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july/ august 2015

life + leisure

win $50 Visa Gift Card page 37

on the water in the

kawarthas from paris to provence

+ viva VENETO—summer wine picks + river rush in COSTA RICA + GAUGE your practice success + helping in haiti

Publications Mail Agreement #41073506

inside: Continuing dental Education Calendar

where will you meet? p i t t s b u r g h / m a u i / g e n e va / k e l o w n a / l o s a n g e l e s >>


Dental Technology and Business Growth Summit October 1–3, 2015 in Banff AB This is NOT your typical dental speaker line-up!

Keynote Speaker:

Keynote Speaker:

Mr. Chris Hadfield “The Sky is not the Limit”

Ms. Arlene Dickinson “Lessons from the Den: Succeeding at Business & Being an Entrepreneur”

PLUS – LEADING minds in Business Growth, Entrepreneurship, DENTAL Technology and much more...

Mr. Andrew McAfee Dr. Jonathan Ferencz Co-Founder of MIT’s

Mr. Verne Harnish

Dr. Brent Boyse

Mr. Vince Barabba

Author #1 best-selling business book “Scaling Up”

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

Former Kodak Executive Owner, Executive Mentors & Author of “The Decision & Trainers Loom: A Design for Interactive DecisionMaking in Organizations”

Initiative on the Digital Economy, (part of the MIT Sloan School of Management).

Clinical Professor of Prosthodontics, New York University College of Dentistry

Dr. Joe Blaes

Mr. Avi Kopelman

Dr. Fred Li

Mr. Albert Giralt

Mr. Rune Fisker

Past Editor of Dental Economics

Co-Founder of Cadent, Inventor, VP and Chief Scientist of Align Technologies

Dentist

President, Grup Villardel Purti

3Shape VP Product Strategy, Business Unit Director, Dental Lab and Dental Clinic

Mr. Ron Huntington

Registration Fees* Aurum Group Platinum** Clients: $1595.00 Aurum Group Clients: $1795.00 Non-Client Dentist/Technicians $1995.00 /Lab Owners: Team members (first three)/Spouse: $1195.00 – (for additional over 3 team members) $995.00 *Registration fees are subject to GST and are in Canadian Dollars. **Certain criteria applies. A percentage of the registration fees will be donated to the Children’s Toothfairy Foundation.

For more information or to register, please call 1-800-363-3989 or email ce@aurumgroup.com or visit www.aurumgroupsummit.com


Just for C

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de nti sts life + leisure

contents

july/august 2015

july/august 2015

Publisher Linh T. Huynh

Editor Barb Sligl

Art Direction BSS Creative

Contributing Editor Janet Gyenes

Editorial Assistant Adam Flint

Contributors Timothy A. Brown Michael DeFreitas Dr. Holly Fong Tim Johnson Manfred Purtzki Dr. Kelly Silverthorn Jenn Smith Nelson Roberta Staley Cover photo B. Sligl

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Senior Account Executive Monique Nguyen Account Executives Lily Yu Wing-Yee Kwong

Production Manager Ninh Hoang

Circulation Fulfillment Shereen Hoang

CE Development Adam Flint

Sales, Classifieds and Advertising In Print Circulation Office 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Phone: 604-681-1811 Fax: 604-681-0456 Email: info@AdvertisingInPrint.com

clockwise from top left: B. Sligl; Jenn smith Nelson; B. Sligl

Just For Canadian Dentists is published 6 times a year by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. dba In Print Publications and distributed to Canadian dentists. Publication of advertisements and any opinions expressed do not constitute endorsement or assumption of liability for any claims made. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. None of the contents of the magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of In Print Publications.

FEATURES

17 Marseille magic Discover la vie sur la mer 34 Lake lounging Houseboating in the Kawarthas COLUMNS

DEPARTMENTS

8 photo prescription

5 July/August mix 21 CE calendar 37 sudoku 38 small talk

Get negative

11 pay it forward Helping in Haiti

12 the wealthy dentist

Journey to hallowed auto ground

15 the thirsty dentist

www.justforcanadiandentists.com

28 practice management

want to reach us? check out our website!

cover photo

14 motoring

In Print Publications 200 – 896 Cambie Street Vancouver, BC V6B 2P6 Canada Printed in Canada.

with Dr. Greg Chang

How to gauge the performance of your practice

Walking through the lacy envelope of the architectural wonder of the MuCEM in Marseille (page 17).

Hot wine picks Recognizing impossible promises and managing expectations

30 the hungry dentist

Summer fruit gets savoury

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

3


from the editor In Marseille, it’s all about the water. This coastal city has been influenced, inspired and enamoured by the Mediterranean for centuries. Story on page 17.

lazy days of summer of Monte Cristo). Then there’s the seafood and seaside sipping of pastis. This is where Parisians escape to, and we’d all be wise to follow (especially now that Air France offers direct flights to Charles de Gaulle airport from across Canada; see “easy access,” page 20). It may be busy on the Med in August, when all of France seems to be on holiday and on the coast, but you can join the fray and make like a local, soaking up that je ne sais quoi and joie de vivre (page 17). To really cool off and get wet, there’s white-water rafting on the Pacuare River in Costa Rica (page 6). From easy-drifting Class I to heart-pounding and hair-raising Class V, this may not be a lazy day of summer, but it’s definitely a hot one. It’s adventures like these, written and photographed by our contributors, that

water world!

Providing Dental C.E. Since 1996

Don’t just take courses,

Take a vacaTion!

make this magazine a winner. We keep adding up the accolades—from photography columnist Michael DeFreitas’ and writer Lucas Aykroyd’s recent wins at the North American Travel Journalists Association to contributing writer, Mark Stevens’ win below. All this on top of our nomination as best trade magazine at the Western Magazine Awards. And that’s thanks to everyone who’s been a part of this publication. We aim to keep the momentum going! feedback@InPrintPublications.com

B. Sligl

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hat’s summer without some water? Whether pool, lake, ocean or even sprinkler, it’s how we cool off in the long, hot, lazy days of summer. Quintessentially Canadian is the lakefront escape. But how about taking your vacation not just to the lakeshore but to the lake itself? Make your summer home a houseboat—we’ve got three different go-to spots across the country to get your lake fix, from Ontario to BC (page 5). And our captaincum-writer tells how even a newbie can take the helm of a houseboat on the idyllic Kawartha Lakes (page 34). Then, in southern France, there’s the Mediterranean, where boating is de rigueur, bien sûr! Water is ingrained in the culture of Marseille, from the Vieux Port to Ile d’If (where the Château d’If looms large, literally and figuratively as the setting for The Count

travel a t home

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Upcoming Vacations:

