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november/ december 2014

life + leisure

arctic adventure in

nunavut sail away in the

Caribbean win $50 Visa Gift Card page 37

+ fall comfort food + whisky wonder + the ultimate toy car + great safari escape Publications Mail Agreement #41073506

inside: Continuing dental Education Calendar

where will you meet? scottsdale / edmonton / brisbane / chicago / panama >>


Just for C

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november/december 2014

contents

november/december 2014

Publisher Linh T. Huynh

Editor Barb Sligl

Art Direction BSS Creative

Contributing Editor Janet Gyenes Editorial Assistant Adam Flint Contributors Lucas Aykroyd Timothy A. Brown Michael DeFreitas Dr. Holly Fong Janet Gyenes Tim Johnson Manfred Purtzki Dr. Kelly Silverthorn Roberta Staley Hans Tammemagi

17 33

Cover photo B. Sligl Senior Account Executive Monique Nguyen Account Executives Lily Yu Wing-Yee Kwong

Production Manager Ninh Hoang

Circulation Fulfillment Shereen Hoang

clockwise from top left: B. Sligl; Lucase aykroyd; B. sligl

CE Development Adam Flint

FEATURES

17 Caribbean sailing on a tall ship 33 Nunavut adventure north of 60

Sales, Classifieds and Advertising In Print Circulation Office 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Phone: 604-681-1811 Fax: 604-681-0456 Email: info@AdvertisingInPrint.com

COLUMNS

DEPARTMENTS

8 photo prescription

11 pay it forward

5 November/December mix 25 CE calendar 37 sudoku 38 small talk

Just For Canadian Dentists is published 6 times a year by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. dba In Print Publications and distributed to Canadian dentists. Publication of advertisements and any opinions expressed do not constitute endorsement or assumption of liability for any claims made. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. None of the contents of the magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of In Print Publications. In Print Publications 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada

Get flashy Mission to the Dominican Republic

13 motoring

with Dr. Brent Wong

Toy-car fantasy

14 the hungry dentist

Indulge in comfort food this fall

21 the wealthy dentist

cover photo

Sail the Caribbean on a tall ship, and experience sunsets and coves and sheltered beaches. Story on page 17.

Grow your business in the no-growth dental economy

22 the thirsty dentist

www.justforcanadiandentists.com Printed in Canada.

36 practice management

want to reach us? check out our website!

Whisky wonder The rush to the exit gates

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

3


from the editor Sail away, sail away, sail away. Scenes from a tall-ship tour of the Caribbean. Story on page 17.

clockwise from top

smooth sailing farther afield to South Africa, where summer is in full swing and exotic animal watching awaits (page 5). Hippos, elephants, giraffes, oh my! Tick off the “big five” in the world’s most popular safari nation… If you’re okay with a somewhat more soggy getaway (yet still a warmweather getaway for most of us in Canada), make your way to Wales to retrace the steps of Dylan Thomas. The 100th anniversary of the legendary poet’s birth just passed, and celebrations wrap up in November (as part of the Dylan Thomas Festival that runs from October 27 to November 9, the dates of his birth and death; dylanthomas.com/2014-centenary), but that just means brushing up on Thomas’ profound poetry and visiting the places that inspired him, like his boathouse and the

sail

away!

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Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

people of Laugharne (page 6). Or find a different kind of inspiration here in Canada’s far north. In winter the mercury may dip to -40°C or so, but the dog sledding and northern lights viewing in Nunavut is extraordinary. Or go for some ice-floe or polar-bear tracking. Year-round, Nunavut is an Arctic destination that’s wildly scenic and full of surprises—from hockey-cap wearing locals to narwhal tusks in gift shops (page 33). Pre- or post-travel, either far north or farther south, downtime at home over the holidays is on most of our lists. We have a slew of gift ideas (page 7) for loved ones (or yourself!), including a rather extravagant toy for the guy who has everything (page 13). And ’tis the season for some serious comfort food (yes, mac ’n’ cheese, please; page 14), after which some whisky sipping fireside may be in order (page 22.) Mmmmm… And in the being-thankful holiday spirit, we’re sending out thanks for all the congratulations we received for our Western Magazine Awards nomination for best trade magazine. Being part of this esteemed group is thanks to all of you— our readers, contributors and advertisers. Happy holidays! feedback@InPrintPublications.com

b. Sligl

W

e all have different ideas of what winter means and what we should be doing during these cold and sometimes dreary months. Some of us relish the crisp air, frosty nip and fresh blanket of white stuff (it means skiing, sledding, skating!). But most of us choose to banish that bleakness with warmweather travel…understandably. For those of us in that warm-weather escape camp, a sailing trip aboard the Royal Clipper is a sure cure for the winter blues (page 17). A week-long tour of the Grenadines out of Barbados, anchoring in smaller coves and ports than any cruise ship (think less crowds and more scenic), is a hot Caribbean adventure that’ll give you the luxe sailing experience without having to deal with rigging and steering yourself. Another kind of hot adventure takes you


what/when/where > November/December style | food | shows | festivals | places | getaways | gear…

wild thing

mix

safari bound

Lucas Aykroyd

Enjoy the thrill of “big five” wildlife sightings in the world’s most popular safari nation

Y

ou stare in awe as the towering matriarch of a pride of African elephants confronts you. It’s dusk at the Entabeni Safari Conservancy in South

Africa’s northern Limpopo Province, but there’s no mistaking how widely the elephant’s ears are spread—staking out her turf, as your host ranger quietly informs the tour group in an

open-air Toyota fourwheel-drive. Crashing through thick foliage, nine more elephants emerge into view (nine!), before entering the nearby forest to feed on acacia trees. The matri-

arch joins them, and there’s an indescribable feeling of peace and wonder. That’s a taste of the wildlife adventure that awaits guests at the Legend Golf and Safari Resort.

Less than three hours away by car from Johannesburg, South Africa’s biggest city, this 22,000-hectare, malaria-free area is less frequented than Kruger National Park. >>

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

5


mix

literary Wales

November/December

>> Yet its opportunities to spot “Big Five” animals like elephants, rhinos and lions are as magnificent as the layered red mass of Hanglip Mountain, which looms over the private game reserve. On an early-morning drive through the savannah, a herd of impala grazes by the dirt road. As the red sun rises rapidly, you find a female black rhino munching on leaves. Like the massive hippopotamus you saw wallowing in a pond the night before, her speed is to be respected, says the ranger. Both animals can run up to 40 kilometres an hour. The ranger keeps his eyes peeled for tracks and spoor as you drive on. It pays off in sightings. A troop of baboons shrieks and wrestles its way into the trees. Out on the plains, wildebeest stand impassively staring, while nocturnal black-backed jackals doze in the dust, and warthogs scuttle off with whimsical urgency. This all happens before 7 am. And there’s much more to do here: quad biking, archery, fishing and hot-air balloon excursions. Adventurous golfers can board an Astar helicopter for a breathtaking two-minute ride up Hanglip Mountain, tee off a cliff toward the world’s longest par-three hole 400 metres below (dubbed the “Extreme 19th”), and then thrill to an even more roller coaster-like descent. The resort’s signature 18-hole golf course was designed by 18 international stars, including Canada’s Mike Weir. At night, dig into a buffet feast at the outdoor White Lion Boma as traditional drumming echoes in the background. Then relax in your spacious suite with a soaker tub, big picture windows, and wired Internet. It’s amazing all these creature comforts go hand-in-hand with some of our planet’s wildest creatures. — Lucas Aykroyd

hippos, elephants, giraffes, oh my!

getaway

For more on South Africa, go to southafrica.net. For the Legend Golf and Safari Resort, see legendgolfsafari.com. >>

fall

READ 6

Rambling

in the

footsteps

“Each October on his birthday Dylan Thomas would walk past the towering castle, along the edge of the bay and up to the wooded brow of Sir John’s Hill,” explains Bob Stevens, the mayor of Laugharne. We are on the two-mile Dylan Thomas Birthday Walk, strolling from sign to sign and bench to bench, enjoying the lyrical imagery of Thomas’ October Poem, which he penned to describe this trail on his “thirtieth year to heaven.” The vast sweep of the Taf estuary with fishing boats bobbing in the distance dominate the view. On the 100th anniversary of Thomas’ birth, I’m touring south Wales, revelling in the year-long binge of readings, festivals and performances. I had left Swansea, Dylan’s birthplace, and driven westward to Laugharne, a pretty little village on the south coast of Wales. Dylan, the greatest Welsh poet of the 20th century, called it “a legendary, lazy little black magical bedlam by the sea.” He visited frequently and lived here for the final four years of his 39-year life. After the Birthday Walk I pass the weathervaned tower of the town hall and the looming walls of the castle—it seems every town in Wales is

read + go

classic

read

DYLAN THOMAS Pick up a classic this fall, and make it this Welsh legend. Curl up and (re)discover his characters, humour and poetry…then consider yourself sufficiently inspired to visit his boathouse. dylanthomasboathouse.com

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

of

Dylan Thomas

dominated by a history and blood-soaked fortress. I visit the Boathouse, now a museum and tea house, where Dylan lived stormily with wife Caitlin and children. Next to the Boathouse is a small boatshed with a grand view over the bay. I imagine Dylan writing in the shed, a beer bottle and ashtray on the table and crunched up sheets of paper littering the floor. Later, sipping a pint in the same corner of Brown’s Hotel where the roistering, hard-living Dylan often sat, I hear laughter in the dusky premises, for Dylan was always the life of the party and had a sonorous voice with a subtle Welsh lilt. His public readings, particularly in America, became almost as famous as his written works. Surreptitiously, I stare at the pub occupants, for it’s said they inspired many of the eccentric characters in Under Milk Wood. The sun is low as I enter the cemetery where Dylan and Caitlin lay under a simple, wooden, white cross surrounded by rows of solid, stone monuments. In spite of the epic legacy of work he created, Dylan died in poverty. The wind whispers Dylan’s words: “Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

— Hans Tammemagi


gift savvy

mix

1

wish list

globalgiving

November/December

2

Take inspiration from Afghanistan to Italy when bestowing gifts this season Written + produced by Janet Gyenes

1 the LADY WHO LUNCHES What woman wouldn’t want a treat, such as these confections— Paloma’s Sugar Stacks in 18-karat gold with “crystallized” pave diamonds. Delicious indeed. Paloma’s Sugar Stacks ring, $6,350; pendant, $2,750, Tiffany & Co. tiffany.ca

3 4

2 the collector When Lucite meets brass, the look is pure glam. These Globo boxes by Jonathan Adler are eye-catching display pieces, plus they keep her best baubles hidden from prying eyes. Starting from $200 each, Modern Shop. www.modernshop.ca 3 the free spirit Eye candy or arm candy? Both! She can look chic and ward off evil with this ultracool clutch embroidered by women in northern Pakistan. $199, Far and Wide Collective. farandwidecollective.com 4 the global citizen A walnut jali (lattice) trivet exhibits the exquisite craftsmanship of artisan and jali master Masoud Abdul Baqi. The gorgeous geometric pieces were typically used in place of windows in homes in Afghanistan. $49, Far and Wide Collective. farandwidecollective.com 5 the connoisseur When a rich Scotch ale tarries in 18-year old Highland whisky casks, beer aficionados start to salivate. But don’t expect the giftee to share a bottle of Innis & Gunn’s Barrelmaster’s Reserve—after all, it’s a limited edition. From $4.95/ea., Innis & Gunn. innisandgunn.com

For her For him 7 5

5

6 the early adopter The Apple Watch promises to be a constant companion with myriad features to keep its wearer in a constant state of awe—and distraction. It comes in 18 models and is available in early 2015. Starting from $350, Apple Canada. apple.com/ca

6

2014 editor’s pick

7 the infomaniac With 456 pages jampacked with information and graphics aplenty (280!), Understanding the World. The Atlas of Infographics (TASCHEN, 2014) will satisfy those who are wont to wonder. Available in December. $46, Indigo. chapters.indigo 8 the casanova The essence of Italy is distilled in this alluring Italian Citrus cologne by D.S. and Durga. Blood orange and cold-pressed lemon mingle with undercurrents of oak moss and musk. Cue the seduction. $110, Still Life; stilllifeboutique.com 9 the ENTERTAINER The best hosts always have a little extra something to elevate an occasion. Why not the copper-topped battery-operated beer foamer by Danish company Menu, which creates a thick foamy head on a beer faster than you can say Skål! $33.99, Bed, Bath & Beyond. bedbathandbeyond.ca

Foam + sip!

