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July/ August 2017

life + leisure

Prairie

summer

Making tracks at MUDFEST + Bringing dental care to JAMAICA + Through the (camera) lens in LAS VEGAS + The wines of Mendoza, ARGENTINA

Happy 150 th Birthda y Canada!

Publications Mail Agreement #41073506

inside: Continuing dental Education Calendar where will you meet? to k yo

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los a n g el es

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Just for C

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de nti sts life + leisure

contents

july/august 2017

july/august 2017

Publisher Linh T. Huynh

Editor Barb Sligl

Art Direction BSS Creative

Contributing Editor Janet Gyenes

Editorial Assistant Adam Flint

Contributors Timothy A. Brown Michael DeFreitas Janet Gyenes Manfred Purtzki Dr. Kellen Silverthorn Barb Sligl Roberta Staley Catherine Tse Cover photo Barb Sligl Senior Account Executive Monique Nguyen

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Account Executives Janice Frome Wing-Yee Kwong

Production Manager Ninh Hoang CE Development Adam Flint

Sales, Classifieds and Advertising In Print Circulation Office 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Phone: 604-681-1811 Fax: 604-681-0456 Email: info@AdvertisingInPrint.com

Just For Canadian Dentists is published six times a year by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. dba In Print Publications and distributed to Canadian dentists. Publication of advertisements and any opinions expressed do not constitute endorsement or assumption of liability for any claims made. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. None of the contents of the magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of In Print Publications.

xx Discovery and self in the jungles of Costa Rica Happy 150 thof birds Birthday Canada! 18 Summer living under the prairie sky in Saskatchewan COLUMNS

DEPARTMENTS

9 photo prescription

5 July/August mix 15 sudoku 23 CE calendar 30 small talk

Loving Las Vegas (with the camera lens)

11 pay it forward Bringing basic dental care to Jamaica

Dr. Warren Roberts

12 the wealthy dentist

Negotiate your practice lease

14 practice management

In Print Publications 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada

barb sligl (2)

FEATURES

Rethink your selling strategy

16 the thirsty dentist

www.justforcanadiandentists.com

Printed in Canada.

17 motoring want to reach us? check out our website!

Wines of Mendoza, Argentina Tracking Mudfest

cover photo Canoeing along Kingsmere River, on the way to Grey Owl’s cabin at Ajawaan Lake in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan (page 18).

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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from the editor Saskatchewan in summer, from lake reflections to fresh-picked, prairie produce (page 18).

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h, summer. When it’s hot, sunny and there’s a warm lake nearby, it’s a recipe for good times. And Saskatchewan has those ingredients in abundance. Canoeing, kayaking, hiking, grilled peaches, crisp radishes, fresh-caught fish…all in the mix in the prairies under a wide, wide sky (page 18). From Saskatoon to Ajawaan Lake in the heart of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan may offer the most quintessential Canadian summer, which is apt on the occasion of our nation’s 150th birthday on July 1st. We celebrate with some Canadiana picks (pages 6 and 7), as well as another Oh-Canada getaway…in a hammock in Quebec (page 5). Swing time! But, knowing Canadians’ adventurous spirit, there are trips beyond our borders

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big sky

as well, whether humid-andhappening Tokyo (page 23) or country also hot-hot-hot Las Vegas (page 9). Want to cool down? It’s winter in Mendoza, Argentina, where we tour the wineries of this region (page 16). The common denominator is adventure. Something our contributors definitely follow…and keep winning awards for. Congratulations to Mark Stevens and Sharon Matthews-Stevens for their awards from the Travel Media Association of Canada (story and photography for “Sail Away to God’s Island” in the May/June issue). Regular contributor Jenn Smith Nelson also won an award. We love sharing their stories! Enjoy this round… Any ideas, comments or questions? Reach us at feedback@InPrintPublications.com.

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

barb sligl

Summer reflection


what/when/where > July/August

style | food | drink | festivals | places | getaways | gear…

mix

sleepover

getaway glamping

SUITE RETREAT

Fully-equipped chalet or simple tent for two? This Eastern Townships’ national park gives visitors an otherworldly experience.

outer

spaces janet gyenes

camping in quebec’s Parc national du mont-MÉgantic

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he van drops me off on a lonely gravel road, the sound of stones crunching under its wheels carried away by the wind as it disappears down the hill. I’m alone in the wilderness. Aglance at my cellphone confirms what I instinctively already know. No signal. It’s just me— camping—amid maples and birches in Parc National du Mont-Mégantic, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. It feels a little unnerving. >>

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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casual style

July/August

chic

get back to nature

getaway

if you go

For more about Quebec’s Parc National du Mont-Mégantic, including its observatory and ASTROlab, go to sepaq.com/pq/ mme/

>> Especially to a city girl used to living in an urban aerie amid a concrete jungle, where the white noise of voices and traffic are soothing signs of life echoing among the skyscrapers. Here, I can’t help but wonder (and worry) if the wolves that live in these woods are lurking behind the gauzy curtains of green leaves quivering in the breeze. My heart skips a beat when I see a signpost just steps away, practically camouflaged by a clump of overgrown grass: Saturne. Thank heaven for this sign from outer space. Saturne, of course, is the French word for the ringed planet. It’s also the name of the Chalet EXP I’m bunking in tonight. It’s a fitting one; the national park has an observatory and ASTROlab, plus it’s the world’s first International Dark Sky Reserve. Here, when night falls, it hits the ground like a meteorite. I reach the signpost and spot two Muskoka-style chairs facing a fire pit ringed with rocks and a wooden picnic table sitting in a shady clearing. Then I see Saturne, a streamlined wood-and-glass structure cloaked by the forest at the end of a scraggly path.

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collabs

No roughing it here. The rectangular chalet isn’t quite Philip Johnson’s celebrated Glass House, but it’s not worlds away. Wide windows frame the summer landscape, a verdant green that will turn gold in autumn. Inside, modern touches include running water, electricity, full kitchen and a compact living/dining area with a wood-burning stove. Twin beds are cozied up to each other in the sleeping alcove. On a shelf sits a picture of Saturn, whose rings are composed of billions of hunks of rock and ice. Above are twin skylights, rudimentary “telescopes” on the Milky Way. Later, I gaze through these while contemplating outer space (and the cracking of branches and rustling of leaves, imaginary or not) until I finally fall asleep. In the morning, I climb into the hammock hanging in the screened porch and read, rocking to and fro, until it’s time to leave. When the van arrives, the other guests ask, excitedly: “Did you hear the wolves howling last night?” No, I reply, wistfully, wishing that I had. —Janet Gyenes

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

wear (able) art

If you’re going into battle, play to your strengths. The Royal Ontario Museum and J. Crew are doing just that. They’ve joined forces in an effort to support the great blue whale with a collection of conservation T-shirts and a tote. Each item features detailed sketches of these lovely leviathans, whose greatest foes, unfortunately, are humans. We haven’t been kind to these creatures whose numbers are declining because of climate change, pollution and collisions with ships. (Learn more at the exhibition, Out of the Depths: The Blue Whale Story; on at the ROM in Toronto until September 4.) J. Crew for Royal Ontario Museum collection tote bag, $25.50, T-shirts from $35.50; ROM Boutique or online, shop.rom.on.ca When a match makes sense, age doesn’t matter. The Hudson Bay Company’s history goes back 350 years when it was born as a trading outpost. Teva, a young buck by comparison, was dreamed up in 1984 by an enterprising river guide. The two brands have teamed up, marrying the heritage heavy-hitter’s signature stripes with the footwear giant’s sturdy sandals. The result? A cool collection of Teva Original sandals (this icon was conceived when a flip flop met an old Velcro watch strap) and Decker flip flops, made for adventurous activity or casual kicking around. Hudson’s Bay Company x Teva Deckers Flip Flops, $75. Hudson’s Bay Company x Teva Originals Sandals, $99. Both styles are available in black (men’s) or white (women’s) at Teva, tevaonline, or at Hudson’s Bay Company, thebay.com —J. G.