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

t’s late in the afternoon and the sun has already droppe behind the western hills, d swathed in now deep stand sentinel shadows, that Park’s southea over Algonquin st boundary. light snow falls and there A a thick layer is on fluffy as a featherthe ground, quilt. The silence is absolut for the crunch e but make on the our snowsh snow as we oes of an undulat step onto the ing path just trailhead inside Come July, the park. Highway 60, visitors to Algonquin flood the park’s main swim and artery. They they will one of 14 trails will canoe, they will hike campgrounds. and pitch a tent in one on of eight two kilomet Some will line up in a cavalcad res e hopes of hearinglong in howls of lonely the a gorgeou wolves. s river Come July, view is one Algonq of tourists’ must-do uin is a the first sights . encount But this isn’t upon approac ered Today we have July. hing the forest algonquin’s to ourselve s. We stop east gate. occasionally, Madawaska the watching skirting the river, the scenery park’s and trying eastern bounda to identify ry, the animal is a vivid example tracks that bisect the of how cold trail. Further crisp a winter and on, dusk visit taking hold of can be. by the throat, the woods we stop again. rapids of Mink Now we hear the at the roiling Creek rushing west and black water we encrusted careering throughgaze with a lacy rocks filigree of ice My wife smiles at me. I hesitate crystals. back. before I smile Part of me seat to nature feels as if I have scored a at ringside her best. Part of palm tree and me pines for a piña a “It’s so beautifu colada. “It’s so cold,” l,” says Sharon. I say. Our goal today after the 2.3-kilom is hardly a five-star resort, but etre hike to like it. And get there, it it certainly feels feels like we’ve from it all. gotten away But I still haven’t warmed up despite the to winter, serenity and things distract the absence of all ing: no cell, television. no phone, no wifi, no Then again, having achieve Eco-lodge d the Algonq mere metres uin outside the boundary, having Park staring heavenw defrosted by the fire and now an indigo velvet ard from a lakesho re hot tub sky decorat of stars, I’m ed with a light at prepared to revisit my opinion show >> .

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Just For

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win! award riter Mark

dentists

January/February

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January/February

2014 Just For

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dentists

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another award winner!


what/when/where > July/August

hot

style | food | drink | festivals | places | getaways | gear…

mix

house boats

to the

lake!

from EAST to

Tobin Lake

west Go for: Northern lights + world-class fishing, an outdoor enthusiasts dream. Kawartha Lakes

Go for: History + engineering meet culture + nature.

main photo and bottom left: Jenn SMith Nelson; top left: Aurora Houseboats; middle left: Happy Day Houseboats

Shuswap Region

Go for: Mountain views, luxury and amenities galore.

Shuswap Region, BC Long known as a house boating hot spot, the Shuswap Region offers changing views of over 600 km of beautiful Shuswap Lake’s mountainous shoreline. Hop aboard and become captain of your own luxury vessel with your family or a dozen of your closest pals. Shuswap has multiple outfitters and diverse boat models to choose from. Luxury amenities include rooftop hot tubs; on-deck water slides, catering options and numerous places to stop along the way including restaurants and floating stores. must-do: Visit one of twofloatingstores at the Narrows where you canget gas, pizzaandrent wake-

boards, alongwithsouvenirs, ice creamand all things kitsch! Tobin Lake, Nipawin, SK As its namesake suggests, chances are high of seeing aurora borealis or ‘the northern lights’ during a buoyant adventure up at picturesque Tobin Lake in Nipawin, found in northern Saskatchewan’s boreal region. Don’t forget your fishing rods! Tobin Lake is a renowned fishermen’s paradise boasting provincial records for walleye (18.2 lbs) and northern pike (38 lbs!). must-do: Lounge, explore, watch for wildlife and enjoy the wide-open star-filled skies of the prairies by night.

Kawartha Lakes, near Bobcaygeon, ON A historical adventure await in the Kawartha Lakes. Besides doubling as a national historic site, the Trent-Severn is one of Canada’s most spectacular waterways, offering some of North America’s best recreational boating. Witness the engineering marvels of the world’s two highest hydraulic lift locks in Peterborough and Kirkfield. Take in the local culture with native artisan works on display at the Whetung Ojibeway Centre. (See page 34 for more on Kawartha.) must-do: Stop for cheeses and wine at Farmer’s markets in most waterfront communities along the way. —Jenn Smith Nelson

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

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mix

July/August

raft rush

gear up

getaway

gear

kick it!

Go-to outdoor footwear manufacturer, KEEN, has come up with another unique—that is, UNEEK—shoe. Made of a simple twocord construction (no glues and conventional materials), UNEEK Open Air Footwear is soft and molds to your foot. And it’s waterrepellent, for in-and-out action, whether you’re rafting (see left), beachcombing or houseboating (page 34). It’s the summer shoe. This free-movement (and, frankly, fashion-rebel) form is the result of more than three years of research and development. In more ways than one, these shoes are so out there… keen.com — B. Sligl

hola! costa rica ready to raft? Go with Rios Tropicales; riostropicales.com

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

far left: costa rica Tourism Board; top: keen

rafting the mighty Pacuare

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he trepidation began the moment I stepped onto the school bus. Plunging deep into the Central American jungle, we chugged away from the town of Turrialba, headed for the river. As we wound over an unpaved road through the dense, humid forest, the faces all around me were easy to read—an even mix of anticipation and fear. We were all bound for the same destiny—to raft the mighty Pacuare during the rainy season. Just over 100 km long, Costa Rica’s Pacuare is one of the world’s great rafting rivers, one ranked in the top 10 on earth by National Geographic. A waterway that offers yearround rafting, the Pacuare is particularly thrilling in the rainy season, when annual showers and storms swell its banks and create a truly wild ride. I was here to paddle—and hang on—from top to bottom. We soon arrived at the roiling, murky river to find a single raft tethered to the near bank, and received a quick briefing on rafting rules, etiquette and procedures from our helpful guides. As we donned lifejackets and helmets, I chatted with the young couple standing next to me, honeymooners from Spain. Just before we climbed aboard, the man turned to me and said, his face twisted into a look of faux panic, “Tell my mother I love her!” And with that, we were off. I drew deep breaths as we immediately encountered a very small rapid—a Class I, at best—and was relieved when we rolled on through it with little drama, everyone digging deep and paddling with gusto. But it wasn’t long before we got into heavier waters. As the sides of the river narrowed, the flow of the river, filled to the brim with seasonal rains, grew intense. The jungle on each side seemed somehow to grow denser, and I imagined the outlines of the big cats that roam this part of Central America— jaguars and even black panthers, stalking in the damp heat. My Spanish friend’s young wife was the first to go overboard. Paddling through a particularly tricky Class III, we skirted a whirlpool only to be slammed, head-on, by a wall of water. The space in the boat seemed to instantly collapse, front to back, and the unlucky honeymooner—the last person in line—popped off the back. She was fine, floating harmlessly down the way, leaning back and letting her lifejacket do the work of buoying her. But I was next. After successfully shooting a Class IV, we reached a borderline Class V—and the scale only goes up to VI. Sideswiped, I plunged into the roiling waters, accompanied by the rough-and-ready Alberta oil-rig worker who sat ahead of me. We were quickly fished out by our guide, and immediately regrouped for another Class IV/Vahead. As we picked up speed, our guide, his voice clipped but steady, said, “When I yell ‘down!’ grab the rope and lean to the middle of the raft!’” A few seconds later, we answered his call, hanging on tight as the angry waters of the river seemed to fold us into an envelope of green and white. And just like that, it was over. The banks quickly drew back and the river became lazy, even languid. Relieved, we all jumped overboard, floating downstream in a zero-gravity haze. It was probably the adrenaline coursing through my veins—and the fact that I was still alive, and whole—but as I floated downstream, I felt supremely happy. — Tim Johnson


whimsical style

July/August

natural selection

mix

There’s nothing quite like these Canadian-made woodsy wonders

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Written + produced by Janet Gyenes

