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ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO S TA G E I I ARCHITECTURE DESIGN

ARC 2001 160134579

TA M Y U N TA K K E N N Y

ARCHITECTURE + COMPETITION

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CONTACT INFORMATION N

Kenny Tam Yun Tak

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07397128130

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kennytam1@gmail.com

Thinking

Post - Review

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Pre - Review

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http://kennytam1.wixsite.com/portfolio

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Newcastle University

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RIBA Part 1 Stage 2


CROSSOVER CHARRETTE

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00

SEMESTER ONE STUDY TYPE

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01

LEITH 2030: A NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN

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DWELLING PLUS

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INHABIT

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Index

CHARRETTE

SEMESTER TWO ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE

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EXPLORING EXPERIENCE

72

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INTERGRATED TECHNOLOGY

104

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CRAFTING ARCHITECTURE

112

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NON-DESIGN COURSEWORK ARCHITECTURE TECHNOLOGY

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ABOUT ARCHITECTURE

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ENVIROMENTAL DESIGN

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DISSERTATION STUDIES

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COMPETITION

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charrette


CROSSOVER CHARRETTE FLUX / FLEX / FLUFF PARABOLIC VISION Char.rette noun a period of intense work, typically undertaken in order to meet a deadline. Throughout history, mankind has created tools that take advantage of its form and texture to help manipulate the environment, from examples such as the Inuit goggles used in the frozen north, to the sound mirror dotted around the English coast. Focusing on a single sense “Sound� and eliminating the other four senses creates a new perspective of feeling the surrounding world. It is all about the choice of listening, to the leafs, the gossip, the harsh noise of cars, the soft mellow of waves.

Listen through the toon

charrette

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Listening For The Direction

Listen The creation of the device blocks out the senses to see, smell, and taste of the surrounding but enhances the ability to hear. The explorations of the trumpet allows you to hear where you go in Necastle. From the metropolis city center towards the park and at last ended up in the middle of no where in the feild. By liminating some of our senses we ultilmately lead ourselfs back to nature, non-man made areas.

Right side: Final Image of Model 8

charrette


In the city I am a walking cellphone restricted to rules of the trafic light and queues, in the nature I am just another wild organism. In here there is no dissaprival nor judgments. I can be at peace.

charrette

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P2.3.1

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Study type


STUDY TYPE OXFORD SOMERVILLE COLLEGE STUDENT ACCOMODATION [Location] Oxford, sumerville [Architects] NĂ­all McLaughlin [clients] students [Group member] Ewan, Flora, Kenny, Shaunee

Studying of typology is a universal activity architect do, it is to analyse various types of architecture to understand the schemes behind the building. Measuring what is positive and what is not in the programme and to distil the function of requirements it holds. It is then we can compare and have a knowledgeable understanding of the type, and how the relationship of people and spaces coincide together in different scales. As a group, we have gained further knowledge of the typology of a student housing in Oxford, the Somerville College Student Accommodation. The newly built student housing used clever design decisions to fit the volumes in a tightly narrow street with protruding window desk boxes to blend the outside and the in together.

Study Type

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1:2500 Urban Context

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study type


1:500 Model

Southern View from Oxford University

Narrow Street

Scale Through the five scales that we have carried out as a group, we have learned the challenges Naill McLaughlin Architects had faced and resolved in their student accommodation. Studying a 1:2500 as an urban context, 1:500 as a massing model, 1:200 as a plan, 1:50 as a dwelling detail section and 1:5 as a threshold study. Giving us a deep understanding of the entirety of the scheme.

study type

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1. Student bed rom 2. Corridoor 3. Stair tower 4. Roof 5. Brick wall parapet 6. Plaster board wall 7. Rear wall - existing

1:50 Technical Section

1:200 Plan

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study type


1:5 Threshold

study type

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Leith Links

Ocean Terminal

P2.3.2

Kagyu Samye Dzong

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LEITH 2030: A NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN MASTER PLAN [Location] Leith, Edinburgh, Schotland [Year of proposal] 2030 [Group] Euence, Ewan, Faith, Flora, Kenny, Kyros, Michael, Shaunee, Sophia

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leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan


Abondoned station

SITE

The Pond

INTRO Leith 2030 is the third project of the semester, as part of a group the project aims to create a master plan for the site proposed next to the Albert Docks. We first investigated the neighbourhood, physically, economically, historically and it’s rhythm. Therefore informs the decisions on what is the biggest problem in Leith and how will the master plan in 2030 provide these needs to the local neighbourhood. Leith was then found to be a place that relates closely to a “No man’s land”, a place that was once a main importing dock filled with inhabitants and now became a passing place where everyone rushes towards the city centre away from the dock. Where the relationship between people and water drifts apart. As a team, the master plan was then focused on achieving these seven points to uplift the neglected town and bridging the gap between people and the dock. Space for more local business to thrive, access to the docks, views, way through, keeping the heritage and it’s industrial character, communal facilities and a control mix of students and other residents.

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan

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Residential Areas

Churches

Industrial Areas

Goverment

Business Areas

Site Location

Green Areas

Great Wall

Mixture of Residence And Business

The Physical Neighbourhood The investigation of the physical neighbourhood gave a foundation of information to develop on for the following stages. The standing out information was the direction of travel of both mobile and foot was away from Leith suggesting a negative affordance in the centre of Leith. Another data where we found curious was how little local shops there was compared to the number of residents in the area.