Far left, top and bottom: janet gyenes (2)

mix


national pride

Happy 150 th y Birthdaa! Can ad

July/August

mix

summer staycation Kick back in Canada with these iconic items Written + produced by Janet Gyenes

scents of our nation

wilderness bliss

essence of canada Does every nation have a signature scent? Canada has an array of aromas that evoke strong emotions. These scents call forth fond memories of exploring in nature, like walking in the woods after a rainstorm has sent pinecones tumbling or the spicy-smokiness of a crackling campfire. Canada’s decor expansive wilderness is the muse for a series of poured-glass scented candles from Indigo. Usher the outdoors inside with Muskoka Pine Forest (pine and balsam fir), Tofino Tide (sea air), True North Campfire (sandalwood and white birch) and Canada 150 Heritage (maple syrup, warm woods). The 10-ounce soy candles (three-ounce tins are also available) burn for up to 56 hours. 10 oz. candles, $29.99 each; Indigo, indigo.ca

canadiana to go

plane-friendly pick-me-ups

editor’s

pick

Need an excuse to ditch your battered travel baggage? Celebrate Canada’s tongue-twisting gear sesquicentennial with a subtle shoutout while travelling our great nation and beyond. Atlantic Luggage has launched four new three-piece collections (Canadiana, Maple Leaf, Buffalo Plaid and Iconic, pictured) decked with Canadian colours and iconic imagery such as the Canada goose, inukshuk and, of course, a pair of hockey sticks. The three-piece collections include a lightweight 20-inch carry-on and expandable 24and 28-inch suitcases. All are hard-sided and feature a “Spin 360°” four-wheeled system for maneuverability. Atlantic Luggage, from $109–$420 each piece; Hudson’s Bay Company, thebay.com

petite pharmacy Knees throbbing from trekking the historic Chilkoot Trail that stretches 53 km from Bennett, BC to Dyea, Alaska? Feeling off-kilter from overindulging on poutine and pints when toasting Montreal’s 375th birthday (it promises to be a year-long party!)? Maybe you just want to ward off the prospect of catching a cold on a crowded plane en route to Ottawa for the YOWttawa music fest, where Canada’s own Our Lady Peace kicks off the August 21 event? fast Thankfully, there are some natural remedies for any fallout from all that adventure and bonhomie: the fix limited-edition Pocket Farmacy Remedy Kit from Saje Natural Wellness. The North Vancouver-based company was founded 25 years ago and it’s marking this occasion (plus our nation’s 150th and the opening of its 50th Canadian store, at the West Edmonton Mall) by launching this travel-sized kit, among other items. It comes with five of its original essential oil roll-ons including our fave: Peppermint Halo Headache Remedy. Slip this compact kit into a tote or backpack for urban escapes or journeys to Canada’s wildest reaches. Saje 25 Limited Edition Pocket Farmacy Remedy Kit, $59.95. Saje Natural Wellness; saje.com/ca

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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p h o t o p r e s c r i p t i o n m i c h a e l d e f r e i ta s Michael DeFreitas is an award-winning photographer who’s been published in a wide variety of travel publications. With his initials, MD, he’s been nicknamed “doc,” making his photography prescriptions apropos.

Loving Las Vegas

: ted Vegas c e p x e n U cture by

Not everything stays in Vegas…especially when it comes to photography

destination photography

There’s more than glitz and glitter to photograph in the desert oasis of Las vegas

forget wide get close

michael defreitas

L

as Vegas is one of those cities that everyone goes to once in their life. It has the world’s most neon lights (thus its nickname) and name another city where you can experience Egypt, New York, Rome, Greece, Venice, a pirate-ship battle, an erupting volcano and a spectacular laser light show on a single street simply known as “The Strip.” I love the energy and photo opportunities of Vegas. However, besides my favourite stops to shoot the neon along Fremont Street or the extravagant outdoor shows along The Strip, Vegas has a lot of not-soobvious venues that provide surprising photo opps. After shooting the city’s cliché lights, casinos, scantily clad showgirls and Elvis impersonators, I usually search out the lessexpected aspects of Vegas. Of course, those clichés deserve some attention, starting with that “Welcome Las Vegas” sign. The trick with shooting what’s become rote is making it look different. On a recent trip I met a cooperative tourist shooting the formulaic welcome sign and recruited her to help me with my shot. Utilizing the low, late-afternoon light, I composed a shot with the sign reflected in her large sunglasses. I selected f18 and focused my medium telephoto zoom (24–70mm) on the sign’s reflection in her glasses. The wide depth of field rendered everything in focus including her smiling face. I took the shot with some of her friends posed in front of the sign. I took some artistic liberty and flipped the image in Photoshop so the lettering would not be backwards. Not a bad opening bookend shot. The Fremont Street experience is now a lodestone for visiting photographers. I like to use a 14–24mm zoom wide angle to capture the people below and the lit ceiling of the promenade. Use a tripod, and shoot at about 1/30 second. The ceiling’s imagery changes every second or so and a slower shutter speed will blur the images. Now, casinos don’t like you taking photos in their casinos, but by letting my camera just hang around my neck while using the selftimer method I easily grabbed a couple shots without drawing any attention from the burly security guards. Preselect 5 seconds on your self-timer. Set your shutter speed to 1/30 sec, ISO to 400 and use a manual focus of 10 feet.

archite ehry Frank G

The Venetian has a man-made canal with gondolas and striped poles. Avoid the urge to shoot wide. Instead shoot tight and use the reflections to create a more artistic shot rather than a documentary shot. I captured the image with my 80–200mm telephoto zoom at 200mm, a shutter speed of 1/500 second and f9. July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

if you go

For more info on Las Vegas: lvcva.com

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Using this method, with the camera dangling on your chest, select an action scene (such as people playing the slots) and make sure any people in the frame

Valley of F ire

have their backs to you. Press the shutter release then position yourself with the camera pointing at the desired scene and stand completely still. I usually look up at the ceiling (to draw less attention to myself) until I hear the click of the shutter. Repeat in another area of the casino or even another

casino. I also use the same technique at various Vegas shows. But Vegas offers much more than glitzy clichés. Only 10 miles west of the city limits on highway 159, is one of Nevada’s bestkept secrets, Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area. The peaceful, serene beauty of the canyon provides a stark contrast to the city’s glitter. Designated a National Conservation Area in 1990, the canyon gets it name from the tall, reddishbrown, petrified sand dunes that dominate the park’s landscape. Towering above the Mojave Desert, these large sandstone formations conceal a labyrinth of narrow canyons offering hikers cascading waterfalls, Native American petroglyphs and a wide variety of flora and fauna. I was in Vegas during a full moon, so early one morning I selected a ridge of red sandstone facing east. The big moon was still visible over the ridge so I stayed far back from the ridge and used a 400mm lens to zoom in on the moon and ridge. This approach rendered the moon large while still accentuating the red sandstone. I set my shutter speed to 1/100 second, which gave

me a wide f16 to render both the ridge and moon in sharp focus. Other different Vegas sites include 727-foot high Hoover Dam and the Valley of Fire State Park, which has another set of unique red sandstone formations. For the best light, shoot the dam around 3pm before the canyon walls cast shadows on its face. Scout the rock formations prior to shooting to determine whether early morning or late afternoon light is best. And check out the funky Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health building designed by renowned Canadian architect Frank Gehry (page 9, top). I selected a high vantage point atop the observation deck of the Eiffel Tower at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel & Casino for my closing bookend shot of The Strip. Using a medium 24–70mm telephoto set at 70mm, I waited until a few minutes after sunset for a golden glow in the western sky and reduced ambient light that accentuated the city lights. One last bit of advice. If you’re going to try your luck at the casinos heed the words of the late American screenwriter, Wilson Mizner, who remarked, “gambling is the sure fire way of getting nothing for something.”

IMPROVING DENTISTS’ SMILES FOR OVER 40YEARS. We know and understand the business of buying and selling dental practices. As Canada’s professional practice appraisal and sales leader since 1974, our record of proven results is second to none. With a dedicated team offering appraisal, consulting and brokerage services, we’re here to make sure you end up smiling. Contact us at (888) 764 - 4145 or info@roicorp.com. roicorp.com

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

BROKERAGE

michael defreitas

photo prescription [continued]


pay i t f o r w a r d

r o b e r ta s ta l e y

Roberta Staley is an award-winning magazine writer and the editor of the Canadian Chemical News, published by the Chemical Institute of Canada. She is also a magazine writing instructor at Douglas College and a graduate student at Simon Fraser University.

A lofty objective

Simple dental procedures and basic oral health initiatives can change people’s lives

courtesy of Dr. gary glassman

J

amaica—the land of Bob Marley, Usain Bolt, Rastafarianism, rum and reggae—has a Canadian connection that goes beyond the 400,000 or so tourists that flee our snowy winters every year to enjoy the Caribbean nation’s tropical beaches. In the late 1990s, Toronto endodontist Dr. Gary Glassman was one of these thousands of Canadians enjoying a Jamaica holiday. But the swimming, sailing and snorkeling didn’t distract him from noticing the “dire need for oral health care” among the impoverished populace. Like many other developing nations, the people of Jamaica have a very low dentist-to-patient ratio; there is only one dentist per 19,000 people and “the majority of Jamaicans probably never see a dentist,” Glassman says. The trip was pivotal; Glassman connected with the dean of the College of Oral Health Sciences, University of Technology (UTech) in Jamaica’s capital of Kingston and organized a lecture for local dentists. This launched what would become a permanent initiative to enhance dental training in Jamaica, helping with curriculum development at UTech as well as bringing in donated dental equipment from Canada. Glassman launched another undertaking: setting up free dental clinics for Jamaicans. The initiatives eventually formalized under the umbrella of Glassman’s charity, called the Goodwill Oral Health Project. Glassman, who works pro bono as an adjunct professor of dentistry and endodontic programming at UTech, says that the Goodwill, through its clinics and education outreach, has reached “hundreds of thousands of Jamaican people.” (Its success has inspired Glassman to plan missions into Africa, where there is only about one dentist per 150,000 people.) His outreach extends into Eastern Europe as well, embracing the training of dentists in Romania and the Czech Republic’s capital of Prague—countries that are both experiencing an uptick in dental tourism. For 2018, he is planning to undertake continuing education for dentists in Israel. Glassman also lectures globally on endodontics. His messaging focuses around the latest technological