Austrian paper twine

palm springs eternal Sometimes a place gets under your skin. Maybe it’s the way the light hits the hills in the evening, the fragrance of native flowers, art or the manmade structures that serve as reminders of the halcyon days that have faded into the sunset. For Judson Beaumont of Straight Line Designs, it was the iconic butterfly homes sprinkled across the Palm Springs’ landscape that served as the architectural inspiration for his floating house shelves, made from maple and oak offcuts. “They are part of Palm Springs. They kind of revitalized that whole area,” he says. Beaumont dubs his shelves “dollhouses for grownups” and that’s a phrase we fully endorse. They’re an artful place to park your keys, cellphone, or coffee cup, while “playing house” and reminiscing of languid days spent poolside in Palm Springs soaking up the desert sun. From $275, Straight Line Designs; straightlinedesigns.com

sustainable shades

editor’s

pick

trÈs soignÉ When the mercury rises, sartorial sensibilities often fall by the wayside. But that doesn’t need to be the case wear when one can don a lightweight wooden bow tie. BÖ by Mansouri was created by Mehran Mansouri and his son Sam, using reclaimed materials to re-think the typical fabric bow tie. “Don’t let the heat sweat your style,” says Sam. “Wear your BÖ with lightweight cotton shirts and suit shorts, keeping your style on point.” The collection sports enough choices to keep your neck decked for any event, but our warm-weather faves are (from top) Infinity Light, Parallel Light and Star Light. They’re made of North American maple and feature a pop of colour fashioned from paper twine. Starting from $60, BÖ by Mansouri; getyourbo.com

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

HOT fashion

Sustainability and sexiness can co-exist quite nicely, as evidenced by the Canadian-made Holz sunglasses fashioned out gear of wood and bamboo. Choose from a number of styles like Zeder, Ulme and Zypress, and and protect your peepers—all have UV 400. For each pair you buy, two trees will be planted in a region of your choice. $99, holzstyle.com

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p h o t o p r e s c r i p t i o n m i c h a e l d e f r e i ta s Michael DeFreitas is an award-winning photographer who’s been published in a wide variety of travel publications. With his initials, MD, he’s been nicknamed “doc,” making his photography prescriptions apropos.

the positive of negative

Sometimes the absence of content doesn’t mean an absence of interest

Send photos and questions to our photography guru at feedback@ inprintpublications.com and your shot may be featured in a future issue!

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The classic summer kayak on the lake is bold + bright when isolated against the water.

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

Leave some breathing room around palm trees and turquoise water for a wow shot.

This image of a back-lit gull over mirrorlike water uses negative space to dramatic effect.

See page 39 for another scenic Caribbean photo that utilizes negative space…

michael defreitas

A voladore in Mexico stands out against an uninterrupted blue sky.

negative

the beauty in

ast glacial-carved cliffs towered above us as we glided through narrow Walker Cove, deep inside Misty Fjord National Monument. Hugging the deck rail I marvelled at the white ribbons of cascading water that gently hissed down the 3,000-foothigh granite walls on either side of our boat. I was concentrating on a group of small gulls fishing in the calm backwaters and used a negative space technique to isolate the gull from the distracting background of rocks and trees. Selecting a backlit gull, I waited for it to hover above the mirror-like water before snapping the shot. By exposing for the bright white gull and shooting slightly downwards I eliminated the distracting background and underexposed the surrounding water. The reflection was a bonus, as the dreamscape image would have worked fine without it. Most images have negative and positive space. Typically, negative space is the area around or between objects in a photo. Negative space helps define and/or emphasize your subject. My gull occupies the positive space and the darkness surrounding it is the negative space. If trees and rocks had filled the negative space the image would have looked cluttered and less dramatic. With negative space, the absence of content does not mean the absence of interest. In short, don’t try to cram things into every square inch of the frame. When using the negative space technique, less equals more. Using negative space helps add drama back-lit and emotion to your images. The space beauty can be a neutral pattern, a uniform A snowy egret in the texture, stark white or black, or a Florida everglades stands contrasting colour to your subject. out when back-lit and An isolated lighthouse, a dark-coloured photographed at a shallow starfish or shell on a white-sand beach, depth of field that lets a Mexican voladore (flying man) against its feathers pop. a blue sky or a small green pine tree surrounded by white snow are all examples of good negative space technique.


photo prescription [continued]

PRO TIPS negative techniques

> Instead of concentrating on the subject, try first to establish your negative space and then position your subject in that space.

> Negative space works best when you remember

the other rules of composition, such as the rule of thirds, leading lines, framing etc.

> Be generous with the negative space. Make sure it covers at least twice as much space as your subject. You can always crop later if needed.

> If you have a great subject but a busy background try over or under exposing it so it blows out (turns almost white) or goes to black.

> Symmetry works well with lots of negative space. For example the reflection of a white egret on underexposed dark water.

gear up Beanbags work great for stabilizing your camera at night when you don’t have a tripod. You can purchase special photographic bags in the $40–$50 range, but I use those drugstore hot/cold therapy beanbags (the ones you can put in the fridge or microwave). They come in a variety of lightweight sizes, are less expensive and after a few minutes in the hotel mini-bar fridge, double as cold packs to soothe aching shoulder muscles.

The more contrast and isolation between positive and negative space the greater the impact. On a recent Cuba trip I shot a series of beach images that included sailboats and those ubiquitous thatched beach umbrellas. Although the umbrella with sailboat image has lots of negative space, the message is more about a tropical beach setting. By isolating the sailboat amid sky and water I created more drama with the impression of openness around the boat. Using negative space typically enhances an image, but the degree of impact depends on what message you’re trying to convey with your main subject. We all have preconceived ideas about the way objects look, and this bias can creep into the type of images we create. Concentrating less on the subjects in your scene, and more on the space between and/or around them will force you to pay more attention to your composition. A yacht anchored off Long Beach on the Caribbean island of St. Martin quickly draws attention. It conveys a sense of tropical luxury, yet the same image without the yacht conveys a sense of intimate tropical seclusion. Both images utilize a similar amount of negative space, but they send different messages. While shooting in the Florida everglades I came across a beautiful snowy egret perched on a low branch. I took a few shots at bird level, but didn’t like the distracting green background. By shifting my position to backlight the bird and shoot from a slightly higher angle I eliminated the messy background. As with the gull, I exposed for the brighter white bird, helping to darken the background too. I used a shallow depth-of-field of f4 to throw the background out of focus. The limited shooting options prevented me from leaving more negative space, but the darker out-of-focus brownish background complemented the white egret. Mastering negative space takes time because most photographers tend to focus more on the subject. Including negative space teaches you to think about each element in your scene more carefully, leading to stronger compositions.

