{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

may/ june 2016

life + leisure

sail AWAY

in Ontario’s lake country discover the art scene in DEnveR

win

$1,o00 towards

any CE COURSE page 22 $50

+

Visa Gift Card page 37

Publications Mail Agreement #41073506

inside: Continuing dental Education Calendar where will you meet? s e at t l e

/

at l a n ta

/

h a l i fa x

/

prishtina

/

dubai

>>


FDI World Dental Federation full page IFC ad


Just for C

a

n

a

d

i

a

n

de nti sts life + leisure

contents

may/june 2016

may/June 2016

Publisher Linh T. Huynh

Editor Barb Sligl Art Direction BSS Creative

Contributing Editor Janet Gyenes

Editorial Assistant Adam Flint Contributors Lucas Aykroyd Timothy A. Brown Michael DeFreitas Janet Gyenes Sharon Matthews-Stevens Manfred Purtzki Dr. Kellen Silverthorn Barb Sligl Roberta Staley Mark Stevens Cover photo Sharon Matthews-Stevens

17 30

Senior Account Executive Monique Nguyen Account Executive Wing-Yee Kwong

Production Manager Ninh Hoang

Circulation Fulfillment Shereen Hoang

CE Development Adam Flint

Sales, Classifieds and Advertising In Print Circulation Office 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Phone: 604-681-1811 Fax: 604-681-0456 Email: info@AdvertisingInPrint.com

FEATURES

17 artsy Denver Discover this wild-west city’s art scene 30 God’s Island Sail Ontario’s southwestern lake country COLUMNS

DEPARTMENTS

8 photo prescription

5 May/June mix 23 CE calendar 37 sudoku 38 small talk

Capturing the Big Island’s contrasts

clockwise from top left: Janet gyenes; sharon matthews-stevens (2)

Just For Canadian Dentists is published 6 times a year by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. dba In Print Publications and distributed to Canadian dentists. Publication of advertisements and any opinions expressed do not constitute endorsement or assumption of liability for any claims made. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. None of the contents of the magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of In Print Publications. In Print Publications 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada

11 pay it forward Helping in Haiti

12 motoring

Dr. Diya Chadha

The devil is in the detail(ing)

14 the thirsty dentist

Bitter booze is all the rage

35 practice management

Bad publicity

36 the wealthy dentist

www.justforcanadiandentists.com

Don’t rent…own your future

Printed in Canada.

want to reach us? check out our website!

cover photo

Sailing on “Summer Breeze” in southwestern Ontario’s Georgian Bay to the rather aptly named God’s Island (page 30).

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

3


from the editor Sailing in Ontario’s lake country, trailing the Group of Seven…and bears. Story on page 30.

into the wild while channelling Alice in a kind of wonderland. Another American city that’s also playing with perceptions and offering another side to its laid-back west-coast discover vibe is Seattle. Yes, there’s coffee, the fish market and coastal beauty but also some thought-provoking art and architecture (page 23). Perhaps the most wild place coming up will be Brazil, where it’ll really heat up with the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Rio de Janeiro promises to put on a spectacular party. But go beyond

God’s Island

Providing Dental C.E. Since 1996

Don’t just take courses,

Take a vacaTion!

Upcoming Upcoming LuxuryVacations: Vacations:

| RIVIERA | FRENCH TURKS &INdIA CAICOS MAYA,RIVIERA MEXICO| TURkS RIVER CRUISE | VIETNAm | mAyAN & CAICoS ALASkA|| SPAIN GALApAGoS | TAhITI/FRENCh poLyNESIA | mEdITERRANEAN CRUISE PANAMA & PORTUGAL | ANTARTICA | MARDI GRAS CRUISE TRAVEL INQUIRIES: 1-866-317-8720

C.E. INQUIRIES: 1-877-536-6736

kENNEdySEmINARS.Com 4

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

sharon matthews-stevens

B

arefoot and bound for adventure. It’s the carefree feeling that comes with spring and only gets stronger into summer, when the warmth and long days bring on an appetite for exploration. Let loose on deck aboard a vessel in Ontario’s lake country, where you can sail to the divine-sounding God’s Island. This is where the Group of Seven once found inspiration, and these shores still seem untouched. So much so that you may encounter a bear swimming across your sailboat’s path, like the author of our “at home” feature story did (page 30). If you’re into a different kind of wild, Denver’s art scene (page 17) has the edge you might expect from the cowboy country and culture of Colorado’s capital. But this city has evolved far beyond its wild west days…today you can sip a hopped coffee

its hopping seaside spectacle and deep into the Amazonian jungle to cavort with caimans and macaws (page 5). On the Pacific side is another wild spot that’s churning quite literally. The Big Island of Hawaii might not be the first place you think of for a late-spring or summer getaway but you’ll find snow (if you’re looking for that come June) and surf and sand and lava—all in one diverse isle of contrasts. And that means it’s the ideal place to practise your photography skills (page 8). Of course, just because things are heating up and getting wild doesn’t mean work stops (unfortunately). But you can combine work and pleasure by planning your CE meetings in some of the wild places we visit throughout this issue. To help you do just that, we’ve created an online database that highlights the latest conferences and continuing education opportunities around the world (justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/). Another bonus: register for a subscription to email notifications for CE courses, and you could win $1,000 to the course of your choice (see the promo on page 22). Good luck and happy (and wild!) travels. Any ideas, comments or questions? Reach us at feedback@InPrintPublications.com.


what/when/where > May/June

style | food | drink | festivals | places | getaways | gear‌

mix

preOlympics

tour

jungle fever

Using a blowgun in the rainforest. right Sunrise over the Pantanal. Dusk in the Brazilian wetlands. right Caimans abound in Amazon rivers.

deep into brazil Andre Maceira/Brazil Tourism

From the Amazon to the Pantanal, South America’s biggest country burgeons with natural wonders

Riding Pantaneiro horses. left

Hyacinth macaws perch overhead. May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

5


mix

bon-bon

May/June

go natural in brazil

into the jungle

rumped caciques chirp in glorious cacophony on a nearby island. The numbers that define the Pantanal’s biodiversity are similarly staggering—and it’s often easier to view creatures here as they’re more out in the open. Covering upwards of 150,000 square kilometres, this region in central-western Brazil is home to some 700 bird species, 250 fish species, 100 mammal species, and 80 reptile species. Driving the dusty Tranpantaneira road to the Araras Pantanal Eco Lodge, sightings of capybaras— the world’s largest rodent—and crab-eating foxes are plentiful. Upon arrival, enjoy grilled pacu fish and

Parisian

Double rainbow over Juma Lake.

Pantanal—the world’s largest tropical wetlands— will endure long beyond any sporting event. Founded in 1669, jungle-ringed Manaus is famed for its domed opera house, financed by the 19thcentury rubber plantation boom. You’ll feel your heart singing as you take a boat tour of the Rio Negro, an Amazon tributary, en route to the Juma Amazon lodge with comfortable bungalows on stilts. When you pause to explore the forest, your guide, whose painted cheeks depict canoe legends, wields his machete. He chops open a biriba fruit, sweet and goopy. He shows how Aztec ants come swarming out when he yells at their brown, misshapen nest, and then rubs them into his skin to create a natural scent camouflage—similar to cheese—against predators. Later, you’ll use a blowgun with darts, catch and hold a baby caiman, and marvel at the antics of capuchin monkeys. You could even experience the surreal, raw power of witnessing a double rainbow on Juma Lake, moments after a thunderstorm. Pink river dolphins surface around the boat, and close to 5,000 yellow-

6

lamb stew for dinner, surrounded by glowing yellow lanterns and jaguar and armadillo carvings. This is an ornithologist’s paradise. During group rides on Pantaneiro horses, hyacinth macaws perch in nearby tarumã trees, casting curious glances, and snail kites soar overhead. Throughout the day, the Pantanal’s sights and sounds are powerfully absorbed from a 25-metrehigh viewing tower erected in the forest. At dusk, a ferruginous pygmy owl makes a shy cameo. At sunrise, howler monkeys raucously defend their territory. “Morning is magic,” says the guide. “All the animals are waking up and thanking God for another day with nature.” You’ll feel overwhelming gratitude too as you soak up Brazil’s natural thrills. — Lucas Aykroyd if you go For more info, go to the websites of Brazil Tourism at visitbrasil.com, Juma Amazon Lodge at jumalodge.com and Araras Pantanal Eco Lodge at araraslodge.com.br.

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

pâtisserie paris in vancouver

taste

Visit a Parisian tea salon…in Vancouver. Ladurée, historic purveyor of oh-la-la macarons in the City of Light, has opened up its first outpost in Canada. The Ladurée Vancouver Boutique and Tea Salon has a façade that evokes the historic Rue Royale boutique in Paris (the original pâtisserie dates back to 1862 when Louis Ernest Ladurée opened the bakery on 16 Rue Royale), and inside are trompe l’oeil skies with angels and goldand-marble counters displaying pastel-coloured macarons, viennoiseries, teas, jams and a collection of perfumed candles and home fragrances. And, to celebrate this Canadian opening, there’s a special maple syrup macaron. The macarons are also available in limited-edition gift boxes (above), by fashion illustrator Kerri Hess (who’s also worked with the likes of Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Lancome Paris). Oh-la-la, indeed! laduree.com

Andre Maceira/Brazil Tourism; courtesy Ladurée

Y

our guide kneels, poking a long palm frond into a hole to coax a female tarantula to come out. Hairy legs appear ominously at the entrance. Since you’ve just heard these massive spiders can throw barbed hairs in self-defence, you back up as your spine tingles in anticipation. (Fortunately, she’s a nice tarantula.) It’s one of many electrifying get- moments on a nature-themed visit away to Brazil, the world’s fifth-largest country. The Rio Olympics may dominate current tourism headlines, but the beauty and strangeness of both the Amazon and the


personal statements

May/June

mix

Companion pieces Make your mark with these iconic items Written + produced by Janet Gyenes

signature style

top talisman

What’s your stylish symbol? Initials, a lucky number or secret code? Put your personal stamp on an engravable talisman pendant from Vancouver’s Pyrrha. Born from heraldic icons, these talismans come in seven styles (available in sterling silver and bronze) such as Eagle, a symbol of integrity and strength, and adorn Unity; the ribbon represents an -ment unbreakable bond when engraved with two initials. Or make a statement with Harmony cufflinks from Pyrrha’s new 18-karat gold collection. The lions serve as a reminder to keep an even mind and overall balance. Eagle pendant, $259; Unity pendant, $183; Harmony cufflinks, $2,880; pyrrha.com homage to an icon

Metallic polish

City sojourn Shouldn’t your mode of transporation be about play, even when commuting to work? This sleek city bike by Martone Cycling Co. covers the bases with a built-in basket (optional on mens’ models), cheery red gear chain (the brand’s signature) and double-walled aluminum frame that’s light and durable. Women’s bike in Greenwich (other styles and colours available), $1,750; The Room at Hudson’s Bay, martonecycling.ca

The world gasped when the bright light that was Davie Bowie (aka Starman) was snuffed out too soon. As part of its new travel collection and an homage to the icon, Edmonton-based Poppy Barley has fashioned a range of footwear in Stardust Silver leather, like the style Zipper Bootie. These kicks feature a 2.5-inch stacked heel and rubber sole to keep you on firm footing. All Poppy Barley footwear is handcrafted in Mexico and the brand offers a collection of made-tomeasure boots for muscular calves or narrow feet. Zipper Bootie, $350–$375; poppybarley.com

Lucite comfort pedals

ridE

ON


p h o t o p r e s c r i p t i o n m i c h a e l d e f r e i ta s Michael DeFreitas is an award-winning photographer who’s been published in a wide variety of travel publications. With his initials, MD, he’s been nicknamed “doc,” making his photography prescriptions apropos.

a study in contrasts

Hawaii’s Big Island appeal is its grand sense of contrast and unpredictability

Send photos and questions to our photography guru at feedback@ inprintpublications.com and your shot may be featured in a future issue!

destination photography

Apply your photography skills to the shooting situations of the BIG ISLAND of Hawaii.

grey is okay

Just north of Hilo are two of the island’s most famous waterfalls, the 80foot Rainbow Falls and 200-foot tiered Umauma Falls. Here, I’m happy for a slightly overcast day so that I can utilize slow shutter speeds (1/10 and 1 second) to make the water look wispy. By using my medium zoom lens (at 50mm–70mm) and f20 for a wide depth of field, I’m also able to include some foreground elements.