advancements in dental procedures as well as cutting-edge methods to eliminate pain, helping ameliorate the irrational fear some people still have for the dentist’s chair. One helpful device, Glassman notes, is B-CALM, which “uses soothing sounds” through audiosensation technology to distract patients from the noise of the equipment. Improving dental health is a lofty objective and one that even dentists from wealthy Western nations have a responsibility to uphold, says Glassman pointing, as an example, to a growing “crisis” in the United States. America’s current health care insurance woes extend to dentistry: 130 million people currently lack the financial ability to maintain their oral health, with the result that nearly one in five Americans over the age of 65 do not have a single real tooth left. As a result of such neglect, Glassman says, oral cancer is on the rise in the US and, tragically, 90% of these cases are preventable through routine dental checks and educating patients about lifestyle changes. The lion’s share of Glassman’s international oral health initiatives, however, is still focused on Jamaica, where he returns every few months with colleague Dr. Len Boksman, an adjunct clinical professor at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry in London, Ontario. The pair organizes regular “Health Fairs” involving two-dozen UTech dental students, who help treat hundreds of people for free. “Many of the patients are children who have never been to a dentist,” Glassman notes. Routine cleanings and check-ups are undertaken, although some cases are of an emergency nature. Glassman recalls one memorable case where—thanks to a few simple procedures—a nine-year-old girl had a new lease on life. The youngster, whose cuspids had grown to resemble pointy

fangs, was enduring the distressing moniker of “Dracula” from classmates. An examination revealed several problems. Numerous baby teeth, which weren’t even loose yet, were rotting, causing constant pain. Glassman told the girl that he was going to “plant a fresh new smile to grow on her face.” Thrilled at the prospect of a pain-free future, she didn’t flinch when administered an injection of freezing. Dr. Gary After extracting the Glassman teeth and filing down instructing on the pointy cuspids, essential dental care the young patient and education in Jamaica

“couldn’t stop smiling,” says Glassman. “That made her mom cry. They both kept thanking me and hugging me. For that little girl, her whole life was changed for the better.” This is only one example of the dramatic physical and mental health improvements that simple dental procedures and basic oral health initiatives can make in the lives of people who otherwise would face a life of suffering and disfigurement. “What stands out is how appreciative they are for the services,” says Glassman. “They are so sincere in their gratitude. At times, I have been brought to tears when a patient hugs me and tells me how I have saved them from the pain and misery they are in from their teeth. It’s very humbling and really makes the whole mission worth it.”

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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t h e w e a l t h y d e n t i s t Ma n f r e d p u r t z k i Manfred Purtzki is the principal of Purtzki & Associates Chartered Accountants. You can reach him at manfred@purtzki.com.

Negotiate that lease

Revenues: $1,000,000. Practice value: $0? Don’t let an office lease ruin your retirement… Don’t let the lease kill your retirement dreams! Having been involved in many lease- and practice-sale negotiations, here are some key lease provisions you need to ensure a smooth practice transition.

solution from page 15

1 The landlord cannot exercise the demolition clause for at least 10 years. Most practice loans are amortized over 10 years and the banks are looking for at least 10 years of undisturbed tenancy. The banks will only amortize practice-purchase loans over the nondemolition period in the lease. 2 Even if your lease does not have a demolition clause you need to protect yourself against the landlord selling the building to a developer who plans to demolish the building. You can protect yourself by having the lease registered against the title of the property. This option may not be available if the landlord opposes registration. Alternatively, you can have an Assumption Agreement. It states that in the event the landlord assigns his interest in the premises, the purchaser will assume all the obligations and conditions of the existing leases. This agreement does not give you full protection in the case of the landlord becoming insolvent or if the landlord company is dissolved. 3 Make sure the lease can be assigned to the new dentist. Without assignment you cannot sell the practice. The landlord can arbitrarily withhold consent or object to the assignment on the basis that the purchaser is not as financially strong as the existing tenant. Ideally you can negotiate an assignment clause which allows you to sell to another dentist without the consent of the landlord. 4 By granting the assignment, the landlord should also release you from your personal guarantees. This is not automatic, as many selling dentists have learned. I know of a number of dentists who have continuing personal guarantees for the lease obligation of their successors. 5 The remaining lease term should be at least five years with at least one five-year renewal option. Many dentists did not receive full value for their practice because of short-term leases. Don’t let Dr. Dente’s predicament become yours. Even if you are not planning to sell your practice any time soon, take a close look at your lease. The sooner you learn about any potential hurdles that could impair the transition of your practice, the more options you have to take remedial action, including moving to another location—with a new, negotiated lease.

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sudoku 1 easier solution 2 8 1 3 5 7 4 9 6 3 4 9 6 2 8 5 1 7 6 5 7 1 9 4 8 2 3 4 7 6 5 1 9 2 3 8 1 2 5 4 8 3 6 7 9 8 9 3 2 7 6 1 5 4 7 1 8 9 4 2 3 6 5 9 6 2 8 3 5 7 4 1 5 3 4 7 6 1 9 8 2

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

solution from May/ June 2017 contest

A

fter 30 years of operating his thriving family practice, Dr. Al Dente was looking forward to cashing in his biggest financial asset. He figured that selling the practice would be a piece of cake. Some of his colleagues sold privately for about 100% of annual gross revenues. Dr. Dente expected that his practice would sell for more than $1 million because of the strategic location right next to a busy shopping plaza. Within three weeks of placing the advertisement, he received an offer in excess of $1 million. What made this deal particularly sweet was that the purchaser agreed to buy the shares of his dental corporation, ensuring that Dr. Dente would receive the proceeds tax-free. But Dr. Dente’s dream of retiring with a million dollars in his pocket was shattered when the prospective purchaser backed out because the banks would not finance the purchase. The reason for the loan rejection was the demolition clause in the lease contract, which states that the landlord can terminate the tenancy with a 12-month notice and no compensation. The landlord, having no sympathy for Dr. Dente’s predicament, was not willing to amend the lease agreement.

sudoku 2 harder solution 6 9 7 4 3 1 8 5 2 8 4 1 7 5 2 3 6 9 3 2 5 6 9 8 7 1 4 7 3 2 1 4 5 9 8 6 1 8 4 9 6 3 5 2 7 5 6 9 2 8 7 4 3 1 2 1 3 5 7 4 6 9 8 4 5 6 8 2 9 1 7 3 9 7 8 3 1 6 2 4 5

Puzzle by websudoku.com


practice management Timothy A. Brown Timothy A. Brown specializes in dental practice appraisals, brokerage, consulting, locum placements, associateships and practice financing across Canada. You can reach Timothy at timothy@roicorp.com. NOTE: This column’s co-author is Jackie Joachim, COO of ROI Corporation Brokerage.

Long-game position

Try not to fixate on numbers and what your practice may sell for

T

he market has changed. The days of excessive premiums and bidding wars with practices selling for 200% of gross are likely a thing of the past. For several years now, we’ve been predicting the market peak. Have we finally reached it? I believe so. So, what’s going on in today’s market? Let’s start with the change in the buyers. They’re still a combination of Canadian grads, foreign-trained dentists and corporates. But unlike buyers in the past, the volume of aggressive offers is substantially less. And if they do submit an aggressive offer, some experience buyer’s remorse shortly thereafter, decline (rightfully) to proceed and do not complete the transaction. Gone are the days when an excited buyer paid a handsome premium for a practice that referred out 20–30 orthodontic, implant or endodontic procedures. Lenders are now consistently pushing back on financing these premiums. Previously, only the odd premium did not get financed. Now the reverse seems to be the norm. Paying a premium for potential no longer happens that often. Today’s buyers also have very different expectations than those of 18 months ago. A steady, well-run practice in which the owner works four days a week, no weekends

or Saturdays, will take longer to sell. Why? Buyers seem to not want to put the effort into building off a strong base. As an associate, they may earn a similar income as the owner; they rationalise not buying this type of office because they think, “Why bother when I make the same or more without the hassle of owing?” Independence, equity and control of their future are not enough motivation. Buyers seem to want the perfect practice to buy—30–40% hygiene, street-level location and an abundance of new patients. Sometimes they want the vendors to stay for a long transition and sometimes not. While there are still more buyers than vendors, selling a practice is not as easy as it looks. Buyers are overwhelmed with the options available. As are the vendors. The amount of work that goes into finding the right buyer, prequalifying the candidates, negotiating the best terms of sale and closing the deal with a smooth transition post-sale, is an elaborate process that requires a highly specialized skill set. Whereas a few years ago an average sale involved approximately 350 hours, that time investment has doubled in the last 12 months. Buyers do not always go to the bank with a well-thought-out strategy. Some buyers don’t pay attention

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

service

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at your

classified ad s

The choices you make now will affect you long after the sale has taken place

to deadlines, nor do they necessarily have advisors who understand the nuances of a dental acquisition. If you want to sell privately, are you willing to spend 500-plus hours negotiating the sale of your business? Are you prepared to take on the stress of handling any part of a negotiation on your own? Your focus is likely better spent on your practice and personal plans post-sale. My advice for vendors preparing to sell? First, set realistic expectations concerning the final purchase price, transition and decision to stay on (or not) as an associate. It’s easy to get lost in emotion during the sale of your practice. Second, be willing to negotiate. Realize that if a buyer expresses interest in purchasing your clinic, there must be some give and take on both sides. A friend recently gave me wise advice: negotiations are supposed to hurt a little. Both sides need to give something up because if not, nothing gets done. After watching the market for the last while, I know that vendors expect to receive a final offer that fulfills everything on their wish list. Yes, you deserve to cash out after years of hard work and sacrifice. However, be smart about the sale of your practice. Don’t let waiting for “more” prevent you from achieving your ultimate goals. If you’ve made the decision to sell today, remember that you’re in a long-game position. Think strategically. The choices you make now will affect you long after the sale has taken place.