IMPROVING DENTISTS’ SMILES FOR OVER 40YEARS. We know and understand the business of buying and selling dental practices. As Canada’s professional practice appraisal and sales leader since 1974, our record of proven results is second to none. With a dedicated team offering appraisal, consulting and brokerage services, we’re here to make sure you end up smiling. Contact us at (888) 764-4145.

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

BROKERAGE


pay i t f o r w a r d

r o b e r ta s ta l e y

Roberta Staley is an award-winning magazine writer and the editor of the Canadian Chemical News, published by the Chemical Institute of Canada. She is also a magazine writing instructor at Douglas College and a graduate student at Simon Fraser University.

saving lives in Haiti

In the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, Dr. Darryl Janes tries to make a difference

courtesy of dr. darryl janes

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he patient was in his mid-20s—he had youth on his side at least. That was the likely reason, says Dr. Darryl Janes of Corner Brook, NL, why the young man had survived long enough to be settling himself into a makeshift dental chair in a temporary clinic set up on the pulpit of a church in Jacmel on Haiti’s southern coastline. As the patient sat down he pointed to his face. The right side had collapsed, “like a prune shrivelled in,” Janes recalls. A hole on the outside of the man’s face, large enough for Janes to probe with a dental elevator, opened to a sinus tract leading to the man’s lower jaw, which held two broken right molars, “grossly decayed below the gum.” The abscess was so advanced Janes estimated that the man, who spoke only Creole, had been suffering for years. “I gave him as much freezing as I could—extra in the drainage area—and began to explore and curette and drain out the gunk and pus,” says Janes. He then rinsed the area with saline and sent the man on his way. One of the things missing from the duffel bags full of dental materials donated by Canadians was antibiotics. But even without medication, the extraction and curetting would have improved the patient’s outlook. “With the offending stuff out of his face, his fever would have gone down and he would be feeling a good bit better. But I wish I could have given him antibiotics,” says Janes, who is the part-time dental surgeon at Humber Valley Dental Clinic in Corner Brook. In Haiti, the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, people are lucky to receive such care, even if it is what most Canadians would regard as less-thanoptimum. Janes encountered the patient this year while on his second mission to the West Indies nation, located on the island of Hispaniola, five years following a catastrophic 7.0 Richter scale earthquake that killed an estimated 220,000 people, injured more than 300,000 and left 1.5 million homeless. The earthquake destroyed much of the country’s already tenuous infrastructure, decimating government buildings, hospitals and schools as well as homes.

Fellow Newfoundlander Dr. Stewart Gillies scape is still in disarray from the rubble of of St. John’s, who founded the Canadian collapsed buildings—and the number of International Dental Foundation, began mis- people seeking help endless. Janes recalls sions to Haiti following the 2010 earthquake. one day in Jacmel where he treated 70 paJanes first joined Gillies on a mission in 2013, tients, aged 10 to 50. He also worked alongfollowing it up this past January with anside new graduates from the University of other eight-day sojourn that saw him and a Haiti School of Dentistry and coached them team of 10 Canadian dentists, dental hygien- on more refined methods of wisdom tooth ists and some family members administer extraction. The Haitian dentists tend to be care to patients in the capital of Port-au“pretty aggressive. They get the tooth out Prince as well as clinics in Jacmel and nearby but do a lot of damage doing it.” Bassin-Bleu. The team also went to schools With so much need, Janes doesn’t have and an orphanage, where they check the time to undertake more elaborate and youngsters’ teeth, lengthy procedures like root canals, focusing teach proper brushing Conditions for techniques providing dental aid in and warn still-struggling Haiti are less against the than ideal, as Dr. Darryl Janes popular of Newfoundland knows from habit of experience: “You can only do sucking on what you can do; making a raw sugar little dent is better than cane. “It’s doing nothing.” common to see teenagers with four front teeth decayed away,” Janes says. Relieving the man’s suffering and probably saving his life—“that’s what I went down to do,” says Janes, who attended Dalhousie University’s Faculty of Dentistry in the early 1990s. Following graduation, he worked in clinics around Newfoundland and Labrador, eventually hanging out a shingle instead on fillings and extractions. However, in Corner Brook. Janes specialized in dental he made time for one man, who had an surgery, becoming the go-to surgeon for abscess in a front tooth. “I wasn’t going to wisdom tooth extractions and implants for take it out so I had to make time, and do it Newfoundlanders along the west coast. in one sitting. It was far from text book but For Janes, the Haitian man’s severe abscess, what can you do?” while grim, wasn’t outside his realm of exJanes, who has tentative plans to return perience. He also encountered similar dental to Haiti this January, is philosophical about problems during three years working with the time, logistical and supplies constraints the poor in an area west of Corner Brook, as that prevent him from doing a perfect job. well as isolated regions of Labrador treating “You can only do what you can do; making a severe decay and infections in Inuit and little dent is better than doing nothing.” other First Nations. The need was great in Haiti—its landJuly/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

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t h e w e a lt h y d e n t i s t m a n f r e d p u r t z k i Manfred Purtzki is the principal of Purtzki & Associates Chartered Accountants. You can reach him at manfred@purtzki.com.

practice check-up The key monitors to gauge your practice success

1 New patient count Find out what your real new patient count is. Most dentists keep track of the number of new patients in their practice, but they 4 Tracking seldom count the number of productivity patients heading to the exit. To calculate the patient attrition rate, The first step in measuring assume that your practice has 2,000 active productivity is to determine how much patients. If you are getting an average revenue per hour you need to cover your of 16 new patients a month without costs. Below is an illustration of measuring experiencing an increase in revenues, your productivity. attrition rate is about 10%. In order to have The break-even or zero profit point of any appreciable $300 per hour revenue growth, you is the gauge to need to set your new calculate your Revenue $300 patient target to 15% profitability. If Expenses of your patient base, you invested $1 or 25 new patients million to set up Direct costs $ 50 per month, resulting the clinic over 15 (lab/supplies) in a net increase of years of useful life nine new patients of assets at 5%, Staff costs $150 per month. the monthly cost is Capital costs $ 60 $8,000. Assuming 2 Treatment 130 hours of clinic Other expenses $ 40 acceptance time per month, rate the hourly cost What is the ratio of TOTAL $300 of capital will be treatment presented about $60. Profit NIL versus treatment Surprisingly, accepted? If patients many practices accept fewer than do not track the production per hour on seven out of 10 treatment plans, you have a systematic basis. As has been shown a problem. To overcome this problem, above, the production per hour is the key consider the remedial strategies of measurement of productivity. increasing staff training and implementing 5 Embezzlement monitors scripting. There is no other small business exposed 3 Converting inquiries into to employee theft more than a dental appointments practice. Many dentists do not think of Are you tracking incoming phone calls? having any internal controls in place Most dentists don’t. The Scheduling because of the belief that embezzlement

do you work ON or just IN your practice?