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8


p h o t o p r e s c r i p t i o n m i c h a e l d e f r e i ta s Michael DeFreitas is an award-winning photographer who’s been published in a wide variety of travel publications. With his initials, MD, he’s been nicknamed “doc,” making his photography prescriptions apropos.

flash it

Send your photos and questions to our photography guru at feedback@ inprintpublications.com and your shot may be featured in a future issue!

Shedding some light on flash photography

don’t be afraid to flash

But not too much… the key to great flash photography is making sure that flash output never overpowers the available light.

get flashy

When photographing people, even in favourable lighting conditions, use flash for the subtle twinkle achieved; catch-light adds liveliness to your subject’s eyes. In overcast conditions, like under storm clouds in an Andean village in the Sacred Valley of Peru, flash is a must to decrease blur and bring out colours. Flash also helps when shooting still life subjects like big mugs of beer and steamers full of dumplings inside dark bars or eateries. But do be sure to “dial down” the flash output so that you don’t overpower ambient light.

8

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

michael defreitas

D

ark storm clouds gathered as I made my way towards an artisan market in the small Andean Inca village of Chinchero, high on the windswept plains of Peru’s Andean Mountains. Bracketed between the lush fertile fields in the Sacred Valley and the snow-capped Cordillera Vilcabamba, the Inca believe that Chinchero is the mythical birthplace of the rainbow. Oh well. I found my Inca ladies busy knitting, weaving and spinning brightly coloured llama wool into even more vibrant textiles. I quickly realized that the darkness was not only muting the fabulous colours, but it was forcing me to use a slow shutter speed that increased the chance of unwanted blurred movement as the ladies worked. To help bring out the colours, I mounted my hand-held flash to a one-metre sync cord and attached the sync cord to the hot-shoe of my camera. This allowed me to hold the flash high and well away from the camera simulating overhead light and reducing the likelihood of “ghost” shadows behind my subjects. I photographed the ladies working, checking after each shot for any pesky ghosts. By far the biggest mistake photographers make when using flash is allowing the flash output to overpower the ambient light. This causes unflattering, unnatural looking light that washes out colours and rims subjects with shadows. It also produces a stark 2-D look I call “the dear in the headlights look.” Therefore the key to great flash photography is making sure that flash output never overpowers the available light. Many of the latest DSLRs have a flash exposure compensation control that allows you to select a negative flash output (one or two f-stops less than the ambient light). It operates similar to the exposure compensation button on your camera body. Since my Inca ladies were working at different speeds I decided to shoot on shutter priority so I could control the speed (slower speed for the knitting and faster speeds for spinning the wool). One of the women was busy knitting so I set my shutter priority speed to 1/125 sec to avoid blurring her hands. I composed the shot and noted in the viewfinder the exposure the camera automatically selected. It showed f8, so I switched my flash to “auto” and selected


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photo prescription [continued]

PRO TIPS for using flash

> Flash is white and considered “cold” light (a high Kelvin

temperature). To warm it up a little, tape a thin strip (one centimetre wide) of yellow tissue paper or a piece of orange Rosco film (from an art supply shop) to the front of the flash.

> Anything used to soften or tint your flash output will also

reduce its output, so make sure you adjust your flash settings accordingly.

> If your flash doesn’t have red-eye reduction always take two

quick shots. The first flash will help constrict your subject’s pupils reducing the chance of red-eye with the second shot. There is less chance of red-eye outdoors because pupils are already constricted.

> When shooting subjects with glasses, have them lower or turn

their heads slightly away from the lens. This will reduce flash reflections in the glasses obscuring their eyes or reflecting back into the lens.

> If you can’t adjust your flash output try moving further away or closer to your subject to lessen or increase respectively the amount of light hitting your subject.

gear up Flashes typically produce a harsh directional light. Using a diffuser is a great way to “soften” or disperse some of the flash output. You can soften flash by taping a white tissue over the front of the flash or by using one of the nifty white plastic “light modifiers” manufactured by LumiQuest, Gary Fong, Vello or Westcott. They mount overtop the flash head (even your pop-up) and do a wonderful job of diffusing or dispersing the light. Most run from $12 to $20.

an f4 output (two stops less than the ambient light reading). I took a series of shots from a low angle so I wouldn’t cast a shadow on the wall behind her, adjusting flash settings as I went. Under these same lighting conditions most modern DSLRs, set on auto or program mode, will either automatically increase the ISO or select a slower shutter speed. High ISO in low-light conditions can cause unsightly noise (graininess) in dark areas of the image and slower shutter speeds contribute to blur from camera shake or subject movement. A better solution in this situation is to use a flash and shutter priority or manual mode. Another benefit of using flash, even in good lighting conditions, is the catch-light it adds to your subject’s eyes. The subtle twinkle gives your subject a more “alive” look. This method works well for people and animals with dark eyes. Without this sparkle, dark coloured eyes usually reproduce as black lifeless blobs. Camera pop-up flashes work okay for these situations, but because they are so close to the lens, they increase the chance of “red-eye” and the lens can block some of the flash output (especially if you have a lens hood installed on the lens). A wide-angle lens records the scene well below the lens, but prevents the popup flash from covering the same space with light. The resulting half-moon “lens” shadows at the centre-bottom of the frame have ruined many a great image. Before heading off on your next adventure, practise using flash outdoors and indoors. Learn how to “dial down” flash output so it doesn’t overpower the ambient light. It takes a while to get the hang of it, but in this digital age, at least you’re not wasting film.

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Helping you realize the value of your practice

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ANNIVERSARY

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pay i t f o r w a r d

r o b e r ta s ta l e y

Roberta Staley is an award-winning magazine writer and the editor of the Canadian Chemical News, published by the Chemical Institute of Canada. She is also a magazine writing instructor at Douglas College and a graduate student at Simon Fraser University.

born of black waters

A dentist undertakes missions to the Dominican Republic to provide oral healthcare

courtesy Dr. Brent Wong

O

n an old garbage dump outside the industrial harbour city of Puerto Plata, on the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, a metamorphosis is taking place. Thousands of teetering shacks, cobbled together with metal scraps and planks of old wood, are slowly being replaced with cement block homes that can endure the Caribbean nation’s ferocious storm season. Called Aguas Negras, or Black Waters—a description of the chronic flooding that swamps homes during heavy rains—the barrio was recently christened Nuevo Renacer, meaning New Birth. Dr. Brent Wong of Shine Dental in Winnipeg has been part of this rebirth. Starting in 2008, Wong, his wife Wendy and his dental staff have undertaken missions three times a year to the Dominican Republic to provide oral healthcare and medical care as well as build homes for Nuevo Renacer residents. Organized through Wong’s humanitarian organization Shine the Light Initiative, the eight-day missions are no Caribbean picnic. Wong’s 40-strong team of Canadian volunteers: nurses, physicians, carpenters and mechanics as well as dental professionals, work from 8 am to 9 pm in tropical heat and challenging working conditions. (A family affair, Wong’s two boys, Isaiah and Jonah, accompany their parents on these trips and help out where they can.) Even though he runs a dedicated dental implant clinic in Winnipeg, Wong and his team utilize all their professional skills, undertaking extractions, implants, root canals, dentures and fillings, to fix the myriad oral problems endured by Dominican patients. Because Wong’s team sets up clinics in different locations throughout the barrio, they often make do with primitive work conditions. Instead of a dental chair, Wong’s patients will lie on beach lounge chairs, forcing him to hunch over nearly double for much of the day. “The physical toll is huge,” Wong says. Like other places in the developing world, the severity of dental problems of the Dominican people is linked to junk food, refined sugars and fizzy pop. The introduction of such consumer products has preceded oral health education, resulting

in severe caries in both children and adults, maintenance and repair. It is important, says says Wong. “I call it the Gospel of Coca-Cola Wong, that the missions help people to and Doritos, which is forcing missions like help themselves. “We do them a disservice mine to remediate the problems.” Caries are if we create dependence.” evident even in toddlers, who have suckled This January will be Wong’s 32nd trip to baby bottles full of pop since infanthood. impoverished countries. Helping improve Kids’ adult molars are often “bombed the health and welfare of the poor is out. It’s sad, because it’s all about a lack of something, he finds, that nurtures his spirit education,” Wong says. Exacerbating the and propagates a sense of purpose. Wong’s dearth of knowledge are economic factors—pop is often cheaper than bottled water, he adds. Education is a key pillar of Shine the Light. Wong and his team instruct the patients on proper brushing techniques and distribute toothbrushes and toothpaste. Wong has also made a video, translated into a dozen languages and distributed in 40 countries around the world, that he distributes When not runto patients to reinforce ning a dedicated oral hygiene and dental dental implant clinic in instructions. Winnipeg, Dr. Brent Wong The needs of first dental trip abroad was and his dental staff aid the poor of Nuevo to Mozambique and Zambia Dominican patients in Renacer are many and shortly after graduating from the barrio. For more on Wong has enriched the University of Manitoba Dr. Wong, see page 38. the missions with a Faculty of Dentistry in 2000. variety of expertise that is The trip “completely changed my intended to help the people life,” says Wong. Another epiphanic forge a career path to raise them out moment was meeting Wendy on a blind of poverty and improve their standard of date (their friends decided the two living. Wendy, for example, has presented humanitarians would be perfect for one clinics on breastfeeding to new moms, another). The friends had good instincts, encouraging them to nurse for as long as as the couple quickly embarked upon a possible to keep babies healthy throughout journey of helping others. They began their all-important first year. Past missions dental missions to Mexico, but after a few have included an esthetician, who has years the escalating drug war made the schooled young women in the art of country too dangerous to visit. So the beauty treatments such as manicures and couple focused their energies on the place pedicures. This past October, Wong’s team they got married—the Dominican Republic. included an aircraft mechanic who taught Each trip saw a few more houses go up, small-engine repair on motorcycles. In more people left a bit healthier, more January, a car mechanic will travel with people left with a bit more hope. As Wong the mission to teach basic car engine says, “Life isn’t just about ourselves.” November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

11


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Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014


motoring

D r . k e l ly s i l v e r t h o r n

Dr. Kelly Silverthorn is Just For Canadian Dentists’ automotive writer. He tries to keep one convertible and/or one track-day car in the family fleet.

