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D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8 · Vo l u m e 1 2 1 : I s s u e 4

Pa g e 1 2 El d e r Co o k vi si ts a n d c o u n s e l s BY U – Hawai i

Page 28 A Mus lim c o nvert shares her sto ry

THE LEADER

Page 54 Students s ay Christ sho u l d b e at the c enter o f Chri st ma s


DECEMBER 2018 • VOLUME 121 • ISSUE 4

ADVISOR Le e A n n Lam ber t MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISTS Mackenzie Beaver Tomson Cheang Mason Cole Shannon Crowley Geena De Maio Elijah Hadley

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Antoniette Yee COPY EDITORS Anuhea Chen Dani Castro Brooklyn Redd VIDEOGRAPHERS Kel sy Si m m ons Pui Hang Yau

Esther Insigne

ART & GRAPHICS

Bruno Maynez

Lynne Hardy

Noah Shoaf Jemesa Snuka Haeley van der Werf PHOTOGRAPHERS C ame ro n Gardner

M cKenna Locken ART DIRECTOR Wesl ey Ng MANAGING EDITOR Em i ly Hal l s

C had Hsi eh Ho Yi n Li

NEW S CE N T ER BOX 1920 BYUH LAIE, HI 96762 PRINTER P r int Ser vi ces

CONTACT

Email: keal akai @by u h. edu Phone: (80 8 ) 6 7 5 -3 6 9 4 Fax: (8 0 8 ) 6 7 5 -3 4 9 1 Office: BYU –Hawai i Al oha Cent er 1 3 4

Editorial, photo submissions & Distribution inquiries: ke a l a k a i @ by u h . e d u . To s u b s c r i b e t o t h e R S S F E E D

ON THE COVER: Lina Legoretta holding a Book of Mormon in front of the little circle. Photo by Chad Hsieh

o r t o v i e w a d d i t i o n a l a r t i c l e s , go t o ke a l a k a i . by u h . e d u

ABO UT US

The Ke Alaka‘i began publishing the same year the university, then called Church College of Hawaii, opened. It has continued printing for more than 60 years. The name means “the leader” in Hawaiian. It began as a monthly newsletter, evolved into a weekly newspaper, then a weekly magazine, and is now a monthly news magazine with a website and a social media presence. Today a staff of about 25 students works to provide information for BYU–Hawaii’s campus ohana and Laie’s community.

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P H OTO SU BMISSIO N The Laie Hawaii Temple reflecting on the pool of water outside the visitor’s center during sunset. Photo by Cameron Gardner

Share your photo with us and we may feature it in our next issue. E-mail us your high-resolution photo with a caption at kealakai@byuh.edu

F O L LO W U S AR O U ND THE WE B

KEA LA KA I.B YUH .EDU

DECEMB ER 2018

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DECEMBER 2018 • VOLUME 121 • ISSUE 4

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Campus Comment: When do you think Christmas should actually begin?

CAMPUS LIFE

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Day in the life of hospitality and tourism management major Damon Kumar

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New film class aims to find parallels between cinema and cities

12

Elder Quentin L. Cook visits and gives counsel to BYU–Hawaii

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Shaka Steel performs with other music groups for a night of diverse music

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Students participate in the annual Makahiki Hawaiian games

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How to successfully apply for an internship at BYUH

12

Clutch Prep, an online tutoring service,

22 provides study materials for students

The Voice Program is a comfortable space

24 for students to practice English FEATURE

28 Lina Legoretta shares her conversion story The Duerdens tell how steel drumming

32 brought them together

Chinese convert travels 26 hours

34 round-trip to attend church 4

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C A L E N D A R

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Social entrepreneurship expert Paul Wilson share business tips

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Senior Lita Bourne creates program to help international students adjust to campus life

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Religion teacher Elder Esplin finishes his mission

42

Savannah Tobey creates tails for real life mermaids

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Graduation speaker Kekaila Ah Puck looks back at her BYUH experience

CHRISTMAS

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The Tanners emphasize the need to remember Christ at Christmas

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Infographic: The Legend of the Candy Cane

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How Christ is depicted in art

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Remembering the real meaning of Christmas

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Students share their Christmas traditions around the world

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The Light of the World campaign inspires members for the third year

DECEMBER

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SUNDAY First Presidency Christmas Devotional at 7 p.m. in the CAC

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THURSDAY Piano Major’s Recital at 7:30 p.m. in the McKay Auditorium

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THURSDAY Gahee Kim Senior Vocal Recital at 9 p.m. in the Little Theatre

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FRIDAY Fall 2018 Commencement from 9:30 a.m. to noon in the CAC

Dec. 14 - Jan. 9 No classes- Christmas Break

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SATURDAY Winter Splash! from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Flag Circle

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MONDAY Christmas Eve

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TUESDAY Christmas Day

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MONDAY New Year’s Eve

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Campus Comment: When do you think Christmas should actually begin—the music, shopping, and decorating? by Mackenzie Beaver / Photos by Chad Hsieh

SERA HONE, a junior from Utah studying communications, said,

“Christmas begins Nov. 1, 110 percent. I love Christmas, and I would listen to Christmas music year-round if it was socially acceptable.”

LINDSEY TERRY, a freshman from Washington studying art, said, “Christmas begins

in the middle of November, that way, it is not overbearing. Technically it is still fall, so I like to enjoy the fall months. I actually keep my Christmas stuff up a little after Christmas—I like to enjoy the winter season.”

SETH TIBUNGCOG, a sophomore from the Philippines studying business, said, “Back home

we start in September when the ‘-ber’ months begin, and I think that is a lot of fun. Everyone loves it and the countdown to December. I grew up this way, so I personally think we should start celebrating in September.”

SAMUEL ANDERSEN, a freshman from California studying political science, said,

“Christmas begins the day after Thanksgiving—that is how I did it growing up. It is tradition. Back home in California, we cut down our Christmas tree the day after Thanksgiving and set it up. I’m from a small town, so the day after Thanksgiving there is always a huge Christmas festival, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Graphic by McKenna Locken 6

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KENNETH FRANCIS, a sophomore from Japan studying psychology, said, “Christmas music and

decorations should definitely begin after Thanksgiving. That way there is less confusion, and we actually know what we are getting ourselves into. Plus, this way, people won’t forget about Thanksgiving.”

ENKHMYAGMAR ERDENETSOGT, a senior from Mongolia studying communications, said,

“I feel that Christmas should start at the end of November—that way it allows people to get more excited for Christmas, rather than let it get dragged out for super long.”


campus life

in this section A rundown of resources at BYUH for those seeking an internship

20

Day in the life of hospitality and tourism management major Damon Kumar

8

A more efficient way to study math and science with Clutch Prep

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New course Cinema and the City will take a new look on film

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Students and volunteers express love for the Voice Program

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Elder Quentin L. Cook shares five principles for personal righteousness

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Shaka Steel and other music groups join together for performance

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Students learn about Hawaiian culture through the Makahiki games

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CA M P US LIFE

Damon Kumar

Hospitality and tourism management major B Y M A S ON COLE

Photo by Cameron Gardner

Damon Kumar, a senior from Fiji majoring in hospitality and tourism management, said he hopes to take his educational background to his home country and expand the tourism industry there.

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What makes your major unique? Kumar said his major is unique because people learn aspects from every area of the industry. “While I was interning at the Sheraton in Fiji, I had the opportunity to really experience my future day-to-day first hand.” “There was a specific instance in my last month at the HR Department during my internship that I organized interviews and screened candidates.”

What do you want to do with it?

What made you decide on HTM as your major? “I am from Fiji and there is a lot of tourism there. I want to go back and... give back to my community. It is important to contribute, whether here, on the mainland, or back at home.” Kumar said his area of study is going to allow him to make a living working in a field he loves, due to his immediate contact with other people and ability to create a positive environment.

Favorite part of the studies?

Kumar said he hopes to take his educational background to his home country and expand the tourism business there. “I want to become a general manger for a hotel in Fiji when I graduate. I also want a restaurant of my own in the future. Before I settle down, I want to travel and maybe try consulting with other businesses.”

Kumar said he spends anywhere from five to eight hours a day on his courses. He also works until midnight as security for the Polynesian Cultural Center. Despite his heavy work load, he said, “Being able to illustrate all of the skills I have learned in the classroom [and] translate to the workplace makes it all worthwhile for me.”

Pros:

Cons:

“I know there are lots of hotels and tourists coming into Fiji, and I know it would be a good opportunity for me to find a job at home.” He explained how the ability to understand and work in a multitude of different environments is a challenge he feels prepared for because of his schooling and experience.

“A lot of the tourism and hospitality in Fiji is managed by foreigners. I hope my work experience from academic training in combination with my theoretical knowledge from my schooling will be enough, or else I’ll have to start at the bottom.”

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Introducing a new perspective in film New course, Cinema and the City, aims to connect students back to why film is important B Y JE M E SA SN U KA

Graphic by McKenna Locken 10

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inema and the City, the newest film course at BYU–Hawaii, will be taught by Professor Mason Allred in Winter 2019 on Tuesdays and Thursdays in hopes of bringing the concept of how film can bring people together. The new film course centers around the idea that both cinemas and cities have historically brought diverse people together, while simultaneously shaping experience and ways of seeing, according to Allred, a communications and media professor. When asked about the new course, Allred said he hopes students will understand how film affects people both collectively and individually. He explained, “We will be thinking and discussing the history of vision and how architecture, the built environment, and cinematic media have packaged and influenced how we see urbanity and by extension often how we feel about it. We will be looking at themes like modernity, crime, mass media, industrialization, gender, race and rhythm as they are connected to cities and cinema.” He shared how film is an art form, the same way people create paintings on canvas. Allred said it is a way in which individuals can express who they are, and the course aims to explain how it can also express a body of people. Aside from just the film aspect of the class, he said the city part is equally important. Hannah Howells, a junior from Utah studying biology, explained what she thought movies did for individuals expressing socially. “Movies offer an artistic escape to experience many things we would not usually. We are able to feel a sense of adventure or thrill without major financial, time-consuming side effects. It spreads stories, fact, and fiction, while helping to educate society.” Allred commented about his goals for the “in the city” part of the study. “I am particularly interested in having students from a variety of places de-familiarize their urban experiences and examine them alongside the representation of various cities through some fantastic films. I hope the films, readings, and discussions will also inspire us to live, envision, and design our future worlds with more care and creativity.” He explained how even though many people think film is a dying medium, it still holds true to many of the things that make it popular. Films continue to always explain situations, and they constantly are based on metaphors, as well as conversations people have in society. People often ask if film is a representation of what others see in the world, or if it is individuals putting real life into the things they see from cinema. This course will help define both reasons why this occurs, as well as helping to invoke an emotional response for both things. The course

“Rather than defaulting into passive audience members, we can actively engage with the films— dissect them, recognize their detailed construction, praise, reject, or even be inspired by them.” -Professor Mason Allred, communications and media professor

will also aim to reignite much of what makes a good film. It hopes to explain both the art of film and what can really move an audience, since people do not gather in the cinema as much as they used to. Movies help unite those people who otherwise would never interact with each other. Gabriela McFarlane, a junior from Utah studying biomedicine, said, “Movies are important to society because they have the unique ability to unite different groups of people through shared emotions and ideas. Movies convey thoughts, ideals, and themes in a way that cannot always be expressed through simple conversation” Allred said he hopes this class is engaging to others and not just his students. He said he also wants to create an environment where students will become engaged with what cinema does for the human spirit. Allred concluded, “Rather than defaulting into passive audience members, we can actively engage with the films—dissect them, recognize their detailed construction, praise, reject, or even be inspired by them. Even as we critically examine films to help become better human beings and pursue truth, I would hope we could also maintain the capacity to let ourselves be immersed—to fall in love with cinema over and over again.” Cinema and the City will begin next semester. It is listed as the class “Film 365” and can be used for the humanities and communications majors. •

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Elder Cook emphasized, “Righteous day-to-day consecrated effort is better than occasional heroic actions.” Photo by Ho Yin Li

Resolve to make righteous choices

Elder Quentin L. Cook counsels people to study the gospel and understand daily righteous living makes an eternal difference B Y E L I JAH H AD L E Y

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The Concert Choir sings “Hosanna” to the student body and community during the devotional. Photo by Monique Saenz

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hrough five principles and relevant stories, Elder Quentin L. Cook, member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, emphasized ways BYU–Hawaii students and others can make righteous choices. Cook explained his personal connection to the Pacific Islands. “I love the diversity of students who attend this great institution. As a new general authority, I served two years in the Philippines and three years in the Pacific Islands. I gained a greater love and appreciation for your part of the world.” After the BYUH Concert Choir opened the Nov. 20 devotional singing “Hosanna,” BYUH President John S. Tanner asked the audience, “Don’t you brothers and sisters feel like shouting ‘Hosanna’ being here on this beautiful day, in the presence of one of the members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles?”