Above: Neighbourhood buildings and key, People in the neighbourhood, Economy 18

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan


Primary Road Primary Road Secondary Road Primary Road Primary Road Secondary Road Tertiary Road Secondary Road Secondary Road Tertiary Road Trinity

Site Location Tertiary Road Tertiary Road

Trinity

Site Location

Trinity Trinity

Site Site Location

Royal Botanic Garden Royal Botanic Garden

Royal Botanic Botanic Garden Garden

Portobello Portobello Portobello Portobello

Edinburgh old town Edinburgh old town EdinburghOld old town Edinburgh Town

SUN PATH /SHADOW SUN PATH /SHADOW IN WINTER SOLSTICE SUN PATH IN WINTER /SHADOW SOLSTICE

Sun Path

IN WINTER SOLSTICE

AUTO AUTO

Auto Mobile

AUTO

Pedestrian And Bike

WIND PATH WIND PATH

Wind Direction

WIND PATH

PEDESTRIAN /BIKE PEDESTRIAN /BIKE

BUS STOPS /ROUTES BUS STOPS /ROUTES

PEDESTRIAN /BIKE Bus stops and toutes

BUS STOPS /ROUTES

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan

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Site sketch

The rhythm of the neighbourhood An abstract approach was taken when surveying the rhythm, a sketch with recordings of the moments was noted as words quickly and loosely to record as much information as possible. A walking survey was also carried out to map the rhythmic of the environment, the findings concluded on the quietness of inhabitants, but an overwhelming commotion of vehicles running left and right on the south side of the site. No man’s land.

Above: Neighbourhood buildings and key, People in the neighbourhood, Economy 20

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan


Rhythm collage

Video of the Rhythm leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan

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MASTER PLAN

Plan of action A master plan was drawn based on the findings after the analysis of Leith, where questions and problems ariesed. The action was to create a master plan that can solve these question and problems and perhaps provide even more to Leith. The master plan is then based on these seven points which has to be achieved at the end of the master plan design.

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leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan


Space For Small Local Business To Thrive

Access To The Dock

Views

Way Through

Keeping The Heritage and It’s Industrial Character

Communal Facilities

Control Mix Of Students And Other Residents

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan

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leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan


CENTRAL PEDESTRIAN STREET CENTRAL PEDESTRIAN STREET

Perspective showing street’s everyday use Perspective showing street’s everyday use

Perspective showing street as a street market Perspective showing street as a street market

Moments

From Top left to bottom right: - 1:500 Site Model - resturant moment - resturant moment - docks moment - south entrance - bike lane moment - main street moment - south entrance moment - main street - during holiday moment - local shops moment - residential area moment - library Middle: - 1:500 Master Plan modle

1:200 Section showing relationship of public roadroad and houses 1:200 Section showing relationship of public and houses

leith 2030: a neighbourhood plan

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03

P2.3.3

DWELLING PLUS ALTERNATIVE STUDENT HOUSING [Location] Leith Edinburgh Schotland [Year of proposal] 2030 [Type] Cohousing [Clients] Student and Familys [Provider] Co-operative

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dwelling plus


APOLOGIA “Alternative student housing is a project that tackles the current lack of homeliness in student housing around Scotland. The project follows directly after Leith 2030: A neighbourhood plan, where the proposed building will sit in the existing master plan to enhance the seven ambitions. The projects span three weeks of design and one week of technological response and inhabitation. We spend the majority of our lifetime dwelling in an enclose place called “house” and therefore as architects we should be creating spatial qualities that benefit the most for the inhabitants needs whereby providing a “home”. The home theory was inspired after a close reading on “Home and Homelessness” by Kimberly Dovey. He suggests that home is an emotionally based and meaningful relationship between dwellers and their dwelling places. It then leads me to create the three characters that establish a home. Identity, with everyone being different in their relationship with space, different volumes is pieced together to create a sense of uniqueness where each dweller has their very own version of apartments. Familiarity, the central circulation is punched through the building forcing neighbours to meet each other on a daily basis. People Driven, a piece of art crafted by the dwellers to enhance community and their relationship with each other, this also strengthens the concept of both identity and familiarity as it will display underneath the cantilever. Thus the aim of the dwelling is to create home for the dwellers. I then took a response on transitioning the theory into model making and drawings to show the qualities and the thinking behind the design. These also lead me to show how important the context can be around the dwelling to complete the concept of home.

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SITE

Material And Site

The Areas leading to Leith

Site and Material Edinburgh is divided into four areas, the Old Town (castle rock and Sandstone), New Town (sandstone), Stockbridge and Canonmills (sandstone and concrete), Leith (timber and sandstone). Sandstone a sedimentary rock which dominates the building material in Edinburgh because of the local resource from the volcano. The material also holds the characteristic of, and therefore it is evident in all regions leading to the docks.

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dwelling plus


1:1000 Site Model

Dwelling Oreientation and Views Sketch

Master plan reviewed The dwellings situate along the first circulation across the site and junctions to the circulation towards the dock. Each cantilever orientated so that there are views towards the pier for all and entrances directly leading to the central public pathways. The decision of placing the entrance under the cantilever meant that it would be well shaded, where it creates a semi-private area for the residence.

dwelling plus

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Rhythm Sketch Of Surrounding Site

Neighbouring Building Sketches

Site Experience Leith has become a passing point in a noman’s land where people, and no one stays. From the site sketch majority of the noise was coming from the heavy trucks and cars that are travelling across salamander street and the trucks that enter the dock. The photos suggest Leith has lost its people and excitement that it once had. Therefore the aim is to generate the excitement it once had and to bridged back the people back toward the dock. The dwelling will then become integrated into this excitement of the new design with the quality of a home.