… Gift i dyea wh o

for th e gu th i n g! h as every

fantasy fulfillment

The slot-car industry generates more than a billion dollars annually…and is growing

courtesy david beattie

T

he 2008 financial crash hit Greater Detroit hard. After David Beattie lost his printing industry job he faced finding his ideal new vocation. He remembers thinking “painting coconuts” as his new career’s karmic goal. Fortunately for automobilia enthusiasts everywhere David seems just as happy having evolved to be the world’s pre-eminent creator of fantasyfilled slot car systems. His starting price is $75,000 USD for the base Slot Mod 7-footby-16-foot size, and it goes up (potentially way up) from there. David fell into this career field mostly by accident. Sure, everyone in Detroit has car juice running through their veins, and his older brother had worked for Bruce McLaren’s Can-Am racing team. However, what really got things going was a 2004 slot-car track Christmas present from his wife, ordered from the Hammacher and Sclemmer catalogue. With unexpected time on his hands, David enlarged and improved it over the years—a lot. A friend asked him for similar improvements. One thing led to another, as they say, and six years later Fortune 500 clients such as Audi AG and Progressive Insurance are ordering elaborate Slot Mod 12-foot-by-20-foot tracks that entertain their patrons streetside Toronto or at trade shows across the continent. You’d think the first Sony Playstation and Gran Turismo video game would have been the death knell of the slot car industry. Not so. It seems there remains a market for those who want to literally build their own tracks, physically touch the cars and zone out into that metronome-like race pattern of muscle memory to get the best performance out of a slot car. In fact, the slot-car industry generates more than a billion dollars annually.

Revenues are growing as boomers entreat their kids and grandkids into how they mispent their own youth. In North America 1:32 scale rules, while in Europe 1:24 is also popular. Around the world 1:87 scale also has a following. While the Eldon, Strombecker and Tyco brands that I remember from my childhood Eaton’s Christmas catalogue (I’d gleefully find that page first!) are no longer marketed, longrunning Scalextric, Revell, Nimco, Carrera, AFX and others robustly remain. A complete 1:32 consumer-intended slot car system of 20-foot plastic track length can be had for $200 – 250. Additional Starting at cars are widely USD $75,000, the available in the racetracks that David $30 – 60 range. Beattie creates are like Car choice works of art or, as his selection is tagline says, “Racing tremendous… beyond expectations.”

forming local clubs. The consumer-intended dual-track we remember as kids will be replaced by something hobbyist-grade, wood-track-based, multi-lane and larger. The print magazine Model Car Racing is a must-have resource for those moving to the dizzying scope and detail of the hobbyistsatisfying set-ups. David’s own multi-lane home track reached 170 feet at its zenith. So, yes, the intrepid handy-man/woman can fashion a hobbyist track for far, far less than the price fetched by David Beattie’s pro-built masterpieces. Yet David’s are sought by the rich and famous. His tracks demonstrate creativity, authenticity and striking detail. Slot Mods’ tag line reads “Museum quality, hand-crafted raceways for the ultimate garage, showroom, man cave or commercial interactive attraction.” The David Beattie/Slot Mod story has captivated the print and video media. The Zulu Alpha Kilo Agency won a 2013 Clio

modern or classic from numerous disciplines including Formula One, IndyCar, NASCAR, DTM, LeMans, rally, drag racing and so on. Beattie has collected more than 400 slot cars in his preferred 1:32 scale. If the slot-car hobby hooks you, others so afflicted end up finding each other and

Award for its short film appropriately titled Painting Coconuts. The film alone is worth a trip to the Slot Mod website/facebook page. And while you’re there, check out some of the tracks they’ve built. My favourite is the one inside the Porsche 917 LeMans racer. Painted coconuts indeed.

slotmods.com

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

13


the hungry dentist Dr. Holly Fong is a practising speech-language pathologist with three young children who’s always trying, adapting and creating dishes.

comfort food

As the weather turns cold, warm up with mac ‘n’ cheese

broccolini mac ’n’ cheese 500g fusilli or any tubular pasta 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 4 tablespoons flour ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce white pepper to taste 250g extra old cheddar, coarsely grated 150g old cheddar, coarsely grated 2 cups 2% milk ¾ cup half-and-half (10% cream) 2 tablespoons fine bread crumbs 1 bunch of broccolini, rinsed, ends trimmed and cut into half-inch pieces (½ pound) 1 clove of garlic, peeled and smashed with the blade of a knife 1 tablespoon canola oil salt to taste

Preheat oven to 400°F. In a large heavy skillet, heat the oil over high heat until hot and shimmering, but not smoking. Add garlic and broccolini. Sauté until tender with some brown bits, approximately 3 – 4 minutes. Season with salt to taste. Discard garlic and set aside. Melt butter in a large saucepot over medium heat. Add the flour and stir for about 4 minutes until the roux is frothy and lightly golden. Stir in milk and whisk constantly for about 10 minutes until the sauce thickens. Add the mustard and Tabasco sauce, stirring to blend. Remove from heat and let cool for about 2 minutes. Cooling

(serves 6)

the sauce will prevent it from separating and becoming mealy after adding the cheese. Mix three-quarters of the cheese into the sauce, stirring until melted. Season with pepper. Fill a large six-quart pot three-quarters full with water. Add two tablespoons salt and bring to a boil. Cook the pasta for one minute. Drain. Add pasta and broccolini to the sauce, stirring gently to coat the noodles. Pour into a large shallow baking dish. Combine remaining cheese and breadcrumbs. Sprinkle mixture over top and bake for 20 minutes. If desired, broil for 4 – 5 minutes to create a brown chewy crust. Serve.

eese Mac ‘n’ ch n ay? ch ardon

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14

OH YES!

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

F

all is a very busy season at my house. Perhaps it’s the return to school and extra-curricular activities for the children—followed by the holiday season—that makes it so hectic. During this time, I find myself turning towards comfort foods, especially those that can be easily frozen and reheated. A favorite is macaroni and cheese. This great North American classic is simple to make and tastes so much better made from scratch than what can be had from a box. It is essentially a gooey, rich milk-based sauce with tangy cheddar. The addition of mustard and hot sauce brings out the tangy flavours of the cheese. It’s also a dish that lends itself well to improvisation; you can dress it up with the addition of roasted garlic, mushrooms, broccoli, cauliflower and even lobster or crab (think high-end restaurants). However you choose to make it—dressed up or plain—use a ridged tubular pasta and bake it in a large shallow dish so that there’s plenty of chewy brown crust. I love scraping up the crunchy dry bits that stick to the pan. A Californian Chardonnay with some oak is a perfect accompaniment. The Dry Creek 2009 Foggy Oaks Chardonnay has aromas of spice and pear followed by a hint of oak, and refreshing tastes of vanilla, citrus, and pepper. This well-balanced wine enhances the flavours of the cheese. Yum.

A Californian Chardonnay with some oak is a perfect accompaniment. Try the Dry Creek 2009 Foggy Oaks, a wellbalanced Chardonnay that enhances the flavours of the cheese.


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ONE-YEAR FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM IN IMPLANT DENTISTRY

San Diego, CA Starting January 2015 Key Educational Objectives

Hands-on Sessions:

Surgery-related topics:

Hands-on workshops will be provided on models and pig jaws.

Surgical anatomy and physiology, patient evaluation for implant treatment, risk factors, vertical and horizontal spaces of occlusion, bone density, implant surgical placement protocols, computer guided implant placement and restoration, immediate load techniques, mini implants, bone grafting before, during and after implant placement, alveolar ridge expansion using split-cortical technique, guided bone regeneration, sinus lifting through the osteotomy site and the lateral window, block grafting and BMP-2 / ACS graft with titanium mesh. Prosthodontics-related topics: Impression techniques, restorative steps for implant crown and bridge, implant prosthodontics for the fully edentulous patients, high-water design, bar-overdenture, CAD/CAM designs, biomechanical principles, biomaterials, implant occlusion and more.

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Tuition: 20-Days Certificate Tuition ......... $12,900 Limited availability. Call today! Tuition includes: 300 CE units, hands-on workshops, live surgeries, two quintessence textbooks, manual and course certificate.

Faculty: Dr. Louie Al-Faraje, Dr. James Rutkowski, Dr. Philip Kroll, Dr. Christopher Church, Renzo Casellini, CDT and more.

Easy online registration at www.implanteducation.net

or call 858.496.0574


t rt ar av veel lt ha et w hom rld e

SA iL y w A A The Royal Clipper tall ship moored just off of Soufrière, as seen from the hills of St. Lucia.

The allure of discovering the Caribbean under sail story + photography by barb

sligl

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

17


W

travel the world

hat’s the limit on watching big, fat glowing orbs dip behind a gently undulating sea? This is the spectacle I see every night that I’m aboard the Royal Clipper tall ship in the Grenadine Islands. Stunning sunset after stunning sunset. And the one night I don’t track the sun’s descent from on deck, it’s because I’m doing so on the beach with a beer in hand, listening to the waves lap ashore. It’s a Lorraine Blonde brew I sip this sunset, on a secluded strip of sand in the cove of Les Anses d’Arlet in Martinique. French families lounge on the beach and in the smattering of seaside bars and restaurants, murmurs of bon soir and alors in the air. Here you can sip pastis, bien sûr. Happy dogs patrol the beach as if making sure everyone is suitably blissed out, much like the resident cat sprawled out on the bar railing, catching the last rays of that sun. Between beers I take a cue from le soleil and dip into the sea. The water is so warm, it’s almost bath-like. Bats begin to come out, dive-bombing for nibbles in the twilight air as the Royal Clipper’s strings of lights come aglow. I linger, suspended in this twilight scene so long that I catch the last tender back aboard. We weave our way through the slew of sailboats moored and bobbing here in Les Anses d’Arlet overnight, past some of these sailors now making their way ashore in dinghies for an apertif and dinner of fresh-caught langoustine or other French/Caribbean fare. The tall ship is anchored

18

on the edge of this hum of twilight activity. The purpleand-gold sky is turning inky and I’m just in time for the daily ritual that takes place at each sail away. The crew sets the sails to the classical strains of the Vangelis soundtrack to the film about Columbus’ sailing, 1492: Conquest of Paradise. And it feels like we’re in a movie as the staggered sails—42 of them!— across five masts billow open, flapping and filling with wind. Romantic. Stirring. Epic.