For Canadian Dentists of British Columbia


diversion

sudoku Solve puzzle #2 for a chance to win a $50 VISA gift card!

adult and pediatric sedation courses: both oral and IV certifications

Each sudoku puzzle has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 square contains the digits 1 through 9.

canadian dental anaesthesia assistant course

dental office emergencies workshop mock emergency drills

acls, pals, and cpr courses for dentists and staff sedation practice compliance inspections sedation supplies, monitors, and emergency equipment sales

GOOD LUCK!

sudoku 2 harder solution in next issue

sudoku 1 easier solution on page 12

$50 Visa Gift Card winner: Dr. Lanny Donald of Surrey, BC

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July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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t h e t h i r s t y d e n t i s t ja n e t g y e n e s Janet Gyenes is a magazine writer and editor who likes to dally in spirits, especially when discovering something like corenwyn jenever (a gin-like Dutch spirit)—straight or in cocktails like the “bramble.” Have a boozy idea or question? Send it to feedback@inprintpublications.com

More than Malbec

W

hen I squeeze the brakes to give way to a dog loping along the paved pathway, my bicycle stops a little too slowly for my liking. It’s another example of Argentina’s languid pace, especially in the Mendoza region where time and winemaking are kindred spirits. Before arriving in the city of Mendoza, the region’s capital, I had romantic notions of wandering a dusty desert town dominated by architecture thousands of years old. But with a million-plus people, Mendoza is surprisingly modern. In 1861, an earthquake rocked this region and the city was rebuilt

twined as the vines that grasp their trellises, reaching from the stony soil to steadfast sun. The grapes that produce the dark-hued, full-bodied wines thrive in this high-altitude desert region that sits in the rain shadow of the Andes Mountains. Mendoza’s wineries are located, on average, 650 to 1,050 metres above sea level. It’s early May, autumn in South America, and I’m wheeling among the wineries in Maipú, 16 km south of Mendoza. Here, a cluster of some 20 wineries and a cache of bicycle-rental companies make for an easy day of self-guided exploration. (Two other wine-touring destinations are Luján de Cuyo, 19 km from the city, and the remote Valle de Uco, 150 km southwest of Mendoza where much of the grapes are grown at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 3,900 metres.) The Mendocinean heat has chilled and the tourist throngs have thinned. Both make for a chilled-out degustación, or tasting, at my first stop, MEVI Bodega Boutique. With the harvest season over, the vines’ once-supple stalks have become brittle and the ruffled leaves burnished. To me, the reds, An ancient wine press including MEVI’s and modern concrete “egg” Malbec, aren’t aging vessels at Trapiche as impressive as winery in Malpú, the white wine I Mendoza sip here: Torrontés.

OLD & NEW

from the rubble. Grapes? Not a cluster grows here. Naturally, wine flows freely through the buzzing bars, restaurants and wine shops, offering ample opportunity to taste why Mendoza’s wines have achieved international acclaim. But to truly explore the terroir and visit the wineries you need to get out of town. Winemaking in northern Argentina dates back 500 years when the Jesuits planted the first vines. It wasn’t until the 19th century, though, that the country earned its place on the winemaking map, thanks to European immigrants who imported noble grape varietals such Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Malbec, however, makes up more than two-thirds of Argentina’s wine production. Mendoza and Malbec are as tightly en-

16

Only Argentina produces this deliciously crisp and aromatic wine that originated in Mendoza when two grapes (one a muscatel) were crossed. It would be a perfect pairing with the spicy empanadas I nibble at the nearby winery I cycle to next: Tempus Alba. On the sun-soaked deck overlooking the green-gold vineyards, I first sample the winery’s Tempus Rosado de Malbec. This rosé is made from 100% Malbec grapes from 60-year-old vines. The tasting notes describe it as having “sweet tannins” and aromas of

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

tropical fruit. I’d already been sampling spicy and velvety Malbecs throughout Argentina for about a week and this wine’s raspberry notes were a pleasant surprise. Its counterpart, the Tempus Malbec, made from the same six-decade-old vines, offered a similarly tasty example of the varietal’s flexibility. A gorgeous deep violet colour, the wine is aged in oak for eight months. Its main fruit flavour is plum, with a hint of coffee. I’m tempted to linger over another glass, but it’s almost time for a tour of another winery about 10 minutes away. Trapiche winery was founded in 1833, with just one vineyard called El Trapiche. Our guide, Ignacio, leads the group to the 1912 Italian building, which was abandoned for some 40 years before it was bought by the winery and restored. It’s a living museum of sorts, filled with original machinery, including the trapiche, or press, for which the winery is named. Today, Trapiche is one of Argentina’s largest exporters of fine wines, with the US and Canada as major markets. More than seven million litres of wine per year are produced here from grapes grown as far south as Buenos Aires. Only six hectares of biodynamic grapes are grown in the surrounding vineyards—all Malbec—says Ignacio, explaining that the sheep and llamas that live here provide fertilizer for the vines. Grapes are harvested during moon cycles, but modern methods and state-of-the-art technology are at play too. Ignacio shows us the egg-shaped vessels Trapiche is using (in addition to oak and stainless steel), which are made of a special type of concrete with “pores” that produce the same aging effects as wood. Upstairs in the tasting room, I sample the 2016 Costa & Pampas Riesling and the 2014 Fond de Cave Reserva Malbec. Both are superb. But once again, the wine that pleases my palate most isn’t Malbec. It’s the 2015 Fond de Cave Reserva Cabernet Franc that’s aged in oak barrels for 15 months. Time marches slowly in winemaking. And while Mendoza has rightfully earned its reputation for Malbec, visitors wanting to truly taste all this region has to offer would be wise to hop on two wheels and explore a little more.

Janet gyenes

A bike tour of Argentina’s famed wine country yields aromatic whites, rosés and more


motoring

D r . k e l l e n s i lv e r t h o r n

Dr. Kellen Silverthorn is Just For Canadian Dentists’ automotive writer. He tries to keep one convertible and/or one track-day car in the family fleet.

Mudfest mayhem

In which mud-caked “outdoor activity” vehicles vie for the top spot

Northwest Automotive Press Association

T

he official name of the annual event is a convoluted mouthful— Northwest Automotive Press Association’s Outdoor Activity Vehicle of the Year (OAVOTY) Competition. No surprise then that “Mudfest” has been its better-known informal name for the past 23 years. It’s where car and truck manufacturers bring their all-wheel-drive wares for judgement under the harsh glare of competition. This year 28 automotive journalists scrutinized the 28 entered vehicles in Shelton, Washington, at Ridge Motorsport Park. Day 1 was the tarmac racetrack competition. Road racing isn’t within the usual design criteria for any of the six categories of vehicles present. For some (Jeep Wrangler Unlimited with giant 34” tires), the racetrack is awkwardly incongruous—but all survived. Day 2 was consumed by the dirt, mud and obstacles of the off-road course. That’s mission-fit perfect for that Jeep Unlimited, but hardly the usual stomping grounds for many of the soft-roaders entered. Again all survived, if mud-caked. For the manufacturers, Mudfest provides an opportunity to educate the press about their product, receive feedback and, if the planets align, bask in OAVOTY glory. For the journalists, Mudfest is a rare opportunity to drive numerous recently designed activity vehicles, one after another, to the limits of their performance envelopes. And, akin to any good dental conference, the assembled scribes network, see old friends, get wined and dined, and discuss the latest techniques and products. The 2017 OAVOTY Event was both my first Mudfest and my first experience as a competition judge. I was initially concerned how each of us could possibly judge 28 vehicles in just two days. Normally, a journalist has a single model to him- or herself for a full week of in-depth use and study. Then I remembered the theory behind The Wisdom of Crowds (a book by James Surowiecki). Averaging a group’s answers accurately guessed how many jellybeans were in the large jar. Reassured that jellybeans and activity vehicles had

some parallels, I set out to flog all 28 to the best of my ability. I noticed I made most of my negative impressions by the time I had the vehicle in gear (30 seconds). Quality of materials? Boring colours or surfaces? Sight lines? Door thunk? Overly complex controls? How bewildering it was to put the car in gear (I’m looking at you, high-priced German brands)? Engine noise, vibration, harshness? My impressions of the vehicles on the race- and off-road courses were mostly surprise capability upsides (cue

pAY DIRT

Most press-use intended vehicles are fully equipped and Mudfest’s entries were no exception. One vehicle almost doubled its base list price with its bevy of optional equipment (and no, it wasn’t European!). Twelve vehicles had four-cylinder engines, 11 had six-cylinder layouts, and just five had a V8. Of the 28, more than a quarter had turbocharging or supercharging (the four-cylinder Volvo V90 wagon has both). Two and one-half had aluminum body structure (Ford Raptor, [best overall] 2017 Land Rover Discovery HSE Luxury

Mudfest’s 2017 Winners BEST OVERALL: 2017 Land Rover Discovery HSE Luxury Best Compact: 2017 Jeep Compass Trailhawk Best Premium Compact: 2017 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack S Wagon Best Family: 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i Touring Best Premium: 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk Best Extreme Capability: 2017 Land Rover Discovery HSE Luxury Best Pickup: 2017 Ford Raptor 28 ts n a li s j ou r d inize s c r u t i c le s h 28 v e Nissan Titan and Armada). And Land Rover Discovery, you killed the perpendicular logcrossing obstacle, far surpassing the others. The organizer’s sub-grouping of the 28 vehicles was by vehicle target function, rather than by price. Thus judges cerebrally handicap a glam style-focused BMW X4 “coupe cross-over” against a practical VW Golf alltrack S wagon costing less than half as much. The median MSRP of all 28 entrants was $45,000 US (or ~$60K CAD).