8

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

if you go

For info on the Big Island: gohawaii. com/en/ big-island/

michael defreitas

T

he drive up Mauna Kea’s steep and curvy summit dirt road is as challenging as it is breathtaking. Besides having no guardrails, the biggest trial for most drivers is keeping their eyes on the road and off the spectacular vistas that pop up around every corner. At the snowcapped summit, I set up my tripod and wait for the spectacular sunset. I use my wide-angle zoom lens (set at 14mm) to include a nearby snow-covered cinder cone for a sense of place and the surprise of snow in a tropical destination. As the sun drops below the cloud cover its orange glow lights up the snow-covered scene and I fire off a few frames at f16 and 1/125 second. It’s not until I edit my photos back home that I notice the snowboard tracks crisscrossing the slope of the cinder cone. Snowboard tracks in Hawaii—unpredictable or what? The Big Island, Hawaii, differs from its siblings in its stark contrasts. The laidback Hilo or east side of the island offers an authentic Hawaiian culture amid a lush tropical backdrop, while the Kona or west side is arid, busy and touristy. Both sides provide a wealth of photographic opportunities. Despite being the island’s largest city, Hilo has maintained the ambience and culture of a small, old-fashioned Hawaiian town. My first stop is the city’s festive Farmers Market that offers everything from local batik sarongs to pots of orchids and stacks of ripe fruit and vegetables. I find a pile of mangoes perfectly lit by the early morning light and position my wide-angle zoom (set at 14mm) close to the fruit. Including people in the background helps to establish a sense of place, but it’s important that the people not be the centre of attention in every shot. By using f8 and focusing on the mangoes about a half-metre in front of the camera, I’m able to accentuate the lush fruit and render the background shoppers slightly out of focus (to make sure the mangoes are what draws the eye). By using 1/125 second, I freeze the human motion. My next stop is literally and figuratively the island’s hottest spot. Just 70 kilometres south of Hilo, the Kilauea volcano (Hawaiian for “much spreading”) has erupted continuously since 1983. Situated in Hawaii


14-Day Continuous Fellowship Program in Implant Dentistry

Key Educational Objectives Hand-on Sessions

Surgery related topics:

Hands-on Sessions

Surgical anatomy and physiology, patient evaluation for implant treatment, risk factors, vertical and horizontal spaces of occlusion, bone density, implant surgical placement protocols, computer guided implant placement and restoration, immediate load techniques, mini implants, bone grafting before, during and after implant placement, alveolar ridge expansion using split-cortical technique, guided bone regeneration, sinus lifting through the osteotomy site and the lateral window, block grafting, BMP-2 / ACS graft with titanium mesh.

Hands-on workshops will be provided on models and pig jaws.

Prosthodontics related topics:

LIVE Surgeries Selected LIVE surgical procedures are performed during the program.

Faculty Dr. Louie Al-Faraje, Dr. James Rutkowski, Dr. Philip Kroll, Dr. Mamaly Reshad, Dr. Christopher Church, Domenico Cascione, CDT and more.

Tuition

Impression techniques, restorative steps for implant crown and bridge, implant prosthodontics for the fully edentulous patients, high-water design, bar-overdenture, CAD/CAM designs, biomechanical principles, biomaterials, implant occlusion and more.

Includes: 112 CE units, hands-on workshops, live surgeries, three Breakfast and lunch provided. Limited availability. Call today!

Easy online registration at: www.implanteducation.net

Approved PACE Program Provider FAGD/MAGD credit. Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. Nationally Approved From 6/1/2014 – 5/31/2017 Provider ID #213111

ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

858.496.0574

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the standards of the Academy of General Dentistry Program Approval for Continuing Education (PACE) through the joint program provider approval of UNLV School of Dental Medicine and California Implant Institute. UNLV School of Dental Medicine is approved for awarding FAGD/MAGD credit.’ Provider 213111


action shot

Volcanoes National Park, it’s one of the most active volcanoes on earth. Although today’s eruption doesn’t feature the 100-metre-high lava fountains, dense plumes of smoke and ash of past eruptions, it’s still a not-to-bemissed event.

You can view the molten lava flowing into the sea from Hakuma Point on the east side of the flow, or from the west side at Kamoamoa along the park’s Chain Of Craters Road. But, despite my fear of heli-

copters, I opt for an aerial perspective. Aerial tours depart Hilo airport daily and some operators offer fully sensory “doors-off” tours. From above, the juxtaposition of lush-green vegetation and the bright-red rivers of molten lava cutting through blackened lava fields offers yet another striking contrast. I use a medium zoom range lens (60–70mm) to frame the lava rivers and a high shutter speed (1/800– 1/1000 second) to eliminate engine vibrations. Framing the lava flows diagonally creates leading lines and allows me to place contrasting green and black patches in opposite corners of the frame. Armed with lots of land-based signature images, I shift my attention to the Hawaii’s

great surfing. The two most important factors for getting great surfing shots are vantage point and sun angle. Although early morning or late day sun offers a lovely warm glow, its lower angle produces more glare and tends to render the water dark. Late morning light (10am to noon) penetrates deeper into the water accentuating its blue colour while providing a bit of reflected light to help illuminate the surfers. I pick a top surfing spot on the west coast to utilize a bit of frontal lighting from the higher morning sun. Before shooting, it’s always best to watch the action for a while to determine the best-lit angle and composition (remember that diagonal compositions help accentuate action). After finding a couple of advanced surfers practising tricks, I set up my tripod and use a 300mm zoom lens to snap a variety of shots using 1/250–1/800 second and f11–f16. With my motor drive set on high speed I compose with the surfers entering the frame, not leaving it. With so many unpredictable photo opps—from sputtering volcanoes to churning surf—make sure that you and your camera are always ready on the Big Island. Aloha!

IMPROVING DENTISTS’ SMILES FOR OVER 40YEARS. We know and understand the business of buying and selling dental practices. As Canada’s professional practice appraisal and sales leader since 1974, our record of proven results is second to none. With a dedicated team offering appraisal, consulting and brokerage services, we’re here to make sure you end up smiling. Contact us at (888) 764-4145.

10

roicorp.com

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

BROKERAGE

michael defreitas

photo prescription [continued]


pay i t f o r w a r d

r o b e r ta s ta l e y

Roberta Staley is an award-winning magazine writer and the editor of the Canadian Chemical News, published by the Chemical Institute of Canada. She is also a magazine writing instructor at Douglas College and a graduate student at Simon Fraser University.

dentistry in a time of cholera

The man behind the humanitarian group Canadian International Dental Foundation

courtesy of Dr. Stewart Gillies

I

t was 2010, only a few months after a 7.0 magnitude Haiti earthquake killed 300,000 and injured many hundreds of thousands more. Dr. Stewart Gillies of Avalon Dental Centre in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, was sitting down to a meal in Haiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince with the vice dean of the country’s Faculté d’Odontologie dental school as well as the nation’s health minister. The minister cut short the meal, saying he had to travel to the Central Plateau region to investigate a number of mysterious deaths. Gillies, who had recently founded the Canadian International Dental Foundation, a Newfoundland-based humanitarian group providing dental care to Haitian earthquake survivors, asked the minister to describe the symptoms. It sounded suspiciously like cholera, Gillies remarked. The minister “looked at me and he was very angry,” says Gillies. “He said, ‘We haven’t had cholera in Haiti for 50 years.’” “Well,” Gillies responded, “I think you’ve got it now.” Gillies, unfortunately, was correct. The Central Plateau—one of the most destitute regions in a nation already regarded as the poorest in the Western Hemisphere—would soon see thousands of people succumb to the deadly disease. The cholera outbreak quickly became a national epidemic due to the decimated post-earthquake infrastructure: no sewer system, unclean drinking water and overcrowded living conditions. It was later discovered that infected Nepali United Nations workers introduced cholera to Haiti. Since then, health-care and foreign aid workers have never gotten the cholera under control and the disease has spread to more than 800,000 people, killing 9,000. (Last year, following the rainy season, physicians struggled to treat 1,000 new cases a week.) From the start, Gillies partnered his organization with three NGOs: the Faculté d’Odontologie, the George Stines Foundation, founded by American dentist Dr. Alfred Stines, and Partners In Health (PIH), a Harvard University-affiliated global group that builds health systems for the world’s poor. In cooperation with PIH, Gillies established a dental clinic at l’Hôpital Saint Nicolas in Saint-Marc.

That initial visit was preceded by cobaffects work at the Haitian dental school. bling together—thanks to Atlantic Canada Gillies has noted that dental assistants are donors—an entire dental clinic in St. John’s, unable to type the names of patients into then shipping it to Haiti at a cost of $12,000 the computers that have been supplied by and re-assembling it at l’Hôpital Saint his organization. Nicolas. Since then, Gillies and a team of volDespite such challenges, “we’re seeing unteer dentists and hygienists have returned great progress in Haiti,” says Gillies. His fellow eight times for a week at a time, Canadian volunteers undertake preventative travelling the countryside to measures, with hygienists setting up care for Haitians at tempofissure sealant clinics to stop decay rary dental clinics as well Dr. Stewart as tutoring students at Gillies, founder of Faculté d’Odontologie. the NewfoundlandThe need to mainbased Canadian tain a sterile field and International Dental instruments is one of Foundation. the lessons that Gillies’ team has hammered home to dental students. Sterility is paramount; cholera is still prevalent, as is a litany of infectious diseases that include HIV-AIDS, hepatitis A and B, multi-drug resistant TB and chikungunya, says Gillies, who emigrated from Scotland to Canada in 1977 as a 23-year-old dental graduate. “If you have someone in your chair and he’s a pretty ragged guy and you have a small girl coming in right behind him, you think: ‘Am I going to cross-infect this person?’ If you are, you have no right being there doing that job,” Gillies says. Things like disease transmission, hygiene and sterility are beyond the understanding of many Haitians. Gillies recalls how difficult it was trying to convince a plumber of the need to ensure that the pipe from the dental clinic on the permanent molar and premolar teeth at l’Hôpital Saint Nicolas led straight to the of children. The hygienists treat upwards of sewer. “We had equipment that sucked up 2,000 kids a week, Gillies says. blood and saliva and he simply wanted to Gillies sees “lots of hope” for the country, run the pipe straight into the street. We had due in large part to the remarkable resiliency to beg him—and pay him—to connect it to of its citizens. A vital step forward for the the sewer. This was an area where 400 to 500 nation will be the creation of a universal edupeople a day were coming to Saint Nicolas cation system. “As dentists, the best thing we Hospital with cholera.” can do is educate them in the thing we do Such a lack of awareness is rooted in the best—dentistry,” says Gillies, who will ship poor education system, Gillies believes. In a 25 new computers later this year to Faculté nation where the average monthly income is d’Odontologie, adding to the 55 already about $100, yearly school fees, uniforms and brought down. “The need for good dentistry supplies run as high as $700. Illiteracy even in the future will be immense.” May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

11


motoring

D r . k e l l e n s i lv e r t h o r n Dr. Kellen Silverthorn is Just For Canadian Dentists’ automotive writer. He tries to keep one convertible and/or one track-day car in the family fleet.

the devil is in the detail(ing) The paradigm-shifting hybrid car keeps getting greener + better

A

colleague, while finalizing an expensive car purchase, asked me if he should opt for the $995 paint and interior protection package. To underscore my position we Googled Consumer Reports. As I expected, the basic advice was to avoid such a package as “vastly overpriced.” My friend was only partially satisfied; “So, if not the dealer-applied versions, then how should I protect my investment?” Which begs the question—from what, exactly, are we protecting our cars? An abridged list: ultraviolet rays, big-city smog, impaled insect entrails, salt, hail, sand, brake and other dust, door dings, (take a breath), tar, gas spills, acid rain, flying rocks, flying ferrous flakes, air-borne-tree-goo, and divebombed-bird-pooh.