Cook began, “Brothers and sisters, it’s a great pleasure for President Tanner, my wife Mary, and me to join you and the students and faculty of BYU–Hawaii. I commend you, wonderful students, for what you are accomplishing. BYU–Hawaii is an outstanding university, and maintains the highest standards in academics and spirituality. Many sacrifices allow you to be here. Thank them as well.” He continued, “Your experience here at BYUH and the education that you are receiving prepares you for the righteousness and unity you must have in the future.” Cook than shared five principles with the audience that he said “will contribute to your success in faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, righteousness, and knowledge.” THE FIVE PRINCIPLES:

1.

To enthusiastically and righteously con-

tinue your quest for knowledge. Cook shared the story of Hans Sloane, and how his constant search for greater knowledge and understanding led to him to invent milk chocolate. “Sloane experimented with cocoa by mixing it with milk and honey. He mixed the cocoa with milk and sugar and found that it was delicious. What is most interesting to me is that Sloane used much of that money to collect herbs and other specimens and donated them to what would one day be the British Museum.” 2. Righteous choices matter. Cook shared an example of the Sesame Street character Cookie Monster, where, after winning a quiz show, he could choose between getting a new house one month later, getting a new car one week later, or a delicious cookie immediately. “We laugh at this,” Cook said, “but the choices we make are critical. They are the key

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Elder Cook said he commends BYUH students for maintaining high standards both academically and spiritually. Photos by Ho Yin Li

to our future and our happiness. We are the sum total of all the choices we make.” 3. Righteous day-to-day consecrated effort is better than occasional heroic actions. “A friend of mine commented that when he was student at BYU, he thought of consecrating his life in one grand, heroic gesture. He came to realize that consecration is not a once-in-a-lifetime event. It is a daily devotion. “When I was young myself, I too wanted to prove myself through some heroic gesture. My great-grandfather was one of the young men who helped carry pioneers across the Sweetwater [River]. That sounded like the sort of consecration for me. “It would be equally heroic today to follow the prophet by serving people daily, studying from the scriptures, and helping to gather scattered Israel on both sides of the veil.”

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4. To be strong and immovable in matters of righteousness. “It is essential that we place faith in our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ at the center of our lives. My mission president had me memorize a statement that has stayed with me all my life. There is no chance, no faith, no destiny that can circumvent or control the firm resolve of a firm soul. “My dear friends, you need to be determined souls when it comes time to living righteously.” 5. Each of us must earn heritage bestowed upon us as we make righteous choices. “One of the great accounts in the Book of Mormon is Alma’s counsel to his three sons. Alma experienced a miraculous conversion as a young man. Two of his sons have made good choices, but one son made some very bad choices. The greatest significance about his

counsel is that he was doing it as a father for his own children. “His first concern was that they have a testimony of God the Father, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost. He tells Helaman of his own miraculous conversion. He testifies of the knowledge he was sharing. The time will come when no man or woman will be able to endure on borrowed light.” Cook said he first visited BYUH “59 years ago, in the Fall of 1959, when I was 19 years old. I was a student body officer at Utah State University, and USU was playing the University of Hawaii in football. President David O. McKay was then the president and prophet of the church. He learned of our trip and invited us to meet with him at Church Headquarters.” Cook remarked, “It was the first time I had ever met a prophet, and I was impressed


Having first visited BYUH in 1959, Elder Cook said the setting is “as inspiring as today as they were then.” Photos by Ho Yin Li

with his countenance. He was warm and gracious with us. President McKay then told us about this institution, where we are today, with great enthusiasm. The school had only been in existence for four years. He had dedicated the first permanent buildings.” Cook recalled the feelings of awe he experienced when he first arrived at the BYUH campus. He called it “a beautiful setting. The ocean, the mountains, the temple, the magnificent vistas are as inspiring today as they were then.” As part of the trip to the campus, the 19-year-old Cook was able to meet with the new [and first] governor of Hawaii. Hawaii had recently become the 50th state only four months before their trip. He showed a picture from 1959 of him with the then-governor William F. Quinn.

Cook joked in reference to the picture of him from 1959, “I have this ongoing conversation with Elder Bednar, whose hair is almost perfect. I’ve told Elder Bednar many times, there was a time when I had hair.” Trinity Carlisle, a freshman from Illinois majoring in business, said, “Elder Cook’s words really hit me. We often rely on other people for our testimonies, and in order to have our own beliefs, we need to gain our own light.” Elder Cook was sustained as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 2007. He served as a general authority in the First Quorum of the Presidency of the Seventy beginning in 1996. He previously served in an Area Presidency in the Philippines and was the president of the Pacific Islands and the North America Northwest areas. He also served as the executive director of Missionary Work. •

“The choices we make are critical. They are the key to our future and our happiness. We are the sum total of all the choices we make.” -Elder Cook

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Jennifer Duerden and Shaka Steel perform at the McKay Auditorium. Photo by Chad Hsieh

Sharing happiness with music Audience members say diversity of music during Shaka Steel performance makes them want to sing and dance B Y TO M SO N CH E AN G

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Left: BYUH Jazz Band students accompany Shaka Steel. Right: The Polynesian drum class performs Tahitian style dance and rhythm. Photo by Chad Hsieh

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ith dancers, Polynesian drums, and various percussion instruments, Helping Every Angel, Ka Pa Kani Ko'ele o Laie, and Shaka Steel performed on Nov. 20 at the McKay Auditorium. The audience shared their thoughts on the uniqueness, diversity, and positive emotion of the performances. With dancers from both community members and elementary school students from Helping Every Angel in the front and drummers of Ka Pa Kani Ko’ele o Laie in the back, together they presented “Haere i Mua,” arranged by Lloyd Chandler. Helping Every Angel is a dance group based in Kahuku dedicated to raising funds for local charities to support children with lifethreatening illnesses and their families, according to helpingeveryangel.com. Ka Pa Kani Ko’ele o Laie is the Polynesian drum band of BYU–Hawaii. Originating from Hong Kong,Yan Wu, a member of Ka Pa Kani Ko’ele o Laie, said she has come to appreciate the opportunity to learn about other cultures through their instruments. “We’re required to tie our hair in a Polynesian style. We’re not just performing the Polynesian instruments. We’re required to truly become a Polynesian from the inside out,” said Wu, a junior majoring in TESOL education. Sister Baker, a senior missionary at BYUH, said the dancers and drummers were well-prepared and they deserved a bigger audience. “They need more people here. It was really cool. I’m glad I came.” Afterward, Shaka Steel performed nine pieces, including “Havana,” originally per-

formed by pop artist Camila Cabello, and arranged by senior steel drum lead player, Ninoy Kusuma. Three students from the BYUH Jazz Band, who played the saxophone, trumpet, and trombone, accompanied the steel drum players to the well-known Brazilian song “Tico Tico.” The band also performed the Christmas song, “I Saw Three Ships,” arranged by Jennifer Duerden, a BYUH music instructor. The band mainly focused on Caribbeanstyle music, but music of other styles such as Waltz-Ballad and music from New Orleans were also performed, according to the members of the band. Duerden explained, “Our school is very multicultural as well. This is the chance to show off our multiculturalism and the band.” Valentine Marcia Suwanto, a senior from Indonesia studying hospitality and tourism management, expressed her feelings on the uniqueness of the Caribbean music performed that night. “It reminds me of 'The Little Mermaid' and all those cool movies of the beach and the ocean. It’s not something super loud, but you can still enjoy it and sing along with the beat.” Sister Rickey, a senior missionary at BYUH, described the concert as the happiest concert she had ever been to because the music was delightful and the happiness was mutual between the performers and the audience. She said, “Not only did they entertain us with their music, but also just to watch them enjoy what they did was just wonderful.” Baker said she had listened to Shaka Steel perform before, but the complete concert was

a new experience to her. “I heard it here a little and there a little before. I’ve never heard much of it. I’ve never heard such beautiful music [and] all those steel drums and all the drummers.” Both Baker and Rickey said the music made them want to dance to it. Two of the lead pan performers, Kusuma and Stella Nathania, are both from Indonesia and graduating this semester. On stage during the concert, Dr. Darren Duerden, the director of the band and a music professor at BYUH, said, “Every semester, without fail, there’s always an Indonesian student in Shaka Steel.” As an Indonesian, Suwanto said she had come to Shaka Steel’s concert every semester and one of the reasons was to support the Indonesian performers in the band. “I’m an Indonesian. Like what Dr. Duerden said, I feel proud. My older sister used to be a part of the band. Stella is my cousin.” Kusuma, a senior majoring in music, said it was his last performance in the auditorium with Shaka Steel, and he was glad it went well. “We played many songs that are not easy at all. We went through some rough times practicing, but it all paid off. Each member of Shaka Steel did really amazing.” Nathania, an Indonesian senior majoring in business management, said the process of working with the members of Shaka Steel was a joyful experience for her. “You need to rehearse and figure out everything together,” she said. “It’s still in the classroom, but it’s not like sitting down and taking notes.” • DECEMB ER 2018

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Participating in the Makahiki Games on Nov. 17, students play a Hawaiian game called the Haka Moa, known as standing chicken fight. Photo by Cameron Gardner

Play the game, learn the culture Students have fun while learning more about ancient Hawaiian culture in Makahiki games B Y E STH E R I N SI GN E

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Left: A student plays Moa Pahe'e, dart throwing. Top right: Participants play 'o'o ihe, spear throwing. Bottom right: Two students participate in Haka Moa. Photo by Cameron Gardner

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urrounded by a yellow painted circle, trying to push their opponent as two students both stand on one leg while holding each other’s hands, BYU–Hawaii students competed in the annual Makahiki games on Nov. 17, organized by Seasider Sports and Activities. The Makahiki games are “the ancient Hawaiian games the people of Hawaii used to celebrate,” explained Brandyn Akana, senior manager for Seasider Sports and Activities. A variety of Hawaiian games such as the Hukihuki (tug of war), Haka Moa (standing chicken fight), ‘o’o ihe (spear throwing), Moa Pahe’e (dart throwing/sliding), and Uma (arm wrestling) were set up in the Flag Circle so people could challenge others as they participated. Despite the rain pouring down during the beginning of the activity, students still came with positive attitudes and were ready to play and have fun. Florentine Pedron, a senior from Tahiti studying hospitality and tourism management, said when she heard about the event, she did not hesitate to think about joining. Pedron said she came because she wanted “to learn more about the Hawaiian culture.”

