuals in an increasingly global society.

In an environment of respect, trust, and safety, we believe in…

Mission The mission of the New Mexico School for the Deaf (NMSD), New Mexico’s first public school, is to provide for the unique needs of children and students who are deaf/hard of hearing, their families, and professional partners by providing a comprehensive array of school and statewide programs. As a school, NMSD provides an American Sign Language and English bilingual learning environment that includes direct, ongoing access to language and communication in and out of the classroom with a wide range of peers and adults. The students are interactive learners who receive dynamic high quality standardsbased instruction in a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities. As a statewide service agency, NMSD collaborates with families, school districts, agencies and communities throughout the state to meet the critical language, communication, and learning needs of children and students in New Mexico who are deaf/hard of hearing, birth through high school.

viewing people who are deaf/hard of hearing from a cultural and linguistic perspective

having high expectations that positively affect self-esteem, identity and whole person development

providing early, ongoing, and fluid access to communication through natural language models

developing proficiency in American Sign Language and English which is critical for fluent communication, literacy and academic achievement

supporting the development of auditory skills and spoken language as appropriate to the strengths and needs of the individual child/student

providing high quality early intervention and involvement services designed to help families give their children the earliest possible on-going opportunities for language, learning and meaningful relationships

fostering strong partnerships with families through learning and social opportunities

identifying each student’s unique strengths and using them as the foundation for learning and development

ensuring the child/student is a consistent and active participant in planned and incidental learning experiences in and out of the classroom

embracing ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity

developing competence in the use of advanced technology

having high quality and committed staff who possess and maintain expertise in their respective area

supporting all students in the pursuit of their personal and professional aspirations

February 2013

30 YEARS

Shelly Lily

2002-2017

2010-2018

20 YEARS

25 YEARS

Keri-Lynn McBride

2009-2017

1997-2017

Patrick Ercolino

Sylvia Serrano

Jaqueline Martinez

Judy Vigil

15 YEARS

Danny DeAguero

Gary Hand

Kim Hand

Heather Huizar

Stephanie Loya

10 YEARS

David Anderson

Laurie Anderson

Dean Krohn

Elizabeth Sandoval

Lena Stavely


Presorted Marketing US Postage Paid Permit 1893 Albuq.NM

1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 www.nmsd.k12.nm.us

Volume 108 / Issue 2 / Winter/Spring 2017-2018

DREAM! EXPLORE! ACHIEVE!

TEAMING UP FOR SUCCESS: NMSD’S WHOLE CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES

NEW MEXICO'S FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL

THE NEW MEXICO PROGRESS since 1909 USPS #381-500 / ISSN #0896-6478 Vol. 108 / Issue 2 / Winter/Spring 2017-18

Published twice during the school year at the New Mexico School for the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505. Distributed to parents of students presently enrolled at NMSD and staff. POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE NEW MEXICO PROGRESS, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87505. Staff: Editor/Keri-Lynn McBride; Associate Editors/Bay Anapol & Kathy Glyer. Designed by Hollie Fleming.

NM Progress Winter/Spring 2017-18 ENG  
NM Progress Winter/Spring 2017-18 ENG  
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