Meanwhile, that same car’s interior is exposed to a diluted version of the above list—plus, we grind the carpet with our feet, and abrade the upholstery with our bums. Also: pens, lipstick and other crayons, cigarette and other smoke, newspaper ink stains, fingernail/jewelry scratches, desiccated human skin, dog hair and drool, and every type of foodstuff and beverage. Again, intermittently applied interior products beats replacing even one interior surface. So “protecting our automotive investment” is really all about a regular program of cleaning-then-protecting. And whether you realize it or not, those in the trade can easily discern the proposed trade-ins that have been well protected since birth. You can guess which car the trade covets. The result-

ing valuation spread between two otherwise identical cars can be 25% or more. Hopefully, I’ve convinced you that the sizable investment parked on your driveway is worth protecting. The next big follow-on question, then, is exactly who is going to clean and protect your car? Your key candidates are: well, there’s you of course, or, a family member or neighbour who is willing/coerced/paid/ quid pro quo’ed—or a professional “detail” shop. A quality detail shop’s services would be the money-no-object solution for all of your car’s cleaning and protection needs. However, that service may cost you $50–$100 per hour several times a month. Almost as costly as a teenager’s cell account. I do take my beloved vehicles for profes-

HAD A LOOK LATELY? A variety of outstanding continuing education programs are available for postgraduate dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants and dental laboratory technicians. Hands-on competency based and lecture based specialized education & certification programs are available year round.

FEATURING: ▶ NEUROMODULATORS (Botulinum Toxin) Level 1 - Applied Anatomy Review & Intro to Botulinum Toxin Type A Level 2 - Cosmetic Treatment of the Upper Face and Bruxism Level 3 - Advance Neuromodulators - Mid-Face and Lower Face/Neck Regions and Myofacial Pain and Dysfunction Treatment ▶ IV CONSCIOUS SEDATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM ▶ MINI CAD/CAM RESIDENCY PROGRAM ▶ NITROUS OXIDE & ORAL SEDATION

www.dentistry.ualberta.ca/CDE | dentce@ualberta.ca | 780-492-5391 12

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016


kellen silverthorn

motoring [continued]

sional detailing to my local experts Julian Richards and his crew to help protect my automotive investments. Originally a journeyman Ferrari mechanic in the UK, Julian shifted to the detailing side of the trade long before moving to Canada 13 years ago. His Right Touch Auto Detailing has a staff of six with 75+ years of collective detailing experience (some of the crew, above). Julian has sagely steered me toward various equipment, products and techniques through the years. And when I explained to Julian my desire to educate our Just for Canadian Dentists readership on detailing, before you could say “wet polish,” I’d been added to his shop’s team as intern for a week of afternoon shifts. Here’s what I learned. Divide detailing into wet and dry phases. There are two levels of wet phase detail (minor and major). In the “minor version”

the equipment needed is a water hose, bucket-withbottom-grate filled with warm soapy water and microfibre mitt and chamois. The steps are pre-rinse, wash, rinse, then chamois. Pretty simple, and more-or-less what dad taught us. The major exterior wet-clean adds four steps after “pre-rinse” for which you need degreaser spray, wetted blocking sponge and wetted clay bar. If the tree sap or bird pooh are not responding to these, then apply spot methyl hydrate soaks. Patience is key here, not aggressive rubbing! I also clean inside the door/trunk jams and fuel-filler door in a major wet clean, as well as using a specific wheel cleaner fluid and brush. My “dry” detail phase also has both a minor and a major version. The minor version is a quick interior vacuum and dressing tires. The major version of the dry phase includes using a $189 Canadian Tire six-inch

random orbital polisher with micro-fibre head. With this tool I apply the Auto Glym Super Polish. If scratches in the factory clearcoat paint layer are still visible after the wax/ polish step, then refer to a pro like Julian. My major dry phase clean also includes carpet shampoo, followed by vacuuming. Similarly upholstery/leather/vinyl is product-specific cleaned, then protected. Glass polish and door rubber silicon treatments are optional. Odours that don’t disappear with a major dry clean can be considered for “fans and Febreeze,” or else referred to the pros. I can perform my minor wet/dry combined home detailing in 30 minutes. My major wet/dry steps take 90 minutes per car. I’ll usually do “the wife’s ride” in the same session—in the vain hope of some later quid pro quo. I recently bumped into my colleague with the new expensive car. He had said “no” to the dealer-applied protection package. He’ll never be more motivated than today to protect his automotive investment. So he’s going to come by my house and check out my detailing gear and techniques. See-one, do-one, teach-one deja vu.

TRAVEL FIRST CLASS WITH MINDWARE SEMINARS! EARN 12 CDE CREDITS PER TRIP! MINDWARE EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS

DON’T MISS OUT - REGISTER TODAY!

Approved PACE Program Provider FAGD/ MAGD Credit approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. 11/01/15 – 10/31/19 Provider ID: 300139

CRUISE ITALY AND THE GREEK ISLES July 8 - 18, 2016 Dr. Fred Calavassy “Achieving Aesthetic Excellence - Considering Occlusion as Part of the Plan” Take a three day pre-cruise tour of the Eternal City of Rome, then join us on board the Celebrity Reflection for stops in Mykonos, Rhodes, Santorini, Athens, Naples and more!

FIVE-STAR LUXURY TOUR IN SOUTH EAST ASIA December 26, 2016 - January 8, 2017 Dr. Chris Walinski “Mini-Mastership in Laser Dentistry” Join us for a highlights tour of Vietnam including a cruise of Halong Bay and a New Year’s Eve Gala in Danang; visit the World Heritage Site that is Angkor Wat, Cambodia; and end the journey in Thailand’s vibrant capital of Bangkok! Ask us about our Phuket extension too!

Choose from any one of our great trips! Register online: www.mindwareseminars.com! …or call us today at: 1-888-574-8288 and book with the best! May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

13


the thirsty dentist janet gyenes Janet Gyenes is a magazine writer and editor who likes to dally in spirits, especially when discovering something like corenwyn jenever (a gin-like Dutch spirit)—straight or in cocktails like the “bramble.” Have a boozy idea or question? Send it to feedback@inprintpublications.com

bitter crush

Herbal liqueurs or Italian amari have seduced the cocktail crowd

D

esperate times call for desperate measures. The proverb is apropos of how Fabio Martini and Joel Myers of The Woods Spirit Co. came to distill amaro, their first-ever spirit. Amaro is the Italian word for “bitter” and it describes an herbal liqueur made in the land of dolce vita. The story isn’t exactly a tale of love and war, but close enough. The love interest: the Negroni cocktail. The war: BC’s Campari shortage last year. The hand-wringing was real and the news media ran half a dozen or more stories about bartenders lamenting the loss of this powerful bitter liqueur in their arsenal. Martini says he and Myers decided to distill a replacement for the Italian amaro—with a West Coast twist. As fanciful as this bitter orange crush might sound, the pair came by distilling honestly. “We’re foragers,” Martini explains. He had run a small foraging tour company and one day, when hiking with Myers, the idea for starting a craft distillery came ‘out of the woods,’ he says. “We started out wanting to make a gin from the forest.” Instead, the Campari shortage spurred them to make “a modern liqueur with a deep respect for the Italian tradition of amaro.” The roots of bitter liqueurs wander far beyond the boot. According to Jim Meehan’s tome, The PDT Cocktail Book, the first bitter liqueurs distilled from herbal ingredients such as bark, herbs and spices were “made by medieval monks or apothecaries as elixirs and health tonics in Northern Europe, France, Italy and Spain.” In fact, the “desperate times” proverb has Latin origins that translate to “Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.”

It makes sense: the main bitter ingredient in herbal liqueurs is gentian root, which was used to battle ills such as malaria and parasites. Today most bitter liqueurs are made in Italy, following time-honoured recipes that are virtually classified. Some are aperitivos, sipped before the meal to stimulate the appetite. Others are digestivos designed to settle the stomach. Many accomplish both tasks, whether sipped neat or on the rocks, in a cocktail or with a splash of soda. By way of explanation for his bitter orange ardour, Martini references his Italian roots and his family’s fondness for the Spritz cocktail, which was introduced by Aperol, another amaro, in the 1950s. Aperol has been around since 1919 when it was launched by the Barbieri brothers at the Padua International Fair. Interestingly, I met Martini and Myers at Vancouver’s annual BC Distilled festival where the pair debuted their amaro. Although they’re not fratelli, Martini and Myers describe their venture as “the combined curiosity of two friends whose lives have been enchanted and shaped by the West Coast…” Perhaps their amaro will endure for a century too. My own enchantment with amari was similarly sparked by a Spritz I sipped in Verona, the locale of another love and war story, starring Romeo and Juliet. On the bitter spectrum, Aperol is sweeter and less bitter compared to Campari. The Woods Spirit Co.’s amaro starts off sweet and citrusy and has a pleasingly bitter finish, close to Campari in my mind. “We worked really hard to balance it,” says Martini. In keeping with tradition he stays mum on the “unconventional sweetener” they use. The bitter ingredients, however, include bitter orange, gentian and wormwood. The West Coast homage comes

from the addition of grand fir needles, which impart nuances of grapefruit. “We also use a lot of rhubarb,” says Martini, which is a go-to bitter ingredient in most amari, including Aperol and Campari. The latter also includes ginseng and chinotto, an Italian bitter orange. For my taste, though, Amaro Nonino Quintessentia hits the bittersweet spot compared to Aperol (too sweet) and Campari (too bitter). These orange-forward amari are typically lighter in colour and alcohol, with a few exceptions. Recently, I’ve started exploring their darker, higher-proof side, starting with Amaro Ramazzotti, which claims to be Italy’s first bitter liqueur. Introduced in 1815, it’s made with a secret blend of 33 herbs, roots and spices. A handful of ingredients include star anise, orange, cardamom, cloves, galangal and myrrh. It’s thick and reminds me of another herbal liqueur: Jägermeister. I like the level of bitters, but I prefer the more chocolate-y and citrusy taste of Averna Amaro (introduced in 1868), though the bitters are definitely on the tame side. Then there’s the legendary Fernet-Branca, which is toe-curlingly bitter, just the way San Franciscans and Argentinians like it. It’s often reported that their lust for the liqueur drinks up a staggering portion of Fernet-Branca’s market share. Fernet-Branca has been made since 1845 following a formula of 27 herbs (the ususal suspects, plus chamomile, aloe and saffron). Its minty aroma is alluring but it takes just a single sip to be hit with its boozy bitterness, finished with a rush of mint. I’m smitten already. You never know what you’ll fall in love with, but exploring amari might be the start of a beautiful relationship. As for Martini and Myers, one thing is for sure. They’ll never be short of their beloved amaro.