Maran Guzman, a sophomore from Wyoming studying psychology, said the activity was her first time playing Hawaiian games and a very unique experience for her. She was able to participate in all the events, except the running events. She got third place for the Uma (arm wrestling) challenge. “I liked the arm wrestling… That was fun, but I also really liked the unique games I’ve never experienced before, like the bowling and the spear throwing. I also liked the spear throwing because... it was a different way of being active,” said Guzman. Other then the weather, one of the challenges Akana and his crew also faced was the manger in the middle of the Little Circle. “It was something we just worked around because the Christmas lighting is going to be in a couple of weeks, so they’re starting to set it up.” With the help of his team, they were able to do the games outside the manger’s area and were still able to continue with the activity. Pedron said the Seasider Sports and Activities team were full of energy and enthusiasm during the event. She shared how she made

new friends, enjoyed the food, and suggested to the team to “maybe put on Hawaiian music instead of modern music to match the theme of the activity,” for next year’s games. Iliesa Malani, a senior from Fiji studying computer science, said the Makahiki games opened his perspective on Hawaiian culture. “I never knew a lot about Hawaiian culture, but events like these help me see what Hawaiian culture is all about.” Guzman shared how activities like the Makahiki games “get the students more involved… It gets students to come closer together and be able to share these experiences with the people around them, share these experiences with the people back home, and introduce diversity.” Akana said seeing the students cheer for each other made him happy. “With the run, everybody’s cheering on fellow students whether they’re from the South Pacific, Asia, or from the [United] States. Everybody was rooting for each other, and that’s what I love best about this activity and event.” •

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How to successfully apply for an internship Career Center staff advise students to begin early to find an internship and take advantage of campus resources B Y E STH E R I N SI GN E

Graphic by Lynne Hardy

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Graphic by Lynne Hardy

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ooking around, trying to figure out what documents to prepare and who to talk to, employees from the BYU–Hawaii Career Center shared their tips and advice for how to successfully apply for and obtain an internship. The Career Center, now located at the Cannon Activities Center, offers services such as helping students register for internships, creating resumes, writing cover letters, holding mock interviews and conducting personality tests, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality test. Florence Farnsworth, a volunteer missionary from Utah, said, “If somebody wants to know how to write a resume, we are happy to help them. We take models and show them how to do that. If they haven’t had any work experience, we still can help them from just the volunteer things they’ve done, the things that they have worked just even growing up [and] help them make a resume.” The Career Center provides brochures for students based on what they need to know. If they need to meet with a mentor and talk about applying for an internship, they have a guide that students can follow to help them throughout the process.

STEPS:

1. Map out your internship with your academic advisor. 2. Meet with your internship coordinator. Get approval and work on objectives. 3. Get hired. (Get offer letter and MOU – this is sent to you by the internship provider) 4. Apply on Handshake. (https://byuh.joinhandshake.com/login) 5. Get approval on the Academic Internship Approval Form (Found under experience on Handshake) 6. Meet with your relationship manager for funding and airfare. Tita Mongan, a sophomore from Indonesia studying communication, explained, “They have to talk to their internship coordinator. Every department has one. They have to ask whether their internship will be counted as an academic internship or not and whether it will be counted as credits or not. After that, they have to find their own job.” According to the Career Center, if a student is planning to do their internship somewhere in Asia or the Pacific, they can apply for Yamagata funding. This scholarship can provide

some financial support as well as airfare as students go on their internships. Mongan shared, “The amount of the funding depends on how long you’re doing the internship for. We encourage students to do it earlier because once it’s all settled – once they are registered, then they can process the funding. They will meet with one of the managers to get the funding.” Hyrum Portugal, a career mentor from the Philippines, said it’s important to prepare months in advance for applying for an internship. “There might be changes in the process, or there might be some things that will hinder you so, as much as possible, you have more time allowance to make the necessary preparation for your internship.” Felmar Bagol, an alumnus from the Philippines, shared a four tips for students that he learned while he was applying for his internship a few years ago. “First, expand your connections. Second, plan and prepare ahead of time. Third, save money. Fourth, find an internship that will help you build your skills and your resume.” • To get a headstart on an internship, visit the Career Center in the CAC.

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CA M P US LIF E

Clutch Prep: An Online Tutoring Service The service helps students through practice tests and video guides B Y E STH E R I N SI GN E

ORGANIC CHEM

MACROECON

CHEMISTRY

ACCOUNTING

MCAT

ANATOMY

PHYSICS

CALCULUS

MICROECON

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BIOLOGY

Graphic by Mckenna Locken


“Clutch Prep covers subjects by the textbooks that you use. So if there’s one specific thing that you’re having a hard time with, you can focus in on that thing. “ -Clutch Prep representative of BYU–Hawaii, Tyler Pisciotta

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lutch Prep is an online tutoring service that provides video guides, practice tests, and real tutors for your academic needs, says clutchprep.com. It covers material from textbooks under the science, math, and accounting categories and aims to help students further understand their lessons from their classes. Students have different options when it comes to their subscription plans, according to Tyler Pisciotta, a senior studying biomedical science from Nevada. Students can opt to pay for a monthly, three-month, six-month or yearly subscription plan. When students sign up for the first time, the first 10 videos are free and from then on, you can choose which plan you would like to use. Pisciotta shared how Clutch Prep is convenient “because sometimes the school tutors can meet at certain times, and if you work, like I do, or you have other commitments, then it’s hard to get to those tutoring sessions. So it’s nice to be able to access it wherever you want, whenever you need it.” Pisciotta is the Clutch Prep representative of BYU–Hawaii. At the beginning of every semester, he said he goes around to different classes to talk about the service and find students who are interested in signing up. “Clutch Prep covers subjects by the textbooks that you use. So if there’s one specific thing that you’re having a hard time with, you can focus on that. Maybe the tutors have a hard time explaining that because they’re not super comfortable with it either, but the Clutch tutors always do a really good job with it,” said Pisciotta. Steven Aurich, a senior studying biomedical science from Oregon, said he feels more confident taking exams whenever he

uses the service beforehand because “it’s an additional study aid to go along with the textbook. The more study you get, I think the better you do.” Aurich said he used to study with his friend who had an account for the service. “Sometimes, he would study it in the library and I would be there, so we’d use it together. It worked out very well, increasing my ability to study.” He also shared that for this semester, him and his friend decided to share the account and split the cost in half. Paying $40 each to gain access to their chosen class’ content. “Only one person can use it at a time,” explained Taylor Dansie, a senior studying marine biology from Utah. “If you plan on splitting the cost with friends, you have to work together,” in order to use Clutch Prep. Brandon Chan, a BYUH alumnus who studied biology from Malaysia, remarked how Clutch Prep’s best feature was “it follows the curriculum that is used by the teacher, and it [customizes] its own questions and practice tests for you.” Pisciotta explained, “They make these practice tests you can take. They might not be the exact format that your teacher here at BYU–Hawaii does, but at least you’re getting exposed to the material in an exam-type format.” Chan used the service for Organic Chemistry 1 and 2 and Cellular Biology. He said he was motivated to use it to practice and solve example problems for those classes. He said he understood the class materials better because of the time he spent on solving the practice problems through the service. •

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Senior missionaries serve as conversational tutors to provide a comfortable environment for students to practice speaking English. Photo by Ho Yin Li

Practicing casual English with VOICE Program mentors Interchange program put on by missionaries seeks to provide conversational English opportunities for EIL students B Y SH AN N O N CRO W L E Y

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International students can sign up to practice their English in a non-academic setting at the Aloha Center. Photo by Ho Yin Li

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nglish as an international language students have the opportunity to practice conversational English with the VOICE Program, which is run by the BYU–Hawaii senior missionaries. Having “conversation buddies” to practice speaking English with, in an informal setting, leads to reduced anxiety amongst students, according to officials who oversee the program. ITS F UN CT I ON

Sister Stephenson, a senior missionary from Pennsylvania, serves full time in the VOICE Program. Talking about who the VOICE Program is for, she said, “It’s specifically designed for EIL students, which is English as an international language, because they test into something and they have a certain level that they test into.” Amanda Wallace, an associate professor in the English Language Teaching and Learning Department, supervises the VOICE Program, the EIL tutoring program, and the Teacher’s Assistant (TA) program. She suggests her

students participate in the VOICE Program. “So many of our EIL teachers will assign students to go there for conversation practice, or they’ll give it to them as an option and they’ll say, ‘Here’s something available to you.’” Speaking directly on what the VOICE Program is, Wallace explained, “It’s general conversation practice for academic assignments from [the EIL] teachers. They go to our EIL tutors, who work with academic English assignments, or to the VOICE Program tutoring [which] is much more casual.” Stephenson explained her role as a conversational tutor. “We’re not supposed to help them with their writing assignments [because] it’s supposed to be speaking or conversational English. We’re not supposed to answer their grammar questions...but I just tell them, ‘If I don’t know the rule behind what you’re asking, I can at least tell you if it sounds right. If it sounds correct, it probably is.’” Wallace said the VOICE Program tutors are “actually conversation buddies… and they

can talk with students about anything they want to converse about just [so the students can] get to practice speaking in English.” Explaining their availability, Stephenson said, “That’s what we do and we’re here from 9 [a.m.] to 4 [p.m.]. We have lunch from 12 to 1 [p.m.] and occasionally we make special allowances or appointments with students that either work or have classes and can’t get here during those hours. We’ll try and help anybody who needs our help.” Expounding on how one gets started in the VOICE Program, Wallace said, “You can just go and sign up,” referring to the schedules on a table in the Aloha Center where students can sign for appointment times. According to Wallace, the location of the VOICE Program has shifted around in the past, but the Aloha Center location has shown to be “the most successful place, to have it.” Wallace expressed her appreciation to the Aloha Center officials for lending the program its public space in the hallway between the HUB and student leadership offices.

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WHO R U N S I T A N D H O W

On who tutors for the VOICE Program, Wallace said, “It would be either service missionaries or full-time missionaries working there generally. “[The missionaries] really, really enjoy it, and it’s a way to get to know the students. The students appreciate the connections and opportunity to practice as well.” Further explaining how missionaries are assigned to the VOICE Program, Wallace said, “There’s actually a process where missionaries are assigned to VOICE and that’s through [Human Resources], so we don’t actually go and recruit.” Stephenson noted she’s the only full-time missionary working in the VOICE Program. “Right now I don’t have any other full-time people with me. I have four part-time people, so it’s making it a little more tricky schedulewise [for students to get in to practice their English].” Explaining how she goes about helping EIL students with their English communication skills, Stephenson said she uses a whiteboard to communicate when she wants to teach them how a word is spelled phonetically or how it sounds phonetically. “If I don’t understand what they’re trying to say, I ask them to try and write it down and we figure it out.