Martinique, St. Lucia—passengers gather on deck to listen and watch the sails unfurl. Once she gets going in full-on old-school style (the Royal Clipper is a replica of a 1902 ship, the Preussen, and the largest and only fivemasted full-rigged sailing ship built since), people go below deck for dinner, where no set seating means a musical chairs of sorts—each night I chat with a new group of people, from football talk with Brits

The Royal Clipper aglow at twilight just after sunset.

Market in St. George’s, Grenada.

Tobago Cays Marine Park.

The ritual is a bit of a wow surprise the first night upon embarkation in Bridgetown, Barbados, and continues each sail away thereafter—and, like those sunsets, it doesn’t get old. All throughout this Caribbean sailing throughout the Grenadine Islands—St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Tobago Cays, Bequia, Grenada,

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

and Germans to philosophical discussions with an American family with college-age kids on spring break. The commonality is a love of sailing—not cruising. One longtime avid sailor who sails out of Tortola himself every year, shares sailing terms—those crossbeams or horizontal spars on the masts are actually called “yards” and

“sheets” is the proper term for ropes controlling the sails. For him, being on this tall ship is a more luxurious and responsibility-free way to be under sail. All the romance and none of the roughing and rigging it. And those who want a more handson taste of the sailor’s life can climb one of the masts part way and help tug on ropes. I just try to stay out of the way of the always-hopping international crew. The Star Clippers line (three tall ships, of which the 439-foot Royal Clipper is the largest) is Swedish, and besides the crew of übertan and -tall blonde Swedes, Dutch and Danes in bright white uniforms, there are Sri Lankans and Indians manning the ship alongside Captain Sergey. The Captain shares stories of his racing and regatta experience with tall ships, including a race that follows Columbus’ route to the Canary Islands and on to Puerto Rico. Our sailing adventure may be minor in comparison, but each tiny cove and uncrowded island feels like a revelation. There are no cruise ships in sight. Our first stop is to Union Island, a small, rugged-looking island between St. Vincent and Grenada. Here I meet a local fisherman in his 60s, who comes here to fish and collect pods off tamarind trees. He shows how to open the pod and suck the tangy fruit from the seed. I chase the sweet-and-sour flavour with a Hairoun beer and marvel at how a cold Caribbean brew never fails to taste like manna on a beach. That night, I scan the sky to try pinpoint stars and think of a phrase from the novel I’ve brought along for beach reading: “the silver pepper of stars.” They’re F. Scott Fitzgerald’s words from a book set on a different coast, but seem rather apropos for the night sky overhead and aboard this tall ship. And the next day more pretty prose comes to mind at Tobago Cays


travel the world Hanging out in the netting under the bowsprit of the Royal Clipper.

Local kids welcome passengers in Soufrière, St. Lucia.

Tools of the tall ship; big piles of rope coiled up on the deck.

Picnic-table perch at Tobago Cays Marine Park.

Ship’s tender with a view, to and from the Royal Clipper.

Hairoun beer, brewed in St. Vincent and enjoyed on the beach at Union Island.


travel the world

The crew steps out on the bowsprit as the sun sets.

Sign of the Caribbean: palm trees.

The Royal Clipper glides past the Pitons of St. Lucia in full sail.

Sailing away…

At a coconut farm on St. Lucia, during one of the ship’s excursions.

Marine Park, which might as well be called a marine paradise. Here, I snorkel with a stingray and an octopus before climbing amongst cacti and agave-like plants to the top of this uninhabited island to glimpse the Royal Clipper far below. She’s surrounded by dozens of smaller craft, a grand dame with her coterie. A sand spit stretches far out into the blue water—the very same one that made an appearance in the Pirates of the Caribbean movie. After my topside stroll, a weathered picnic table beckons under the shade of palms as a secluded spot to take it all in. I’m not sure how it can get any better, and yet it does with each stop. Or everything just keeps culminating into a whole that’s greater than any of the stops. In St. Lucia, the little town of Soufrière is flanked by the volcanic spires of the Pitons. And, as if that’s not enough wow factor, the crew steps out on the ship’s bowsprit as we sail away. At Bequia, the harbour of Port Elizabeth is full of sailboats and bars and restaurants strung along the water’s edge, reached by a seawalk to which people’s dinghies are tied. I have yet another doesn’t-taste-like-this-at-home beer at the Whaleboner Bar, sitting atop a massive whale vertebra that’s now a stool. I watch yet another sunset from my perch. And, no, there’s no tiring of le couché du soleil. Seems this Grenadine Islands sailing pulls no punches with grandiose, almost cliché gestures, because back on board, the sun and sails now both set and Vangelis’ music playing as the Royal Clipper glides out of Bequia’s port, a glow appears from behind the island. It’s a full moon rising.

+

if you go sail away, sail away, sail away

Grenadine Island sailings start November and run through until the end of March. The seven-day sailing trip includes food and water sports (sailing, snorkelling, waterskiing­—with the blond-bombshell crew) and starts at USD $3,310 per person. Excursions like the “Hike at the Seven Sisters Waterfall” in Grenada or the “La Soufrière Volcano Hike” are extra. Embarkation and debarkation take place in Bridgetown, Barbados, itself worthy of a few days of exploration before or after the sailing. And if the Grenadine Islands aren’t your thing, Star Clippers offers plenty of Leeward Island sailings in the Caribbean, as well as the Mediterranean, Panama Canal and ocean crossings. For more info on dates and itineraries go to starclippers.com.


wealth y dentist m anfred pur tzk i Manfred Purtzki is the principal of Purtzki & Associates Chartered Accountants. You can reach him at manfred@purtzki.com.

risktaking, focus &

growing pains

determination

Growing in a no-growth dental economy

It takes risk to get a practice off the ground. It takes the other strengths of business focus and determination to keep the practice growing

1. We want to have 95% of all patients scheduled at all times. No one leaves the practice without an appointment.

2. We want to reactivate 80% of our inactive patients who have been in the clinic within the last three years. 3. We want to grow revenues by a minimum of 15% this year. 4. We want to reduce overhead by 7% this year. First-class business systems are essential to monitoring the progress and achievement of your goals. Business systems are the key component of a thriving practice, and you need to review and/or replace your systems every three years. The hard-core traits of risk-taking, focus and determination help you build a successful practice, but to sustain the longterm growth and excitement, you also need to be a relationship builder. Build loyalties by creating an inspiring work climate and by having caring relationships with your staff and patients.

solution from September/October 2014 contest

at your practice through the money making lens. Dental practice management today is about one thing: having the systems and metrics to give you daily feedback on all aspects of the practice so that you and your team can dissect the numbers and take action immediately. Following a thorough analysis of the data, new goals are set weekly and monthly. Determination is the third ranked talent of the top entrepreneurs. Gallup describes determination in terms of work ethic and the drive to achieve; 97% of the high-scoring Inc. 500 business owners said that they intend to grow significantly. Being highly determined means that you have the ability to overcome obstacles and persevere despite setbacks. It is risk taking, business focus and determination that will help you grow your practice in a tough dental market. If you are not growing, you are declining. The revenues of 75% of practices in the last three years have declined. The number of new patients is down significantly, and unless you increase your practice revenues, you can expect to work 7 to 10 years longer than you expected. A good starting point to putting your practice on the growth track is to set goals or targets. Each team member is assigned a target for each week or month, and then reports on the progress of meeting that goal. Here are some examples of targets:

solution from page 37

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hy are some practice owners experiencing double-digit growth each year, while the revenues of most other dental practices keep shrinking? Do these practices just happen to be in a perfect location, or are these dentists gifted with talents needed to build a super successful practice? The list of the top-500 small business owners as published in the September edition of INC. magazine provides an answer. The global research firm Gallup created a questionnaire to assess the strengths of the Inc. 500 business leaders and compared the results with those from a national sample of 2,700 business owners. Gallup found that the top 500 entrepreneurs absolutely dominated in three areas compared with the national sample: risk taking, business focus and determination. Without taking risks, there is no practice ownership. It is very risky to start a practice from scratch, but you optimize your chances for rapid growth and increased profits compared to a dentist who buys into an existing practice. Gallup concluded that those with a talent for taking risks have a very optimistic perception of the risk, combined with a rational approach to decision-making to mitigate that risk. It takes risk to get a practice off the ground. It takes the other strengths of business focus and determination to keep the practice growing. Gallup defines business focus as an emphasis on profit, goals, and metrics. You are basically looking

sudoku 2 harder solution 1 7 8 5 4 9 3 6 2 2 6 3 1 8 7 4 5 9 9 4 5 3 6 2 1 8 7 8 3 2 4 5 6 7 9 1 6 5 4 7 9 1 8 2 3 7 9 1 2 3 8 5 4 6 4 8 6 9 1 3 2 7 5 3 2 9 8 7 5 6 1 4 5 1 7 6 2 4 9 3 8

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sudoku 1 easier solution 8 1 6 9 3 4 2 5 7 5 7 9 8 2 6 1 3 4 2 4 3 5 1 7 9 8 6 9 5 2 4 6 8 3 7 1 7 6 4 1 9 3 8 2 5 1 3 8 7 5 2 6 4 9 4 9 5 3 8 1 7 6 2 3 2 1 6 7 5 4 9 8 6 8 7 2 4 9 5 1 3

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November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

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the thirsty dentist janet gyenes Janet Gyenes is a magazine writer and editor who likes to dally in spirits, especially when discovering something like corenwyn jenever (a gin-like Dutch spirit)—straight or in cocktails like the “bramble.” Have a boozy idea or question? Send it to feedback@inprintpublications.com

whisky decoded

{whisky speak} dram

A globetrotter’s guide to where to imbibe

W

hisky is a spirit that conjures much romanticism, legend and sense of place, perhaps more so than, say, vodka or gin. It’s simple in its ingredients—grain and water—but mystifying once you delve into its history. Scan the menu at Shebeen Whiskey House in Vancouver, for instance and the globetrotting whisky list lingers in Scotland, traversing from Highlands to Lowlands, evoking the romance of mist-shrouded lochs and glens. It stretches out to the isles of Mull, Skye and Islay, among others, before crossing the North Atlantic and Irish Sea to the Emerald Isle, where whisky (spelled whiskey) was born. Familiar names include Bushmills in Northern Ireland, a stone’s throw from the basalt pillars of the Giants Causeway, and Jameson in County Cork, where stone castles and crosses punctuate the impossibly green landscape. The whisky list then trips away from tartan and tweed and into the bluegrass territory, where American whisky, in Kentucky at least, is better known as bourbon, before editor’s moving north to Canada, with a smattering of brands from sea to sea, including

pick

{sipping tips}

that regal-named fave, Crown Royal. In order to understand whisky’s globetrotting ways, it’s essential to take a quick trip back in time to unravel its evolution.

luck of the Irish

You couldn’t weave a yarn about whisky’s origins that would stand up to the colourful truth. After all, St. Patrick—a Scot—is credited for teaching monks in Ireland how to distil in about 432 AD, long before the spirit arrived in Scotland. But they were hardly the first people to discover the alchemy of coaxing cheap ingredients into uisce beatha vitae, Gaelic for “water of life”; St. Patrick learned it from the French. Well before that, Moorish scholars were distilling spirits and even earlier, ancient Egyptians were crafting potable spirits from flowers or grapes, while the Chinese and Tibetans were doing the same with rice and millet. What makes Irish whisky so? Most Irish distillers still favour traditional swan-necked copper pot stills over the less-labourious column stills. By law, after distillation, the spirit must be aged in wooden casks—for no fewer than three years—on the island of Ireland. If the whisky is solely made from malted or unmalted barley, it can be called “single malt,” whereas “blended whisky” is created

*

when malt and grain spirits are mixed together. Irish whisky is often triple distilled and aged in oak casks that once used to hold sherry or rum—all which make it light in colour and smooth, not smoky, compared to its Scottish counterparts.