Less bitter

Aperol 11% ABV Aperol Spritz 3 parts Prosecco 2 parts Aperol 1 part soda Pour all ingredients into a wine glass. Garnish with an orange slice.

More bitter

Nonino Quintessentia 35% ABV Aperol Spritz 1 oz Nonino Quintessentia Amaro 1 oz Aperol 1 oz Bourbon 1 oz Lemon juice Shake together with ice. Strain and serve.

Campari 25% ABV Negroni Stir together equal parts of each: Campari, gin, sweet Vermouth. Serve over ice. Garnish with an orange slice.

Brown + boozy

Light(er) + citrusy

know your bitter booze Less bitter

More bitter

Ramazzotti 30% ABV

Averna 29% ABV

Fernet-Branca 39% ABV

Ragtime

Black Manhattan

Hanky Panky

1 oz Rye whiskey 1 oz Amaro Ramazzotti 1 oz Aperol 2 dashes Peychaud’s bitters Absinthe mist

2 oz Bourbon 1 oz Averna Amaro 1 dash Angostura bitters

1.75 oz Gin 0.75 oz Sweet Vermouth 0.25 oz Fernet-Branca

Stir. Strain. Garnish with an orange twist.

Stir with ice; strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.

Stir with ice; strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Parenteral Moderate Sedation for Dentists Course Directors: Dr. James Tom, Dr. Kenneth K. Lee This comprehensive course expands its curriculum to include new drug regimens, advances in patient monitoring, and ACLS Certification. The course consists of 12 days for a total of 96 hours; 8 days of lectures and workshops and 4 days of clinical patient interaction. The course meets (and exceeds) the educational requirements established by the ADA Guidelines and fulfills most state regulations for administration of IV moderate sedation to dental patients. Each didactic day begins with a pre-session knowledge assessment and concludes with a case-based group learning exercise. Participants will perform physical evaluation, take medical history, outline an anesthetic plan, initiate and confirm intravenous access, administer and become competent in the titration of sedative medications, and perform dental procedures under close supervision of faculty who have had post-graduate training in dental anesthesiology.

USC 9 t h International Restorative Dentistr y Symposium

Limited Attendance Lectures and Workshops Wednesday - Sunday, July 13 - 17, 2016 8:00 am - 5:00 pm (at USC) Clinical Sessions Thursday, July 28, 2016 7:00 am - 9:00 am (at Solis Surgical Arts Center) 10:00 am -5:00 pm (at USC) Friday - Sunday, July 29 - 31, 2016 Friday - Sunday, August 5 - 7, 2016 8:00 am - 5:00 pm (at USC) To register, please call 213.821.2127 or visit www.uscdentalce.org

Friday - Saturday, October 28 - 29, 2016 Featuring National and International speakers The goal of this symposium is to update the dental community on contemporary “hot” topics related to restorative dentistry. The symposium will showcase current, evidence-based information, with presentations by nationally and internationally renowned speakers who are opinion leaders, academicians, educators and researchers.

THE FIFTEENTH INTERNATIONAL ENDODONTIC SYMPOSIUM Clinical and Biological Concepts of Modern Endodontics

2016

Friday - Saturday, November 18 - 19, 2016

Speakers: Dr. Paul Abbott, Dr. Nadim Baba, Dr. George Bogen, Dr. Arnaldo Castellucci, Dr. Ashraf Fouad, Dr. James Johnson, Dr. Stephen Niemczyk, Dr. Shahrokh Shabahang, Dr. Rafael Roges, and Dr. Ilan Rotstein The Scientific program will include updates on current hot topics in endodontics and advanced treatment modalities, as well as a deep insight into the future of endodontics. This International Symposium has become a tradition. It promises to be a most exciting event and will provide you, the clinician, with relevant information and tools to bring you to the next level of excellence in delivering the best evidence-based endodontics to your patients. Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC Continuing Professional Education 925 W. 34th Street, Room 201J, Los Angeles,  CA  90089 cedental@usc.edu • Register online at www.uscdentalce.org Ph: 213.821.2127 • Fx: 213.740

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

15


The Scotia Professional Plan for Dentists. You’ve worked hard to get where you are today and we can help ensure your ongoing success. The Scotia Professional® Plan lets you manage your professional and personal banking with a customized suite of products and services, preferred rates, and the support of a dedicated Scotiabank advisor. And that’s something to smile about. To learn more, visit your nearest branch or www.scotiabank.com/professional

®

Registered trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia.


travel the world

e h t h g u o thr

g n i k

o lo gl as s

Nothi ng

Jeff Wells, Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

by j a

ne t

gye n

es

is wha t it se ems in Den ve

r’s pl ay

ful art

scene

Titanium angles and blue sky. The mountain-like metal peaks of the Denver Art Museum. May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

17


travel the world

Downtown Denver and the Denver Art Museum’s new addition designed by Daniel Libeskind. above Toxic Schizophrenia, by Tim Noble and Sue Webster, outside the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver.

18

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

A

janet gyenes (3); bottom photo: © Jeff Goldberg/Esto, Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

Colorado, glass artist Dale Chihuly’s interpretation of local skies and sunsets, at the Denver Botanic Gardens. below left The giant chair and horse of The Yearling, outside the Denver Children’s Museum.

s the elevator doors open I’m greeted by a young girl with her arm outstretched, clutching a spray of yellow flowers in her hand. Behind her is a dun-coloured horse, at least 16 hands high, staring at a pile of rowboats that looks like a many-petalled flower. It’s like I’ve stepped through a portal into a different universe. This tableau isn’t a tired-traveller daydream, but rather the fourth floor main lobby of The Art, Denver’s five-star gallery-esque hotel, which opened last June in the Colorado capital. The girl, the horse and boats are real, but only artfully so. Singer, as the girl is called, is a bronze sculpture by Kiki Smith. She welcomes guests who have already been entertained by Oliver Michaels’ Tube Balloon Thing or Revolution videos playing on continuous loops in the elevators. Otter, the horse, is imagined from driftwood pieced together like a giant Jenga game. But even that’s an artful deception. The sun-bleached wood is actually cast bronze, the handiwork of sculptor Deborah Butterfield. And the jumble of boats is Collage, a print of Nancy Rubins’ Real McCoy: a massive sculpture composed of vessels that exemplifies her signature of using salvaged materials. These provocative and playful pieces are part of a serious collection composed by the Art’s in-house curator. A wing of the Fire restaurant is decked with John Baldessari’s Eight Soups screen prints, a mash-up of Matisse (Goldfish and Sculpture) and Warhol (Soup Cans) whose work graces the hotel too. So do pieces by noted artists Josef Albers, Frank Gehry and Clyfford Still, the Abstract Expressionist whose eponymous museum sits among seven others in addition to 50-plus galleries in downtown Denver’s Golden Triangle Museum District. When I gaze out my window the next morning I spy the mountain-like metal peaks of the Denver Art Museum, which I’ll visit this afternoon as part of my art-filled day. Then I spot a playful throwback on the table in my modern room: a kaleidoscope. I make my own art as I turn the toy and watch the tumbling pieces settle into shapes that paint the slate sky with fanciful flowers. At the Denver Botanic Gardens, the sky has turned cerulean on this cloudless June morning. Yet, strangely, the sun is


American made.

We've been takin' calls and makin' aligners right here in the heart of Texas since 2006.

The most affordable, doctor-friendly alternative in clear aligners.

25% OFF YOUR FIRST CASE Use promo code JFCD2 when you sign up for free at clearcorrect.com/doctors Paid advertising. Offer expires July 31, 2016.


Lobby of the Art Hotel, with Otter, by Deborah Butterfield. above left The Big Sweep art installation outside the Denver Art Museum, in which the dustpan’s angle echoes the shape of the distant mountains. above right The four-story El Pomar Grand Atrium in the Denver Art Museum’s Frederic C. Hamilton Building.

The Science Pyramid rises amidst plants and reflecting pools at the Denver Botanic Gardens.

Refuel with a bottle of locally brewed Corvus hopped coffee.

setting too. The gleaming rays of yellow, orange and red radiating from the orb in front of me is Colorado, glass artist Dale Chihuly’s interpretation of Denver’s skies and sunsets. In 2014 his self-titled exhibit transformed the 24-acre urban garden into a Seussian landscape of glass spires, floats and curlicues, along with Colorado (now in the garden’s permanent collection), composed of 700 icicle-like rods rising almost four metres high. It’s also reminiscent of the yucca, one of the native plants that thrive in this arid climate. “This is a living museum. We are here to curate plants,” says Tiffany Coleman, the garden’s brand manager. The canvas is constantly repainted here as the plants and visiting art collections cycle through the seasons. Through summer and into fall, Barry Flanagan’s bronze-and-limestone Harebell on Portland Stone Piers will grace the garden as part of the “Stories in Sculpture” exhibition. Just one of Deborah Butterfield’s bronze equine beauties will join the leaping hare, but on my visit there’s a stable of 15 horses hidden under shade trees and standing among red-hot pokers, the Science Pyramid rising from the Four Towers Pool behind. Here, still life meets science: inside the pyramid, touch screens and videos invite people to see the world of plants through a scientific lens. I prefer my own looking glass and continue strolling to unexpected landscapes: through a moon gate, around the lily pad-filled Monet pool and past dwarf conifers where I stop to chat with one of many artists painting en plein air. My fantastical journey continues at Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Denver, which promotes creative experimentation with art and ideas through its rotating collection and events. Designed by acclaimed architect David Adjaye, the building blurs interior and exterior worlds with windows and a rooftop deck that look into the shape-shifting Lower Downtown “LoDo” neighbourhood that was once the epicentre of Colorado’s gold rush, industrial era and most recently, skid row. Inside the museum I’m surrounded by outsized Canadian landscapes, but the vibe is more funhouse than woodsy walk. Case in point: I’m face-to-face with a gentle giant, Sasquatch #2. The three-metre painting is one of many darkly comic portraitures in Alberta-born artist Kim Dorland’s “Every Day Monsters” exhibition. In his artist’s statement, Dorland describes how this mythical monster represents

janet gyenes (4); top right photo: © Jeff Goldberg/Esto, Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

travel the world


OpenRoad honda Burnaby 6984 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. V5E 1E6 (5 minutes East of Metrotown)

Tel: 604-525-4667 OpenRoadHonda.ca


travel the world if you go primal fear. “It’s a way for people to place their fear on something. I’ve always thought that Sasquatch is a nice representation of the artist; the loner.” Toxic Schizophrenia (a revolving heart pierced with a dagger) outside the entrance of MCA Denver is its only permanent piece. Non-collecting art museums can be risky ventures since they’re constantly seeking collections to lure visitors, but it also gives MCA Denver freedom to shape the local art

Paris

scene in a city whose Old West roots run deep. The trifecta of beer, sports and beef are still institutions. Nearby craft beer pioneer Wynkoop Brewing put down stakes here in 1988 long before Coors Field

Plan your trip: denver.org. STAY: The Art Hotel, thearthotel.com. The hotel gives guided gallery tours on Saturdays. VISIT: Denver Botanic Gardens, botanicgardens.org; Denver Museum of Contemporary Art, mcadenver.org; Denver Art Museum, denverartmuseum.org. SAMPLE: Corvus hopped coffee, corvuscoffee.com; the Rocky Mountain Oyster Stout at Wynkoop Brewing, wynkoop.com.