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dwelling plus


The emptiness dominates the silence in Leith docks. A place where it once was the largest importing and exporting dock in Scotland is now sealed off and blocked away from people Above: Empty dock, The pond pub, non used scafoldings, salamander street, east side of dock dwelling plus

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House noun

“an object, a part of the enviroment”

Home noun “a kind of relationship between people and their enviroment. It is an emotionally based and meaningful relationship between dwellers and their dwelling places.”

‘Concomitant with this distinction is the assumption that the concept of the “housing problem” is not identical to that of “homelessness.” Indeed, the housing problem can be, and often solved in a manner that creates homelessness.’ - Kimberly Dovey

Above: Home and Homelessness Book, Kimberly Dovey’s definition of house and home 32

dwelling plus


power

Temp ion a l o r r d e Ho me osrtia b entificat i l i t y s g p a n i t i a v l o p a t t eird inng time memor y social culture order

ur rounding m esn v iro

fam Home dm ialen titca l iliarity body rituale as routine

technology experience connectedness identity

inhabit orientation ed rationalism per mit scale size spe

tangible par ticipatio n e r hieng relationship attitudeosbiroenattim

stereotype generic people driven par ticipator y design

war mth hear th professionalism past present future meaningful

ALTERNATIVE STUDENT HOUSING HOME Concept Kimberly Dovey inspired me with his essay “ Home and Homelessness� where he depicts the profession of architects who often solves design or economic problems such as housing crisis, but often results in consequence of homelessness. His research influence my design especially with the three words that I highlighted, Identity, Familiarity and People Driven. Therefore Influencing me to challenge the brief by changing the brief to alternative student home.

Above: Key words from reading, New brief dwelling plus

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CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

Identity Everyone has different characteristics and therefore has mixed emotions in different spaces. Individual volumes designed for different dwellers, ranging from students to families. Uniqueness concurrently, and dwellers will spark curiosity in how the other masses fit together.

Above: Identity concept diagram 34

dwelling plus


Familiarity Familiarity is mostly driven by time, creating opportunities for neighbours to meet each other is one of the ideas. By limiting the circulation to one singular primary path neighbours are more likely to meet each other. The use of colour also enhances familiarity with the dwellers and their flats.

People driven The dwellers are invited to craft and work together in an art installation that will be installed on the underhang of the cantilever. The result is an outcome of satisfaction in what the community has produced and also the strengthening of the neighbours.

Above: Familiarity concept diagram, People driven concept diagram dwelling plus

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Top to bottom: Light well and couryard, Exterior circulation, Stepping views, Double cantilever. 36

dwelling plus


Axonometric Of Concept Model

Iterations

Iterations The first approach was to test out the building volume and form in iteration with models and drawings. After testing with ideas such as atrium courtyard, exterior circulation and stepping views. The final iteration resulted in a simple volumetric structure with two different cantilevers perpendicular to each other.

dwelling plus

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Facade development

Structual Bracing

Service

Cladding

Frame Cladding

Sandstone Exploded Diagram of Facade Make Up

Materials and tectonics Sandstone and timber is the dominant material in Leith, the development of the facade material tests how timber can be made visually like sandstone. Due to the cross bracing of the structure, windows are placed between the bracing in four different shapes according to the schedule of accommodations inside the building. This, therefore, created almost stone-like shapes on the facade and the frame cladding represents the shades on the stones.

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dwelling plus


Top left to bottom right: Structual model, 1:5 detail model, 1:50 floor to Roof sectional model dwelling plus

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Above: Axonometric exploded view of building inteior 40

dwelling plus


Sketches Of Interior Flats

Interlocking Interiors Following on from the concept of the creation of identity the Interior volumes of the dwelling is constructed in variations of stacked cubes . These are then interlocked together as shown in the axonometric sketch. Individual flat has their own colour themes and therefore creates identity and familiarity with their own unique volumes.

dwelling plus

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1 2

3 4

Context Surrounding the building various of activities is built into the context to enhance further the concept of home from indoors to outdoors. Whereby creating a place where dwellers can inhabit and create memory of their own and to look forward to coming back at the end of the day

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dwelling plus


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9

6

5

In number order: 1) Road leading to the docks 2) Pop up tent for festivals 3) Outdoor breakoutspace and performance space 4) Market stalls 5) Public road 6) Entrance to dwelling 7)Parks 8)Running track 9)Road to Carpark

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The relationship of the dwellers also has to have a positive relationship with the surrounding context, to complete the concept of Home.

dwelling plus

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GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR Plans A four by four grid system laid over the plans and construction during the development of the program. The rational structural design resulted in a simple layout for the structural walls and vertical steel beams. The partition walls and stud walls sculpt the interior form and segregate the volumes.

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dwelling plus


SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

In order of the Plans: 1:200 Ground floor plan, 1:200 First floor plan, 1:200 Second floor plan, 1:200 Third floor plan

dwelling plus

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Sections The interior of the flats is clad with larch wood locally sourced from Leith timber manufacturer. Timber is used extensively because it gives off it gives off the sense of comfort and ease. The roofscape of the building enhance the axes from the south side of the master plans to the docks.

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dwelling plus


Long Section

Section

The difference in height between the two cantilevers created two distinctive experience, an entrance displaying the comunity painting and the flexible space for music and relaxing.

dwelling plus

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Economic model Eight individuals live in their dwelling across the master plan, where they organise and operate the cohousing property. However, the community can also contribute to decisions that the self-providing group is making to the changes and activities in the dwellings.