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

happens elsewhere, not in their practice. Here is how you make sure that all treatments are billed and all cash receipts are deposited in the bank: a. Compare daily treatments per patient chart to treatments recorded in the system. b. Inquire about the “fee/payment adjustments” in the front desk report. c. Follow up old uncollected accounts receivable. d. Compare the collections per reports to the bank deposits. Most computer systems in dental practices today have the ability to produce detailed reports that include all the information you need to boost the productivity of your office.

solution from May/ June 2015 contest

Institute specializes in telephone training programs to attract patients to your practice. It estimates that receptionists, in general, unknowingly turn away one-third of prospective patients. The inability to convert prospects into patients is the Achilles heel of most practices, resulting in hundreds of thousands of dollars in increased costs each year and decreased revenues, and is mostly due to the lack of staff training.

sudoku 2 harder solution 8 3 7 2 4 5 6 9 1 9 2 1 8 6 3 5 4 7 4 5 6 1 7 9 2 8 3 6 7 8 4 5 2 3 1 9 3 4 2 6 9 1 8 7 5 1 9 5 3 8 7 4 6 2 2 1 4 7 3 6 9 5 8 7 6 9 5 2 8 1 3 4 5 8 3 9 1 4 7 2 6

Puzzle by websudoku.com

solution from page 37

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ow successful you are in your practice depends on how much time you spend working on—not in—your practice. To keep your fingers on the pulse of practice profitability, here are some key practice monitors to consider.

sudoku 1 easier solution 9 7 6 3 2 5 1 8 4 2 5 4 6 8 1 9 3 7 3 8 1 4 7 9 2 6 5 7 6 9 1 4 8 3 5 2 8 3 5 7 9 2 6 4 1 1 4 2 5 3 6 7 9 8 4 9 8 2 1 3 5 7 6 5 2 3 8 6 7 4 1 9 6 1 7 9 5 4 8 2 3

Puzzle by websudoku.com


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OFFLINE DO PEOPLE IN YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD KNOW ABOUT YOU? DIRECT MAIL is still one of the most powerful marketing methods. NO MATTER HOW GOOD YOU ARE, THERE ARE MANY PEOPLE IN YOUR AREA THAT DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU! We will design, print and mail your marketing material to your target audience.

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Is Your Practice on Social Media? aAchieve Higher Online Visibility aBuild Patient Loyalty aReach New Patients aWatch Your Patients Promote Your Practice aBoost Your SEO Efforts Contact Us Today For A Free Consultation Phone: 905-829-3330 Toll Free: 1-888-502-2526 Email: info@iquestmedia.ca Follow us on Twitter @iQuestMedia

iquestmedia.ca


motoring

D r . k e l ly s i l v e r t h o r n

Dr. Kelly Silverthorn is Just For Canadian Dentists’ automotive writer. He tries to keep one convertible and/or one track-day car in the family fleet.

stylin’ in Stuttgart

A European side trip to the storied land of German automotive engineering

MOTOR WORLD The pre-war aerodrome/Zepplinplatz, with its stunning Bauhaus-style buildings, has been re-invented as a remarkable automotive business bazaar called Motor World. Its parking lots and perimeter roads rival Germany’s pay-per-lap Nurburgring for the plethora of weapons-grade high-performance hardware strutting their stuff—Ferrari, McLaren, Lamborghini, Maserati and Bentley all have dealerships on the former aerodrome campus. I tried testing my ability to discern each of their soundtracks, from the ever-present horsepower hooligans with Mercedes V8s, Porsche flat sixes, flat-crank Italians and wacko Harley-Davidson twins. Also on campus within Motor World’s former hangars are numerous classic car dealers, restoration shops, race

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teams, a Hans Hermann tribute, automotive art, clothing and die-casts…plus restaurants, kaffee shops, bars, meeting and conference rooms, even wedding facilities. The V8Hotel occupies the former passenger terminal and control tower and the entire hotel is either aero and/or auto-history themed. The location is within Stuttgart’s urban-rail grid, which is arguably recommended over renting a car (we used both). motorworld.de/stuttgart/ THE PORSCHE MUSEUM Opened in 2009, the 56,000-square-foot facility is the newest auto attraction in Stuttgart. Understanding the museum requires a bit of a review of the MercedesPorsche family Benz Museum in history of Stuttgart, Germany, is grandfather/ both an automotive and architectural wonder—its son/ structure is based on a grandson, double helix, with no each named closed rooms or Ferdinand, to straight walls. differentiate between back-inthe-day Ferdinand to scion Ferry and finally Butzi. Ferdinand (grandfather) was a famous and prolific engineer/designer from the 1900s to late 1940s, but he never built a sports car carrying the Porsche nameplate. In 1948, his son Ferry started the company that builds the eponymous sports and racing cars. And Ferry’s son Butzi designed the seminal sports car for Porsche, the 911, which debuted in 1963, before leaving the company to launch Porsche Design. While Ferdinand (grandfather) had negligible involvement with the Porsche sports- and racing-car company, the subsequent Zuffenhausen (Stuttgart suburb) sports car factory and museum surround his 1938workshops. His amazing career alone could occupy an entire dedicated museum. In the Porsche Museum, Ferdinand’s works include his early electric and hybrid cars of the 1900s, Austro-Daimler of the 1920s, the VW Beetle of the 1930s and the Cisitalia F1 car of 1947. Missing are the Mercedes SSK, Auto Union silver arrows racers and Tiger tank. The vast majority of the Porsche Museum is