[best pick-up] Land Rover Discovery 2017 Ford Raptor and the new Honda Ridgeline’s pick-up bed). Only one vehicle, the Nissan Rouge SL Hybrid, had any electrification—surprisingly few for such a hot-selling and youth-appealing collection of vehicles. Without further adieu, and with another nod to The Wisdom of Crowds, see sidebar for Mudfest’s 2017 Winners.

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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travel at home

Pra irie

sk y

CANADA’S QUINTESSENTIAL SUMMER MAY BE FOUND IN SASKATCHEWAN story

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

+ photography by Barb Sligl


travel at home

T

he clouds on the prairie are unlike anywhere else. Voluminous and mercurial, they make the skies of Saskatchewan dynamic and alive, a continual reel of ethereal shapes and forms, like some avant-garde film of abstract art. Land of Living Skies. It’s the provincial tagline seen on all vehicle licence plates, rather poetic for something so pragmatic. But that seems to be Saskatchewan’s character…lyrical yet down-to-earth. Under the summer skies, this essence is all the more pronounced. Wheat and canola fields sway under the sun, crystalline rivers and lakes welcome with warm waters, fat heirloom tomatoes and radishes beckon, juicy and crisp. There’s canoeing and portaging to a historic cabin, kayaking along a city’s surprisingly green shoreline, wake-boarding on a lake in the middle of a national park, hiking with mushrooms underfoot and the whisper of aspen leaves. Summer in Saskatchewan is a revelation. It’s as Grey Owl wrote: “The feel of a canoe gunnel at the thigh, the splash of flying spray in the face, the rhythm of the … trail, the beckoning of far-off hills and valleys, the majesty of the tempest, the calm and silent presence of the trees that seem to muse and ponder in their silence….” Oh yes, I feel all these things en route to Grey Owl’s cabin on the shores of Ajawaan Lake in Prince Albert National Park in central Saskatchewan. Grey Owl was the name Archibald Belaney gave himself, part of the First Nations identity he fabricated. An Englishman who came to Canada in the early 1900s, he became a trapper and later a braided-hair, buckskin-wearing wildlife and conservation advocate, living in this remote lakeshore cabin with Anahareo, a Mohawk woman, and a family of beavers he rescued

top Atop the prairie and under the wide, wide prairie sky at Wanuskewin Heritage Park, just outside Saskatoon bottom Sunset at Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park opposite, top Perfect reflection (and eagle nest!) en route to Grey Owl’s cabin opposite, bottom Crossing Kingsmere Lake amidst clouds in the sky and reflected in the water

Just For Canadian dentists

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travel at home


travel at home

and raised (their den came up from the shoreline through the floorboards and into the cabin, aptly called Beaver Lodge). Whatever the controversy of the man’s dual identity, his devotion to this landscape was heartfelt (he was hired by the then Dominion Parks Service to promote the message of conservation and also said, “Remember you belong to Nature, not it to you”). I stop to read one of the signposts along the Grey Owl Trail, reached after first traversing Waskesiu Lake, navigating the shallow waters of Kingsmere River, portaging to the shores of Kingsmere Lake and crossing this body of water to reach its northern shore and the trailhead to Ajawaan and Beaver Lodge. The sign reads: “Ajawaan; a small, deep lake that, / like a splash of quick silver, / lies gleaming in its setting of the wooded hills that stretch in long, / heaving undulations into the North… / Its waters day by day reflect its countless moods, / And the ever-changing colors of the sky…” Again, that mercurial sky. After the gentle hike skirting Ajawaan, if you go much of it on boardwalk For Canada’s 150th birthday year, maintained by Parks Canada, entry to national parks is free, including I sit on the weathered porch Prince Albert National Park. You can hike of Beaver Lodge, gazing at or canoe to Grey Owl’s cabin (the long way) lily pads bobbing upon the or get a ride with Waskesiu Marina (the easy lake’s surface and counting way, by motor boat; waskesiumarina.com). butterflies that seem to For more on the park: drop out of that sky for pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/sk/princealbert an impromptu rest upon For more on Saskatchewan: tourismsask.com my arm. It’s as if summer’s For more on Saskatoon: been distilled in this lakeside tourismsaskatoon.com moment. I want to bottle it and take it home. I encounter it again the next day, this time on Waskesiu Lake, still in Prince Albert National Park, but now amidst a townsite and marina with a lively summer community. The lake is dotted with pleasure boats and fishers. The beach is thrumming with the chatter and laughter of families and littered with blankets, portable chairs and paddleboards. At dusk, people line the breakwater to watch the living sky deepen from ochre to magenta and then amethyst, while the last waterskiers and paddleboarders take advantage of the glassy surface of the lake. If there’s a quintessentially Canadian summer experience, I think this must be it, here at Waskesiu. But there’s more summer to experience—and taste—two and a half hours southbound, in Saskatoon. A similar warm-weather effervescence is found in the city on the riverfront and on yet another sunny, blue-skyfluffy-cloud morning, I embark from the banks of the South Saskatchewan River—now in a kayak. It’s almost as if I’m still in the wild, gliding through the greenery of Meewasin Valley (the next morning I jog along this same shore and through the trees on the city’s trail

top On the South Saskatchewan River with views of Saskatoon’s prairie “castle,” The Bessborough hotel bottom Summer harvest includes roasted peaches in a kale and prosciutto salad at Ayden Kitchen & Bar opposite, top left Teepee at Wanuskewin Heritage Park opposite, top right A boardwalk section of the Grey Owl Trail, Prince Albert National Park opposite, bottom left Taste of summer at Thrive Juice Co. in Saskatoon’s Riversdale neighbourhood opposite, bottom right Grey Owl’s cabin, Prince Albert National Park

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

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travel at home

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

network), and then I spot a castle…The Bessborough, one of the grand railway hotels built almost a century ago. The rosy-brick-and-turreted structure rises from the riverbank, above the green, reminding me that Saskatoon is about sophistication too. I sample some of that in its progressive food scene. The Hollows (which is all about “high quality, seasonal, sustainable”) is a millennial mix of old-school cool in a forward-thinking permutation (set in what was once a Chinese restaurant, it retains original, kitschy décor inside and a “Golden Dragon” neon light outside). Atop mismatched vintage tableware, the multi-course tasting menu starts with this simple amuse-bouche: a just-harvested radish smeared with fresh-churned butter. Summer in a bite. My accompaniment: Into the Woods, a cocktail made with house-blended “Woodsy” tea-infused gin and smoky pear bitters. Then there’s clover and dandelion, heirloom cucumber and steelhead trout (from one of those northern lakes, of course), to name just a few of the hyper-local ingredients (some grown in the parking lot just outside). At another of-the-moment restaurant, Ayden (co-owned by Chef Dale MacKay, winner of the first season of Top Chef Canada), there’s more modern-day prairie-summer fare: a salad of roasted peaches, ricotta, kale, corn, prosciutto and cold-pressed canola oil (yes, from those swaying, yellow fields). At Thrive Juice Co., in the up-and-coming Riversdale neighbourhood, I have a “superfood smoothie” with grown-here haskap, Saskatoon and sea-buckthorn berries (naturally, it’s called The Local). Across the street, at Hardpressed studio, I spot a T-shirt with the fitting words “grown on the prairies” and, of course, hoodies with “Land of Living Skies.” I venture just outside the city for another communion with this entity, the sky. At Wanuskewin Heritage Park, a National Historic Site, I meet local First Nations and hear about prairie traditions and culture that go back more than 6,000 years, from the buffalo hunt to teepee building. Walking along the grassy ridges, above Opimihaw Creek and the South Saskatchewan River, I think of the Cree word I just learned: ototemiwewin (oh-toe-dem-eh-way-win) or friendship. Saskatchewan, especially in the summer, radiates this. It’s as if that wide, wide sky is constantly enveloping everything and everyone in a big embrace.