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Sustainability The building incorporates two sustainability strategies. Water harvesting system collects water from the roof which runs to the main structural wall and down to the water tank, and filter then disturbs back to the building use. Underfloor heating provides consistent comfortable temperature to the dwelling.

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EXTERIOR VIEWS

Large Cantilever perspective

Lower Cantilever perspective

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The difference in height between the two cantilevers created two distinctive experience, an entrance displaying the comunity painting and the flexible space for performance.

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04

P2.3.4

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INHABIT ALTERNATIVE STUDENT HOUSING [Location] Leith Edinburgh Schotland [Year of proposal] 2030 [Type] Cohousing [Clients] Student and Familys [Provider] Co-operative

Inhabit is the fifth project of the year which ties in with dwelling plus, where the projects will be focusing on a particular part of the building and details. These sections are understood and shown technologically with its inhabitants using the space. Materiality will demonstrate in perspectives on how the interior is clad to produce specific experiences to the dwellers in different areas such as the public and private places. The detailed model will show the differences between the interior and exterior and how these affect the different experience for the people and the dwellers.

The project will, therefore, display the experiences of the interior materiality and technology which creates for the dwellers on a scale which closely links to the human size.

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Studio And Workshop

Communal Kitchen

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Student Bedrooms

Living room

Both public and private spaces are inhabited with families and students . In the workshop and communal kitch are where dwellers meet eachother.

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TECHNICAL MODEL

Construction model The Sectional Model and details show the makeup of the building in particular corners. They illustrate the material wrapping around interior and exterior showing the two distinct characteristics for the public (chared larch) and private (larch). A contrast of cold to warm.

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1

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4

5 6

7 8 9 10 11

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Technology Report

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15 16

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Top window - stack ventilation Steel ‘I’ beams Insulation Siberian larch - cladding Timber batten - vertical Timber batten - horizontal Charred larch - cladding Alluminium flashing Fire protection Concrete slab with metal deck inside Wood fibre board - sheathing insulation Pine timber flooring Concrete - block and beam Plaster board White brick Block work Concrete slab in situ

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1:5 Model

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A 1:5 model is made on the cantilevered corner to study the makeup of the detail. The material and technology also closely understood behind the making of the model

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05

P2.4

ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE ALIEN (1979) [Film inspriation] Alien [Director of film inspriation] Ridley Scott [Film made] BLUE LIGHT [Group] Amabelle, Simon, Crissy, Alice, Gul, Kenny

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INTRO In Engineering experience, the film Alien particularly focused on our group. Alien is a science fiction film where Darko Suvin suggest as making ‘cognitive estrangement’ where the scenes in the movie allow the viewers to conceptualise the realistic and fiction simultaneously from views to scenes. In the film, the spaceship is essentially spatially abstract and un-human due to the scale of an alien spacecraft being drastically different from any human scale.

The segment of the film we are mainly inspired by was during the exploration of the crew in the alien spaceship, the feeling of uncanny and uncertainty of the unknown was particularly fascinating. Therefore we will be creating our version of a film that represents a similar feeling. In response, we created the Blue Light, a film that explored the change in scale, material and light as a spaceman pursue the unknow drawn by the colour blue. A maquette and a final installation were also built for the exhibition day where the audience can experience the qualities of the film in a 1:1 scale

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Story Board Of Alien

Film Analysis Sketching the scenes from Alien made us realise how to capture and compose the experience of uncanny, uncertainty, through close-ups, pans shots and the use of darkness. Lighting predominantly came from the crew and the reflection of texture from the head torch, another source was the blue mist at the bottom of the drop.

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Alien, a play in scale, light and texture to create the fictional imaginary world parallel to the alien. The vast darkness of the film was crucial in creating the feeling of uncanny

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STORYBOARD

Storyboard The narrative of the story is about the curiosity of the spaceman walking towards the blue light. As the spaceman approaches closer to the blue mist, light camera movement and audio will alter. Sketching the storyboard broke down the critical scenes into more mini-stages that bridge the key scenes together. The yellow arrows indicate the movement of the camera.

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Composition of key scenes Sketching the scenes from Alien made us realise how to capture and compose the experience of uncanny, uncertainty, through close-ups, pans shots and the use of darkness. Lighting predominantly came from the crew and the reflection of texture from the head torch, another source was the blue mist at the bottom of the drop.

Above: Composition sketch 65


Exterior View

Point Of View

Cinematic Scale

1:1 Scale

Storyboard The narrative of the story is about the curiosity of the spaceman walking towards the blue light. As the spaceman approaches closer to the blue mist, light camera movement and audio will alter. Sketching the storyboard broke down the critical scenes into more mini-stages that bridge the key scenes together. The yellow arrows indicate the movement of the camera.

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Landscape

Time

Cave

Alien Spaceship

Texture Texture changes according to time throughout the film and the installation. As the spaceman approaches closer to the blue mist the texture changes from

organic landscapes (calm) to uneven lumps (strange) and mechanical (fear). The transformation of texture displays the transition from the familiar to the foreign.

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Maquette The maquette from the installation was also an essential part of the filmmaking. The space helmet will be worn and during the experience of the installation simulating the exact moment in the film when the spaceman looks down the gorge. The maquette was also a tool for shooting different angles, creating a diverse cinematic film.