Do you want

updates about CE courses? Register now for email notifications of CE courses and a chance to

WIN $1,000*

TOWARDS YOUR CHOICE OF ANY CE COURSE. go to justforcanadiandentists.com/subscribe

Where do you wanna be for your next CE?

For inspiration on where to go, search our current CE course database by specialty, location or date at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce. *Chance of winning is dependent on number of registrations. Only one (1) $1,000 prize will be awarded for use towards a future CE course and is not redeemable for cash. Registration information becomes the property of Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. and will not be shared with any third party. To be eligible for draw, registrant must be a Canadian practicing dentist and registration is received by midnight August 31, 2016.

Hawaii

22

Greece

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

Hong Kong

(just a stone’s throw beyond) was built. It still serves signature brews like Patty’s Chile Beer and the Rocky Mountain Oyster Stout made with—you guessed it—roasted bull testicles. Sitting in MCA Denver’s rooftop cafe, I’m contentedly sipping another kind of local cold brew: Corvus hopped coffee, laced with Colorado-grown Cascade hops. Back outside, I return to the Golden Triangle on the free shuttle that travels the mile-long spine of 16th Street Mall, where artful touches include architect I. M. Pei’s pavers placed in the pattern of a rattlesnake’s back. When I approach the Denver Art Museum (DAM), I start to wonder if the hopped coffee potion has made me shrink like Alice in her wonderland. A giant’s dustpan and broom rise 35 feet beside me. It’s Big Sweep, one delightful example of Claes Oldenburg’s and Coosje van Bruggen’s whimsical work of super-sized everyday objects. The dustpan’s angles echo those of the distant mountains. So do the knife edges of the museum’s Daniel Libeskind–designed Frederic C. Hamilton Building. “It took some time to figure out how to hang art when no structural walls are at 90 degrees,” says Marty Corren, one of the museum’s docents. Permanent collections at the DAM include American Indian and Western masterpieces, plus Warhol’s provocative The American Indian. Its subject is Native American activist and actor, Russell Means. The silk screen immortalizes the man described as blurring the lines of societal status. My muse of the moment is a longrunning installation whose days are fleeting: Fox Games. Sandy Skoglund’s surrealist room is painted fire-engine red, complete with bistro-style tables and chairs and 23 dark grey foxes sculpted out of clay running amok. As I walk through the installation of frolicking foxes, Corren asks a question: “Did you see the red fox?” I want to go back for a second look but another portal into another art-filled universe awaits.


seattle / atlanta / halifax / prishtina / dubai … |

calendar

ce

A n intern ation a l guide to con tinuing denta l Education

spr ing 2016 + beyond

SEATTLE

2

4

3

1

6

5

The “Emerald City” of seattle is laidback west coast but also cutting-edge, the birthplace of grunge music and also some über-modern architecture (CE events in Seattle + beyond are highlighted in blue.)

hotel and restaurant photos, courtesy of provenance hotels and The Miller’s guild; other photos: b. Sligl (3)

S

eattle is often referred to as Emerald City. And while that’s a reference to the fantastical place in The Wizard of Oz, it’s also a moniker for the lush and green coastal wonderland of Seattle on Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest. Washington State’s largest city is known for many “wonderous” things; it’s ground zero of grunge music and tech-forward companies like Microsoft, Amazon and Boeing. There’s a new-world gleam here as well as a rebellious spirit. This is the birthplace of the Starbucks coffee empire (its Pike Place roast is now ubiquitous but is named for Starbucks’ very first location at Seattle’s public market). And yet the city’s caffeinated can-do spirit is tempered with an easy-going PNW vibe that puts the outdoors (Seattle comes by its Emerald City nickname because of thousands of acres of parkland) and west-coast lifestyle first and foremost. While the Space Needle (a legacy of the 1962 World’s Fair) may still be the city’s most iconic landmark, there’s far more futuristic architecture to behold in Seattle. Within the Needle’s shadow is the sinuous EMP Museum 1 . It stands for Experience Music Project and as such its mission statement states that it’s a “leading-

edge nonprofit museum, dedicated to the ideas and risk-taking that fuel contemporary popular culture.” And gazing up at its gleaming, undulating Frank Gehry design (made of 21,000 aluminum stainless steel shingles and 280 steel ribs), one can envision the cross-sections of curvilinear guitars that the architect says inspired him and served as building blocks. And inside “boldly go where no one has gone before” via the Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds exhibition (opening May 21). {empmuseum.org} Also currently showing at the EMP: Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Masses. The band most associated with grunge music also embodies Seattle spirit. Local label Sub Pop Records signed the band in 1989, over 25 years ago, and to relive some of that era stay at the Hotel Max, the art- and music-filled boutique bolthole that recently revealed an exterior mural (proudly proclaiming that “Seattle doesn’t settle” in six-foot tall letters 2 ) and a redesigned lobby that shows off vibrant art (including an original Warhol and a bass guitar signed by Krist Novoselic of Nirvana), along with a retail shop collaboration with Sub Pop. Also on offer: free samples of local Caffe Vita brew in the morning and craft beer in the

afternoon…and there’s a Sub Pop floor in which to hole up and listen to tunes 3 . {hotelmaxseattle.com} Attached to the Hotel Max lobby is The Miller’s Guild, where a custom-made nine-foot-long Infierno wood-fired grill is a fiery centrepiece. The name is inspired by the building’s past as the 1925 Vance Lumber Company Hotel, where workers rested between harvesting and milling trees in the surrounding forests. Now it’s all about nose-to-tail cuisine and other fire-roasted PNW fare, as well as cask-aged craft cocktails 4 . {millersguild.com} More of Seattle’s creative spirit and innovative pioneering is found at the central branch of the Seattle Public Library. The multi-faceted structure, as if a bright gem nestled in the downtown core, is the creation of another internationally renowned architect, Rem Koolhaas and former Seattleite Joshua Ramus 5 . Take a free guided tour of its award-winning architecture, including a maple floor that’s made of 556 lines of raised text in 11 languages 6 . {spl.org} — Barb Sligl For more visitor info on Seattle go to visitseattle.org.

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

23


Endodontics

Dental Materials

Cosmetics/Aesthetic/Restorative

Anesthesia/Sedation

ce calendar ce when where

24

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC

213-821-2121 See Ad Page 15

uscdentalce.org

Multiple Dates

Los Angeles California

Parenteral Moderate Sedation For Dentists Wednesday - Sunday, July 13-17 Thursday - Sunday, July 28-31 Friday- Sunday, August 05-07

Sep 16-18

Edmonton Alberta

Nitrous Oxide & Oral Sedation

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 12

dentistry.ualberta.ca/cde

Sep 16-19

Edmonton Alberta

IV Conscious Sedation Certification Program (Session 1); Oct 26-Nov 1 (Session 2); And Dec 10-15 (Session 3)

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 12

dentistry.ualberta.ca/cde

Ongoing

Leuven Belgium

Biocompatible And Durable Restorations With Glass Ionomers From GC

GC Europe

See website

gceurope.com

Monthly Courses

Vancouver British Columbia

Botox, Dermal Fillers, Lasers

Pacific Training Institute for Facial Aesthetics

855-681-0066

ptifa.com

Jul 08-18

Italy, Turkey & Greek Islands Cruise

Demystifying Occlusion For Aesthetic Restorations

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 13

mindwareseminars.com

Sep 08-09

Seattle Washington

Botox & Dermal Fillers & Frontline TMJ & Orofacial Pain WA

American Academy of Facial Esthetics

800-952-0521

facialesthetics. org

Oct 28-29

Los Angeles California

The USC 9th International Restorative Dentistry Symposium

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC

213-821-2121 See Ad Page 15

uscdentalce.org

Nov 04-06

Edmonton Alberta

CAD/CAM Mini-Residency In Aesthetic Dentistry (Module 1)

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 12

dentistry.ualberta.ca/cde

Nov 10-12

Las Vegas Nevada

Upper Face & Bruxism

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 12

dentistry.ualberta.ca/cde

May 20

Harrisburg Pennsylvania

Adhesive Dentistry Symposium

Pennsylvania Dental Association

717-234-5941

padental.org

Jun 25

Los Angeles California

Suturing Techniques:A Practical Hands-On Course On Soft Tissue Suturing

University of Southern California

213-821-2127

uscdentalce.org

Sep 09-16

Pearls of the Adriatic Croatia Cruise

Crown And Bridge

Cruise and Travel Partners/ Catapult Elite

800-856-8826 See Ad Page 27

cruiseandtravelpartners.com

Ongoing

Vancouver British Columbia

Course #1 Shaping, Cleaning,And Obturation Of Root Canal Systems Course #2 Re-Treatment & Other Complex Cases

Endodontics Unsponsored

604-987-2285

vancouverrootcanals.com

Jun 03-06

Cape Town South Africa

IFEA 2016 - 10th World Endodontic Congress

International Federation of Endodontic Associations

630-469-3599

ifeaendo.org

Sep 22-30

Portugal Land Tour and Golf

Endodontics

Cruise and Travel Partners/Univ. of Florida

800-856-8826 See Ad Page 27

cruiseandtravelpartners.com

Nov 18-19

Los Angeles California

The USC 15th International Endodontic Symposium

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC

213-821-2121 See Ad Page 15

uscdentalce.org

new CE to be placed Neuromodulators Level 2 - Treatment of the

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016


Geriatric Dentistry

General Dentistry

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Through 2016

BC and Ontario

Functional Occlusion For The General Practitioner

FOCUS Education Continuum

604-922-3465

drracich.ca

Through 2016

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 - 6 Weekends: Oct. 10-11 Through April 16-17; Course Directors: Drs.Tarnow And Fine

Columbia College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia. edu

May 20

Seattle Washington

E1587: Effective & Efficient Use Of Social Media

University of Washington Continuing Dental Education

206-543-5840

uwcde.com

Jul 09-16

Great Bear Lake NWT

23rd Annual Dental Seminar

Plummer’s Arctic Lodges

800-665-0240

plummerslodges.com

Aug 04-05

Seattle Washington

The Art Of Photography

Clinical Mastery Series

480-489-5551

clinicalmastery. com

Aug 08-19

Danube River Europe

Adventure And Learn, European River Cruise

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 28

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Sep 07-10

Poznan Poland

FDI Annual World Dental Congress

FDI World Dental Federation

41-22-560 81-50 See Ad Page 02

fdi2016poznan. org

Fall 2016

Calgary Alberta

Women In Dentistry

ROI Corporation

888-764-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Jan 22-29 2017

Panama Central America

Clinician & Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 04

kennedyseminars.com

Jan 30Feb 03 2017

Maui Hawaii

Adventure And Learn, Hawaii

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 28

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Feb 19Mar 03 2017

Mardi Gras Cruise

Clinician & Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 04

kennedyseminars.com

Feb 23-25 2017

Whistler British Columbia

Ski And Learn

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 28

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Mar 11-18 2017

Beaches Turks & Caicos

Clinician & Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736

kennedyseminars.com

Mar 11-18 2017

Riviera Maya Mexico

Clinician & Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736

kennedyseminars.com

Mar 31Apr 09 2017

Argentina Land Tour

General Dentistry

Cruise and Travel Partners/ UB School of Dentistry

800-856-8826 See Ad Page 27

cruiseandtravelpartners.com

Oct 17-25

New England & Canada Crystal Cruise

Advances In Caring For Our Aging Population/ Seminar At Sea From Montreal To New York

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Nov 10

Victoria British Columbia

Current Concepts In Dentistry

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

continuingstudies.uvic.ca

new CE to UBC Continuing Dental Education be placed

Rondeau Seminars Internet course available. For more information, visit our website.