“We have magazines, church magazines, or the Ke Alaka‘i. They learn lots of new words and then we help them look up those words and learn what the definitions are. “I really encourage the students to take notes and to write down the vocabulary words and what they mean. Some really try to incorporate them into their everyday language, and it’s amazing to watch.” Wallace mentioned the support she has felt for the program and said, “We really appreciate the support we’ve gotten for the VOICE Program. I thank the personnel in the Aloha Center and other people who have helped... all the missionaries who’ve been working, managing, and running it and, just everybody that helps support it.” I T S E F FECT O N ST UDENT S

“I’ve really seen them blossom,” said Stephenson. “They really blossom by the end of the semester. A lot of them don’t come back. They feel confident enough to progress on their own.” Wallace said she enjoys the effects she’s seen the program have with students. “It’s engaging and it helps them feel more motivated for language learning.” She continued, “It’s a safe way to practice language and to build skills. I think [overall] it’s just a positive, well-used, program. Language

learning… helps [students] to feel more at ease in talking or with any aspects of conversation, like pronunciation.” Stephenson said, “I think they sense this is a safe environment because I’m not their peer. I’m an auntie, or a mother, or a grandmother figure, and they just feel safe here. We talk about all kinds of things. We talk about dating or marriage if they want to.” As he was writing his name down on the schedule for a tutoring time, Jessup Lee, a freshman majoring in computer science from Korea, said, “I’m signing up for my first time. My classmates and my EIL professors introduced me to the program, and I came with my friends... to practice conversational English speaking skills.” Lee said he is enthusiastic to begin coming to the tutoring program. This type of enthusiasm in EIL students toward the VOICE Program is backed up by Wallace as she said, “Students really appreciate the opportunity to just talk and practice with somebody. It’s a friendly environment... and it’s not academic. Students can talk about academic things if they want to, but it’s really not an academic approach to conversation practice.” Wallace concluded by saying, “I think it’s a really valuable language learning resource on campus, and we appreciate having it. We appreciate the students who suggested it, and we just look forward to keeping it going.” •

Senior missionaries explained how those who attend the VOICE Program “really blossom by the end of the semester.” Photo by Ho Yin Li

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feature

in this section Elder Esplin finishes his mission at BYU–Hawaii

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Lina Legoretta shares how she found her purpose through her conversion

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The unconventional job of making mermaid tales

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The Duerdens say steel drumming led to their marriage

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Graduation speaker Kekaila Ah Puck expresses her gratitude for BYUH

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Yao Liao travels 26 hours round-trip to attend sacrament meeting

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Entrepreneurship professor Paul Wilson shares his business tips for students

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Lita Bourne helps international students adjust to university culture

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Lina Legorreta with the missionaries, Elder Chandler and Elder Collins who taught her the missionary lessons. Photo by Chad Hsieh

Lina Legorreta: A Muslim convert Legorreta shares how she finds direction through the gospel B Y M ACK E N ZI E B E AVE R

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Legorreta said "I was meant to be here, and I know that now." Photo by Chad Hsieh

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ina Legorreta, a freshman from Jordan studying computer science, was born and raised in the Middle East as a Muslim. She moved to Virginia in middle school and since then, she said she has felt like she was floating and lost without structure or religion. She said she feels relieved to have found the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Legoretta was baptized on Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE BYU–HAWAII IF YOU WERE NOT A MEMBER?

In 2016, Legorreta and her family came to Oahu, spent a week or so in Waikiki and took a trip up to the North Shore. “I chose to come to school in Hawaii because of the location. I loved the location as well as the community and ‘aloha spirit’ surrounding Hawaii.” Legorreta also said she chose to come to BYUH because it was culturally diverse, and she liked how the school had standards and was religious.

“After I graduated from high school, I took a year off to save up money for college. My uncle remembered that I loved Hawaii so much, so he Googled schools on Oahu. He gave me a list of five schools, and I saw ‘Brigham Young University–Hawaii,’ on the top of the list. I knew I didn’t want to apply to five different schools here, so I just applied for the first one on the list.” Legorreta said she was about to enroll in a community college in Virginia when she found out she was accepted to BYUH. “When I was accepted into this school, I was so happy. For some reason, I knew I needed to come here and that my heart was in Hawaii.” WHAT DID YOU KNOW ABOUT CHURCH CULTURE BEFORE YOU CAME HERE?

Legorreta said she knew little about the Church before coming to school here. “I actually thought you guys still practiced polygamy.”

Legorreta said she did have a Mormon friend in high school, and she began meeting with the missionaries before coming here, but it was just to get her ecclesiastical endorsement. Legorreta said when she met with a bishop back home, he was surprised she wanted to attend a CES school. “I remember the bishop in Virginia looking at me and say, ‘Out of all 300 students I have interviewed for an endorsement, you are the first one who is not a member.’ That really shocked me for some reason. I didn’t really realize only LDS students went here. I just thought that was preferred.” DID YOU THINK YOU WERE GOING TO GET BAPTIZED BEFORE COMING HERE?

Legorreta said her friends and coworkers back home would always give her a hard time, and tell her she would get baptized and become super religious after coming here. “I did not

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Legorreta said BYUH and the Church have given her a purpose in life. Photo by Chad Hsieh

think I would get baptized at all honestly." WAS IT WEIRD TRANSITIONING TO A SCHOOL WITH STRICT STANDARDS?

BYUH is set apart because of the faith of the Church and its standards on dressing and grooming. At BYUH and other CES schools, there is an Honor Code that students must sign and follow before attending. Legorreta said she was pretty motivated to follow the rules here because she was so grateful to come here. She said she believed her Muslim background would help her adjust to the culture and standards, because their beliefs and ways of life are so similar. “I was wearing outfits I thought was okay. But after a few weeks here, I realized that a lot of the things I thought were okay really weren’t and that was hard. After being dress coded a few times, I was really hurt because I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong. I then took a step back. I realized this

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was all new to me and there was actual reasoning behind that.” Legorreta said it was weird having to be so mindful about what she was wearing and how late she stayed out, but other than that the adjustment wasn’t as hard as she thought it would be. “I knew the rules are there to keep us safe—but it was so foreign to me.” HOW DOES YOUR FAMILY FEEL ABOUT YOUR BAPTISM?

Legorreta said her mother is super grateful she finally found her “path” in life. “To be honest, my family doesn’t really understand. My older brother is really confused at my decision.” Legorreta said her family is super supportive of her and her decision—but they don’t really understand. However, they are super grateful she now has structure and believes in something. “For the majority of my life, I have always been free-spirited and didn’t have any

structure. I didn’t really believe in much, but now I know there is a purpose for everything and I am so grateful for that.” WHO HAS HAD THE BIGGEST IMPACT ON YOU?

Legorreta said her religion professors have had a huge impact on her. “I don’t really think they realize this, but it was because of them assigning us so much work and making us dig deep into the gospel and the reading that I got baptized.” Elder McAffee, a full-time service missionary from Washington who teaches in the Religion Department at BYUH, is one of Legorreta’s former Religion instructors. He said, “Lina is one of the most enjoyable students I have ever had. She was not afraid to ask questions, and you could tell she was sincere and genuinely wanted to learn.” McAffee said he did not know Legorreta wasn’t a member until he asked her, but he remembers watching her in


Legorreta with Elder McAffee, who initially began teaching her the missionary lessons. Photo by Chad Hsieh

class and noticing she was a little bit confused. “I tried to make my lessons a little easier to understand and direct them toward teaching Lina.” When Legorreta was interested in taking the missionary discussions, she reached out to McAffee and asked him to teach her the lessons. McAffee said, “I started teaching Lina the missionary discussions, and then we got the elders involved and went on from there.” Legorreta said, “I’m not sure if she knows this, but my Religion professor, Dr. Kruse has made a huge impact on me. She assigns a lot of homework, and really encouraged me and the rest of her students to dive into their work and really find their own testimony. She really helped me dig deep into the scriptures.” Dr. Line Kruse, an instructor in the Religion Department, said, “It was amazing as I witnessed Lina’s spirit really take flight. It was such a blessing to watch her find her happiness and witness the love of God herself.”

Kruse’s husband is a recent convert, and she said there is no other way people can accept the gospel besides finding out about it for themselves. “My class is structured in a way that allows the gospel to be the center focus.” Along with McAffee having an impact, Legorreta's roommate’s friend, Libby Templeton, a junior from Washington majoring in history education, also had an impact on Legoretta and her conversion. Legorreta and Templeton became friends through Lina’s unit mate. Templeton said she had no idea Legoretta was not a member, but it came up one day. “I remember Lina telling me she had a really hard time understanding her religion course. I mean, she still did well because she is just a smart girl, but she has no Christian background whatsoever. She was born and raised Muslim.” Templeton said she encouraged Lina to seek help from the missionaries to help her

understand her Religion courses better. “I didn’t want to push her, but I kind of planted the seed of Lina talking to the missionaries. And before we knew it, she accepted the invitation to get baptized.” Templeton said it has been amazing watching Legoretta grow and accept the gospel. Legorreta said, “I am very grateful to be here. Looking back on everything that has happened, even from coming to Hawaii in 2016 and falling in love with this place, I know that everything happens for a reason.” Legorreta said she feels no other school offers such a unique way of life and experiences. No other school allows students to be so open about their religion and the way they choose to live. “I honestly couldn’t have gone to a better school. I was meant to be here, and I know that now. I am so excited that I’m finally baptized and part of something bigger.” •

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Drumming up love Darren and Jennifer Duerdens’ say the affinity for a certain sound leads to their marriage and careers B Y N OAH SH OAF

Darren and Jennifer Duerden with fellow performers at the PCC. Photo courtesys of the Duerdens

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teel drumming is more than a musical outlet, according to Dr. Darren Duerden, a Music professor at BYU–Hawaii. Although this art form originated in the Caribbean, Duerden said he has found it has a special place in Laie. Duerden’s wife, Jennifer Duerden, said drumming brought great opportunities and even influenced their marriage. Darren said he sees music as more than a class or subject someone can teach, but rather a life enhancer that helps him and his wife live life to the fullest. “You don’t have to be a music major to enjoy music. Music is a language. I like how it makes people feel. There is a discipline to it, yet people can enjoy it, work hard, and still have a great time,” Darren expressed. “Unlike some disciplines where you can miss out on the aspect of living life because you are stuck in a library with your head in a book.”

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A COMMONALITY

“Back in the late 1980s, the percussion director brought steel drums to BYU in Provo, Utah,” Darren said. “I just absolutely fell in love with the sound of it and the whole discipline of it. My wife did as well. We met in the steel band, so we have always had that as a commonality. We both love the world of steel drumming.” Jennifer is a special instructor at BYUH who teaches music and piano classes. She also plays the piano for university events. “I heard the steel band at BYU in Provo and I loved the sound. I talked to the professor and I got into the steel band. My husband was already in the steel band, of course, we weren’t married yet,” she said. Jennifer said they were in the band for two years. In those two years, they would go on trips and performances together. Over time, they got to know each other better, which ultimately lead to their marriage.

LIFETIME OF DRUMMING

Darren said there is a special power found within the drums. “The steel drum was an instrument developed in Trinidad back the 1930s. I fell in love with the sound and even the cultural aspect of the drums. It takes me to a different place when I play steel drums.” Due to the impact of steel drumming, Darren said he wanted to pursue drumming as his career, but his passion was not always received positively from his peers. They mocked him, but he responded by continuing to explore his musical passion. Throughout his career, he said everything was influenced by steel drumming. “When I taught at Florida State [and Mississippi], I taught the steel band.” Jennifer agreed with her husband. She said she felt steel drumming offered great opportunities.“ I started playing in college, and at BYU we got a scholarship to go with a smaller group and tour.”