Scotland’s great divides

An unknown Scottish poet once quipped, “The Irish invented whisky, but only used it as a liniment for their sick mules. Only my fellow countrymen would have thought of the idea for drinking whisky.” Or so the story goes. Scotland records indicate that its firstever distilled spirit, made from barley malt, was for none other than King James IV. But that was in 1494 and Scotland’s cherished spirit has changed since then, thanks to its taxation system, which led to the initial Highland-Lowland divide. Lowland whiskies lean to the lighter side: paler in colour and more citrus in flavour. The Northern Highlands, where brands such as Glenmorangie and Dalmore hail, offer sweet, rich malts. Head south for lighter, continued on page 24 >> drier and fruitier

Skip the ice and sip whisky neat or dilute with a bit of water to “open up” the spirit.

Want to expand your sipping repertoire? Here’s where to start your whisky-themed globe-trotting…

classic {scotland} Tobermory 10 Year Single Malt Scotch Whisky // Isle of Mull

Colour Bright lemony gold // Nose Hints of grass, malt, gingerbread, stewed fruit syrup and finely polished oak // Palate Smooth and velvety; tang of fruit, spiced gingerbread, acacia honey and aniseed // Finish Ginger and spicy oak, bitter chocolate and almond, fading with sea salt

22

A measure equivalent to an eighth of an ounce, but in “Scotch speak” — a wee bit

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

winning blend {SOUTH AFRICA} Three Ships Five Year Old Premium Select // Blend of South African + Scottish whiskies Colour Full golden with a sherry red tinge // Nose Robust and full with an aromatic, peaty nose // Palate Slightly sweet, but with full peaty character // Finish Long, full, warm

new player {SWEDEN} Mackmyra Svensk Whisky // First edition single malt whisky Colour Pale gold // Nose Fruity, with citrus, pear, honey and cereal notes // Palate Citrus, caramel and honey // Finish Dark chocolate


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thirsty [continued] whiskies, which become more full-bodied as you head east and get peatier in the west. Highlands’ Speyside whiskies, with brands such as Glenfiddich and The Macallam, tend to be more complex single malts, with pear and apple notes and perhaps a hint of smoke, though they’re usually made with un-peated malt. These are heralded as among the best of the Highlands. Campbeltown single malts are considered the “most manly” of whiskies, owing to their pungent aromas and dryness, while the wet climates of the Islands impart their own peaty distinctiveness, with peppery brands such as Talisker, and Tobermory, which offers smooth notes of fruit and spice. Islay whiskies may be the most aggressive tasting, with flavours described as oily, salty and smoky.

>> continued from page 22

Canada’s hardy rye In its early days, Canadian whisky was made of various cereal grains—wheat, barley, corn—until enterprising distillers added a little something extra, which gives it its telltale sweetness: rye. The cold-hardy grain was brought to the country by German and

Dutch immigrants, but nowadays, the grain is used primarily for flavouring, adding spicy notes such as ginger, clove and cinnamon. Corn now dominates Canada’s whisky trade, although Crown Royal also includes malted barley and rye in its award-winning recipe. In Alberta, Highwood Distillers’ eponymous rye whisky also includes wheat, while Alberta Premium Whisky is made from 100% rye. Smaller producers, such as Glenora Distillery in Nova Scotia and Okanagan Spirits in BC are using 100% barley to produce their single malts. To borrow from the tequila/mezcal saying, all whisky is rye, but not all rye is whisky. Of course, before it can be called whisky in Canada, the spirit must be aged for a minimum of three years.

stop everyday folks from making their own tipple. Even George Washington distilled his own rye whisky. In Kentucky, though, corn was the predominant crop, and it became bourbon’s de facto birthplace. Although the Bluegrass State’s cash crop imparted a sweetness to the spirit, it was the oak aging that helped make bourbon the revered spirit it is today. Using charred brand-new white oak barrels infuses the spirit with its characteristic vanilla and caramel notes. By law, to be called bourbon, grain must be at least 51% corn and charred barrels can only be used once for aging; afterwards they’re retired and commonly put to work for aging other spirits, including Scotch. Not to be outdone by Ireland and Scotland in the truth-is-stranger than fiction category, Bourbon County, the namesake for America’s Native Spirit, as enshrined in law by US Congress in 1964, does not produce bourbon.

Whisky is a spirit that conjures much romanticism

America’s sweet corn sensation American whisky has had rollicking history, thanks to taxes, the temperance movement and more than one war. But that didn’t

The 36th Australian Dental Congress Wednesday 25th to Sunday 29th March 2015

Invitation from the Congress Chairman On behalf of the Local Organising Committee of the 36th Australian Dental Congress, it is with great pleasure that I invite you to attend Congress and enjoy the river city of Brisbane. Over three and a half days, highly acclaimed International and Australian speakers supported by contemporary research, will present a wide range of subjects relevant to practice. These presentations will be complimented by hands on workshops, Lunch and Learn sessions, specific programmes for members of the dental team. Social activities will be available for relaxation purposes. The Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre is adjacent to the Southbank Precinct on the banks of the Brisbane River. Nearby is the Queensland Performing Arts Complex, the Queensland Museum and the Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art. A comprehensive industry exhibition will be held alongside the Congress enabling delegates access between scientific sessions to view the latest in equipment and materials. Come and join us for the scientific programme, the opportunity to meet colleagues and the experience Brisbane has to offer. Dr David H Thomson

Educating for Dental Excellence Congress Chairman 24 Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014 36th Australian Dental Congress

facebook.com/adacongress twitter.com/adacongress youtube.com/adacongress adc2015.com


scottsdale / edmonton / brisbane / chicago / panama … | c a l e n d a r

ce

An intern ation a l guide to con tinuing dental Education

scottsdale

fall 2014 + beyond Fairmont’s Well & Being Spa

The Rusty Spur

McDowell Sonoran Preserve Golf specialty massage

Troon North Golf Course

The Boulders Resort

scottsdale is a wild-west and five-star-luxe mash-up, where you can kick up dust off-road in the desert and then kick up your boots on the dance floor…

Photos courtesy of Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau

S

et between a vast, untamed wilderness and one of the largest cities in the Southwest, Scottsdale truly offers the best of both worlds. A place of sumptuous spas, top-drawer restaurants and five-star hotels, it’s a desired destination for those seeking a super-luxury vacation. But this sunny city offers more than gratifying massages and gourmet bites. Bordered by towering cacti and home to true cowboys, Scottsdale is officially—according to its motto—“the west’s most western town,” something that’s always delivered with a touch of class. Start by getting out of town to gain a better feel for the Sonoran Desert. Covering large parts of the American Southwest and Mexico, this vast and varied landscape looks straight out of a Western movie set, with red soil, velvet mesquite and towering saguaro cacti. It’s an environment that just beckons exploration—and a company called Green Zebra offers adrenaline-fueled adventures that run straight through the heart of it. From their base just east of the city, you’ll get behind the wheel of a Tomcar—a sort of dune buggy crafted and utilized by the Israeli army—and race down miles of dusty desert paths, roaring over hills and

(CE events in Scottsdale are highlighted in blue.)

screaming around tight turns. Then head back into town to learn more about this arid ecosystem at Desert Botanical Garden. Here, you can wander down pleasant paths through 140 acres of Sonoran flora and fauna, taking in more than 50,000 plant exhibits. And then, for a true taste of the West, take a walk with Arizona Food Tours. Their Taste of Old Town Scottsdale trip is a three-hour culinary excursion into the quirky—and delicious—restaurants that populate this quaint and historic district. Learn about the city’s history, from its founding by an adventurous army chaplain in the late 19th century, to the cosmopolitan present, along the way downing everything from juicy beef sliders at an Old West spot called the Rusty Spur, to chicken satay at Malee’s Thai Bistro. Return for a full dinner, then finish off with a nightcap at the Coach House, a loveable dive bar that decks the halls with thousands of Christmas lights during the holidays. And if you still have a bit of energy, head up to the Buffalo Chip Saloon, and sprawling indoor and outdoor bar that offers live bull riding; sign a waiver, and you can even give it a try. But if bull riding isn’t your thing, no worries—Scottsdale

offers a wide variety of other opportunities to show off your athleticism. Home to some of the best golf courses in the nation, try your swing at Troon North—one of the most stunning desert courses in the Southwest, or TPC Scottsdale, home to the PGA’s Phoenix Open. Or watch the pros do their stuff—Scottsdale is an ideal jumping off point to watch professional hockey, baseball, football and basketball, just a few minutes’ drive away. If you tire of playing and exploring, slow things down for one of Scottsdale’s many full-service spas. Check in at the beautiful Boulders Resort, Four Seasons or the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, all of which offer top-notch treatments. At the latter’s Well & Being Spa, you can easily spend an entire day—go for acupuncture, a full-body massage, or get a tailored fitness plan, which includes an evaluation using cutting-edge equipment to assess your BMI and other vital stats before an expert instructs you on how to slim down in the future. After all that good Western food, you’re probably going to need it. — Tim Johnson For more on what to do in the desert getaway of Scottsdale this fall and winter, go to experiencescottsdale.com.

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

25


Cosmetics/Aesthetics

Anesthesia

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Nov 08-11

Victoria British Columbia

Local Anesthetics And Pain Control

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

uvcs.uvic.ca

Oct 31Nov 02

Vancouver British Columbia

Inhalation And Oral Sedation

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 29

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Apr 17May 03 2015

Seattle Washington

I.V. Sedation Training For Dentists

Conscious Sedation Consulting

888-581-4448

sedationconsulting.com

Through 2015

Western Canada

FOCUS Dental Education Series: Part II

F.O.C.U.S.