The Leader in Dental Continuing Education

1-877-372-7625 rondeauseminars.com

Approved PACE Program Provider FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement 3/1/2015 to 2/28/2018

Level I - Introduction to Orthodontics Expand Your Practice • Increase Your Income • Revitalize Your Interest In Dentistry

2016 - 2017 Course Locations Toronto, ON Orange County, CA Vancouver, BC

Chicago, IL Dallas, TX Miami, FL

Space is Limited, Register Early!

Sessions 1. Early Treatment Mixed Dentition, Functional Appliances, Diagnostic Records, Cephalometrics, Practice Management 2. Straight Wire Mechanics, Class II Treatment, Twin Block™, Rick-A-Nator™, Bracketing, Banding of Molars, Archwires 3. TMJ in Orthodontics, Sagittal & Tandem Appliance, Class III, Utility Arches, Splint Therapy, Joint Vibration Analysis 4. MARA™ Appliance, Open Bite Cases, Impacted Cuspids, Clear Braces, Case Finishing, Retention, Snoring & Sleep Apnea, Air Rotor Stripping & Invisalign (Clear Aligners) May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

25


Implantology

Infection Control

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Ongoing

Online

Preventing And Controlling Healthcare Associated Infection In The Dental Practice

eDen Education Pty

800-773-7571

e-deneducation. com

Nov 25

Fairfield New Jersey

AIDS

Dental Studies Institute

973-808-1666

dsi-nj.com

Multiple Dates

Multiple Locations

Implant Dentistry Continuum (2-day Sessions Held In 4 Consecutive Months) Tampa, FL - May 19-20, 2016 Miami, FL - September 17-18, 2016 Houston, TX - October 20-21, 2016 Los Angeles, CA - December 1-2, 2016

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 34

implantseminars.com

Multiple Dates

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient Implant Surgical Course (3 Day Course) June 15-17, 2016 September 15-17, 2016 October 20-22, 2016

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 34

implantseminars.com

Multiple Dates

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient Extraction Course (3 Day Course) July 14-16, 2016 September 8-10, 2016 October 13-15, 2016 December 1-3, 2016

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 34

implantseminars.com

Multiple Dates

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient 3rd Molar Course (3 Day Course) July 7-9, 2016 October 27-29, 2016 November 10-12, 2016

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 34

implantseminars.com

Starts May

Vancouver British Columbia

Surgical-Prosthetic Master Continuum (30 Days & Over 500 CE Hours)

800-668-2280

pacificinstitute. co

May 23-28

Baja California Mexico

Dental new CE toAdvanced Education be(All-On-4 placedCalifornia 6-Day Live Patient Surgical Externship Implant Program) Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 09

implanteducation.net

Jun 11-18

Alaskan Cruise

Attachment Dentistry Ultimate Course

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 24

seacourses.com

Jun 28-30

San Diego California

3-Day Oral Sedation Program

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 09

implanteducation.net

Aug 2016Aug 2017

San Diego California

Master Of Oral Implantology Program 1-Year Track - August 2016-2017 (2-Year Track Also Available)

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 09

implanteducation.net

Aug 01-14

San Diego California

14-Day Continuous Fellowship Program

California Implant Institute and University of Nevada, Las Vegas

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 09

implanteducation.net

Sep 23 2016 Jun 04 2017

Newark New Jersey

MaxiCourse, A Comprehensive Training Program In Implant Dentistry (Ten Friday to Sunday Modules)

Rutgers School of Dental Medicine

973-972-4242 See Ad Page 26

cde.sdm.rutgers.edu

May 18-28 2017

Tour of Tuscany

Building Your Practice With Implants: Enhancing Diagnosis, Placement, Cementation And Marketing With Dr. Sam Halabo

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 13

mindwareseminars.com

Aug 23Sep 04 2017

Russia & Scandinavia Cruise

Practical Pearls For Achieving Predictable Success In Your Implant Practice

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 13

mindwareseminars.com

Rutgers School of Dental Medicine and The American Academy of Implant

Pacific Institute for

MaxiCourse速 (AAID)

A COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING PROGRAM IN IMPLANT DENTISTRY

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

26

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit our Website:

cde.sdm.rutgers.edu/maxicourse Or Call:

973-972-6561 or 866-720-1971


Pediatric Dentistry

Orthodontics

Oral Pathology

Medical/Dental Issues

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

May 27-31

Montreal Quebec

46th Annual Convention Of The Ordre des Dentistes du Québec

Ordre des dentistes du Québec

800-361-4887

odq.qc.ca

Sep 24

Clemmons North Carolina

Airway Management - Medical Emergency Course

Conscious Sedation Consulting

888-581-4448

sedationconsulting.com

Oct 20-22

Prishtina Kosovo

2016 Medikos - Medical, Dental And Pharmaceutical Trade Fair

CEO - Congress & Event Organization & Prishtina Fair

381-38-220003

kosovafair.com

Sep 22

St. Louis Missouri

Love Those Oral Lesions: What’s Age Got To Do With It - Parts I & II

Greater St. Louis Dental Society

314-569-0444

greaterstlouisdentalsociety. org

Oct 27

St. Paul Minnesota

Oral Pathology Update 2016

University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

612-625-1418

dentistry.umn. edu

Oct 28 Nov 04

Mediterranean Cruise

Oral, Maxillofacial & Head And Neck Pathology

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingeducation.net

Oct 28 Nov 04

Mediterranean Cruise

Oral Dermatology And Pathology

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 24

seacourses.com

Sep 16-17

Toronto Ontario

Level I, Introduction To Orthodontics, Session #1

Rondeau Seminars

877-372-7625 See Ad Page 25

rondeauseminars.com

Sep 30Oct 01

Las Vegas Nevada

Early Orthodontic Treatment Conference

877-372-7625 See Ad Page 25

rondeauseminars.com

Oct 14-23

France River Cruise

Early Orthodontics, Missing Teeth, Recent Advances With Dr. David Kennedy

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 04

kennedyseminars.com

Oct 21-22

Vancouver British Columbia

Level I, Introduction To Orthodontics, Session #1

Rondeau Seminars

877-372-7625 See Ad Page 25

rondeauseminars.com

Nov 11-12

Toronto Ontario

Dentist’s Role In Snoring And Sleep Apnea

Rondeau Seminars

877-372-7625 See Ad Page 25

rondeauseminars.com

Mar 20-24 2017

Big Island Hawaii

Adventure And Learn, Orthodontic Symposium ~ Advances In Orthodontics

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744 See Ad Page 28

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

May 19

Nashville Tennessee

Preventive Parent Management: How To Handle The Tough Parent Questions In Pediatric Dentistry While Supporting Each Other As A Team

Tennessee Dental Association

615-628-0208

tenndental.org

Aug 25-26

Atlanta Georgia

Pediatric Emergencies In The Dental Office

Emory University School of Medicine

404-727-6069

med.emory.edu

Mar 11-18 2017

Southern Caribbean Cruise

Pediatric Dental Pearls And Life Planning Gems

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingeducation.net

Mar 11-18 2017

Southern Caribbean Cruise

Pediatric Dental Pearls And Life Planning Gems

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 24

seacourses.com

new CE to Kennedy Professional Education Seminars be placed Rondeau Seminars

Pearls of the Adriatic Croatia Cruise

Portugal Land Tour And Golf

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Argentina Land Tour

September 9 – 16: Crown and Bridge

September 22 – 30: Endodontics

February 18 - 25, 2017: Prosthodontics and Periodontics

March 31 – April 9, 2017: General Dentistry

Jodi Murphy, Managing Member Tel: (800) 856-8826 Email: cruiseandtravelpartners@comcast.net

www.cruiseandtravelpartners.com

Offering unique CUSTOM EXPERIENTIAL TRAVEL FOR DENTAL PROFESSIONALS May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

27


Practice Management, Technology and Planning

Prosthodontics

Periodontics

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Jun 02

Boston Massachusetts

Crown Lengthening Workshop

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine

617-636-6767

tufts.edu

Oct 13-14

Wintergreen Virginia

Fall Wine Weekend At Wintergreen Resort

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry

804-828-9184

dentistry.vcu.edu

Feb 18-25 2017

Eastern

Caribbean Cruise

Prosthodontics And Periodontics

Cruise and Travel Partners/ Toronto Faculty of Dentistry

800-856-8826 See Ad Page 27

cruiseandtravelpartners.com

May 05

Dubai UAE

11th CAD/CAM & Digital Dentistry International Conference In Dubai 2016 By CAPPmea

Centre for Advanced Professional Practices FZ LLC (CAPPmea)

971-502793711

cappmea.com

Sep 08-10

Halifax Nova Scotia

24th Annual Scientific Meeting

Canadian Academy of Restorative Dentistry and Prosthodontics

902-435-1723

cardp.ca

Jan 27Feb 06 2017

Antarctic Cruise

Dr. Jim McGorman - Antibiotics Use And Abuse; Dr. Dan Izakow - Cad Cam And Digital Dentistry; Dr. Jack Pipkin - Prosthodontics & Implants

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 04

kennedyseminars.com

Various Dates

Vancouver British Columbia

Certificate In Dental Practice Management: Building A Business Worth Smiling About March 4-6, April 8-10, May 13-15

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

Jun 02

Edmonton Alberta

The Profitable Hygiene Seminar

MGE: Management Experts

800-640-1140

mgeonline.com

Late Fall

Various Cities

Business Of Dentistry Seminars

ROI Corporation

888-764-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Nov 05-21

Trans Atlantic Cruise Barcelona to Barbados

Sailing Successfully Into Your Professional Practice: Mental Health In the Workplace

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327

seacourses.com

Nov 10

New Orleans Louisiana

Spice Up Your Practice

Classic Practice Resources

800-928-9289

classicpractice. com

Nov 19-26

Western Caribbean Cruise

Predictable Treatment Planning

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 24

seacourses.com

Nov 19-26

Western Caribbean Cruise

Predictable Treatment Planning: From The Seemingly Simple To The Worn Dentition...And Everything In Between

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingeducation.net

Dec 26Jan 08 2017

Southeast Asia Land Tour

Mini-Mastership In Laser Dentistry

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 13

mindwareseminars.com

Jan 21-28 2017

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Dental Treatment Planning And Sequencing; The Keys To Predictable, Profitable Dentistry