Top: Family at Jennifer’s devotional talk. Above: Duerdens play the steel drums in college. Left: Darren at a Shaka Steel band rehearsal. Photo by Cameron Gardner

Then the couple went to Florida State, and said more opportunities came through drumming. Jennifer said her husband taught the college steel drumming group while she taught the high school group. She and her husband even formed their own professional steel drum band. “People would call us for a party or something, and neither group was exactly the right fit, so we actually formed our own group. A substantial amount of my income came from [our] steel band performances.” SHARING THE SOUND

Darren said they moved to BYUH because they didn't feel Mississippi, where they were living at the time, was the right fit for their family. “There were a lot of challenges in Mississippi I didn’t like. For example, I didn’t like the racial tension in Mississippi. I have always had an affinity for music from all around the world, and I

specialize in music of the Caribbean, so it didn’t go over so well in Mississippi because people didn’t treat each other of equal par.” Then the couple applied for positions at BYUH, and according to Darren, it was the right choice. “When we came out here, it was shocking to see people of so many races get along so well. It was great here. We lived next to the temple for 10 years, and we were finally able to buy a home. ” Darren was able to bring his love of Caribbean music here to BYUH, and when he first applied to BYUH, he pitched his idea of a steel band because he thought it would be a perfect fit. From this passion, he created the only functioning steel band in Hawaii called Shaka Steel. This group plays at various campus concerts, the Polynesian Cultural Center, and the Christmas devotional. He added they even tour neighboring Hawaiian islands, but he said

he wished his group could travel internationally because he believes it would be more impactful. Ninoy Kusuma, a senior from Indonesia majoring in music, explained how the Duerdens have made an unmeasurable impact to the music program at BYUH. Kusuma is a lead pan player in Shaka Steel and said there would be no show without the Duerdens. “As teachers, they taught me to be a better musician. They help me to see more opportunities for me to grow in the music field. They taught me reach the best potential in me as a musician. As a friend and family, they taught me to always help each other, to care and listen.” •

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Sacrificing for the sacrament

After traveling 13 hours to church, convert says to not take church attendance for granted B Y N OAH SH OAF

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Left: Yao Liao holding Chinese scriptures near the Stake Center on campus. Top: Liao reading the scriptures. Photos by Cameron Gardner

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ao Liao, a freshman and undecided major from China, explained how she experienced God’s blessings despite having obstacles. Liao is from Guigang, Guangxi, China and when she joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at the age of 15, there was not a congregation in her city. Liao shared, “When I first started going to church, my city didn’t have any priesthood holders, so I would travel overnight by bus for 13 hours [one way] to have the sacrament.” Liao said she traveled more than 26 hours from Guigang to the Guangdong province twice a month to meet with other members of the church and partake of the sacrament. She said the journey wasn’t always easy. “It was hard for me, because every time I took the bus I felt dizzy and sick. I couldn’t sleep for the whole night on the bus, but when I got to church, all the bad feelings left.” Due to the sacrifice Liao made by going to church, she described how sacred she feels church attendance is. “We need to treat church buildings like a treasure. We have beautiful chapels here, and many brothers and sisters. We need to recognize how church meetinghouses are a blessing from God.” Liao was introduced to the Church by her mother’s friends. She said when she heard about the gospel, she felt happy and loved. Those feelings led Liao to travel with her family to Hong Kong. There she was taught all the missionary lessons in a day and then the next day she was baptized. “I didn’t even read the Book of Mormon before I was baptized. I didn’t really understand the Book of Mormon. I just felt it was the right decision, so I joined the Church.”

Now Liao said she reads the Book of Mormon every day. The book led her to serve a Chinese-speaking mission in Sydney, Australia. Liao also said because of the Church, she decided to come to BYU–Hawaii. “When I was 15, I went to an LDS Youth Conference in China. I heard people talk about BYUH, so I made the goal to come here. I wanted to meet many people from different countries.” At the youth conference, Liao met Josie Luo, a sophomore from China majoring in TESOL. Like Liao, Luo had to make sacrifices to go to church. She was baptized at the age of 9 and also had to travel many hours to go to church because there was not a church in her city for a long time. Luo said, “I met Yao when she had been a member for only two months. We had a Youth Conference in China for all the members, and she came to travel with our group. She traveled [alone] for 30 hours to go to that Youth Conference. When I first saw her, my Seminary teacher told me [Yao] was a new convert and needed a friend, so I became her friend.” Because of Luo’s Seminary team encouraging her to talk to Liao, they instantly became friends. The only time the two could see each other was at the Youth Conferences each year. Youth Conference often required lots of travel for the participants, according to Liao, with locations in Shanghai, Guangzhou, and even Hong Kong. Luo said she looked forward to the conferences and their friendship kept growing because they both had the same goals. “We had the same goal to serve the church. We would see each other at every Youth Conference and say we will both go on a mission, we will both come to BYUH, and we will both have a temple marriage.”

Luo said she was surprised Liao found the gospel. She said it shows how Heavenly Father has a plan for each of us knows our potential. In Laie, Liao said she is blessed to be close to the temple and church meetinghouses. She explained how she appreciates what Laie offers because of the sacrifices she made in China. “It was a big sacrifice, but I think it is a blessing as well. Imagine if the chapel was right next to my house, I might not even go there.” After BYUH, Liao said, “I will go back to China because I miss my small church group of 13 members.” Now her city has priesthood holders, so she can partake of the sacrament without traveling. Liao said she believes China, one day, will open and allow missionaries. In the meantime, she suggests members in China set a good example. “Even though we cannot preach the gospel to others, we can still be good examples to others. We can love others and share the love of Jesus Christ.” Brent Esplin, a senior missionary and Religion teacher at BYUH, heard about Liao’s story because she is a student in his Book of Mormon class. Esplin learned of Laio’s story when she wrote for an assignment about riding a bus for 13 hours one way to get to sacrament meeting. Because of the remarkable faith of Liao, Esplin said he wants to share her story with his family back home in Utah. Esplin explained, “How could the Lord find one person in a population of billions. There are no missionaries there. No one was looking for her. Most people who investigate the church take months or years to join, but she was willing to make the sacrifice after one day of lessons.” He said Liao’s story proves the Lord knows us personally and God answers people’s prayers no matter where they are. •

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How to succeed in entrepreneurship From 3D printing to teaching crowdfunding in the Congo, Paul Wilson encourages unique thinking B Y B RU N O M AYN E Z Professor of Entrepreneurship Paul Wilson is pictured in his office. Photo by Chad Hsieh

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hor’s Hammer sat on a shelf in Paul Wilson’s office. So did Narsil, the broken sword from “Lord of the Rings.” His office has many items like a 3D printer, a virtual reality headset, and microphone. Having made more than 100 apps for iTunes, Wilson, who is an entrepreneurship professor at BYU–Hawaii, teaches students about entrepreneurship to help them learn how they can make money in nontraditional ways. THE FRUITS OF HIS LABORS

Wilson’s entrepreneurship classes have opened opportunities to current and former students. He said they have obtained positions at Google, brought Enterprise Resource Planning to India, and made 3D printed models for architects. With these examples in mind, Wilson said, “I want students to come up with better ideas than food trucks. Those ideas are okay, but something in the field of, let’s say VR [virtual reality], is better. VR is the future and it can change not just video games, but the way we do education, exercise, or architecture.

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“For example, an architect can render a 3D model and show his clients what their house would look like. There are places where there is VR setup on a track. People can run on the track and play a game while using VR.” Wilson and one of his students, Vulcan Yengo, had the opportunity to go to the Republic of the Congo to teach locals about crowdfunding. Wilson said, “I love seeing students create and build businesses not just here, but in other countries. It’s a way to get out of poverty.” BEHIND THE SCENES

Wilson said the motivation behind his ventures in entrepreneurship is his family. “The true story behind any entrepreneur is their family. An entrepreneur’s first priority should be their family. I promised my wife I would always take care of them, even if it meant finding employment.” Wilson and his wife have five young children plus a new baby girl. He said if an entrepreneur’s spouse is not supportive, the relationship and the business will not work.

BUSINESS BEGINNINGS

During the ‘90s, Wilson graduated from BYU in Provo with a degree in philosophy. While studying at BYU, he entered a business competition with friends. His responsibility was to oversee marketing and explore digital marketing. Their business model was called CityNet Systems and their goal was to install wireless high-speed internet networks into apartments in Provo. After Wilson got married, he realized CityNet Systems was failing. He and his wife wanted to go to Hawaii after hearing about missionaries teaching business at the campus. They went on a service mission to BYUH from 2013 to 2015 teaching business. In 2017, he was offered a faculty position. He said he accepted the position because he loves to see what the students can do with the ideas he was teaching them. TEACHING THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA

Regarding Wilson’s teaching, Sophie Olsen, a junior from California majoring in


Thor's Hammer and Narsil, the broken sword, found in Wilson's office. Photo by Chad Hsieh

graphic design, said, “I liked the way he taught. It was a lot of work, but in the end, I was surprised by how much I not only learned, but also retained.” She continued, “He is not a typical teacher. He uses a ton of examples, which is great for visual learners. The way he taught generated lots of discussion in the class and sometimes disagreement, which you can learn from more than anything.” Jennifer Ayala, a senior from Guatemala studying hospitality and tourism management, is currently taking Wilson’s Social Entrepreneurship class. Ayala said the classes are unique because students raise money and learn tools to prepare them for business. “He is well prepared,” she said. “ What I appreciate is his willingness to share everything he knows with his students. “He is nice and willing to help any time he is available, and if he is not, he makes time. His teachings are fun because he includes fun stories and makes sure you understand what was taught. He has so much knowledge to share that 50 minutes are not enough.”

On the side, Wilson produces a podcast about business consulting and uses social media to promote his podcast. He teaches his students how to find markets through apps and services. Olsen said, “I learned about how to successfully market your business through social media. Already because of that class, I have [around] 12 [thousand] followers on my Pinterest out of nowhere. It’s just understanding the patterns that are successfully in marketing. “I think it’s important for all people to have these kinds of skills and understanding. I have definitely referred to lessons from his class since taking it. I have even been able to help others with this knowledge. Ayala said, “I would recommend a minor [in] entrepreneurship to everyone because I have learned more about how to start up or grow a business with this than anything else or my business classes.” •

Top: Student Bruno Maynez using VR. Middle and bottom: Objects made from a 3D printer. Photos by Chad Hsieh DECEMB ER 2018

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Creating a solution for international students Lita Bourne creates program to help international students adjust to student life B Y JE M E SA SN U KA

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Lita Bourne is one of 1,104 international students at BYUH.Photo by Cameron Gardner


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ita Bourne, a senior studying business management from New Zealand, said she saw that international students face struggles adapting to the school, and, for many of them, leaving their home country for the first time. As an international student herself, she said she is determined to help others overcome the trials she personally experienced in her first semesters. Bourne explained, “I had to start from the very basics again. While juggling to find balance in my academics, social life, and spiritual pursuits, there was also the pressure of needing to learn extra things like familiarizing myself with resources on campus, working with different people, learning new lingo, deciding what classes to take and getting adjusted to working in the heat.” She decided to create a project in helping other international students with the same problem. Her project, known as the International Student Mentoring Program, is a program that takes students of separate years, but similar countries, and pairs them together with a mentor. Bourne said, “These mentors act as guides in helping them to make effective decisions.” “The mentees are international freshman students in their first or second semester. They are provided a mentor who doesn’t necessarily have to be studying the major they are looking into, but someone who will support and motivate them.” She said, “When there is an opportunity to be helped in any way, don’t shy away from it. The Lord hears each of our prayers and knows exactly what we are going through. He is mindful of our struggles and will provide the very help we need to be successful in life and to go forward and assist in building his kingdom wherever he needs us.” BYUH is home to approximately 1,104 international students, and Bourne said she believes international students have a lot of potential, but because of the difference in language and other struggles, they lose some opportunities to lead. When asked about her inspiration for the project, she answered, “My interests in helping international students started with my personal experiences, but mainly because I knew of so many people who were struggling more than I was. Many of my new friends at the time were overwhelmed with adjusting to living in a completely new and different place. “[They were] struggling to know how to prioritize and they didn’t know where to go for help. If they did, they were either too shy or had too prideful to ask for it.” This program helps international students relieve pressures of figuring things on their own and helps those who may be left out because of what they do not know. Bourne said, “I found that with a genuine heart when inviting people to open up to you (or anyone they trusted), it would give them a chance to know that others did care for them. “With the right support and motivation, they were able to see their own potential in aiming high and believing in themselves more, not just settling for less.”