Top left to bottom right: maquttee concept, view from under, view from the side, maquette installation testing 68


Top left to bottom right: Beginning, First view of the spaceman, Texture of the cave, Drop zone 69


EXHIBITION DAY

SOUND

TOUCH

SIGHT

Installation The Installation is set up with six different texture that creates the experience of the film from familiar to foreign. We focused on enhancing the three senses sound, touch and sight, whereby the viewer can walk through the installation with the space helmet and look down the gorge which mimics the exact feelings of the spaceman in the film.

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Engineering experience


SOUND

TOUCH

Blue Light

SIGHT

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06 P2.5

EXPLORING EXPERIENCE BELL MAKING WORKSHOP AND FOUNDRY [Location] Kings Gate Bridge, Durham, England [Material Focus] Material [Building] Public [Main Programs] Atrium, workshop, foundry, gallery, educational space

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Exploring experience


APOLOGIA Exploring Experience is a project that focuses on the experience the public has of the building. The design respects the surrounding context of nature and to celebrate the bell making process as it has a rich history with its religion in Durham. Therefore a festival route is designed to celebrate the religion Durham holds closely to. The aim of the building is to provide experiences for the public to learn about bell making but also to connect to nature through inhabiting the building. The projects span seven weeks of design and two weeks of integrated technology. Nature is slowly disappearing in Durham and in the design the building works closely with nature by incorporating the theory of blending in nature and the rhythm of the bell. The building blends into nature by mimicking the surrounding forms, tree. The cantilever structure performs and holds similar aesthetic values to a tree. The building also blurs the exterior and interior spaces together by having firstly an atrium, that gives a new scene for the skyline and secondly viewing docks, which overlooks the sculpture park and the forest in the south and finally curtain walls that provides a panoramic view of nature. Rhythm is also integrated into the design by the wall of rhythm translated from the cathedral noon bell ringing.

In this project, interior spatial qualities became an approach to the design philosophy. Keyspaces such as the atrium, workshop and foundry hold an essential value to the overall design concept. I then took a response on transitioning the theory into model making and drawings to show the experience throughout the building and the thinking behind the design. Therefore, this also lead me to find, how vital the concept model was regarding completing the theory of nature and rhythm.

Exploring experience

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Residential areas

Goverment

Main public transportation

Water

Churches

Education

Business areas

Main roads

Green areas

SITE

Above: Durham neighbourhood buildings 74

Exploring experience


Man Made Metal 70%

Pedestrian Foot Paths

Nature 30%

Auto

Sun Path

Wind Path

Durham site analysis After analysing Durhams neighbourhood and it’s context, I found out that Metal is a dominant material in the city, in comparison to nature the ratio of both elements is 7 to 3. Suggesting that nature is slowly disappearing from the city. Religion associates closely to nature and heavily embedded into the city’s culture in all ages. Thus a religious festival will be integrated into the future of Durham to celebrate the religion while reinforcing the importance of nature.

Exploring experience

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WAT ER

CUR REN T

FLO

WIN

G IN

HEART OF DURHAM

FLO

WIN

B

GO

UT

ROADS TO MARKET PLACE

S E G RID

BRID

GES

CATHEDRAL CURRENT

The similar form of the human heart and Durhams peninsula sparks the creation of the festival route. Where the the blood and circulation flows fluidly towards the Cathedral.

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Exploring experience


Farmwell gate bridge - festival poster

Elvet bridge - festival poster

Prebends bridge - festival poster

Kingsgate bridge - festival poster

Festival In the entry to the peninsula, every bridge will have activity throughout the festival where it then leads to the cathedral courtyard where the main celebration takes place. Bell making workshop locates under Kingsgate bridge. This, therefore, will be the building programme this project revolved around.

Exploring experience

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BELL MAKING PROCESS

Manufacturing process diagram

Making The process of bell making is divided into six stages, crafting the wax mould, adding runners and risers, dipping the mould in the sand and liquid slur repeatedly, firing in the kiln to melt the wax and finally pouring the moulding metal in the mould. I also attempted bell making with plaster and found an interesting relationship of form from the bell and the negative.

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Exploring experience


Top left to bottom right: Cracking mold for negative, negative, pouring plaster to mould, pouring plaster to moud, Neagative with wax bell template Exploring experience

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Site sketch

Upward perspective

Downward perspective

Site The site is situated inder the Kings gate bridge opposite the dunlem house. The site is populate with greenery and concrete architecture. During the site visit I was particularly intrested in the upward and downward perspective where both is dominated by natrue and the blue sky and river.

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Exploring experience


Top to bottom: Kings gate bridge and greenery, Movement of people from dunlem house and greenery, Greenery, Dunlem house views to site Exploring experience

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CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

Tree

Gallery

Treellery

Tree The site is populated with trees and therefore the building proposed to perform structually and awesthestically like a tree, therefore blending within the enviroment, maintaining the upward perspective of the site

Bridging in and out By blending and bringing in the greenery into the building the sense of outside and inside merges. Placing a green roof on the top of the building meant the architecture is not taking away nature because it has replaced the excavated ground on the roof.

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Recording of Durham Cathedral bell ringing 12:00PM

compressions and rarefactions

Air particals

Walls of rhythm

Rhythm The rhythm of Durham Cathedral bell ringing at noon is recorded and translated through the sound waves and particles to the walls of rhythm. The repetitive walls across the facade also frame and limits the sight of nature in a formless manner like an organic organism.

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Primary Use Secondary Use

Design Workshop

Storage and display.