tokyo / leuven / los angeles / flores / brisbane … | c a l e n d a r

ce

A n intern ation al guide to continuing dental Education

summe r 2017 + beyond

Prada building

Meiji Shrine

tokyo

Sushi at Nadaman

Tokyo skyline Vintage obis at a market

Secret Ginza back-alley bar

Imperial Palace

Tsukiji Fish Market

tokyo, Japan: serene + frenetic, old + new, day + night…

catherine tse

I

arrive at Haneda Airport in Tokyo in the heat of summer with my carry-on, hotel reservations and little else—no itinerary, no bucket list, no restaurant reservations. When a city has earned a reputation like Tokyo’s—efficient, safe, vibrant, cultural—it’s hardly a risk to go without set plans. My first hotel is in Chiyoda, considered the political and spiritual heart of Tokyo. It’s home to the Imperial Palace, the Prime Minister’s official residence and landmarks such as Yasukuni Shrine. Chiyoda is also the location of Tokyo Station, the major rail and metro hub (including the Shinkansen high-speed trains) servicing some 3,000 trains each day. The metro and train systems form the backbone of Japan and everyone uses it to move around, making Chiyoda an excellent starting point. It’s an easy subway ride from the airport and I feel like a local right away. With a transit pass (Pasmo or Suica) instead of individual tickets, it’s the most efficient way to move around Tokyo’s metro system (avoid rush hours unless you want to experience a Tokyo transit crush). The Imperial Palace, where the royal family resides, is a 10-minute walk from Tokyo Station. Its inner grounds are only accessible via tour so I just walk through the

(CE events in Tokyo + beyond are highlighted in blue.)

exterior parklands and along its moats to get a good sense of its grandeur. As the former site of the Edo Castle (dating back to 1457), it’s a stunning juxtaposition to the modern city surrounding it. I take advantage of my jetlag and early morning go to Tsukiji Fish Market to watch the famous tuna auction. Lineups start forming at 3am for access inside the world’s largest fish and seafood market where massive tunafish and other seafood are auctioned off. Tuna is the prize item and can weigh several hundred kilograms. I walk amongst the wholesale dealers, who work swiftly with their long, thin knives and bandsaws to break down whole fish into clean, packaged portions. In the outer market, I find the much-hyped Sushi Dai, where lineups start forming at 3am. 3am. I keep going in search of other sushi spots…the farther out I go, the shorter the lineup and cheaper it gets. My next stay: Ginza for shopping and entertainment. Here, jetlag continues to serve me as Ginza by night opens up a labyrinth of back-alleys that are eclipsed during the day. Follow your ears down an alley and look for narrow doors leading to narrower staircases where at the top (or bottom) you’ll likely find a craft bar that locals would prefer to keep a secret. I did and promised not to tell…

A not-so-secret neighbourhood for fashion mavens is Harajuku. Takeshita Street is impossible to miss, lined with cat cafés, bunny cafés (just what they sound like: cafés where you sit with furry patrons) [more] and all the trendy costume-like clothing Check out gotokyo.org/en/ stores to make any young fashionista’s heart melt. But a few streets over is Omotesando, known as Tokyo’s Champs-Élysées with all the designer labels that make my heart melt. The Prada building (designed by Herzog and de Meuron) is fabulous with its scale-like concave glass tiles. And the Dior building (designed by SANNA) is best viewed at night when it comes lit from within, looking like a glorious ombre cake. Nearby is Tokyo’s most famous Shinto shrine, Meiji Shrine, offering a sensory relief from frenetic Harajuku. Frequented by tourists and locals alike, it’s an ancient, wooded oasis that feels as if it could be from another time. I watch women dressed in traditional kimonos or yukatas (summer-weight kimonos) stroll the grounds and think of yin-yang. Tokyo is one of the few cities that seems to have successfully developed an elegant culture honouring its past while also leading into a bright future. Who needs an itinerary for that ride? — Catherine Tse

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

23


Ethics

Endodontics

Cosmetics/Aesthetic

Anesthesia/Sedation

c ece c awhen lendar where

24

MORE CE Full-access CE calendar and destinations at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/

topic

sponsor

contact

website

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 4

dentistry.ual berta.ca/cde

Multiple Dates

Edmonton Alberta

Sept 15-18 - Edmonton - IV Conscious Sedation Program (Session 1) Oct 25-31 - Edmonton - IV Conscious Sedation Program (Session 2) Dec 16-21 - Edmonton - IV Conscious Sedation Program (Session 3)

Sep 15-17

Edmonton Alberta

Nitrous Oxide Inhalation And Oral Sedation

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 4

dentistry.ual berta.ca/cde

Sep 15Oct 02

Vancouver British Columbia

Mastering Adult Moderate Conscious IV Sedation

Sea to Sky Dental-Ed

778-984-0915 See Ad Page 15

dental-ed.com

Sep 15Oct 02

Vancouver British Columbia

Mastering Adult Moderate Conscious Oral Sedation

Sea to Sky Dental-Ed

778-984-0915 See Ad Page 15

dental-ed.com

Nov 03-19

Sacramento California

IV Moderate Sedation Training For Dentists

Conscious Sedation Consulting

888-581-4448

sedationcon sulting.com

Dec 18-21

Miami Beach Florida

Anesthesia Update

Northwest Anesthesia Seminars

800-222-6927

nwas.com

Ongoing

Leuven Belgium

Biocompatible And Durable Restorations With Glass Ionomers From GC

GC Europe

See Website

gceurope.com

Ongoing

Amsterdam Netherlands

Academic Center For Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Department Of Oral Function, Section Of Oral Implantology And Prosthetic Dentistry

ITI International Team for Implantology

41-61-270-8383

iti.org

Monthly Courses

Vancouver British Columbia

Pacific Training Institute for Facial Aesthetics

855-681-0066

ptifa.com

Sep 01-10

Spain Portugal

The Evolving Impact Of All-Ceramics And CAD/ CAM Technology On The Contemporary Dental Practice - From Concepts To Clinical Success - Dr. Ariel J. Raigrodski

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 26

kennedysemi nars.com

Spring 2018

New York New York

Managing Complex Esthetic Cases With Dr. Mark Pitel

Columbia University

212-305-7124

dental.colum bia.edu/ce

Ongoing

Vancouver British Columbia

Course #1 Shaping, Cleaning,And Obturation Of Root Canal Systems Course #2 Re-Treatment & Other Complex Cases

Endodontics Unsponsored

604-987-2285

vancouverroot canals.com

Apr 25-28 2018

Denver Colorado

Annual Session 2018

American Association of Endodontists

800-872-3636

aae.org

Oct 21-25 2018

Key Biscayne Florida

TMD Complete: Cases Start To Finish

The Pankey Institute for Advanced Dental Education

800-472-6539

pankey.org

Ongoing

Online

Family Violence: Implications For Florida Dental Patients And Practice, Updated 1st Edition

Western Schools

800-953-8731

western schools.com

Jun 08 2018

Fairfield New Jersey

Ethics & Recordkeeping

Dental Studies Institute

973-808-1666

dsi-nj.com

new CE to be placed Botox, Dermal Fillers, Lasers

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017


MORE CE Full-access CE calendar and destinations at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/

Implantology

Infection

Geriatric Dentistry

General Dentistry

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Aug 03

Tokyo Japan

Medical CBT: Ten-Minute Techniques For Real Doctors (Tokyo, 2017)

CBT Canada

877-466-8228

cbt.ca

Aug 26

Las Vegas Nevada

Dental Symposium

Dental Development Seminars

843-488-4357

weteachextrac tions.com

Oct 19-21

Kelowna British Columbia

2017 TODS Meeting: Multi-Topic Conference

Thompson Okanagan Dental Society

250-832-2811

todsmeeting. com

Nov 04-11

Tahiti & the Society Islands Cruise

Updates In Dentistry / Dental & Medical Symposium At Sea On The 5-Star All-Inclusive Luxury Small Ship Paul Gauguin

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005

pestravel.com

Nov 18-19

Tokyo Japan

65th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Association for Dental Research

International Association for Dental Research

703-548-0066

Mar 09-16 2018

Turks & Caicos

Oral Medicine, TMD, Oral Pain-Diagnosis & Meds - Dr. Gary Klasser

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 26

kennedysemi nars.com

June 2018 to June 2020

Gainesville Florida

Comprehensive Dentistry Program Class 30 AGD MasterTrack Course

University of Florida

888-550-4590 See Ad Page 22

ce.dental.ufl.edu

Aug 06-16 2018

East African Safari

Kenya And Tanzania - Experience The Wildebeest Migration And The Big Five, Maasai People, Ngorongoro Crater With Dr. Michael GoldbergPeriodontist

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 24

mindwaresem inars.com

Ongoing

Online

Periodontal Disease In The Baby Boom Population

888-844-2237

aces4ce.com

Ongoing

Online

Treating The Aging Baby Boomer: Looking Through Dental Care The Crystal Ball

800-543-2577

dentalcare.com

Ongoing

Online

Preventing And Controlling Healthcare Associated Infection In The Dental Practice

eDen Education Pty

800-773-7571

e-deneduca tion.com

Sep 15

Edmonton Alberta

Perio Celebration Day

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 4

dentistry.ual berta.ca/cde

Oct 21

Los Angeles California

Emerging Diseases, Infection Control And California Dental Practice Act (October 2017)

University of Southern California

213-821-2127

uscdentalce.org

Multiple Dates

San Diego California and Las Vegas Nevada

Annual Fellowship Program Jun 20-25 & Jul 19-23, 2017 CII Campus San Diego And UNLV Campus Las Vegas