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingeducation.net

Jan 28Feb 4 2017

Hawaiian Cruise

Management 301: Practice Rejuvenation Retreat

Dental Management Secrets

403-984-0111 See Ad Page 33

dentalmanagementsecrets. com

new CE to be placed

For feedback, requests or to have your course featured email dentalce@inprintpublications.com

Romantic Danube River Cruise Travel and Learn Hawaii

August 2016 January & March 2017

Ski and Learn Whistler, BC

February 2017

Palm Springs, CA

February 2017

28

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016


For more information - Call 800-422-0711 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Outstanding value for your time and resources Combine live continuing education and personal renewal time with family & friends

Space Still Available June 11, 2016 The Ultimate Attachment Dentistry Course: Everything You Wanted to Know but Were Afraid to Ask!! 14 CE Credits 7-Night Alaska from Seattle, Washington Holland America’s ms Westerdam

August 21, 2016 Boston University Goldman School of Dentistry - Cruise & Learn: Endodontic Diagnosis, Case Selection, and General Risk Management 9 CE Credits 7-Night Bermuda from Cape Liberty, New Jersey Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Summit August 28, 2016 Dental Photography Made Simple: One Picture is Worth a Thousand Crowns 12 CE Credits 7 Night Western Mediterranean from Barcelona, Spain Royal Caribbean’s Brand New Harmony of the Seas October 15, 2016 Boston University Goldman School of Dentistry - Cruise & Learn: Implants and Esthetic Dentistry for Dentists and Updates in Dental Hygiene for Dental Auxiliaries 9 CE Credits 8-Night Caribbean from New York City to San Juan Norwegian Cruise Lines’ Norwegian Gem October 28, 2016 Oral, Maxillofacial & Head and Neck Pathology 14 CE Credits 7-Day Mediterranean from Barcelona, Spain Holland America’s ms Eurodam November 19, 2016 Predictable Treatment Planning: From the Seemingly Simple to the Worn Dentition... and Everything in Between 14 CE Credits 7-Night Western Caribbean from Miami, Florida Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Reflection

January 21, 2017 Dental Treatment Planning & Sequencing: The Keys to Predictable, Profitable Dentistry 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Fort Lauderdale, Florida Royal Caribbean’s Harmony of the Seas March 11, 2017 Pediatric Dental Pearls and Life Planning Gems 14 CE Credits 7-Night Southern Caribbean from San Juan, Puerto Rico Royal Caribbean’s Adventure of the Seas April 23, 2017 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Royal Caribbean’s Allure of the Seas June 3, 2017 Dental Implants: An Integral Component of the Comprehensive Dental Practice 14 CE Hours 7-Night Alaska from Seattle, Washington Holland America’s ms Eurodam July 30, 2017 Dental Occlusion: It Can Make You or Break You! & The Total Wellness Dental Practice Model 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas

Please visit our web site (www.ContinuingEducation.NET) for current course fees and cancellation policies. All Activities are either AGD or ADA Approved. For specific Continuing Education Program approval please visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET Florida Seller of Travel Reg. #14337

Selected Cruises listed here. See a complete Program Listing at www.ContinuingEducation.NET Ask about our Guest Travels Free Program We can manage or joint provide/accredit your next association or group meeting Call 800-422-0711 or 727-526-1571 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET


travel at home

Ed North (left) and the author (right) stand lookout to navigate the tricky Channel. left Bridal Veil Falls on Manitoulin Island, a short hike from the popular “overnight” dock at Kagawong. The most beautiful anchorage in the world, South Benjamin Island. right A bit of company shares the waters off Croker Island. opposite “Summer Breeze” is just one of more than a dozen boats in the fleet maintained by Canadian Yacht Charters.

30

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016


travel at home

SAILING TO

GOD’S ISLAND

W

story by Mark Stevens | photography by Sharon matthews-stevens

e’re skimming the waters of Frazer Bay in Ontario’s Georgian Bay in a forty-nine-foot sailboat named “Summer Breeze.” The quartzite LaCloche Mountains, their rugged slopes white as a February snowfall in the afternoon sun, reach skyward off our starboard quarter. Far astern we can see Killarney Provincial Park and Baie Fine. Royal blue decorates the bay, mirroring the sky but for whitecaps scattered like lace collars across its wind-riffled surface. Those landmarks inspired numerous Group of Seven paintings. No surprise there: the views embracing us show like landscapes painted by masters. “Summer Breeze” groans in twenty knots of wind, leaning precipitously, a position that would be frightening but for the fact that this is how she sails—and that all aboard know what we are doing. We’ve chartered this boat from Canadian Yacht Charters out of Manitoulin Island’s Gore Bay. If you know how to sail, they’ll rent you the boat. If you don’t, you can book a skipper. We’re navigating the North Channel, guarded to the south by Manitoulin Island and by the Canadian Shield to the north, an east-west passage marked by roughly 300 islands, most of which are unmarred by human occupation. It’s one of only two Canadian destinations cited in a book called “Fifty Places to Sail Before You Die,” one of the world’s best freshwater cruising grounds. My wife and I first sailed here in 1999. It’s the first voyage for our friends, Kim and Ed North. Serious sailors, they’re here to help us

work the boat—and to sail paradise itself. And now I yell over the howling winds. “Manitoulin, dead ahead.” I point past a white lighthouse with a fire-engine-red roof toward a blue-gray expanse rising up from Lake Huron like a great leviathan. “We’re sailing to God’s Island.” First Manitoulin waypoint is Wikwemikong, one of the few First Nations territories local Ojibwa never ceded to the government. Come here in August to participate in one of Canada’s biggest powwows and take in some First Nations theatre. Hike to picturesque waterfalls, climb to the crest of Niagara escarpment ridges, rent a bicycle, recline on a beach you’ll share with no one, and take in some history. Explore a fascinating— and sacred—island. Legend has it that Manitou—the Anishnabe God—saved the bluest waters, the brightest stars, the most scintillating quartzite to make his own retreat—placing it, the world’s largest freshwater island, right here. Off the port bow. Tonight we’d make landfall at Little Current, one of the island’s few settlements, securing “Summer Breeze” to a dock, dining ashore on local whitefish.

“And tomorrow,” says Ken Blodgett, the fifth member of our ship manifest, who’s taken over the helm, wrestling the boat through waves that shatter into scintillating spray as we chase the sun west, “we’re taking you to the most beautiful anchorage in the world.” Blodgett owns Canadian Yacht Charters and has become a friend over the years. Given that it’s late summer, so things are slower back in Gore Bay, and given that Blodgett has promised to show us “secret spots you can only imagine,” we enthusiastically add him to the crew list. Tomorrow he’d share one of those secret spots. Yesterday he shared another one: the Pool in Baie Fine, where we swung at anchor in what felt like the sanctuary of an emerald cathedral. Early this morning we dinghied ashore from that anchorage, tying to a rudimentary dock and climbing a logging trail to a hilltop lake nestled in a granite cradle, surrounded by gnarled wind-crippled pine, boasting waters so clear you could see ten metres down, painted—like its name suggested—topaz. “Just wait until tomorrow,” I tell Ed and Kim. “We’ll take you to a really pretty spot.” A spot called South Benjamin Island, a spot I consider the most beautiful anchorage in the world, a spot we would achieve on our last full day on the water, after a lunch stop at Croker Island, hot dogs on

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

31


travel at home

the barbecue in a delightful granite bowl decorated by pine, by juniper, by fecund blueberry bushes. Lunch done, we raise anchor and power west, past Sows and Pigs, a collection of surreal rock outcroppings rearing up from the water like breaching whales. Kim notices a black irregularity in the water’s surface just off the port stern. “What is that?” she asks. Ken slows the engine, we make a lazy circle. We squint at this ‘bump’ then someone realizes that it’s moving, a small wake fanThe Pool in Baie Fine, another ning out from it. It is a black bear. anchorage regulars consider one She looks at us; she swims away. of the world’s most beautiful. We give her space, but follow her until she reaches a headland off Croker. She clamours ashore, up onto the rock, turns to face us contemptuously, shakes vigorously, then disappears into the forest. That evening, as the sun falls in the west, as we swing gently off a curvaceous slab of pink granite, blushing in the sunset, I reflect on the spectacle of the she-bear, nature setting out as if to convince us we were sailing paradise itself, on other highlights, on other visits. I’m sitting on the shore, gazing at “Summer Breeze”, inhaling the scent of pine, listening to the water lapping the rock shore in liquid melody, the echoing call of a loon. I remember our first day out of Gore Bay, navigating shoals in Clapperton Channel, skies heavy, vista a minimalist line drawing: sky, rock, water in pewter and purple hues. I remember the dawn light at Killarney; North Channel scenery like this— prime Canadian Shield—inspired the sun spotlighting a fishing boat, painting the art of members of the Group of Seven. forest rose then gold. I remember a dock at Kagawong on Manitoulin itself, a circa-1920s general store across from a church whose pulpit was built from the prow of a boat shipwrecked just offshore. Now Ed climbs the slope; he sits beside me. I point south to the far reaches of the channel, toward the world’s SAIL AWAY To book your sailing biggest freshwater adventure—either with a skipper or island that even on your own—and to check the fleet of now disappears available boats, log on to cycnorth.com in the dusk. or call 1-800-565-0022 to book. PLAN NOW For more info on God’s Island “Manitoulin,” I say, and other shore-based options, “Home of the Great check out manitoulinSpirit.” And then tourism.com. I pause reflectively. “God’s Island.”

if you go

32

Just For Canadian dentists

Checking out the directions to sail to God’s Island. below Killarney Mountain Lodge— dock here for the night and sample the attractions of this friendly Ontario lodge.


Get Your CEs While Crusing Beautiful Hawaii

Join Us Jan 28 - Feb 4, 2017 For This Practice Rejuvenation Retreat Why you should attend this event and even bring your manager and staff with you: • The seminar leaders use these strategies and methods to continue to grow one of Canada’s top practices. • The owners and managers learn how to lead, and your team learns how important their individual roles are. • Everything presented gets put together into an office plan that is taken home. Everyone returns knowing their part in the success of the practice.

Your Hawaiian Cruise Package Includes: • 7 nights onboard the Norwegian Cruise Line Pride of America • Transportation to some of the most beautiful places on earth via cruise ship • Meals in the complimentary dining venues • Choice Beverages • On board Activities such as Onboard Entertainment, Art Auctions, Poolside activities, Access to fitness facilities. Select onboard presentations, Sports Court activities, Use of outdoor pools and hot tubs • Attentive room stewards and complimentary room service

We Don’t Teach Theory, We Teach What We Do Every Day! 100% Canadian Content and Presenters

Dr Dave Robertson Owner Dental Management Secrets

Craig Hayes Office Manager Deer Valley Dental Care

Trent Wehrhahn Owner Dental Growth Strategies

For Details and Pricing Visit:

Approved PACE Program Provider FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. 03/01/2016 to 02/28/2017. Provider ID# 368363

Free Pr eview Video

DentalManagementSecrets.com/hawaii Or Call Michelle at 403-984-0111


practice management Timothy A. Brown Timothy A. Brown specializes in dental practice appraisals, brokerage, consulting, locum placements, associateships and practice financing across Canada. You can reach Timothy at timothy@roicorp.com.

managing bad publicity

We’re all prone to thoughtless acts, but healthcare professionals need to be extra diligent

O

n July 29, 2015 a news story broke that caused a worldwide uproar. It involved the Minnesota dentist, Dr. Walter Palmer, who shot and killed a lion in Zimbabwe. That lion, named Cecil, happened to be a national icon. Now, many months later, what are the lessons to be learned? (Besides not shooting an off-limits taggedand-protected animal outside a park.) What do professionals do when they have purposely or accidently placed themselves in a very bad publicity situation? What are the consequences and how can they be avoided or lessened? One of the first things that professional handlers tell celebrities or professionals when they do something wrong, is to apologize sincerely and quickly, and admit their mistake (if indeed they made one). There are conflicting accounts that this dentist did not know he was on a game reserve and one of the guides may have misinformed him of his rights in this type of hunting venture. However, if professionals receive bad publicity through social media or television or any other form of public communication, they need to respond promptly. Denial or excuses, whether they be real or contrived, are rarely believed by the public because the power of perception and the media is often more influential than any explanations of what happened. Our company has received just one negative feedback on Facebook since we started our social media campaign years ago. We immediately came forward and addressed the concerns of the complainant.