Bell Making

Extraction Workshop

Foundry

Office

Work Space

Education Space

Gallery

Public Space

Cafe

Kitchen

Kitchen

Scheduel of accomodations Each program is calculated to accomodate a certain ammount of people who inhabits the specific accomodations with the ease of movement. This is then tested on iterations for the massing of the entire building.

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Exploring experience


Attempt 2

Attempt 3

Circulation

Cantilever

Seperate accomodations

Bell proccess

Attempt 1

Iterations Each stage of the massing I’ve added more context which guided me to a rough form, however on the last itteration model it still felt a lack of thought and rigour. This then lead me to further develope the building with even more context with the methodology approach.

Exploring experience

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Concept and Development I first attempted to focus on the gallery but found that many schedules of accommodation do not fit well next to each other, the second attempt resulted in an atrium as a hybrid space that connects the accommodations. The atrium then interestingly fitted well with the bell model where the negative guides the atrium form.

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Exploring experience


Bell To Atrium Concept Model

Left to right top row: Bubble diagram I, Bubble diagram II, Metal bell cast, Negative space, Bell into Atrium, Negative into stairs

Exploring experience

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METHODOLOGY

Site

Bell

The site sits on a steep hill with well-populated greenery. A

The bell atrium is positioned directly in the centre of the stair,

staircase connects the bottom of the hill to the top with the Kings

to connect the programmes. It also introduces a new way of

gate bridge hovering about the site linking the Dunelm house to

viewing the skyline.

the peninsula.

Sunlight and gallery

Structure

Twisting the layers from the origin of the bell, according to the

Both cantilevers will be supported by the tree-like trunks

sunlight and views. A gallery is added in the south benefiting

which blend in with the surrounding nature.

the natural light and views to nature.

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Exploring experience


Programme

Uplift

The programs placed parallel to the staircase, and it is opened

By uplifting a layer, the horizontal greenery is preserved, this

at the bottom to create a stack ventilation.

also allows the top layer to become a viewing deck for the surrounding nature.

Rhythm of walls

Journey

Durhams cathedral’s noon bell ringing is translated into the

The concrete wall is placed at the entrance following down

rhythm of walls which wraps around the facade of the existing

the stairs to limit the vision to nature. A green roof is also

form. While mimicking the verticality of trees.

incorporated to strengthen the concept of nature.

Exploring experience

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FOUNDRY LEVEL

GROUND LEVEL

Plans

All four floors are connected by the atrium which is like the heart of the building producing the beat of rhythm to the building. On the foundry level, visitors can watch the bell being made in front of them. On the ground floor, there is the reception and the sitting area underneath the atrium, a bell ringing call can also be taken in the outdoor space undeath the south cantilever. On the Education Level

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Exploring experience


EDUCATION LEVEL

BRIDGE LEVEL student, and the visitors can learn about the history and the bell making process before attempting the workshop. On the Bridge level, the gallery is on the south and the workshop on the east where the rhythm wall is clad around, where the views populate the viewer with nature. Access for disability is incorporated into the plans with a central lift running up to the roof.

Exploring experience

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Sectional Perspective

Durham Lumiere

Sections The connection of nature and the public in public is majority vertical, with vertical views to the sky in the atrium and workshop. Also viewing docks merging the inside and nature into one. A thick concrete wall runs diagonally upwards simulating the bell. This achieves the acoustic of a bell. At night the building is lit a following the cathedrals bell ringing beats.

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Exploring experience


The musical chimes of the bell ring from the inside out at night serenading the city with each beat of white light.

Exploring experience

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Void or circulation

Green roof

Workshop

Outdoor sitting area Office Uni-sex Toilet Reading area

Sculpture park

Gallery Elevator Educational space Viewing platform Reception Atrium break out space Notice board Sand and liquid Slur Workshop Plant room

Foundry

Viewing area for foundry

Axonometric structual and programme diagram

Programme and structure The programmes of the building primarily structure around the atrium where it connects everything. Secondly, the decisions are made by the workflow of bell making.

Above: Axo-nometric of building program and structure 94

Exploring experience


Section AA

Section BB

Section CC

DD

CC

BB

AA

Section DD

Exploring experience

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From top left to right bottom : Inner stair case perspective, Outer stair case perspective, Atrium perspective, Facade perspective right side: 1:50 Technical section model


Exploring the building in 1:50 gave an insight into the moments that can be created for the public to inhabit in. Light, form and views played key roles in the design proccess.

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Studio And Workshop

Foundry

Interior workshop and foundry perspective In the workshop the walls of rhythm are angled purposefully to have views towards nature, it almost feels like there isn’t any wall. The foundry can be exhibited by visitors to understand bell making in the steamy and noisy foundry.

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Exploring experience


Entry Perspective From River Level

The organic and rigorous form resulted in a un human-made nor natural design, a place where it sits comfortably in between river wear and the peninsula 1:100 Model Of Cantilever

Outdoor perspective and cantilever structure The cantilever structure has developed in various forms as the building structure aims to mimic trees in the surrounding. Therefore, lead me to the final development of two angled steel columns which mimics the nature but also the Kings gate bridge.

Exploring experience

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Bell atrium

Bell atrium One of the key spaces in the building is the atrium, and it runs through from the ground floor to the roof, the interior of the bell made of corten steel with rectangle gaps which symbol the musical notes played by the bell. The other side of the corten steel is a staircase that runs along and up to the roof.