California Implant Institute and University of Nevada, Las Vegas

858-496-0574

implanteduca tion.net

Multiple Dates

Vancouver British Columbia

A.A.I.D.Vancouver Maxicourse

888-teeth-99

vancouvermaxi course.com

Multiple Dates

Vancouver British Columbia

A.A.I.D.Vancouver Maxicourse

888-teeth-99

vancouvermaxi course.com

new CE to Advanced Continuing Education be placed Systems

AAID Vancouver MaxiCourse: Comprehensive Dental Implant Training Post-Grad Program

2017: Sep 22-24, Oct 20-22, Nov 17-19, Dec 8-10 2018: Jan12-14, Feb 9-11, Mar 16-18, Apr 13-15, May 4-6, Jun 1-2

Vancouver Implant Continuum: Advanced Surgical Study Club 2017: Sep 22-24, Oct 20-21, Nov 17-18, Dec 8-10 2018: Jan 12-13, 2018, Feb 9-10, Mar 16-17, Apr 13-14, May 4-5, Jun 1-2

iadr.org

HANDS ON EXTRACTION CLASSES

Stop Referring your Retirement Money to the Oral Surgeon. Come Learn How to Remove Teeth Quickly and Confidently by Mastering the following procedures: Flaps, Sectioning, Removing Bone with Hand Pieces, Closing Sinus Perforations, Stopping Bleeders, Incising Abscesses and Placing Drains, Removing Wisdom Teeth, and MUCH more.

Classes offered Four Times a Year! Contact us or visit our website for upcoming dates.

48 CE Hours on Live Patients Approved PACE Program Provider FAGD/MAGD credit. Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. 4/1/2016 to 3/31/2020. Provider ID 218239.

Contact: Dr. Tommy Murph T: 843-488-4357 or E: drtommymurph@yahoo.com

Retire Years Earlier!

www.WeTeachExtractions.com July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

25


Implantology

ce calendar ce when where

26

MORE CE Full-access CE calendar and destinations at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/

topic

sponsor

contact

website

The BITE Club: Implant Prosthetics Study Club

A.A.I.D.Vancouver Maxicourse

888-teeth-99

thebiteclub.ca

Multiple Dates

Vancouver British Columbia

Dates TBD

Surrey British Columbia

Bar Overdentures Program

A.A.I.D.Vancouver Maxicourse

andrew@ implant.ca

vancouvermaxi course.com

Aug 23Sep 04

Russia & Scandinavia Cruise

Practical Pearls For Achieving Predictable Success In Implants With Dr. Will Martin

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 24

mindwaresem inars.com

Oct 12-14

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient Implant Placement

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 13

implantsemi nars.com

Oct 14-15

Seattle Washington

Seattle Dental Implant Continuum Session 1 Of 4 2017: Oct 14-15, Nov 18-19, Dec 9-10 2018: Jan 13-14

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 13

implantsemi nars.com

Oct 28Apr 22 2018

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 Option 1, 6 Weekends: 2017-Oct 28-29, Nov 18-19; 2018-Jan 20-21, Feb 10-11, Mar 17-18, Apr 21-22

Columbia University

212-305-7124 See Ad Page 28

dental.colum bia.edu/ce

Oct 28Apr 22 2018

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 Option 2, 2 Weeks: Week 1 - Sat Oct 28-Thu Nov 2, 2017; Week 2 - Tue Apr 17-Sun Apr 22, 2018

Columbia University

212-305-7124 See Ad Page 28

dental.colum bia.edu/ce

Oct 28-29

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient Facial Rejuvenation

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 13

implantsemi nars.com

Nov 07-11

Puebla Mexico

Wehrle Implant Immersion Course

Ultra Modern Dental Group

222-285-1572

ultramodern dentalgroup. com

Nov 17

Fort Lauderdale Florida

Boomer Dentistry And Managing Implant Mucositis Versus Peri-Implantitis

University of Florida

888-550-4590 See Ad Page 22

ce.dental.ufl.edu

Dec 08

New York New York

8th Annual Columbia University/ICOI Dental Implant Symposium

Columbia University

212-305-7124 See Ad Page 28

dental.colum bia.edu/ce

Dec 15-16

Gainsville Florida

Soft-Tissue Grafting Options For The Single Or Adjacent Missing Tooth Site: Diagnosis, Indications And Technique

University of Florida

888-550-4590 See Ad Page 22

ce.dental.ufl.edu

Jan 20-27 2018

Secrets Resort Huatulco Mexico

Problem Solvers For Restorative Dentistry - Dr. Howard Strassler

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 26

kennedysemi nars.com

Feb 17-24 2018

Montego Bay Jamaica

Implant Placement & Maintenance - Dr. Hoda Hosseini

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 26

kennedysemi nars.com

Apr 15-26 2018

Tokyo Japan Cruise

Precision, Productivity And Profitability Of Implant Prosthetics With Dr. Robert Vogel

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 24

mindwaresem inars.com

2017: Sep14, Oct 19, Nov 16, Dec 14 2018: Jan 11, Feb 8, Mar 15

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017

new CE to be placedImplant Seminars


MORE CE Full-access CE calendar and destinations at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/

Orthodontics

Oral Surgery

Medical/Dental Issues

ce

when

where

Ongoing

topic

calendar

ce

sponsor

contact

website

Cayman Islands Various Topics And Dates

Cayman Islands Medical & Dental Society

345-945-4388

caymancham ber.ky

Oct 13-14

Brisbane Australia

2017 ADIA Queensland Dental Show

Australian Dental Industry Association

02-9319-5631

adia.org.au

Feb 24Mar 03 2018

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Treating The Apprehensive Dental Patient, Medical Emergencies And Practice Jewels You Can Use On Monday

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingedu cation.net

Sep 14-16

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Live Patient Third Molar Extraction

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 13

implantsemi nars.com

Sep 23-30

La Esperanza, Guatemala

Hands On Extraction Course

Dental Development Seminars

843-488-4357 See Ad Page 25

weteachex tractions.com

Jan 20-26 2018

Jutiapa Guatemala

Hands On Extraction Course

Dental Development Seminars

843-488-4357 See Ad Page 25

weteachex tractions.com

Apr 06-13 2018

Flores Guatemala

Hands On Extraction Course

Dental Development Seminars

843-488-4357 See Ad Page 25

weteachex tractions.com

Jun 29Jul 06 2018

Alaskan Cruise

Oral, Maxillofacial & Head And Neck Pathology

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingedu cation.net

Jun 30Jul 05 2018

Mixco Guatemala

Hands On Extraction Course

843-488-4357 See Ad Page 25

weteachex tractions.com

Sep 07-08

Edmonton Alberta

Orthodontic Symposium: Learning About Impacted Teeth With Dr. Adrian Becker & Dr. Stella Chaushu

University of Alberta

780-492-5391 See Ad Page 4

dentistry.ual berta.ca/cde

Sep 22-23

Toronto Ontario

Level I – Introduction To Orthodontics Session 1

Rondeau Seminars

519-455-9845 See Ad Page 27

rondeausemi nars.com

Sep 29-30

Calgary Alberta

Level I – Introduction To Orthodontics Session 1

Rondeau Seminars

519-455-9845 See Ad Page 27

rondeausemi nars.com

Oct 20-21

Las Vegas Nevada

Orthodontic Case Finishing Conference

Rondeau Seminars

519-455-9845 See Ad Page 27

rondeausemi nars.com

Oct 20-22

Gainesville Florida

Orthodontics For The General Dentist Or Pediatric Dentist

University of Florida

888-550-4590 See Ad Page 22

ce.dental.ufl.edu

Nov 10-11

Toronto Ontario

Case Finishing And Mechanics

Rondeau Seminars

519-455-9845 See Ad Page 27

rondeausemi nars.com

Nov 29Dec 01

New York New York

Advanced Topics In Orthodontics: International MiniResidency Seminar (in Spanish)

Columbia University

212-305-7124 See Ad Page 28

dental.colum bia.edu/ce

Mar 26-30 2018

Big Island Hawaii

Orthodontic Symposium

UBC Continuing Dental Education

877-328-7744

dentistry.ubc. ca/cde

new Dental CE Development to Seminars be placed

Orthodontic Case Finishing Conference Paris Hotel, Las Vegas • October 20 & 21, 2017

Event Speaker List Dr. B. Rondeau - Diplomate IBO Dr. L. Carrière - Orthodontist Dr. N. Murphy - Orthodontist/Periodontist Dr. T. Shipley - Orthodontist Dr. A. Palencar - Diplomate IBO Randy Bird - Practice Management Specialist

Rondeau Seminars The Leader in Dental Continuing Education

1-877-372-7625 rondeauseminars.com

July/August 2017 Just For Canadian dentists

27


Practice Management, Technology and Planning

Prosthodontics/ Restorative

Pharmacology/ Therapeutics

Pediatric Dentistry

ce calendar ce when where

MORE CE Full-access CE calendar and destinations at justforcanadiandentists.com/ce/