Bourne created the International Student Mentoring Program. Photo by Cameron Gardner

Bourne hopes this project can motivate and support international students. Photo by Cameron Gardner

Many of Bourne’s goals include wanting to help other students become successful and fulfilling their goals. She said her main focus was “All this contributes to making BYUH a Zion university, as envisioned by President Tanner.” Lastly, Bourne said her greatest hope is that such a project will focus on mentoring these students to create a stronger foundation that will help them throughout their educational journey. Bourne said, “I can see this becoming a part of student development services. This program can ensure students are being provided the help they need to finish their own ambitions and lead in areas they have been blessed to be a part of.” •

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Teaching as the Savior taught After a year and half of service, Elder Brent Esplin is returning home with a deeper understanding of faith B Y N OAH SH OAF

Elder Esplin encourages his class to have a strong foundation in the gospel, according to his students. Photo by Monique Saenz 40

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oming to Hawaii and serving a senior mission was not in the plans of Elder Brent Esplin, a senior missionary from Utah assigned to the Religious Education Department at BYU–Hawaii. He said because of his faith, Hawaii brought great blessings of health and spiritual growth. “I had many health issues, especially after I retired. It is interesting to come here and to put in incredible hours from 4 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., but still be able to wake up refreshed and full of energy. I marvel at that, because the Lord kept his word and sustained me. I couldn’t even stand up with the back surgeries and the knee surgeries I had. Now I don’t have any effects of it when I am teaching.” Before he was asked to serve in Hawaii, Esplin and his wife were senior missionaries in Utica, New York. He said serving in the brutal cold of the Northeast and shoveling snow was hard on him. So when the two got the call to come to Hawaii, they had to decide if another mission was a good choice. “Our kids said, ‘Dad, you are going out of the snow to Hawaii. It is a no-brainer,’” shared Esplin. “One of our kids said, ‘The Lord is rewarding you for all the snow you shoveled in New York.’” Since Aug. 2017, he has taught the classes Doctrines of the Book of Mormon, Foundations of the Restoration, and the Eternal Family. After this semester, Esplin and his wife plan to go back home and spend more time with their grandchildren, but he said another mission could be in his future. “[My wife and I] have always wanted to serve a mission. I served a mission when I was 19. I wanted my wife to have this experience, and she wanted to have the experience of a mission too. We have five sons, and they all went on missions. So [my wife] has heard their stories, and we planned to go on a mission when we retired.” Through his experience of teaching at BYUH, Esplin said when he interacts with students, he knows the Church is in good hands. “I have worked harder at this than working for 38 years teaching Seminary and Institute for the church. It is very rewarding to be around young people and to see the church on a worldwide basis. “It is amazing to see the different cultures and nations who at times were at war with each other, and now they’re working together sitting side by side in a classroom.” Charlotte Kennington, a freshman from Belgium majoring in elementary education, is in Esplin’s Book of Mormon class. She said Esplin is more than a teacher, but rather a close friend. She said she went to Esplin during a difficult time, and he offered her peace.

Kennington also expressed she loved being in his Religion class because she never experienced one back home. “I graduated from Seminary, but I never had a sit-down experience,” said Kennington. “I did online Seminary my senior year, and the other three years I did Seminary through Google hangouts. It was nice to be in my house, but you don’t get the same feeling as sitting in a classroom and actually taking notes.” Along with the open environment Esplin created for his class, Kennington said she appreciates Esplin’s stories because she finds him understandable. “You understand his stories… Sometimes people give spiritual stories about their lives and say how blessed they are. He is very humble about his experiences. “Brother Esplin is the best professor I have ever had. He truly cares about his students and emits a Christlike love. His lectures are spiritual. My testimony has grown in his class because he focuses on learning, rather than bombarding us with unnecessary academic work like some Religion professors tend to do. As a result, I can focus more on feeling the spirit and applying his valuable lessons to my life. I really like how he uses personal or real life stories because they are inspiring in various ways.” Emily Payne, a freshman from California majoring in sports medicine, shared having Esplin as a teacher has positively impacted her BYUH experience. “My testimony has grown in his class because he focuses on learning rather than focusing solely on homework and tests. As a result, I can focus more on feeling the spirit and applying his valuable lessons to my life.” Payne said Esplin is one of the best professors she has ever had because he emits Christlike love and truly cares about the wellbeing of his students. Each day, he personally shakes his hand with everyone in class which shows he invests time to understand his students. Before Esplin leaves BYUH, he said he wants students to have a strong foundation in gospel doctrines of the Atonement and personal revelation. “There is a power in the Atonement. It is not just [about] forgiveness and that we can live again, but our lives can be sustained, and we can get through hard times because of His Atonement.” Esplin continued by saying personal revelation is vital because we need it now more than ever. “There is a great need for personal revelation and for the Holy Ghost to be our constant companion. We live in tough times, as President Nelson said. We won’t survive if we don’t learn to get personal revelation. I have learned that without walking by faith, you can’t make it.” •

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Sewing sequins and scales Savannah Tobey explains her unconventional job of creating mermaid tails for clients all over the world B Y JE M E SA SN U KA

The mermaid tails are customized and hand sewn by Savannah Tobey. Photo by Cameron Gardner 42

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According to Tobey, it takes her 20-to-24 hours to make one tail. Photo by Cameron Gardner

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hile working at Sunset Elementary, Savannah Tobey, a junior from Washington studying elementary education, was asked by the well-known YouTuber Mermaid Kariel, “Do you know how to babysit, and do you know how to sew?” Savannah answered truthfully that she did know how to babysit but sewing was not a skill she possessed. After she was shown a few times how to sew scales onto a wet suit, Tobey found herself creating mermaid tails for the professional mermaid, Mermaid Kariel. As time passed on, Tobey said she realized she had a talent for creating these tails and bringing a real mermaid experience to life. She eventually moved from sewing tails as a part-time job to a full-time job, and her work at the elementary school became her part-time job. Tobey explained, “I now only have to work at the elementary school two days a week, and I now spend all my extra time making mermaid tails. On average it takes me about 20-24 hours to make one tail.” Other individuals outside of the mermaid community have seen Tobey’s work and have commented on her skill. Blair Houk, a junior from California majoring in business, said, “When I saw her work, I was really impressed with how well she put together all these tails

and how they looked. They are beautiful to touch and, needless to say, I wasn’t surprised. This work is her calling in life, and I fully support it.” Tobey has learned a lot sewing the mermaid tails as well as witnessing the selling of the tails. She said although she has not worn any of the tails, people from all over the world want to have their own custom-made tails. Some people order the tails to be a certain color or the bottom fins are to be shaped a specific way. Tobey also explained there are people who love to follow other mermaid individuals and each tail can cost over $5,000. “One of the things that is really interesting is I never knew how to sew, and now I am fairly good at it. Also, there are actually a lot of people from the United States and Australia who pay a lot more money than I have.” The tails sold and sewn by Tobey are all customized so that no tail is the same. Tobey said she is responsible for sewing the tails correctly and in a specific colored pattern. Tobey loves to take the tails anywhere she can like Hukilau Beach or other areas on the island. She also expressed how each tail has many hand sewn sequins, which are tiny, shiny plastic objects sewn together to look like scales. Tobey said she actually enjoys making the tails

and having them at the house because they are always a good conversation starter. The tails are more than just a fun hobby, she said, and provide Tobey a little over two-thirds of her income during the year. Danna Usevitsch, a senior from Arizona studying math education, said how her roommate, Tobey, “has a number of eccentric hobbies, so I wasn’t too shocked when she started making mermaid tails. At first, I couldn’t get over the idea there was a mermaid here on the North Shore. But after I saw the tails, I realized they are pretty cool and it’s an interesting business.” Usevitch added the only down side to the mermaid tails is sometimes the sewing needles get mixed in the laundry, and she finds random sequins in the house. As Tobey continues to make more tails and more memories, she said she hopes her customers are satisfied with the product they receive. She also advised students to find something new to do to keep them progressing. “Sewing mermaid tails is not that hard, but it is a lot of extra time that I have to put in to finish the tails. It’s been really fun to not just sew them, but also be able to see pictures of them being used and swam with,” said Tobey. •

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Her friends said Kekaila Ah Puck is a hard worker and loves what she does. Photo by Wesley Ng

A degree is an accomplishment to be proud of, says Ah Puck Graduation speaker says teachers influence her decision to get a degree in education B Y SH AN N O N CRO W L E Y

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Photos by Cameron Gardner

Kekaila Ah Puck said her favorite part of teaching is connecting with the students. Photo by Wesley Ng

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hosen as the Fall 2018 Graduation speaker, Kekaila Ah Puck, an elementary education major from Laie, Hawaii, said she developed the topic of her commencement speech, being proud of yourself, based on things she has learned during her time at BYU–Hawaii. “The message I want to give to the graduates is that you should always be proud of yourself.You’ve worked so hard to accomplish what you’ve accomplished.You’re here at graduation. Be proud of yourself,” she said. “You’re definitely making your family and your friends proud.Your hard work paid off.” Ah Puck said while she was developing her speech, she thought of her many moments of self doubt. “It’s very hard, especially as a student when you’re being overwhelmed with assignments and everything. It’s hard to catch up and continuously think how you didn’t do well [on some] assignments. “[I’d say] surrounding yourself with your professors and having a relationship with them and surrounding yourself with good friends in

your major adds to that environment of support you need.” Reflecting back on studying at BYUH, Ah Puck said, “The main reason I chose BYUH is because I’m from here. I did have thoughts of maybe transferring to BYU in Provo, but I just liked being here so much that I stayed and finished. I think this campus has something special. “The gospel plays a big part in it, but also because there’s so much culture here.” Ah Puck said, “It was such a good experience because when you start as a student here, you are introduced to so many cultures.You make friends from all over the world, and I think that that brings a special spirit to BYUH.” When Ah Puck received an email from Vice President of Academics John Bell, she recalled, “I thought, ‘Why me? Out of all the hundreds of other students graduating, why me?’ Then I thought about how this is a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity, so I accepted the invitation.”

ALWAYS BE PROUD OF YOURSELF

Kawehi Housman, a senior from the Big Island graduating with Ah Puck who double majored in elementary education and Hawaiian studies, spoke on the relevance of Ah Puck’s message of being proud of your accomplishments. “I think [her message] is definitely an important message for this time and age. People tend to look on the negative and it can be overwhelming at times. Graduation is such a big deal and something to be celebrated and to be proud of, but you still need to continue on. “I feel like we get so caught up in having to finish a paper, or say ‘I didn’t do good enough on this test.’ But I feel like we need to focus on, ‘I did a good job, I tried my best…’ and I think we should always be proud of ourselves.” EDUCATION MAJOR

Ah Puck acknowledged how being surrounded by teacher figures in her life influenced her from a young age to pursue teaching as a career. She said, “I always knew I wanted to

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Kekaila Ah Puck wants to continue her education and become an educational counselor. Photo by Wesley Ng

be a teacher. My grandma was a teacher at Laie Elementary for 38 years, and I always heard stories of how good of a teacher she was, and that’s kind of what I wanted. “I want my students to remember me like, ‘Miss Kekaila was such a good teacher. She helped me, she’s fun, but she also made me learn something.’” Ah Puck recalled the moment it clicked for her that she was in the right major. “I was teaching, and one of the other staff members at the elementary school came up to me and said, ‘Wow, you’re really good.’ Just complimenting me and I was like, ‘I guess I can do this.’ “I’m also a Primary teacher in my home ward. So having that experience at church and school, I know this is where I belong and that I can do this.” Ah Puck said she thinks the School of Education is a good program. “It’s tough. It’s challenging. But I really think it pushes the education majors. When we start teaching at the end of the program, things are much easier. They definitely prepare you for student teaching.”