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

understandably dedicated to its sports and racing cars. Until the Boxster arrived in 1996, all Porsches had numerical names. Those passionate for the brand will know the look, sound and history of the 356, 550, 718, 804 (F1), 904, 906, 908, 910, 911, 917and 930from the classic air-cooled eras. Later water-cooled cars, including the current line-up of sports cars, SUVs and the Panamera sedan are all well chronicled in the collection. Porsche has more LeMans victories than any other manufacturer: 17. This competition history is proudly featured. Besides these famous victories, there are scores of others in the more than 30,000competition victories Porsche has now accrued. While many key cars from this history are hidden away in private collections, the Porsche Museum’s collection is still a must-see. porsche.com/ international/aboutporsche/porschemuseum/ THE MERCEDES MUSEUM My personal journey of automotive fascination is more Porsche-linked than Mercedes-Benz. And yet, if you only have the chance to visit one museum, I’d have to give the nod to the 178,000-square-foot Mercedes facility. While Porsche’s story of interest is that of a small family company between 1948and 1975, Mercedes’ is that of an auto- and air-industry giant since its inception in the late 1890s. As such, the Mercedes-Benz curators cleverly weave world history with that of the company and its products. Jazz music, the OPECOil Crisis and Nelson Mandela share equal billing with safety, environmental and powertrain issues in the auto industry. Even the company’s role in WW I and Nazi Germany is dealt with factually. Today’s consumers in North America tend to view Mercedes-Benz as a retailer of quality, conservative luxury cars. But their history (and present) is much more than that. The three-pointed star logo itself stems back to the company’s inception of transportation on land, sea and in the air. That trifecta is showcased in a collection of boats, autos, trucks, buses, aircraft and racing cars that spans more than 100 years. That corporate perspective might explain why Mercedes-Benz now owns more seminal examples of its history than does Porsche. It’s a true benchmark exhibition, even if your interest in cars is limited. mercedes-benz.com/en/mercedes-benz/classic/ museum/ Now, after experiencing the Mercedes and Porsche Museums in BadenWürttemberg, I’ll need to cook up a future side-trip to Bavaria, a few hours drive east, home of the BMW (Munchen) and Audi (Ingolstadt) headquarters and museums. Oktoberfest, then?

mercedes-benz

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onfession: I’m always looking for the motoring angle on nonautomotive family trips, much to my wife’s chagrin. Serendipity: It turns out the headwaters of the Danube River are in the Black Forest, so an up-river Danube cruise “naturally” flows to Stuttgart—the ancestral homebase of Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and AMG. Result: This city, the largest and most central city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany’s most southwestern state, made it on our European itinerary. As it should for any car lover.


t h e t h i r s t y d e n t i s t ja n e t g y e n e s Janet Gyenes is a magazine writer and editor who likes to dally in spirits, especially when discovering something like corenwyn jenever (a gin-like Dutch spirit)—straight or in cocktails like the “bramble.” Have a boozy idea or question? Send it to feedback@inprintpublications.com

Italian job

Navigating the wines of Italy, starting with a sip of Veneto

I

f you’ve ever visited Verona in the Veneto region of Italy, there’s a good chance that, like me, you were enchanted. Who could resist climbing up the stairs at Casa di Giulietta, a 14th-century house, to lean over the balcony where Juliet was (allegedly) wooed by her fair Romeo? Or pass up an impromptu opportunity to see singer Luciano Ligabue (the “Bono of Italy,” according to my Italian friend) perform live at the Arena di Verona, a Roman amphitheatre built in AD 30? And who wouldn’t jump at the chance to savour a luscious Amarone wine at an enoteca (wine bar) that’s tucked into a secret courtyard? Ah, the Amarone. My first taste of the raisin-y wine is an enduring memory and one I would have missed out on if I hadn’t been dining with an Italian. Guidebooks and word-of-mouth recommendations can help you hit the hotspots and hidden haunts when you’re exploring a region, but knowing what wine to sample? That’s tricky. There’s an Italian saying that goes something like this: If it grows together, it goes together. It’s sound advice and underpins why regional food-and-wine pairings make sense. I often simply order the vina della casa but that’s not always a safe bet at tourist-area restaurants, many of which have earned a bad rap for serving bad wine. A little knowledge or guidance from an expert can go a long way. And you don’t even need to travel to Veneto to get it. Case in point: At Vancouver’s Cibo

Trattoria, Robert Stelmachuk, GM and Wine Director, is hosting “In Vino Veneto,” a fivecourse wine dinner (conceived by chef Faizal Kassam) that’s centred on this region in Northern Italy. “How many of you have been to Veneto?” he asks the guests attending the event. A smattering of hands go up. That’s when Stelmachuk admits his envy: he’s never been to Veneto. But as a sommelier, Stelmachuk knows the rules—and how

Sommelier Robert Stelmachuk of Cibo Trattoria.

PROSECCO PRIMER 5 things you didn’t know

{ } try this

1 Prosecco is not just a blanket term that describes Italy’s answer to Champagne as many people wrongfully assume.

3

4

to break them. For instance, he explains that Prosecco (see Prosecco Primer below) is typically the pre-dinner drink you’d have when dining in Veneto, but he’s making a break with tradition by serving red wine instead. If you visit the Lake Garda resort town of Bardolino, just 30 km northwest of Verona, you’re in the region where Stelmachuk’s first pick—chilled Monte del Fra Bardolino—is produced. It’s a blend of Corvina and Rondinella grapes, plus some Sangiovese for good measure. “When you chill it, it takes the harshness out of it a bit,” says Sommelier Robert Stelmachuk. “It Stelmachuk’s dumbs down the 5 sips of Veneto alcohol and the tannins, brightens 1. Monte del Fra Bardolino the fruit quite a 2. Ca’Rugate “Monte Alto” bit and makes it Soave Classico 2009 more palatable 3. Brigaldara Valpolicella with a wider 4. Ilary Cordin Amarone spectrum of 5. Masi Recioto di Amarone food.” Tonight, it’s paired perfectly with our amuse bouche of paper-thin ox tongue, accompanied by raw fava beans, pecorino cheese and mint. Next up is Garganega. The name doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, and this grape, which is the predominant variety that goes into Soave wine, doesn’t seem to get much respect, either. The Ca’Rugate “Monte Alto” Soave Classico 2009, chosen to accompany our next course (tortellini in brodo), is grown in the volcanic soil that surrounds the Soave region where this white wine has been produced since Roman times. “Soave often gets a bad reputation for

2 Prosecco is specific to Veneto and named for the grape—also called Glera— which has a number of subtypes. 3 True: it’s sparkling (or spumante), but it’s just one type of effervescent wine that’s produced in Italy.

4 The Veronese winery, Alba, makes a Soave Spumante. 5 Unlike Champagne, Prosecco is not made in the Charmat method, not the classic méthode champenoise.