604-922-3465

drracich.ca

Vancouver British Columbia

AAID Vancouver MaxiCourse

Vancouver Maxicourse

888-teeth-99

vancouvermaxicourse.com

Jan 25Feb 04 2016

Tahiti & French Polynesian Islands

Cementation Sanity – Eliminating Confusion & Problems With Indirect Restoration Placement

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Nov 08-11

Victoria British Columbia

The Impact Of All-Ceramics On Contemporary Dental Practice: An Update

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

uvcs.uvic.ca

Dec 05

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Modern Material Science And Technology: Using Products To Enhance Restorative Success

Through

Dental Materials

2015

new CE to Lincoln Just For Canadian Dentists Weeth Lecture 2015 be placed Nebraska

University of Pittsburgh

412-648-8370

pitt.edu

University of Nebraska Medical Center

402-472-7993

unmc.edu

Tempe Arizona

Nov / Oct Treatment 2014 Planning Workshop

Clinical Mastery Series

480-489-5551

clinicalmastery. com

Nov

Red Deer Alberta

And Effective Endodontics 604 - 681 Efficient - 0456

DENTSPLY International

717-849-4273

dentsply.com

Dec 05-06

Vancouver British Columbia

Course #1: Shaping, Cleaning, And Obturation Of Root Canal Systems

North Shore Endodontics

604-987-2285

vancouverrootcanals.com

Feb 13-14 2015

Foster City California

Mastering Your Endodontic Excellence: How Far Can You Get? A Tailor-Made Course For Alumni

Interdisciplinary Dental Education Academy

650-578-9495

ideausa.net

Mar 13-20 2015

Beaches Turks And Caicos

Endodontic Solutions: Strategies For Performing Endodontic Treatment Predictably, Profitably & Painlessly

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Through 2014

Western Canada

FOCUS Dental Education Series: Part I

F.O.C.U.S.

604-922-3465

drracich.ca

Multiple Dates

Multiple Locations

Understanding Dementia November 18 - London, ON November 19 - Markham, ON November 20 - Vaughn, ON November 21 - Toronto, ON

Biomed

877-246-6336

biomedglobal. com

Diagnosis and Planning

For:Jan 08

2015

May

Issue: 01-02 2015

Endodontics

Fax:14

Attn:

General Dentistry

Email:

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Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

GREECE TURKEY CARIBBEAN &

July 11 - 18, 2015 The Challenging Dental Practice

www.seacourses.com

September 20 - 27, 2015 Pediatric Dentistry Canadian pricing


General Dentistry

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Nov 07-17

Panama Canal Cruise

Comprehensive Dentistry

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327

seacourses.com

Nov 14-16

Edmonton Alberta

Hands On Restorative Case Preparation And Insertion

The Manhattan Training Centre

780-428-2799

manhattantrainingcentre.ca

Dec 12

Vancouver British Columbia

Annual VDDS Midwinter Clinic

Vancouver & District Dental Society

604-461-4171

vdds.com

Dec 27Jan 03 2015

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Dental Healthcare Delivery

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Jan 31Feb 07 2015

Kauai Hawaii

35th Annual Hawaiian Dental Forum

Dental Seminars & Symposia, LLC

952-922-1707 See Ad Page 28

dentsem.com

Jan 27Feb 08 2015

Australia & New Zealand Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Comprehensive Dentistry

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Feb 08-15 2015

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Dental Infection Control And Safety - 2015 What’s In Your Infection Control Program?

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 31

continuingeducation.net

Feb 24Mar 09 2015

Malaysia & Myanmar Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Dental Healthcare Delivery Emerging Healthcare Issues

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Feb 26-28 2015

Chicago Illinois

150th Midwinter Meeting

312-836-7300

cds.org

Mar 5-7 2015

Vancouver British Columbia

Pacific Dental Conference

BC Dental Association

604-736-3781 See Ad Page 27

pdconf.com

Mar 14-21 2015

Western Caribbean Cruise

Dental Excellence

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 26

seacourses.com

Mar 19-21 2015

Winnipeg Manitoba

Western Canada Dental Society Bonspiel

Western Canada Dental Society

306-359-3945

wcdentalsociety.ca

Mar 25-29 2015

Brisbane Australia

36th Australian Dental Congress

Australian Dental Association

02-9906-4412 See Ad Page 24

adc2015.com

Jun 13-20 2015

Alaskan Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Comprehensive Dentistry

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Jul 12-25 2015

Western European Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Dental Healthcare Delivery

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Aug 02-09 2015

Alaskan Cruise

Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736

kennedyseminars.com

new CE to Chicago Dental Society be placed

Pacific Dental Conference March 5-7, 2015 Vancouver, BC Canada

Meet up with your colleagues from across the country! Three days of varied and contemporary continuing education sessions are offered, covering topics relating to clinical excellence, practice excellence and personal development (something for the entire staff) Over 130 speakers and 150 open sessions and hands-on courses to choose from, as well as the Live Dentistry Stage in the spacious Exhibit Hall Two day tradeshow with over 300 exhibiting companies Registration and program information at...

www.pdconf.com

Save money by registering before January 16th, 2015

Featured Speakers

Gordon J. Christensen Christensen Bottom Line

Lesley David Oral Surgery

Cliff Ruddle Endodontics

Jim Grisdale Periodontics

Carla Cohn - Pediatrics Timothy Caruso - Ergonomics Samson Ng Uche Odiatu - Health Fernanda Almeida - Sleep Apnea Oral Medicine/Pathology Mark Morin - Digital Imaging Greg Psaltis - Pediatrics Anthony (Rick) Cardoza - Lasers Elliot Mechanic - Aesthetics Check our website for the complete speaker roster

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

27


Occlusion

Medical / Dental Issues

Implantology

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 30

implantseminars.com

Through 2015

Multiple Locations

Dental Implant Continuum Seattle,WA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Boston, MA And Additional Cities Located In Warmer Locations!

Through 2015

Multiple Locations

Live Patient Program Miami, Florida, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, San José, Costa Rica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 30

implantseminars.com

Nov 09-15

La Romana Dominican Republic

7-Day Intensive Live Surgical Training At The Gran Bahia Principe La Romana 5 Star Hotel Resort

Blue Sky Bio

786-249-4510

liveimplanttraining.com

Nov 13-16

San Diego California

Advanced Hard And Soft Tissue Program With Cadavers Hands-On Training

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574

implanteducation.net

Nov 11-16 & Feb 3-8 2015

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 (2 Weeklong Sessions)

Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia. edu/ce

Nov 15-16 & more

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 (6 Weekend Sessions) Nov. 15-16, Jan. 10-11, Feb. 7-8, Mar. 14-15,Apr. 18-19 & May 2-3

Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia. edu/ce

Feb 08-15 2015

Southern Caribbean Cruise

American Academy Of Dental Education Restoring Dental Implants: Current Prosthetic Options

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 31

continuingeducation.net

Jan 22Feb 03 2015

Australia & New Zealand Cruise

Implants For GPs

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Jul 13-25 2015

Cinque Terre Tuscany & Amalfi Coast

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Through 2014

Educational new CE toMindware Seminars beMoreplaced Profitable Implant Treatment; Make Money Mindware Educational Before You Get Out Of Bed Monday Morning Than You Do The Rest Of The Week!

Seminars

Cancun Mexico

The 2013-14 Medical-Dental-Legal Update

American Educational Institute

888-725-8308

aeiseminars. com

Nov 08-11

Victoria British Columbia

Management Of Dental Patients With Medical Problems: How They Affect Your Treatment

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

uvcs.uvic.ca

Nov 29-30

Vancouver British Columbia

The Use Of Oral Appliances For The Treatment Of Snoring And Obstructive Sleep Apnea

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 29

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Dec 11

Scottsdale Arizona

CPR Certification & Recertification

Arizona Dental Association

800-866-2732

azda.org

Nov 13-15

Anaheim California

Functional Occlusion – From TMJ To Smile Design

The Dawson Academy

727-823-7047

thedawsonacademy.com

Feb 11-13 2015

Scottsdale Arizona

Occlusion In Clinical Practice

Spear Education

866-781-0072

speareducation. com

Feb 25-26 2015

Chicago Illinois

AES 60th Scientific Meeting - Interdisciplinary Dentistry In The 21st Century

American Equilibration Society

847-965-2888

aes-tmj.org

don’t miss the 35th annual

Dental Forum in hawaii! maui january 31-february 7 &/OR kauai february 7-14

Dental Seminars & Symposia, LLC

28

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

For details & registration, visit

For travel information, call Linda

or call 952.922.1707

or email linda@travelleaders-cf.com

www.dentsem.com

800.826.6644


topic

sponsor

contact

website

Oral Pathology

ce

where

Feb 14-15 2015

Maui Hawaii

CE1455: To Biopsy Or Not To Biopsy: Interactive Soft Tissue Oral Pathology For The Dental Practitioner

University of Washington

206-543-5448

uwcde.com

Jun 14-21 2015

Alaskan Cruise

Oral Pathology In Dentistry

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 26

seacourses.com

Oral Surgery

calendar

when

Nov 21-23

Vancouver British Columbia

Advanced Soft Tissue Surgery

Pacific Implant Institute

604-868-9700

pacificimplantinstitute.com

Feb 07-14 2015

Mayan Riviera Cruise

Oral Pathology & Oral Medicine

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Jan 16-17 2015

Carlsbad California

Advanced Mechanics And Case Finishing Series: 2014-2015

Henry Schein Dental Specialties Group

760-448-8717

hsdsg.com

Feb 15-22 2015

Caribbean Cruise

Focus On Orthodontics

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

May 15-17 2015

Tulsa Oklahoma

Robert G. Gerety Comprehensive Orthodontic Education Program

Henry Schein Dental Specialties Group

760-448-8717

hsdsg.com

Sep 20-26 2015

Tour of Southern England

Clinical Concepts For Success In Orthodontics. The Top Ten Mistakes Made In Orthodontic Clinics, How To Avoid Them & How To Fix Them

Mindware Educational Seminars

mindwareseminars.com

Oct 03-17 2015

Mediterranean Cruise

new CE to Over 100 Tips To Make Prosthodontics More Fun Kennedy Professional be placed Education Seminars & Profitable

888-574-8288 877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Nov 14-15

Miami Florida

An Update In Pediatric Restorative Dentistry Symposium

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

312-337-2169

aapd.org

Dec 04

Minneapolis Minnesota

Clinical Grand Rounds For The Dental Team: Pediatric Dentistry

University of Minnesota

612-625-9439

dentalce.umn. edu

May 29-30 2015

Gainesville Florida

Pediatric Dentistry Practicum

University of Florida

352-273-8481

ufl.edu

Sep 20-27 2015

Caribbean Cruise

Pediatric Dentistry

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 26

seacourses.com

Dec 10

New York New York

Dental Lasers: What Wavelengths Are Right For Your Practice?

Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia. edu/ce

Feb 14-15 2015

Scottsdale Arizona

The Periodontal-Restorative Interface

Spear Education

866-781-0072

speareducation. com

Apr 10 2015

Seattle Washington

Update In Periodontics

University of Washington

206-685-8258

washington.edu

Periodontics

Pediatric Dentistry

Orthodontics

ce

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

29


Hygienists/Assistants

Radiology/ Imaging

Practice Management, Technology and Planning

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

800-866-2732

azda.org

Nov 06

Scottsdale Arizona

Pitfalls And Promises: Purchasing Your Dental Practice

Arizona Dental Association

Jan 23 2015

Vancouver British Columbia

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Pages 10 and 32

roicorp.com

Jan 23 2015

Vancouver British Columbia

Dental Team Day… “The Challenges Of Being A Boss (or Having One!)” And “How To Avoid Complaints” With Speakers From The College Of Dental Surgeons Of BC

Vancouver & District Dental Society

604-461-4171

vdds.com

Feb 06 2015

Mississauga Ontario

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Page 10 and 32

roicorp.com

Mar 14-21 2015

Western Caribbean Cruise

Comprehensive Dentistry And The Dental Team: The Pursuit Of Excellence

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 31

continuingeducation.net

Apr 10 2015

Dartmouth Nova Scotia

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Pages 10 and 32

roicorp.com

Jul 11-18 2015

Greece and Turkey Cruise

Happiness, Fulfillment And Success In Today’s Changing Dental Practice Environment

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 31

continuingeducation.net

Jul 11-18 2015

Greece and Turkey Cruise

The Challenging Dental Practice

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 26

seacourses.com

Oct 11-23 2015

Galapagos Islands & Tour of Machu Picchu

Social Media Marketing & Branding

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Sep 28Oct 05 2015

Mediterranean Cruise

The Ultimate Opportunity To Optimize Your Practice – Cruise Into Semi-Retirement

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Pages 10 and 32

roicorp.com

Nov 21-23

Vancouver British Columbia

Cone Beam CT (CBCT) A Hands On Approach To Technique And Interpretation!

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 29

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Jan 17 2015 Jan 17 2016

Gainesville Florida

Oral And Maxillofacial Radiology Internship

University of Florida

352-273-8481

ufl.edu

Ongoing

Kelowna British Columbia

Certified Dental Assistant Certificate

Okanagan College

877-755-2266

okanagan.bc.ca

Nov 08-11

Victoria British Columbia

Embracing The “Doctor” In Dental Medicine: The Dental Team In Comprehensive Health

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

uvcs.uvic.ca

Apr 03 2015

Scottsdale Arizona

CR Dentistry Update

CR Foundation

801-226-2121

cliniciansreport. org

new CE to be placed

For feedback, requests or to have your course featured email dentalce@inprintpublications.com

Attend the Dental Implant Continuum™ or the Live Patient Program and Gain the Confidence and Knowledge to Place Implants and/or to Bone Graft Dental Implant Continuum™ Features:

• Practical Knowledge for Implant Placement • Lectures, with Pig Jaw and Cadaver workshops • Continuums are offered in: Seattle, WA Chicago, IL New York, NY Boston, MA Additional cities located in warmer locations!

Live Patient Program Features:

• Place up to 30 implants, overseen by expert surgical supervision in 3-5 days • Program structure matches your skills to your surgeries • Live Patient Programs are offered in: Miami, Florida Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic San José, Costa Rica Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

305.944.9636

www.implantseminars.com

30

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014


For more information—Call 800-422-0711 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Continuing Education, Inc. University at Sea™

Outstanding Value for your Time and Resources

Combine Live, Accredited Continuing Dental Education and Personal Renewal Time with Family & Friends

February 15, 2015 Boston University Goldman School of Dentistry Dental Infection Control and Safety – 2015 What’s in Your Infection Control Program? 12 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Fort Lauderdale Royal Caribbean's Allure of the Seas Course Fees: Dentists $495 - Dental Staff $395 February 8, 2015 American Academy of Dental Education - Restoring Dental Implants: Current Prosthetic Options 9 CE Credits 7-Night Southern Caribbean from San Juan Royal Caribbean's Adventure of the Seas Course Fees: Dentists $495 - Dental Staff $395 March 14, 2015 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Western Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale Royal Caribbean's Oasis of the Seas Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff June 14, 2015 Oral Dermatology and Pathology 14 CE Credits 7-Night Alaska Round-trip from Vancouver, Canada Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Infinity Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff July 11, 2015 Happiness, Fulfillment and Success in Today’s Changing Dental Practice Environment 14 CE Hours 7-Night Greece and Turkey Athens to Istanbul Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Equinox Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff

August 15, 2015 Boston University Goldman School of Dentistry Save The Date Contact Hours: TBA 7-Night Alaska Round-trip from Seattle, Washington Holland America's ms Westerdam Course Fees: TBA September 20, 2015 Pediatric Dentistry 14 CE Hours 7-Night Western Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale Royal Caribbean's Independence of the Seas Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff November 7, 2015 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Hawaiian Islands Roundtrip from Honolulu Norwegian Cruise Line's Pride of America Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff

All Activities are either AGD or ADA Approved For specific Continuing Education Program approval please visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET Ask about our Guest Travels Free Program

We can plan or joint sponsor/accredit your next meeting Call 800-422-0711 or

727-526-1571

or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET Our in-house travel division can handle your personal travel needs

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists 31 Florida Seller of Travel Reg. #14337


PROFITABLE PRACTICE Presenters: This is a great time to start planning for 2015. This seminar will be a joint presentation from noted industry leaders to discuss: •

The best tax strategies for you; deductible expenses to save money for investment

How practice values are determined in today’s market

Freedom from ownership! Exiting with dignity and profitability

Learning the most effective way to sell your practice

Financing and best practices from both a purchaser and vendor perspective

Macro view of financial markets with a focus on succession planning

Sale structure (asset vs. share vs. hybrid)

Employee severance obligations

A strong recare system positions you to maximize the value and appeal of your practice at the time of sale

CITIES/DATES/TIMES

BROKERAGE

ROI Corporation, national dental practice appraisal and sales leader, specializes in dental practice appraisals, transitions, brokerage, buyer education and business management across Canada. Many dentists are planning for the increasing volume of practices coming to market in 2015 and beyond.

BMO Bank of Montreal provides customized financing and banking solutions to dentists across Canada. Our dedicated healthcare banking specialists can deliver a comprehensive offering to meet all your financial needs.

MNP is one of the largest accounting and business consulting firms in Canada, providing client focused accounting, taxation and consulting advice. Succession planning and thinking about retirement needs to start as early as possible in the lifecycle of your practice. By developing an effective succession strategy now, you can save on tax, invest smartly and decide on the best plan according to your circumstances and personal goals heading into the future.

Vancouver Patterson Dental Branch Office Friday, January 23rd, 2015 8:45am - 3:15pm GTA/Mississauga Delta Meadowvale Hotel Friday, February 6th, 2015

8:45am - 3:15pm

Dartmouth Patterson Dental Branch Office Friday, April 10th, 2015 8:45am - 3:15pm Edmonton Patterson Dental Branch Office Friday, May 1st, 2015

Exclusive to Patterson Dental, Recall System Pro is assisting hundreds of practices to achieve their business goals with the dental industry’s first complete and comprehensive recall solution.

8:45am - 3:15pm

Calgary Patterson Dental Branch Office Saturday, May 2nd, 2015 8:45am - 3:15pm

Seminar fee is $299 +tax for doctor; non-doctor spouses/partners are highly encouraged to attend at no charge. Continental breakfast and lunch will be served.

To register please visit: profitable-practice.com/news-events Or for more information please contact: 1-888-764-4145 or info@profitable-practice.com

N


travel at home

north of 60 in

Nunavut Arctic adventures, rich wildlife and northern traditions await in Canada’s newest territory

lucas aykroyd

story by lucas aykroyd

Mama polar bear and her cubs, swimming off the rocky shores of Harbour Island in Hudson’s Bay.

r pol ar bea vi ewi n g!

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

33


travel at home

Local kids in Nunavut. Chunks of ice dot the landscape year round.

frigid Arctic wind is blowing in my face when the Inuit guides in our open motorboat alert me to the polar bears paddling in the water. My heart pounds faster as I squint ahead. At first, the bears are three white dots in the distance, just off the stark, rocky shores of Harbour Island in Hudson Bay. Could those merely be chunks of ice? No, they’re moving with purpose. As we get near, I can make out their majestic profiles: a mother and two cubs, sticking closely together, almost like synchronized swimmers. Sometimes the cubs cling to their mother’s back. Our experienced guides pilot the boat incredibly close, just far away enough not to perturb the bears. Awestruck, I almost forget to reach for my camera. This is the Canadian North at its finest. This is Nunavut. Although it’s eight times the size of the United Kingdom and would be the world’s 15th-largest country if independent, Canada’s newest territory is only home to

34

The gargantuan, glittering view en route to Nunavut.

some 30,000 inhabitants. Carved out of the Northwest Territories in 1999, Nunavut’s name means “our land” in Inuktitut, the language of the native people who make up 85 percent of the population. Nunavut made headlines this past summer when archaeologists discovered a ship from the doomed 1845 quest of Sir John Franklin to find the Northwest Passage. Nunavut is also front and centre in the Canadian government’s bid to assert its Arctic sovereignty. Yet it still feels undiscovered, uncharted. Visitors come here to experience a remoteness, vastness, and wildness that is extraordinary even in a country of Canada’s grandeur. It takes three Calm Air flights for me to get to my Nunavut destination—travelling via Winnipeg, Churchill and Rankin Inlet to Repulse Bay—more than 950 kilometres northeast of Churchill, right on the edge of the Arctic Circle. I gaze out the window at the gargantuan, glittering expanse of Hudson Bay. During a brief layover in Rankin Inlet, I get my first taste of Nunavut life. Roaming the dirt streets, I spot a huge billboard. Topped with real caribou antlers, it features

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

local hockey hero Jordin Tootoo. The first Inuit-born NHLer sports the Canadian jersey he wore at the 2003 IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship. I browse through the Ivalu gift store, which sells everything from Inuit herbal tea ($9.50) to a sealskin iPod cover ($40). Returning to the airport, I admire an epic Inukshuk, looming atop a rock mass. The iconic cairn of stacked stones gained international fame as the logo of the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Resembling a human figure, the stone monument is a giant marker, representing good hunting grounds, a place where food is stored, or even a historical event. After my last leg of some 500 kilometres, I land in Repulse Bay, a hamlet of 1,045 that’s a traditional, working Inuit community. Hunting and fishing are the backbone of Repulse Bay. It’s no place for hardcore vegans—but the locals kill for food, not for fun. ATVs and snowmobiles, parked everywhere, help the Inuit negotiate this shadeless, surreal landscape. You can find Arctic char fish drying outside the heavily insulated houses with metal roofs. Even beneath the summer

clockwise from top left: Lee Narraway / Nunavut Tourism; Lucas Aykryod (3)

A

Whale bones on an isolated beach.


travel at home

Icon of the north, the Inukshuk. Roaming musk ox. Arctic char, drying outside. Nunavut local, wearing a Canadiens cap.

clockwise from top left: Heiner Kubny; Hans G. Pfaff / Nunavut Tourism; Lucas Aykryod; Lee Narraway / Nunavut Tourism (2)

Wildlife abounds, like this walrus.