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She said after graduation she wants to go more into educational counseling. “I might move on to get a master’s in psychology with an emphasis in graduation. I like working with kids, and yes, as a teacher you’re there with students. But I like developing a good relationship with students, getting to know them–knowing people and knowing students–especially, I want to get into that.” HER INFLUENCE AND WORK ETHIC

Brittany Akeripa, a senior from New Zealand studying accounting, said she first met Ah Puck when she was Akeripa’s trainer at the Polynesian Cultural Center. “I started working evenings as a cashier because I had a baby, and on my first day she trained me.” Akeripa said Ah Puck has stepped in many times to help her with her children. She said, “She always has time to help me and my kids. I don’t know where she finds the time to do everything. My kids love her. She’s really good with kids.” Housman met Ah Puck when she substituted for her mother’s Hawaiian language class

Ah Puck happened to be taking. She said they continued to see each other in their education classes and became good friends. “I think when you first get to meet Kekaila, she’s a little shy. But as I’ve gotten to know her, I’ve watched her grow into the woman she is today. She’s very open and sweet spoken.” Housman said, “In our group, she’s always the one who goes ahead and gets things done. She goes beyond what’s required, which is why I think it’s great she’s been chosen as a speaker, because she has really given her all these past few years at BYUH. “Something I’m really happy about is how Kekaila is Hawaiian, so she’s representing all of us Hawaiians on campus, which is sometimes a small ratio. Also because she’s from Laie, she can represent this community as well. I’m very proud to see her as a speaker at this graduation.” Akeripa said Ah Puck was always at work, on time, and with energy while being a full time student. “She’s pretty awesome. I’ve seen her grow and get better and better. When I heard she was speaking, I was really excited. I feel like she is one of those people who goes under the radar because she is one of those ... who help everyone and is really smart and gets things done.” • ELDER UTCHDORF TO SPEAK AT DECEMBER COMMENCEMENT

Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf is scheduled to speak at Commencement on Dec. 14. He was called as second counselor in the First Presidency on Feb. 3, 2008, says lds.org. He served in that position until January 2018. He was sustained as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on Oct. 2, 2004. He has served as a General Authority since April 1994. He was born on Nov. 6, 1940 in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia. In 1947 his family became members of the Church in Zwickau, Germany. They fled to Frankfurt/Main in 1952 where he received an education in engineering. In 1965 Elder Uchtdorf began working for Lufthansa German Airlines as a pilot and then a senior vice president. Uchtdorf and Harriet Reich married in 1962. They have two children, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. •


christmas

in this section The Light of the World campaign inspires members for the third year

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The Christ in Christmas lighting ceremony with the Tanners

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Infographic: The Legend of the Candy Cane

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Students share opinions about how Christ is depicted in art

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How we can remember Christ during the Christmas season

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International Christmas traditions

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The Mele Kalikimaka sign lit the McKay foyer after a 10-second countdown. Photo by Chad Hsieh

Christ is the light

of Christmas

Tanners say international Nativities reinforce the knowledge Jesus is the Savior of for people B Y H AE L E Y VAN D E R W E RF

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Top: President and Sister Tanner said they wanted to put Christ in the center of Christmas traditions. Bottom: The Filipino choir sings “Bro, Ikaw ang Star ng Pasko.” Photos by Chad Hsieh

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resident John S. Tanner, along with his wife, Susan Tanner, brought to light the international nature of Christmas at BYU– Hawaii by showcasing part of Sister Tanner’s extensive Nativity collection at the Christ in Christmas devotional and lighting ceremony on Nov. 25. They also reminded students to make Christ the center of their Christmas celebrations. Susan Tanner said, “I want to bear my witness to you that Jesus Christ is the light of the whole world. He is the Savior for each one of us, no matter where we come from or how we imagine Him in our minds and our hearts.” Pres. Tanner explained, “What we wanted to do was put Christ in the center of our Christmas tradition. We have a wonderful tradition of lighting the tree for the community, and it’s sort of a ‘Santa Claus’ tradition… We still

are doing that, but we want to make sure you know… Christ really is the center of Christmas.” Susan Tanner explained how Christmas at BYUH is inevitably going to have an international twist, but at the center of every nation is Jesus Christ. “You in the audience represent a whole array of many nations. We really believe Christ is at the center for all of our nations. In fact, in the Living Christ, as it refers to Christ it says, ‘None other has had so profound an influence upon all who have lived and will yet live upon the earth.’” Pres. Tanner explained this is why the BYUH Nativity is in the center of the Flag Circle. “We have decided to put that in the Flag Circle so all the nations of the world will be around that manger. I like to think of this as the nations of the flags, which represent you

and me, all coming together with Christ as the center. Christ is what brings us together and unites us in a gospel culture.” Susan Tanner said whenever she visits a country, instead of buying souvenirs, she will try to find a Nativity representing that place. “I really love doing this because I feel like each country’s manger scenes represent their culture. Christ is universal, but in these little depictions, the Mary and Joseph and baby Jesus often will look like the people of that nation. Even the animals at the manger scene will represent animals of that nation.” She showed 10 of her manger scenes, including an all-shell Nativity from Hawaii, and ebony Nativity from Tanzania, and a traditional olive wood Nativity from Israel.

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Mongolian students sings “O Little Town of Bethlehem” in their native language.

Pres. Tanner said, “I love that because it’s a way the cultures embrace the story of Jesus and Mary, and they translate that into figures that look like women, men, or babies they would see next door. I love the one from Bolivia. In the Palo Alto region, the women wear bowler hats, so Mary has a bowler hat. It’s quite charming because that is Mary the way they would see her. They are embracing the story and translating it into something they love and something that expresses who they are.” He then asked students to consider how they worship the Savior and bring their unique cultural gifts and blend them with the gospel. Pres. Tanner emphasized the importance of the message the angels gave to the shepherds, who said, “I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.” He explained how, “Sometimes we pass over the idea of ‘all people,’ and, in fact, ‘good tidings.’ The two words have interesting meanings. Good tidings can mean gospel or good news. Tidings is just an old-fashioned word for news. So, I bring you good news. That’s what gospel means: I bring you the gospel, which is a joyful message. Who will have that message? It will be to all people. “When you think of the scope in The Living Christ where it says, ‘None other has had so profound an influence upon all who have lived and will yet live upon the earth.’ That’s the message we want to stress today. The gospel is for all nations, all people, all tongues, all kindreds.

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Students and community members then headed to the Flag Circle, where they joined together to count down to the lighting the lights around campus. A large, red Mele Kalikimaka sign above the McKay Building lit up the night, and lights of all different colors lit up nearly every tree on campus, all the way to the front of the school along Kulanui Street. Three clubs performed Christmas songs in their native languages. The Filipino choir sang “Bro, Ikaw ang Star ng Pasko” (The Star of Christmas), which they explained was produced after a particularly bad storm “as a tribute to the unsinkable Filipino spirit, influenced by our faith in the Savior. The song gives importance to light of hope that emanates from each one of us and from Jesus Christ himself, and, most importantly, the light He gives during our most trying times.” The Mongolian choir sang “O Little Town of Bethlehem.” The Samoan choir finished the musical part of the devotional by singing “Sa i Iutaia o Leoleo Lelei” (Far Far Away on Judea’s Plains), “Na Oso Mai Mea e Ofo ai” (With Wondering Awe), and “Manuia le Kerisimasi” (We Wish You a Merry Christmas). Susan Tanner challenged, “I hope that as we see these lights and enjoy their beauty, we will reflect on the light of Jesus Christ in our lives. I hope we will also reflect his light in our campus and our deeds and our thoughts, and that we will follow his light, and be a light to others.” •

The Samoan choir serenades the audience with Christmas songs in Samoan.

Students getting ready to capture the lighting. Photos by Chad Hsieh


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The art of faith

Graphic by Lynne Hardy

BYU–Hawaii students and faculty reflect on depictions of the Savior throughout history B Y E L I JAH H AD L E Y

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ince the beginning of Christianity, artists have used their skills to attempt to depict the Savior, Jesus Christ, as an expression of faith, said BYU–Hawaii artists. Throughout the history of art, different depictions of Christ have been common. Although students and faculty said it would be nice to know how he looked, they said the emotion that the art emits is more important. Artists from different countries have depicted Jesus Christ in many different ways, often creating controversies, according to Elysse Hunt, a junior from California studying intercultural peacebuilding. “Artists often depict the Savior with their skin tone and wearing the clothing of their culture. This was so that he could be more relatable to them because he looked like one of them.” “Whenever I decide to draw the Savior, it’s honestly a little bit daunting. He is the most important person in my life, and I want to make

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sure I get it right. Sometimes in church or at a conference, I’ll sketch him in my journal whenever I am reminded of the Atonement. I take it very seriously, but I don’t know if there is a specifically correct way to draw or paint him.” When asked how she thought Jesus Christ should be depicted, Hunt responded, “He should be strong and brotherly, but should also look meek and mild. He should not look stern or angry but have a loving, tender look in his eyes. “He should look more like a kind older brother than an all-powerful being. If someone can accurately depict that way in a painting or drawing of Christ, that’s what I connect with best.” Hunt said a common depiction of Jesus Christ is a strong-looking middle-aged man with a short beard and long hair. Of this depiction, Hunt said, “The scriptures do not really tell us what Jesus looked like.


Joseph Smith’s testimony tells us that ‘His brightness and glory defy all description.’ A lot of artists paint him as a Caucasian male, some depict him as African or Asian, but in reality, he was a Galilean Jew from Nazareth. Many of the paintings we have of him probably were not what he looked like.” When asked if it mattered to her what Christ really looked like, Hunt said, “It does not matter to me. I don’t think God and Jesus Christ care about skin color. We should focus more on his message than his appearance.” “My favorite paintings of Christ,” Hunt continued, “are by Walter Rane. He shows him living with the people, not isolated and stern as other artists do. I connect better with depictions of Christ that portray him as a leader and a loving older brother; someone who is strong, calm, compassionate, and firm but not overbearing.” Reagan Spence, a freshman from California majoring in business, said, “I think the color is something we as people take into consideration way too often. I don’t think Heavenly Father and Jesus see color the way we do.” “If an artist wants to portray Christ in a certain way, as being part of a certain race, I don’t see a problem. After all, it doesn’t really matter

what Jesus looked like. His teachings were the most important thing. Pictures just give us the feeling of what His presence must have been like.” Jeff Merrill, associate professor and coordinator of the Visual Arts Department, said, “It shouldn’t matter if it looks what someone might deem ‘accurate,’ because the truth is, we just don’t know. Skin color doesn’t matter either. “What matters is an artist is depicting their concept of Christ, and in doing so, they want to create an emotional power. It doesn’t matter what he looks like in the painting. To me, painting is a deviation from reality, so it should not look exact. It’s all about visualizing Christ.” Merrill continued, “I feel like a lot of the members of our church get hung up on the likeness and miss out on the teachings. I do not think Christ wants us to debate about what color his skin or hair was. When we have realistic paintings such as the one by Del Parson, which is very recognizable, of Jesus in a red robe looking straight at the viewer, we lose some mystery. I prefer the paintings without very defined edges or lines.“ Merrill added, “My favorite paintings of Christ are by Minerva Teichert, which show him in a way that leaves more to the imagination, and he is shown as less stern and more loving and caring.” •

Graphic by Lynne Hardy

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A Christ-centered

Christmas

Although Christmas is becoming more secular, students find ways to marvel in the miracle of Christ’s birth B Y N OAH SH OAF