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

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the thirsty dentist [continued]

being simplistic, but this wine proves that the Garganega grape can reach higher levels of complexity,” Stelmachuk says. Why? Most Soave wines aren’t aged in oak barrels—but this one is, giving it structure, not flavour. He describes it as “textural and round, with lemon verbena, almond skin and apricot.” Who says white wine can’t follow red? Now it’s time for wine from Valpolicella, which is matched with a jet-black octopus risotto. In fact, the next three wines we’re going to drink come from this region north of Verona, whose name translates—lyrically and literally—to “valley of many cellars.” Valpolicella’s red wines are primarily blends of three grape varieties: Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara. Their popularity is enduring, but not all bottles are created equally. There’s a hierarchy here, in price and value. Lower “tier” wines are great for everyday drinking. (If you see the word “Classico” on the label, there’s no need to wait for a special occasion to pop the cork.) Of course, Stelmachuk wouldn’t choose an ordinary Valpolicella for our meal: he’s selected one from Brigaldara, a winery that sits on a slope at the mouth of the Marano

Valley. “Valpolicella shines when you have a serious producer like this one who knows how to show off the wonderful Corvina and Rondinella grapes,” he says. “[It has] notes of baked plum fruits wrapped in saddle leather and spiced tobacco, finished off with baker’s chocolate.” What makes it so unusual is that unlike most reds, it’s not aged in oak barrels. “So what you get is a pure expression of this varietal and it lets it play incredibly well with the food.” Finally, the wine I’ve been waiting for all evening—Amarone—and there are two varieties to taste. The Ilary Cordin Amarone is served with a savoury course, an earthy plate of grilled quail and red wine lentils. It has those classic flavours I remember sipping that evening in Verona: dry, prune-y, chocolatey… To truly appreciate this top-tier wine’s full-bodied punch of flavour, you need to understand how this blend of noble grapes (Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara), is made. The grapes are laid out on straw to air dry, sometimes for several months. This pre-Roman process is called appassimento. When the grapes start to shrivel up, sugar is concentrated and the alcohol content is

elevated, resulting in a dry, full-bodied wine that’s ideal for aging and commands a heftier price tag too. It’s name means “big bitter” after all, from the Italian word for that acerbic quality: amaro. It’s as delicious as I recall, and perhaps even more so, since I’ve had time to appreciate its complexity. In contrast, the Masi Recioto di Amarone we savour next is a dessert wine that complements our final course, a decadent walnut and caramel tart. “In this style, fermentation is arrested and the residual sugar left over lends a little sweetness. Then it’s put in barrels where it takes on more acidity,” says Stelmachuk. “Recioto is the unsung hero of the Veneto region,” he adds. It’s “sweet and refined with hints of prunes, stewed pecan and cherry. Dark chocolate and raisins round out the finish.” It’s a satisfying conclusion to an enchanting evening, that’s transported me from Vancouver back to Verona. And although I may never get to lean over Juliet’s balcony or hear Luciano sing in the arena, Cibo Trattoria has become my new not-so-secret enoteca, where I can sip a luscious Amarone.

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Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015


hom t rt ar av ve el tl ha et w r l de Vieux Port of Marseille (below) and Château d’If.

la v ie sur la mer from Paris to Provence and back again story + photography by barb sligl

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

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travel the world he sea thrums to my right. A soft breeze tries to chase away the day’s intense heat as the stillstrong sun dips closer to the horizon. The Plage des Catalans is like a colourful Pointillist painting, a jumble of local Marseillais en masse on one of the city’s two natural beaches. Other than this sandy crescent, it’s a rocky embrace with the Mediterranean around Marseille. I’m walking along Le Corniche, a seaside road atop the rocky ledge of the coast. Cafés and eateries are carved into the cliffs, bright lounge chairs perched just above the beckoning water.

within walking distance of the Vieux Port or Old Port in the centre of Marseille. Consider me charmed. Mais, bien sûr! C’est Provence sur la mer. C’est France. My dinner here, at Chez Fonfon, a longstanding restaurant in Vallon des Auffes, matches the scene. C’est parfait. Colourful cigales or cicadas adorn the wall alongside old photographs of local fishermen and past guests and a quote by French writer Alfred Capus, “La bouillabaisse, c’est du poisson avec du soleil.” Indeed. The word “bouillabaisse” is itself a mash-up of “boil” and “simmer,” and the classic French stew is a hearty mix of saffron, parsley, garlic, olive oil, tomatoes and Mediterranean fish that’s served with potatoes, croutons, aioli and rouille mayonnaise. But on this balmy summer night I have

Along Le Corniche.

Med. We sail right out of Vieux Port, the central and ancient meeting place of Marseille, where ships have docked for some 26 centuries— since the Phoenicians came here in 600 BC. The port is sandwiched between two rather impressive forts, Fort Saint-Jean, dating back to the 13th century, and Fort Saint-Nicolas, built by Louis XIV in 1600. The Palais du Pharo, built by Napolean III, also looms large on the hill that separates the Vieux Port from the sea. All the surrounding and somewhat overwhelming history of this place is playfully alleviated by a new installation at the far end of the port. L’Ombrière was built to coincide with Marseille’s turn as the European Capital of Culture in 2013, and is a mirrored piece of art-cum-pavilion by Norman Foster that’s become a modern meeting place abuzz with Vallon des Auffes.

if you go

For more on Marseille: marseille-tourisme.com/en/. Beyond the Mediterranean coast is inland Provence, where lavender fields bloom and Alpes-de-Haute-Provence beckons. the “fisherRegions like the Luberon offer wineries, man’s rockfish bike tours and a factory and museum visit soup” topped of iconic soap and skincare purveyor with crunchy L’Occitane en Provence. It’s fields, vines, Alps + Med—all in the south of rounds of bread France. tourismpaca.com + and rouille. And, rendezvousenfrance.com oh, there’s nothing

But I turn the other way, away from the blue and down a set of narrow stairs between charmingly crumbling buildings. It doesn’t look like I’m going anywhere until a sharp corner reveals a scene that’s almost cliché in its French-fishing-village charisma. I’m now in Vallon des Auffes, a tiny harbour tucked behind a bridge and packed with boats. Vallon means “small valley” and auffes is a grass that was once used to make fishing ropes and nets. It’s like another dimension in this pretty port, with locals gathering around the water, sipping glasses of rosé and pastis, en plein air. Yet this enchanting scene is

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like French bread… Of course, on the coast (and steps from a still-working fishing village in the heart of Marseille), the seafood doesn’t disappoint either—nor does that blue yonder, the Med itself. The next morning, charming Frenchman (is there any other kind?) Yannick Long takes me out on his boat—a traditional pointu style, the pointy or notched fisherman boat of the

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

street musicians, tourists and fun-loving locals. Inland from here is the old and appropriately named neighbourhood of Le Panier (the basket), where narrow, meandering streets like Rue des Cartiers (named for Marseille’s famous tarot card makers) lead to spice- and soapfilled stores (with Marseille’s iconic square blocks), food vendors and markets. An even more stunning juxtaposition of old and new is the MuCEM building, a lacy or leafy box that’s connected to Fort SaintJean by a vertigo-inducing bridge over the turquoise water. Designed by Rudy Ricciotti and Roland Carta, the perfect square is a “vertical casbah” enveloped by the foliagelike brise-soleil or Mashrabiya. The MuCEM (Museum of European and Mediterranean


travel the world

L’Ombrière.

Marseillais Yannick Long.

Chez Fonfon. Classic Marseille fare, sardines, and the neighbourhood of Le Panier (right).

Marseillais selling his wares.

De rigueur apertif, rosé.

Marseille soap and the MuCEM (right).