sun, though, it’s a little chilly. And come winter, it can drop to -40°C. Not that frigid temperature should dissuade anyone; people come year-round for floe-edge trips, dogsledding and northern lights viewing. As a hockey fan, I feel entirely at home with all the people in NHL gear here. At the Naujat Co-op grocery store, I spot two guys wearing Boston Bruins and New York Rangers caps in the lineup. A little Inuit girl in a Detroit Red Wings toque smiles shyly up at me. And then that sense of familiarity suddenly dissipates—when I notice enormous narwhal tusks for sale behind the counter. Soapstone carvings I’d expected, but this? I ask the assistant manager if I can take a closer look. “Sure,” he says, adding: “We had 91 narwhal tags this year.” (In other words, Fisheries and Oceans Canada permitted the hunting of 91 of these whales, who can grow to nearly six metres in length, and whose tusks, used for foraging, are the basis of the unicorn legend.) I grip a seven-foot-long ivory spear for a photo op. Priced at $15 an inch, it would

if you go

Check out nunavuttourism.com for more on this great Canadian territory. For easy sampling north of 60 take The Great Canadian it at that, I take a Travel Company’s “Best of the Arctic” guided hike past tour, which also includes snorkelling with beluga whales and visiting the Inukshuks to a Prince of Wales Fort fur trade post cliffside site where in Churchill, Manitoba, en route the Thule, ancestors to Nunavut; greatcanadianof the Inuit who arrived travel.com.

cost more than $1,200. Perhaps another time. There’s no lack of otherworldly creatures here. You never know when you’ll encounter wildlife in Nunavut. Thousands of caribou and musk ox roam the territory, while walruses, seals, and birds abound at sea. And those bears. If, like me, you’re a city-slicker qablunaq (Inuit for “white person”), it’s particularly vital to be aware of polar bears, who sometimes wander into Repulse Bay. “Always be aware of your surroundings,” instructs my Great Canadian Travel Company guide. “Never get low down in the rocks. Stay visible, and don’t run from a bear. If you encounter one, back up slowly and talk to him. Drop clothing for him to sniff at.” Happily, nothing like that happens when I venture over to the hamlet office to get my “Polar Bear Chapter, Order of Arctic Adventurers Certificate.” It’s dated and witnessed to show that I visited this isolated community. Not content to leave

1,000 years ago, once resided. En route, we learn about native plants. On an isolated beach, I view the huge, defleshed skulls of bowhead whales captured in recent decades. And then I sample the arctic, quite literally. At an Inuit feast at the community centre, I have Arctic char soup (delicious) and fresh muktuk (not so much). The latter is narwhal whale blubber. To my Vancouver-schooled, sushi-centric taste buds, it evokes rubbery sashimi. Traditional singing and drumming follow. But nothing quite matches the pounding of my heart when those polar bears swim past. I watch as the mother leads her cubs ashore and they vanish over a rocky ridge, into that remoteness, vastness and wildness that’s unlike anywhere else.

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

35


practice management timothy brown Timothy A. Brown specializes in dental practice appraisals, brokerage, consulting, locum placements, associateships and practice financing across Canada. You can reach Timothy at timothy@roicorp.com.

rush to the exit gates How does the current market impact sellers and buyers?

W

hat are the key factors that influence the future of dental practice values in Canada? While discussing this matter with numerous industry leaders and experts, I was cautioned about writing about it. Ordinarily, somebody in my position—in practice management—wouldn’t document such predictions and opinions, but here’s my take: the current dental practice market is in a bubble, a market peak of valuations and resultant sale prices is imminent and a decline in practice values is inevitable. The 2013 Ontario Dental Association Economic Report to the Profession, authored by the highly regarded firm of R.K. House & Associates Ltd. says, “After years of prosperity, it [the dental profession] now stands on the threshold of a very uncertain future.” There are numerous factors that could lead to these predictions coming to fruition: 1. Interest rates have been at all-time lows for one of the longest periods in recent history and they will increase—perhaps not drastically, but certainly they can’t go any lower. Many of today’s younger-generation dentists are deeply in debt and, as borrowers, are concerned. I’ve been asked about hedging this debt position by shifting to fixed interest rates to avoid variable-rate increases and, yes, now may be the time. The good news: the savers (those with investments) will be pleased when rates finally go up.

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3. There’s serious and heightened competition amongst dentists and we certainly have an over-concentration of dental offices, particularly in the urban and suburban markets. Competition for new patient flow is fierce and I’ve encountered a few instances in which I believe the dentist is behaving unprofessionally to meet their overhead. R.K. House comments that recent graduates eschewing rural areas and over-concentrating in urban centres only adds to heightened competition for patients for all dental offices in those areas. 4. The insurance industry is monitoring costs. The dental segment of group insurance coverage remains one of the largest expenditures to employers. The dental profession is under constant scrutiny. It’s highly probable that employers and insurers will continue to trim dental benefits, as they’ve been doing for the past few years. R.K. House also notes that insurance coverage is in decline. 5. There are thousands of dentists in Canada with substantial debt to equity ratios who are highly leveraged. This causes concern for bankers, appraisers, accountants and, most importantly, the dentists themselves who have the personal burden of carrying a substantial debt load. I witness this as I appraise dental offices and examine the balance sheets. 6. When analyzing financial statements, I perform a “stress test” of income, overhead and resultant cash flow. In some instances, dentists would not be able to meet their financial obligations if affected by three or four of the above conditions.

This is not intended to be a doomsday prediction but I’m concerned for the industry at large and feel a duty to report these Enter promo code 50SAVE5 and SAVE $50* findings to the dentists of Canada. I’ve surveyed the opinions of on your FIRST ORDER many clients, industry leaders and team members who are active in *Some conditions apply. the field, as well as respected members of the dental profession. Trademark of Canada Post Corporation. I predict that the market is at its peak and that the roughly 10,000 Canadian dentists over 50 years of age should seriously examine their retirement plan and finances and budget for 10 to CPC_M_140119_DEN_MPJFCD.indd 1 10/8/14 5:57 PM 30% less than the recent record sale prices. Speak to your advisors and listen to experts on the topic, including appraisers and brokers. One source of advice will be available at the upcoming Business of PRODUCTION NOTES Dentistry seminars, sponsored by the Bank of Montreal, Patterson BY DATE APPROVALS IMAGES ARE HI-REZ Dental of Canada and Myer Norris Penny (my firm is also a coStudio sponsor). JOHN FINN Retoucher JIM GARBUTT Brokers like myself will be affected too, facing reduced commisSUSAN WALSH Use this space to sions if an all-out rush to the exit gates takes place or if a disproporProofreader MAYA ADLER/LINDSAY COLLINS/SKYLAR SYLVESTER tionate number of baby-boomer dentists place their practices on deliver your message to 4C Print Mgr. MINION PRO, TT SLUG OTF, FRUTIGER LT STD the market at- INTRODUCING... once. Then again, buyers will be thrilled as prices will Title: CHOCOLATE 14,500Artdentists across Canada. Director Pubs: MARKETPLACE finally relax… - JUST FOR CANADIAN DENTISTS

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resonating in a multitude of ways. A recent column in The Globe and Mail stated: “The global economy With the current dental is now projected to expand by 3.4 per cent, down practice market in from an earlier 3.6 per cent, which, the IMF said, a bubble, what will reflects both the legacy of the weak first quarter happen? (of 2014), particularly in the United States, and a less optimistic outlook for several emerging markets.” This could just be the beginning of a cascade of other economic factors. Even a single-operator dentist is affected by the global economy.

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2. Global economic conditions can and have changed rapidly in past years. The US T:3.25” meltdown in mortgages caused global economic shock and six years later it’s still

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1. Entry form must be accompanied with solved puzzle. Only correctly solved puzzles entered into random draw. 2. Send puzzle + entry form to Just For Canadian Dentists, 200 – 896 Cambie St., Vancouver, BC, V6B 2P6 or fax 604-681-0456. Entries must be received by December 12, 2014. 3. Prize: $50 VISA Gift Card. 4. Contest can be changed and/or cancelled without prior notice. 5. All entries become property of In Print Publications. 6. Employees of In Print Publications and its affliates are not eligible to participate.

November/December 2014 Just For Canadian dentists

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dr. Brent Wong practises dentistry in Canada’s heartland of Winnipeg, but he’s just as often abroad on dental and medical clinic missions (see page 11). His family (his three best friends) comes with him, roughing it in open-air trucks and make-shift missions. Along the way they’ve built homes for families, provided supplies to jump-start new lives and had amazing experiences like the best meal ever in a “hole-in-the-wall” restaurant in Zambia. But this do-gooder also appreciates some fly style, like his latest splurge: a Montreal-made m0851 jacket. Think savvy philanthropy. My name: Brent Wong I live and practise in: Winnipeg, Manitoba My training: B.Sc, DMD, DACSDD

My last trip: Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. We saw hundreds in our makeshift dental clinic, even more in our medical clinic

Potosi, Mexico. We ascended 1,000 metres up a mountain to hold a dental clinic. We were so high

from a small village in Mozambique, Africa

My most-frequented store: Home Depot!

Best meal anywhere: A hole-in-the-wall restaurant in Kitwe, Zambia

My closet has too many: Ties

A “wow” hotel/resort I’d happily stay at again: Bay Lake Towers in Disneyworld was quite memorable.

Why I was drawn

A favourite place that I keep returning to: Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic! Can’t believe I’ve never been to: Italy or Paris If I could travel at any time, I’d go to: 1 AD. It would be quite amazing to see what the geopolitical climate of the world was like around that time. My jet-lag cure: Fight going to sleep when you land and go to sleep at the bedtime of the time zone in which you land. Works every time! I always travel with: Bose cancelling in-ear headphones

Dr. Brent Wong on one of his earlier missions trips, with his wife and two sons, taking an open-air truck ride to the make-shift dental clinic. right Dr. Wong and his three best friends; family portrait at home in the grasslands of Winnipeg. top

to dentistry: I thought dentistry was the perfect mix of medical specialties and I love the business side of it as well.

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and built four houses for local families—all in one week! The most exotic place I’ve travelled: San Luis

Favourite city: Prague, Czech Republic My first job: I painted houses!

up that we woke up in a cloud! The best souvenir I’ve brought back from a trip: A beautiful painting

Just For Canadian dentists November/December 2014

I’d describe my home as: A place of rest, where I get to hang out with my three best friends! My last splurge: Fall coat from m0851

My fridge is always stocked with: Almond milk My guilty pleasure is: Sushi, sushi and more sushi! Favourite sport to watch: Watching my two boys wrestle! I’d want this with me if stranded on a desert island: My wife and two boys My secret to relaxing and relieving tension: Finding some time to be alone and soaking in some quiet, peaceful music A talent I wish I had: To be a better singer A big challenge I’ve faced: Setting up a dental office exclusively for dental implants in Winnipeg One thing I’d change about myself: I’d like to be more patient The word that best describes me: Determined I’m inspired by: People who’ve done it better than me My motto is: People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care A cause close to my heart: Shine the Light Initiative Something I haven’t done yet that’s on my must-do list: Go visit Israel

photos: photosbyjodi.com

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Just For Canadian Dentists 2014-11 November December  

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