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1:500 Site Model

1:200 Model

Model

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P2.5

The Natural landscape of the hill and populated trees was particularlly importantin in terms of the building responce. This resulted was a central point (atrium) as an origin for the programs to twist and form the final design. It sits facing the Dunelm House with viewes out towards to the nature

right side : Building entrance perspective Exploring experience


The organic and rigorous form resulted in a un human-made nor natural design, a place where it sits comfortably in between river wear and the peninsula P2.5

Exploring experience

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07 P2.6

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Intergrated design


INTERGRATED TECHNOLOGY BELL MAKING WORKSHOP AND FOUNDRY [Location] Kings Gate Bridge, Durham, England [Material Focus] Material [Building] Public [Main Programs] Atrium, workshop, foundry, gallery, educational space

Integrated technology follows the project exploring experience, where the project focuses on the experiential details, strategies and environment. Through modelling, diagram and details the technology should be explored through material and structure.

Intergrated design

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1:50 MODEL

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Intergrated design


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16

17 18 19 20

21 22 23

24

1. Roof vent 2. Granite, sand, gravel base 3. Oldroyd TP filter 4. Drainage layer 5. Water proof membrane 6. Counter flashing 7. Artifical Light 8. Steel beam 9. Corten steel - atrium inner wall 10. Sink fixing 11. Void in concrete for service 12. Reinforcement 13. Stair case fitting into concrete 14. Metal decking 15. Steel bracing frame 16. Double glazed glass 17. Flashing 18. Compact sand 19. Crushed rock 20. Perforated pipe foundation drain 21. Heating pipes - ground source 22. Soil 23. Base slab footing 24. Pile foundation

Intergrated design

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Material through a key space The atrium’s interior is corten steel that exdends from floor to ceiling holded up by the steel frames befind. A primary circulation with rusted chrome treads is used to enhance the acoustic values of the experience. on the outer layer a thick concrete wall is positioned to display the heavyness of the bell.

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Intergrated design


Clear glass roof

Clear Glass Corten steel inner layer

Corten Steel

Steel frame structure

Steel

Circulation from ground floor to roof

Rusted Chrome

Thick concrete walls

Concrete

Ground Floor

Intergrated design

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Structure and enviroment By incorporating sustabillity strategies, it lowers the carbon emission of the building but also informs the public about sustainability. Natural stack ventilation happens in the building due to the atrium void. Natural sunlight can also reflect into the ground floor due to the atrium. Ground source heat pump is used to create a comfortable temperature during winter. Water harvesting system is also utilized to drain toilets, Further implications in the future can be photovoltaic cells or sun panels.

Above: Stuctual axonometric diagram 110

Intergrated design


3 4

2

6

1

5 Day Time And Summer

9

8

10 7

11 Night Time And Winter

In number order: 1) Warm air during the day 2) Future “add-ons� Solar panels 3) Summer and Winter sun 4) Cool thermal mass rising 5) Warm air rising from Foundry 6) Reflected light 7) Cool air during night time 8) Thermal stacking 9) Collecting water for draining toilets 10) radiant floor, from ground source heat pump 11) Ground source loop

Above: Stuctual axonometric diagram Intergrated design

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08 P2.2

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Intergrated design


CRAFTING ARCHITECTURE WORKSHOP AND PRACTICE [workshops] Site analysis, Diagramming, Detail, Structure

Intergrated design

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SITE READING WORKSHOP

Long section of Bewick Court -Left

Outcome During the site reading workshop, the objective was to imagine a sectional cut through of the building Bewick court located in the city centre of Newcastle. The Sectional drawings were rough, but at points, I focused on recording the details of windows, plants and people, especially on the upper level. It gave me an insight into the rhythms of the area, people walking in and out of the building, going into the shops, couples sitting on the bench. While the cluster of transportation rushes under the bridge, where it almost feels like an earthquake on the upper level. I enjoy this workshop especially because we get to stay at the location for a long time and therefore I had a chance to feel the rhythm and movement of the area.

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Long section of Bewick Court -Middle

Long section of Bewick Court - right

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SITE READING SKILLS IN PRACTICE

Rhythm of Site - Home in the City P2.3.3

Outcome Taking the interest of rhythm of the site analysis, I focused on the next two design project, Home in the city and Engineering experience to keep working and drawing the rhythm of the site during the site visit. I developed the drawing style on images or mapping of the location. Where I record as much information that I could as sentences or words in the drawing, a direct response from mind to hand. As a result, these based the fundamental and the starting points of my concept for the projects. It was mainly used entirely in Leith where I started to understand the behaviour of the site regarding inhabitants which I found that, Leith docks have a negative affordance to many around the place. Building drawing study - Home in the City P2.3.3

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Movement and ecology stufy of Edinburgh - Home in the City

Sound of alley Way In Central Edinburgh - Home in the City

P2.3.3

P2.3.3

site drawing - Exploring Experience P.5

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DIAGRAM WORKSHOP

Concept and circulation diagramming

Outcome During the diagramming workshop, I went with the initial ideas of the design. In the workshop, I learnt many different ways to diagram a concept or idea. A diagram is where we communicate with the viewers with the least amount of information to show the concept or ideas we are trying to portray. The workshop gave me an understanding of the variations of diagrams such as the circulation diagram and programme diagram to show the building uses in a pure form. The diagram workshop is my favourite workshop as it taught me how to produce images in a way that is less but more. Dimention of diagramming

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Primary circulation axonometric diagramming