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Jul 17-18

Munich Germany

23rd Global Dentists And Pediatric Dentistry Annual Meeting

Conference Series LLC Conferences

888-843-8169

conference series.com

Jul 21

Brisbane Australia

Paedodontics Update 2017

Queensland Dental Group

07-3839-8000

qldentalg.com. au

Feb 16-18 2018

Vancouver British Columbia

Mastering Pediatric Sedation; A Nitrous Oxide/ Oral Pediatric Minimal Sedation Course

Sea to Sky Dental-Ed

778-984-0915 See Ad Page 15

dental-ed.com

Feb 16-26 2018

Vancouver British Columbia

Mastering Pediatric Sedation; An Inhalation/Oral Pediatric Moderate Conscious Sedation Course

Sea to Sky Dental-Ed

778-984-0915 See Ad Page 15

dental-ed.com

Ongoing

Online

Chemical Therapeutic Agents For Treatment Of Periodontal Disease

Home Study Solutions

877-547-8933

homestudyso lutions.com

Ongoing

Online

Therapeutic Mouthrinsing: An Effective Component To Oral Hygiene

Procter & Gamble Company

800-543-2577

dentalcare.com

Aug 02

New York New York

Mandated Program in Prescribing Opioids and Controlled Substances

New York County Dental 212-573-8500 Society

nycdentalsoci ety.org

Ongoing

Online

Sleep Apnea And Snoring: Treatment With An Oral Device

International Marketing Ventures

520-298-1000

drbicuspid.com

Sep 08-09

Minneapolis Minnesota

Three-appointment Dentures: A Hands-on Workshop

University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

800-685-1418

dentalce.umn. edu

Oct 06

Boston Massachusetts

The Management Of Complex Cases And Treatment Planning: Case Discussion (Stage I)

Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine (GSDM)

617-638-4700

bu.edu/den tal/ce

Oct 19-21

Lake Louise Alberta

2017 Summit - Dental Technology And Business Growth Summit

The Aurum Group

800-363-3989 See Ad Page 8

aurumgroup summit.com

Oct 21

Ancaster Ontario

Introduction To Erbium Lasers

Southern Ontario Dental College

866-979-6334

sodentalcol lege.com

Oct 2017 Oct 2018

Seminole Florida

Executive Practice Management™ Program For Dentists – Cohort 6

University of Florida

888-550-4590

ce.dental.ufl.edu

Dec 23Jan 07 2018

South America Cruise

Social Media Marketing For Your Clinic With Ms. Rita Zamora

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288 See Ad Page 24

mindwaresem inars.com

Mar 10-18 2018

Caribbean Cruise

Digital Technology In The Modern Dental Practice - Dr. Amarjit Rihal

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736

kennedysemi nars.com

May 28Jun 07 2018

Ireland Cruise

Dental Treatment Planning And Sequencing; The Keys To Predictable, Profitable Dentistry

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingedu cation.net

Jul 01-08 2018

Spain Cruise

Integrative Dental Medicine: The Next Great Frontier In Dentistry

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 29

continuingedu cation.net

new CE to be placed

For feedback, requests or to have your course featured email dentalce@inprintpublications.com

C O N T I N U I N G D E N TA L E D U C AT I O N

COMPREHENSIVE IMPLANTOLOGY CONTINUUM Part I: October 28, 2017 – April 22, 2018 12 Days: six weekends or two weeks course directors :

Dr. Dennis Tarnow Dr. James B. Fine

Columbia University/ICOI Symposium: Dec. 8, 2017 www.dental.columbia.edu/ce Inquiries: (212) 305-7124 dentalce@columbia.edu

28

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2017


For more information - Call 800-422-0711 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Outstanding value for your time and resources Combine live continuing education and personal renewal time with family & friends

Featured Cruise May 28, 2018 Dental Treatment Planning & Sequencing; The Keys to Predictable, Profitable Dentistry 14 CE Credits 10- Night Ireland & Iceland from Dublin, Ireland Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Eclipse

October 21, 2017 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale Royal Caribbean’s Harmony of the Seas December 9, 2017 Clinical Pearls for Success in Esthetic and Implant Dentistry 14 CE Credits 7-Night Western Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale Royal Caribbean’s Harmony of the Seas January 10, 2018 Oral Dermatology and Pathology 14 CE Credits 7-Night Mexican Riviera from San Diego Holland America’s ms Oosterdam February 24, 2018 Treating the Apprehensive Dental Patient, Medical Emergencies and Practice Jewels 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern from Ft. Lauderdale Royal Caribbean’s Harmony of the Seas April 1, 2018 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale Holland America’s ms Eurodam

June 29, 2018 Oral, Maxillofacial, and Head and Neck Pathology 14 CE Credits 7-Day Alaska from Seattle, Washington Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Solstice July 1, 2018 Integrative Dental Medicine: The Next Great Frontier in Dentistry 12 CE Credits 7-Night Western Mediterranean from Barcelona Royal Caribbean’s Symphony of the Seas

For specific Continuing Education Program approval statements please visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Selected Cruises listed here. See a complete Program Listing at www.ContinuingEducation.NET Please visit our web site (www.ContinuingEducation.NET) for current course fees and cancellation policies. Florida Seller of Travel Reg. #14337

Ask about our Guest Travels Free Program We can manage or joint provide/accredit your next association or group meeting Call 800-422-0711 or 727-526-1571 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET


s m a l l ta l k

dentists share their picks + pleasures

dr. warren roberts is one of the leading facial rejuvenation educators in North America. He’s trained over 8,000 practitioners internationally and treated hundreds of botulinum toxin patients (he’s also the co-founder of The Pacific Training Institute for Facial Aesthetics). He’s been named a “2017 CE Leader” in Dentistry Today and featured in many other dental publications. But when he’s not sharing his professional expertise on dental topics from botox to periodontal disease, you’ll find him in Maui (at Ka’anapali Beach, a favourite place, or at nearby Pacific’O restaurant), walking (his go-to exercise) along the seaside and later perhaps indulging in a glass of red wine (his guilty pleasure)… The next beach getaway on his list: Greek Islands. Meantime, we’re going to adopt his rather enlightened motto… I always travel with: Visa

I live, practise in: Vancouver, BC

Favourite city: Vancouver, BC

My training: DMD Why I was drawn to dentistry: Orthodontic nontreatment My last trip: Palm Springs Best meal anywhere: Confit d’canard Memorable restaurant: Pacific’O in Maui A “wow” hotel/ resort I’d happily stay at again: Ka’anapali Beach, Maui A favourite place that I keep returning to: Ka’anapali Beach, Maui Can’t believe I’ve never been to: Australia If I could travel to anytime, I’d go: Pre-school era

Favourite spectator sport: Hockey

The word that best describes me: Considerate

Must-see TV: Blue Bloods

My secret to relaxing and relieving tension: Deep breathing

I’m inspired by: My wife, Dr. Jan Robert

Favourite band/ album or song: The Beatles

I talent I wish I had: Guitar playing

My first job: Commercial fishing

A big challenge I’ve faced: Herniated discs

Gadget or gear I could not do without: Laptop I’d describe my home as: Relaxing My car: Dodge Ram 3500 Last purchase: Clothes My fridge is always stocked with: Cheese My guilty pleasure: Red wine My go-to exercise/sport: Walking a few favourite things :

The Beatles, Blue Bloods, red wine… and the guitar (if only he could play)

30

Just For Canadian dentists

last trip :

Palm Springs (here, a historic photo of Palm Canyon)

My motto: I want to be the kind of person my dog thinks I am On my must-do list: Greek Islands If I wasn’t a dentist, I’d be: Plastic surgeon

Portrait, courtesy of Dr. Warren Roberts; Palm springs photo: California Historical Society Collection

My name: Warren Roberts


TECHNIQUE® DEEP CLEAN Designed for optimal patient gum health Patented Quad-Grip® Thumb Pad Designed to guide the hand to hold the brush at 45° in all quadrants so the bristles are properly positioned at the sulcus for optimal subgingival cleaning.1

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1. Tests conducted through the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry and YRC Inc. utilizing laboratory equipment fabricated to the design of Nygard-Ostby, Edvardsen and Spydevold. This method has been widely used in reporting toothbrush evaluations since 1998. Published data are available and on file. 2. In-Vitro Test, YRC Inc., September 2008

To order or for more information: 1-800-265-8353

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ALL-NEW DISCOVERY

IT’LL GET YOU INTO AMAZING PLACES. IT’LL ALSO HELP GET YOU OUT AGAIN.

STARTING FROM $64,222* One of the many innovative features in the All-New Discovery is All-Terrain Progress Control. This manages the engine and brakes, so that the vehicle maintains a comfortable and steady off-road speed automatically. Leaving you to concentrate on steering a path through any far-flung landscape you find yourself in. landrover.ca

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*Purchase a new (in-stock) 2017 Discovery SE starting from $64,222. Price includes freight ($1,600), PDI ($495), Admin ($395), AC Charge ($100), Tire Levy (up to $36) and RDPRM (up to $96); other charges may apply depending on province. License, insurance and all applicable taxes are extra. Vehicle may not be exactly as shown. Retailers may sell or lease for less. Please visit your local Land Rover Authorized retailer for details. © 2017 Jaguar Land Rover Canada ULC

Just For Canadian Dentists Jul / Aug 2017  
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