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Graphic by McKenna Zohner


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ith the commercialization of Christmas, the true meaning of the holiday is often overlooked. BYU–Hawaii students said they are adamant in creating traditions that will help them remember that Christ is the reason for the celebration. In 2017, consumers in the United States expected to spend $906 on average on Christmas gifts, according to a study published by Gallup, which is the highest amount the survey has ever recorded. Ethan Hopkin, a freshman majoring in TESOL from Ohio, said, “The spiritual aspect is the aspect. It is what Christmas exactly is. I think gifts and the Christmas tree add to the ambiance of Christmas. It creates a Christmas atmosphere, and since the main focus of Christmas is the spiritual aspect, creating an atmosphere of Christmas helps to create a religious focus. I think if you have the right mindset, decorations and the giving of gifts can strongly encourage charity within yourself and unite families.” To focus on the true meaning of Christmas, Hopkin said his family centers their celebration on reading about the Savior’s birth in the Bible and Book of Mormon.“I read the Christmas scriptures leading up to Christmas day. My family has an advent calendar my grandmother made for us. It has a verse from the scriptures for everyday of the month up to Christmas.” Scripture study is not the only focus of Hopkin’s Christmas traditions. He said he does engage in some of the more secular elements of Christmas, but there is a point when Christmas can become superficial. “If people get too obsessed with giving the right gift, it can distract you from the real meaning of Christmas.You are showing you love

U.S. consumers were expected to spend about $906 on average on Christmas gifts in 2017.

someone by giving them a gift but driving yourself insane over getting the perfect gift.That keeps you from emulating the Savior through charity.” Finding the perfect gift is something Andraya Tam, a freshman with an undeclared major from California, said it is a problem she faces when trying to buy gifts for her siblings, but she does not think it takes away from her religious focus of Christmas. “Buying gifts can be distracting to some people, but I have grown up in The Church [of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints], so Christmas has always been spiritual for me. Since Christ gave us all his gifts, we also need to give to be like him.” Emulating the Savior is a critical part of observing Christmas, said Tam, because it is how you feel God's spirit. Tam revealed she and her family give gifts to families who do not have enough money to buy their own. Along with service, Tam encouraged everyone to center their celebrations on family because that is a way to focus Christmas on love. “For me Christmas is about family. I spend the whole day with my grandparents, aunts, and uncles. We open all our gifts and we eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner together.” Tam said spending time with family on Christmas is significant because of the joy it brings. She encouraged students staying at BYU–Hawaii for Christmas to get together with friends because it makes the holiday joyous and more than just a day of presents and decorations. According to Sydney Stewart, a freshman majoring in TESOL from California, the gifts and decorations bring her closer to the religious message of the holiday. “I don’t think the over commercialized part of Christmas takes away

In 2016, people purchased 27.4 million real Christmas trees, while only 18.6 million fake trees were sold. (47 million trees were purchased)

from the spiritual part. Personally, seeing the lights and other people giving gifts makes me think of Christmas and Christ’s birth.” She also agreed with Tam and said spending time with family around Christmas helps her feel Christ’s love. Part of Stewart’s family tradition is acting out the Nativity or the account of Christ’s birth, and she said she loves how that tradition made her feel. Overall, Stewart wants Christmas to include gift giving and stories about Santa, but not at the expense of overlooking Christ’s birth. “With my family in the future, I want to emphasize why we have Christmas and why Santa is not the focus, [but] just a symbol which can help represent Christ.” Alyssa Wilson, a freshman majoring in marine biology from Oregon, said although Santa and other symbols of Christmas are not necessarily religious, they still can lead others to the real reason why we observe Christmas. “It has become a secular holiday, which is good for people who aren’t Christians because they can think about Christ. The commercialization of Christmas makes more non-Christians interested in Christ's birth.” Wilson explained she participates in the Light the World campaign that was started by the Church to keep the holiday genuinely Christcentered. “For a couple of years, the Church has been doing the Light the World campaign, and I really like that because it gives you something to do every day to remind you what you're celebrating during December.” Wilson also recommended listening to Christmas music to combat the stress of the holidays. She explained uplifting music is everywhere around this time of year because even famous artists sing about Christ. •

In 2016, the retailers in the United States hired roughly an extra 570,000 people for the holiday season.

In 2018, holiday retail sales in the United States were forecast to amount to about $719.17 billion.

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Christmas traditions around the world B Y E STH E R I N SI GN E

CHRISTMAS STARTS IN SEPTEMBER

Sariah Villalon, a junior from the Philippines studying biochemistry, said in the Philippines, they start to prepare for Christmas when the -ber months come. She explained that on Sept. 1, people start putting up decorations and start blasting Christmas music everywhere. According to Villalon, on Christmas Eve, her family and extended family gather together to celebrate the holiday with each other. “Because we’re such a big family, we won’t fit in one place. So we have to rent a big house someplace else, then we would have Noche Buena. We would have the typical spaghetti, fried chicken, all the good Filipino food… and we would also have karaoke and games as well.” She shared that in her family, they have a tradition where they have a theme for their Christmas gatherings. “This year I think their theme is superheroes. Last year was winter-themed, and I just wore my pajamas or onesie.” One Christmas traditions in the Philippines is called the parol. According to whychristmas.com, a parol is a lantern in the shape of a star made with a wooden frame. The parol is a representation of the star that guided the wise men to Jesus. Another Filipino Christmas tradition is the Noche Buena. Noche Buena is a feast that Filipinos usually have on Christmas Eve, and it is a time where friends and families gather and share all the food they prepared for the occasion, according to thespruceeats.com. Food like hamon [ham], and queso de bola [cheese], pancit, fried chicken, and spaghetti are some of the popular dishes prepared during the Christmas season.

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CHRISTMAS CELEBRATED IN NEW YEAR

Anton Kruglyak, a sophomore from Russia studying computer science, said the New Year is bigger and more important compared to Christmas for those in Russia. Kruglyak explained, “In Russia, we celebrate Christmas on Jan. 7 the same way as how they celebrate in the [United] States on Dec. 25. We decorate Christmas trees and we have presents. According to whychristmas.com, some people fast on Christmas Eve and don’t eat until they see the first star in the sky. Then people would eat a porridge called sochivo or kutia that is made from wheat or rice and is served with honey, poppy seeds, fruits, etc. Children in some areas will also go caroling around houses in their neighborhoods to wish people a happy New Year. In return, the children are given money, cookies or sweets.

FAMILY-CENTERED CHRISTMAS

Sesika Faanunu, a junior from Tonga studying accounting, shared Christmas is one of the biggest holidays in Tonga. She said, “It’s mostly about family. On Christmas, we make food, we visit all our families and relatives, and eat with them.” Faanunu said they do not usually give gifts because they spend their time catching up with family. She and her family prepare traditional food such as lu sipi, ota ika, yams, and cakes for Christmas. One of the traditions they have in Tonga is the tutukupakanava, which is the lining up of coconut husks, setting them up along the beach and lighting them on fire, which from a distance looks like Christmas lights, according to agchurches.org


T H E CO NNECT IO N BET WEEN KFC A ND CH R IST MA S

Will Kawamura, a senior from Japan studying peace building, said during Christmas, she and her family would eat dinner together and sometimes join the ward caroling and have fun at the Christmas party the church organizes. Kawamura also said her family has a tradition called “secret friends” every December. “We write our names down and fold it, try to pick one and whoever’s name you pick, you prepare a present for them.” She explained they do it a week or a few weeks before Christmas. If she picks her father’s name, she has to think of a present for her father and put it in one of the socks they have in their house, so they wouldn’t know who gave it. Kawamura also shared during December, a lot of Kentucky Fried Chicken commercials, commonly known as KFC, are played on televisions in Japan. Her parents sometimes bought chicken for the family and she shared how the Japanese started associating KFC with Christmas. According to Business Insider, there are not a lot of Christmas traditions in Japan because there were not a lot of people who practiced Christianity. So KFC started promoting its brand in the 1970s with the message, “At Christmas, you eat chicken.” The tradition became so big that nowadays, people are told to plan and order their meals in advance, so they would not have to wait in line for hours.

CH R I ST M A S CA RO LS A RO U N D THE N E I G HB O RH O O D

FR ESH CH R IST MA S T R EES A ND G ING ER BR EA D H O USES

Dhika Naraputraka, a sophomore from Indonesia studying marketing, said his family likes to gather for the holidays. One of the things they usually do is hold a Family Home Evening every Christmas Eve. He said, “In my family, on Christmas day, we read scriptures focusing on Jesus Christ’s birth and [we] pray as a family. [We] listen and watch the talks from prophets and apostles too.” “[We] also do Christmas caroling [around] our neighborhood, including the people who are not members, maybe to Muslims or other religions,” shared Naraputraka. In Indonesia, Christmas trees and colorful lights surround shopping malls in the country. Despite Indonesia being populated by Muslims more than Christians, Christians still celebrate Christmas. There are Christmas-themed concerts and an annual Christmas celebration that is held by the Indonesian government. is then broadcasted nationwide, according to whychristmas.com.

Melissa Nguyen Lumogdang, a senior from Ohio studying biochemistry, said her family always buys a real Christmas tree for Christmas and decorates it together with the family. A tradition they also have is called “The 12 Nights of Christmas” where they leave gifts on the doorsteps of families in their ward everyday for the 12 days leading up to Christmas. Lumogdang added, “Another tradition is a Dutch tradition that’s like stockings, but we leave our shoes by the fireplace the night before Christmas, and it’s filled with goodies the next day.” The United States has a lot of different traditions during Christmas time because it is populated with people from different cultures. A few of them include making gingerbread houses, caroling, and families decorating the outside of their homes with lights and statues of Santa and reindeers, according to whychristmas.com. Churches in some areas have special Christmas events where the members join in a reenactment of the Nativity scene.

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A symphony of light through service Following Christ’s example is the theme of this year’s Light the World campaign B Y E L I JAH H AD L E Y

Graphic by Wesley Ng

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or the third year in a row, the Light the World campaign of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will be encouraging its members to share love and kindness as the Savior did. BYU–Hawaii students said they plan to light the world this Christmas season through their examples. Sara Nelson, a junior from Utah majoring in exercise science, said, “I love the work that the Church has been doing the past few years with this campaign. In a world where Christmas is being used as an excuse for people to shop until they drop, we need Christ in our Christmas now more than ever. So many people think of other symbols and icons and buying as much as they can during Christmas, and forget about Jesus.” In October 2018, the Church introduced its new campaign for the month of December, which is slightly different from the years before. According to LDS.org, the Light the

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World campaign challenges “people of all ages and religious backgrounds to not only to share the good news of Christ’s birth but to actively follow His example of service throughout the month of December.” The main theme for this year is “Give as He gave,” which encourages members of the Church to be charitable and serve others as the Savior would. Along with the main theme, this year’s initiative will include four sub-themes, one for each week leading up to Christmas Day. They are, “Light Your Faith,” “Light Your Family,” “Light Your Community,” and finally, “Light the World.” Sei Kuwahara, a sophomore from Japan majoring in marketing, said, “My way to light the world is simply to smile always. It has been good remembering to smile always. I know life is hard, but still we have a reason to smile. “I like the program, because we as members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-

day Saints have a big reason to become a light of the world. This is the only true church of God, and His children deserve to have the light shared among them.” Altanshagai Enkhbat, a sophomore from Mongolia majoring in business management, said, “For me, I feel that lighting the world means lighting up the people. From the article I read in the Ensign, it talks a lot about how we need to be bright at the last day. So I am thinking that if people help to serve others and make others feel good, their spirit adds additional light to the person’s soul.” This year’s Light the World initiative will begin Dec. 1. On this day, members of the church are encouraged to participate in a worldwide day of service and serve others in any way they can. Members are encouraged to use Justserve.org to find service opportunities. Additionally, The First Presidency’s Worldwide Christmas Devotional will be broadcast Dec. 2. •


"I will honor

Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year." - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

Graphic by Anuhea Chen DECEMB ER 2018 59


Merry Christmas! Photo by Wesley Ng

Ke Alaka'i- December 2018  
Ke Alaka'i- December 2018