We kept the backstory, regardless of what it may have explained, confidential. We took the position that the client was right, although internally we felt he/she had acted inappropriately. Our company took the high road and apologized and tried to rectify the situation with the complainant. We never did receive a reply back from this individual, so we’re uncertain if he/she is satisfied with how we responded. We did so openly and quickly and, I believe, were very professional in dealing with this social media attack. Professionals are often targets of gossip, rumor or worse because of the jealousy of competitors, exspouses and disgruntled staff members, to name just a few. We have all seen information on Rate My MD, where any member of the public can post any comment. That comment is not monitored or governed in any meaningful way. And it’s an unfortunate reality that people in high-ranking positions in the community, such as healthcare professionals, who are also in higher income brackets, can and will be targeted by a person or persons who have an agenda. And this is when public relations firms can be helpful, guiding individuals on how to manage such situations. Dr. Palmer’s practice and reputation have suffered as a result of his actions. Some of his patients have voted with

istock

The old adages “keep your nose clean” and “think of the consequences before you act” are undoubtedly appropriate for people to follow in life…

their feet and regard him guilty in the court of public opinion, regardless of any defense of his actions that he has presented. He’s been forced to hire security guards to protect himself, his family, practice and properties. And, yes, this will have a negative impact on the value of his practice, business and income and it’s entirely possible he may not be able to recover from this self-made disaster. In a recent interview, Dr. Palmer relayed his concern for his many staff members whose lives and livelihood have also been disrupted by the furor over the death of Cecil. The old adages “keep your nose clean” and “think of the consequences before you act” are undoubtedly appropriate for people to follow in life to avoid potential devastating results. It’s a lesson for all healthcare professionals.

the Thoughtless act of a successful dentist ruins his career and business

do no harm, to others and yourself

be smart about what you do outside the practice

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

35


t h e w e a lt h y d e n t i s t m a n f r e d p u r t z k i Manfred Purtzki is the principal of Purtzki & Associates Chartered Accountants. You can reach him at manfred@purtzki.com.

new start

Don’t rent your future…own it

W

Purtzki & associates chartered accountants

hen you start to practise as a dentist, there’s a fork in the road that will have great impact on your career and your financial future. It’s when you come across this question: “Shall I work as an associate for the foreseeable future until my student loan is paid off or shall I become a practice owner as soon as possible? Most dental graduates decide to work as associates for many years. Often they choose to leave the city to work in a rural area in search for more money. But if you really want to pay off your student loan quickly, become an owner as soon as you can. Use the short-term associateship to hone your clinical and patient communication skills. In particular, ask yourself the following three questions:

1 Do I have the confidence and clinical

speed to produce monthly revenues of $40,000–$50,000 based on 20 days per month?

3 Do I have the basic business skills to run a practice?

See the above chart for a comparison of a new graduate becoming a practice owner after two years of associateship versus another dentist who works as an associate for seven years before purchasing the practice. Over a 10-year period the dentist who chose the early ownership option in year three is over $800,000 of excess cash flow ahead of the dentist who did not become an owner until year eight. The conclusion is simple: You are almost always better off to become a practice owner as soon as you are ready. If you can’t find an attractive associate position with ownership potential, create one by providing a service that the prospective practice currently does not. Here’s how:

• Propose to the practice owner that you’ll build up your own patient base by working as an associate during the extended hours and weekends the practice has previously been closed. • Make an agreement that after an initial trial period you’ll have the option to purchase an interest in the practice and become a cost-sharing partner.

solution from March/ April 2016 contest

communication skills to make a persuasive case presentation?

• Contact well-established practices in the community in which you’d like to live and work.

sudoku 2 harder solution 1 4 5 7 8 9 6 3 2 8 3 6 2 5 1 9 7 4 7 2 9 4 3 6 8 1 5 4 5 1 6 7 2 3 8 9 2 9 7 8 1 3 4 5 6 3 6 8 5 9 4 1 2 7 6 7 3 9 2 8 5 4 1 9 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 8 5 8 4 1 6 7 2 9 3

Puzzle by websudoku.com

This deal is a win-win for the principal dentist and for you. The principal dentist keeps all his/her patient revenues and has less overhead because it’s shared with you. You, on the other hand, can quickly achieve practice ownership at a relatively low cost since you’re not purchasing expensive patient charts from the principal. By staying flexible and taking initiative, new dentists can still find their way to professionally satisfying and financially rewarding careers.

solution from page 37

2 Have I developed the necessary

sudoku 1 easier solution 7 3 9 5 8 1 6 2 4 5 6 8 4 3 2 7 9 1 1 2 4 6 7 9 3 5 8 3 5 6 8 9 7 4 1 2 9 8 2 1 4 3 5 7 6 4 7 1 2 5 6 8 3 9 2 1 5 7 6 8 9 4 3 6 4 3 9 2 5 1 8 7 8 9 7 3 1 4 2 6 5

Puzzle by websudoku.com

36

Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016


diversion

sudoku Solve puzzle #2 for a chance to win a $50 VISA gift card!

Each sudoku puzzle has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 square contains the digits 1 through 9. GOOD LUCK!

sudoku 2 harder solution in next issue

sudoku 1 easier solution on page 36

$50 Visa Gift Card winner: Dr. Noel Farrell of Burin, NL

3 5 6 4 3 2 3 6 2 1 4 7 1 2 7 9 2 8

4

2 9 7 4 1 3 5 9 8 4 5 8 7 6

Puzzle by websudoku.com

8 5

9

4 1 9 7

7 6

8

7

5 8

9

1 3 2 5 8 5

2

7

4 3

8 7

6

2 1

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Sudoku Contest entry form (solve + send in sudoku!)

Yes, I would like to receive the CE newsletter & updates by e-mail. NB: Information collected will not be shared with any third party.

Name: __________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________ City, Province, Postal Code: _________________________________________

E-mail: _________________________________________________________ Tel: ____________________________ Fax: ____________________________ sudoku Contest Rules:

1. Entry form must be accompanied with solved puzzle. Only correctly solved puzzles entered into random draw. 2. Send puzzle + entry form to Just For Canadian Dentists, 200 – 896 Cambie St., Vancouver, BC, V6B 2P6 or fax 604-681-0456. Entries must be received by June 10, 2016. 3. Prize: $50 VISA Gift Card. 4. Contest can be changed and/or cancelled without prior notice. 5. All entries become property of In Print Publications. 6. Employees of In Print Publications and its affliates are not eligible to participate.

May/June 2016 Just For Canadian dentists

37


Dr. Diya Chadha describes herself and her home as “happy.” Little wonder, given her smile (even in a selfie with a camel in Dubai!) and adventurous spirit. From Egypt to New York City and Brazil to Bora Bora (the dream vacation she’s sure to embark on soon), she’s definitely in touch with her wild side (a theme throughout this issue)—in fact, next on her to-do list: bungee jump! My name: Diya Dimple Chadha

Medical Center, New York

I live in: Vancouver

Why I was drawn to dentistry: My orthodontist changed my life! I had awful rotated teeth and my orthodontist improved my

My training: DMD (From the University of Pennsylvania) and Certificate in Pediatric dentistry from Lutheran

smile and my life. I wanted to do the same for people.

from a trip: A king Tutankhamun statue from Egypt

My last trip: Dubai

Best meal anywhere: Pork ribs at Duke’s in Maui

Most exotic place I’ve travelled to: Falls de Iguacu, Brazil Best souvenir I’ve brought back

Memorable restaurant: Spice Market in NYC

A “wow” hotel I’d happily stay in again: The Atlantis Bahamas

Most frequented store: Disney Store

A favourite place that I keep returning to: New York City

My fridge is always stocked with: Ice cream

Can’t believe I’ve never been to: China

Dream vacation: Bora Bora If I could travel to any time, I’d go to: The ’70s

My go-to exercise/sport: Long walks

Jetlag cure: Coffee with a shot of Bailey’s

Favourite spectator sport: Hockey

I always travel with: My camera Favourite city: Seville, Spain Favourite book: The Kite Runner Favourite film: Home Alone Favourite TV show: Dexter Favourite band/ album/song: Anything and everything My first job: Telemarketer

In Paris and with her son Nik in Mexico.

favourite book :

The Kite Runner

Gadget/gear I could not do without: My smartphone I’d describe my home as: Happy

world traveller :

My car: A Toyota Highlander. . .

In Cairo

Last purchase: Lunch

must-have staple :

38

Ice cream! Just For Canadian dentists May/June 2016

My guilty pleasure: Online shopping My medicine cabinet is always stocked with: Extra-large Band-Aids

Don’t need to go to: Fargo

Dr. Diya Chadha meets a new friend on her latest trip to Dubai

I have too many: Shoes

Last splurge: Shoes. . . it’s always shoes!

Celebrity crush: Matthew McConaughey My secret to relaxing and relieving tension: Foot massages A talent I wish I had: Playing a musical instrument One thing I’d change about myself: Learn to say “no” The word that best describes me: Happy My motto: Work hard, play hard! A cause close to my heart: Care for special needs children On my must-do list: Bungee jump If I wasn’t a dentist, I’d be: A lawyer share your picks! Want to be a “small talk” subject? Contact feedback@inprintpublications.com.

travel photos courtesy of Dr. Diya Chadha

s m a l l ta l k

dentists share their picks, plans + pleasures


The survey asked: Would Dental Shield...

Attract new patients? 75% say YES! Increase patient retention? 80% say YES! Want to learn more about Dental Shield? 100% of dentists say YES! Canada’s premier Dental Warranty and Custom In-Clinic Dental Plan. Dental Shield In-Clinic Plans allow your practice to offer in-clinic preventive membership plans that cover necessary check-ups, cleanings, and x-rays. In addition, the Dental Warranty program allows you to offer a warranty on restorative procedures. Dental Shield Membership has Privileges.

BENEFITS

Contact us today!

• Attract new patients. • Generate positive cash flow. • Reduce unproductive chair-time. • Retain existing patients. • Increase case acceptance. • Improve collections. • Build more value in existing or newly adjusted fees. • Build long-term value and marketability of your practice.

www.dentalshield.org

info@dentalshield.org

Profile for Just For Canadian Dentists

Just For Canadian Dentists May / June 2016  

Sail Away in Ontario's Lake Country Discover the Art Scene in Denver

Just For Canadian Dentists May / June 2016  

Sail Away in Ontario's Lake Country Discover the Art Scene in Denver

Advertisement