Primary circulation diagramming

Program diagraming

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DIAGRAM SKILLS IN PRACTICE

Concept Diagram - Home in the City P2.3.3

Outcome Taking the understanding and skills from the diagramming workshop, I then made it further and developed the diagrams show my scheme in an attractive representation. I graphically designed the conceptual diagrams into a representation for presentation. They show the concept of identity and familiarity where unique volumes come together to a building and a primary circulation punching through space. I also made a model a rough circulation model to show the concept of primary circulation running through the building, horizontally and vertically shown in red. I further developed the program diagramme where I inhabited the diagram with uses and technology. At the end of the project, I created sustainability diagrams of water harvesting system and underfloor heating which proved a somewhat strong understanding of the viewers. overall the workshop has pushed me to understand diagrams and the effect it has regarding transferring information. Circulation model - Home in the City P2.3.3

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Sustainability diagram - Home in the city P2.3.3

Programme diagram- Home in the City P2.3.3

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DETAIL WORKSHOP

Details of concrete walls with service

Outcome During the workshop, we mainly discussed the detail junctions between various, but we drew upon particularly on the corner where the thick concrete wall meets the floor deck on every floor. We developed a scheme where sustainability incorporates into the detail such as a (ground source heat pump) pipes running along the concrete walls, but also to release heat out under seating areas. We also discuss the light that enters the building from the top of the atrium and shines on the staircase that runs parallel to the curved wall. Through the workshop learned the technology behind the construction of the wall and floor makeup, which influences the experience but also has a vital role in the sustainability roles. light entering the stair well detail sketch

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DETAIL SKILLS IN PRACTICE 16

1 2 3

17

4 5

18

6

19

7

20

8 9 21

10 11

22

12 13

23

14 15

24

Details of concrete walls - Exploring Experience P2.5

Outcome Taking the understanding from the detailed workshop, I then created details that fit into the scheme. I developed the details especially with the thick concrete wall where I sculpted areas out to create spaces where it can be inhabited such as the sink. I remained the sustainable strategy of ground source heat pump on top of the concrete slabs whereby give a comfortable temperature during summer and winter. The structure also developed into more of an accurate representation in the material and beams.

1. Roof vent 2. Granite, sand, gravel base 3. Oldroyd TP filter 4. Drainage layer 5. Water proof membrane 6. Counter flashing 7. Artifical Light 8. Steel beam 9. Corten steel - atrium inner wall 10. Sink fixing 11. Void in concrete for service 12. Reinforcement 13. Stair case fitting into concrete 14. Metal decking 15. Steel bracing frame 16. Double glazed glass 17. Flashing 18. Compact sand 19. Crushed rock 20. Perforated pipe foundation drain 21. Heating pipes - ground source 22. Soil 23. Base slab footing 24. Pile foundation Keys for Details- Exploring Experience P2.5

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STRUCTUAL WORKSHOP

Ground sound heat pump and structual sketches

Outcome During the workshop, we focused on sketching the atrium construction from floor to roof and how the tapering walls are going to attach to the foundation. A cross bracing on the floor plate was suggested to create opportunities for the randomness of vertical beams. A sustainability diagram on the atrium was also drawn to show how stack ventilation can happen, and also how the ground source heat pump can integrate with the floor slabs. The workshop was beneficial regarding giving me a foundation of knowledge to work on for the final representation. Structure diagram with I beams and tappering wall

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STRUCTUAL SKILLS IN PRACTICE

Sustainability strategy - Intergrated Technology P2.6

Structual axonometric diagram - Intergrated Technology P2.6

Outcome Learning from the structured workshop, I then developed the atrium structure in the axonometric drawings showing materials and construction. A 1:50 architectural drawing is also developed from the sketches from the workshop in a detailed manner showing the I beams, foundation, and how the thick concrete walls work together with the building. Sustainability diagram also shows how the structure works together within the building and how sustainability and services perform as an entity. 1:50 structual model- Intergrated Technology P2.6

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NON - DESIGN

126


MODULE COURSEWORK

127


ARC2009 ARCHITECTURE TECHNOLOGY

128


129


ARC2024 ABOUT ARCHITECTURE

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ARC2010 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

134


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ARC2009 DISSERTATION PROPOSAL

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09

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Non-architecture competition


NON ARCHITECTURE COMPETITION “A THOUGHT EXPERIMENT IN DANCE” [Location] Anywhere [Group] Edward Benedict Yan, Tobias Evan Himawan, Tam Yun Tak Kenny [Result] Top 100

To dance is to express one’s self through the one’s movements, often with or against a rhythm. Dance as a collective is far more interesting. Individual points ebb and flow in and out of sync. Points of similar natures are able to resonant together, creating swells. Points of dissimilar natures create tension. Both interactions are dynamic. As a collective, we create infinite relationships, we are a tide. The internet of everything extends far beyond physical gadgets. It has amalgamated into our movements, into our rhythms. We have become the rhythm and space of this condition. The wristband elevates individuals, conditions, communities, apps, vices all into this phenomenon of dance. We transcend the limits of hard realities, and dance can become the means to explore the abstract. Song of songs, dance of dances. Dance transcends space and time, language and boundaries. The movements speak to the soul, not the mind. We have created a spaceless space and timeless time, a marginal space if you will, in the reality that is dance. Instead of asking what does dance say or how does dance feel? Perhaps one should instead ask, why does dance dance? Let’s get schwifty.

Non-architecture competition

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PRESENTATION

FUNC

Tam Yun Tak Kenny

Tobias Evan


CTION

n Himawan

TECHNOLOGY Edward Benedict Yan

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THANK YOU

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academic portfolio 2017-18  
academic portfolio 2017-18  
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