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travel the world Civilizations) also opened in 2013, along with the spectacularly cantilevered-over-the-water Villa Méditerranée and the Musée Regards de Provence. But back on the water, Yannick guides his pointu between the old Palais du Pharo and the new MuCEM and out into the blue. Soon, he’s pointing out yet another architectural marvel, the Château d’If of The Count of Monte Cristo fame, rising out of the water on one of the Îles du Frioul. He cuts the engine in the isolated cove of another island in this archipelago, lets down his hair, takes off his shirt and dives in…as the Marsaillais do on a hot and sunny day on the Med. I follow the charmant Frenchman’s lead (bien sûr!). Swimming in the water, I think of a line I once read that’s stuck with me: the blue I’m in is blue the way water is wet. It’s all-encompassing. There’s no other way to describe such an

innate, primal blue. I float effortlessly—there’s no work involved in keeping buoyant in this saline paradise—and my Frenchman (as I’ve come to think of Yannick) points out formations in the rock. Stubby, column-like holds carved out of the cliffs are ancient bollards and remnants of Marseille’s marine history. In his singsong French (the Marseillais have a lovely lilt to their already lovely French accents), he tells how at one time, centuries ago, there were so many ships anchored in these waters that one could walk all the way back to the Vieux Port from here simply by walking from boat to boat. Formidable. Floating and gazing upon the bollards and arid beauty of the îles des Frioules, I think of Edmond Dantès on the Château d’If and how, yes, although that rocky atoll and isolated edifice was once a prison, I couldn’t think of a better place to be held captive.

la vie dans la ville 1

easy access

Fly to France direct—from coast to coast. In addition to weekly flights to CDG from YYZ and YUL, Air France has added YVR to the mix. YVR TO CDG This summer, Air France offers five flights a week, and will continue year-round with four and then three per week. STOPOVER IN MRS All fares allow a free stopover in Paris, so you can visit Paris and Marseille—or one of the other 38 French cities Air France connects to. ADD ANOTHER If you want to add another French city to the mix so you can experience even more of Provence via Nice, for instance, the additional fare is minimal— about $25 CDN. CODESHARE Not in YYZ, YUL or YVR? Air France has codeshare flights with WestJet that make flying from anywhere in Canada très facile. airfrance.ca

Paris]

3 new ways to explore the city of light You’re doing a stopover in Paris because, c’est Paris, and even though you’ve been here before you can’t not visit again, whether it’s for three weeks, three days or a mere 36 hours. Here’s what we’d do if we had time for just three adventures in one of our favourite cities. 1 galeries Lafayette Head to the top floor of the iconic

department store, serving up haute couture in its flagship building since 1912. On your way to the seventh floor of the Lafayette Coupoler, browse designer brands, catch glimpses of the glass dome and stop at the Galerie des Galeries for the Idées Multiples exhibit. Cerebral and chic. Then, on the rooftop terrace, gaze at the Opera Garnier and Eiffel Tower. It may be the best gratis view over the rooftops of Paris. haussmann.galerieslafayette.com/en/

36

hours in

paris

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3

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2 le vrai paris Paris’ 9th arrondissement includes South Pigalle or SoPi, the undiscovered neighbourhood most Parisians probably want to keep that way (it’s also been cheekily referred to as BoBo for “bourgeois bohemian”). Tucked in the centre of Paris, just south of Montmartre’s busy streets, are local hipster hangouts—cafés, bistros, fromageries, gastrothèques and hidden courtyards. To get the insider scoop on what’s been called the new Marais, take a tour and have a beer with Guillaume Le Roux (yet another charming Frenchman; far left), who lives in SoPi and whose blog “716” or “sept, un, six,” which sounds like “c’est ainsi,” is a phonetic play on the French saying, “that’s the way it is.” levraiparis.com 3 paris authentic Tour the original Marais in a classic Citroën 2CV (“deux chevaux” or two horsepower) convertible with another vrai Parisian, like Eric Falce (near left), who drives while he regales you with anecdotes. He dubs this experience Paris insolite or the unusual, non-touristy side of Paris. And super fun. en.parisauthentic.com

MORE For more on Paris go to en.parisinfo.com. — B.Sligl

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pittsburgh / maui / geneva / kelowna / los angeles … | c a l e n d a r

ce

A n intern ation al guide to continuing dental Education

summe r 2015 + beyond The Mattress Factory is a contemporary art museum and “experimental lab.” left The Conflict Kitchen and Cathedral of Learning.

One of Pittsburgh’s many steel bridges, this one for bikes only.

PITTSBURGH

Pittsburgh’s growing network of bike lanes.

Fallingwater, just outside the city.

Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, Eric Shiner, mimics the artist’s pose above him—as can anyone who visits.

Downtown Pittsburgh’s architectural details.

pretty in pittsburgh where there’s a long-lived + still-strong creative push, from Frank Lloyd Wright to Andy Warhol… (CE events in Pittsburgh + just beyond are highlighted in blue.)

b. Sligl

T

hink Pittsburgh, and you’ll likely think steel and Steelers (or Pirates or Penguins). This is a fervent sports town— or rather, “This is Steelers Nation”—with good ol’ working-class and blue-collar roots. The true grit of America. But it also has a history of blue-blood wealth and big-name capitalists—Heinz, Carnegie, Frick, Westinghouse, Mellon—and a fierce creative spirit. Set where three rivers—Allegheny, Monongahela, Ohio—meet, Pittsburgh was once known as the “Gateway to the West” and industrial centre of America. Turn-of-the-century capitalists built social institutions like the University of Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning [tour.pitt.edu/tour/cathedrallearning], as well as grand architecture downtown and on “Millionaires Row,” where you can now stay in a golden-era mansion [mansionsonfifth.com]. Today, Pittsburgh remains rather cutting edge, in another way. This is Andy Warhol’s home town, after all. The Andy Warhol Museum [warhol.org] has an extensive collection of the artist’s paintings, including Pop Art like Campbell’s Soup Cans, as well as photos,

letters and archival pieces from his daily life. You can even film your own Screen Test, à la Edie Sedgwick, and have it emailed to you. [screentest.warhol.org] Then there’s The Mattress Factory, in an abandoned mattress warehouse, of course. This contemporary art museum and “experimental lab” was the first in the US to exhibit art by wild-child Damien Hirst, back in 1994. It’s also played a key role in the revitalization of Pittsburgh’s North Side since its inception in 1977. And it’s just cool. [mattress.org] Another creative initiative—through food instead of art—sits almost under the Cathedral of Learning in the Oakland neighbourhood. The Conflict Kitchen serves cuisine from countries in conflict with the US. Past menus include Afghanistan, North Korea, Venezuela and now Cuba; “The restaurant rotates identities in relation to current geopolitical events.” Something to think about while you munch in the rather bucolic surroundings… [conflictkitchen.org] It gets more idyllic in the Laurel Highlands just outside the city, where you’ll find another iconoclastic must-see: Fallingwater. Called “The best all-time work

of American architecture” by the American Institute of Architects, Frank Lloyd Wright’s house is one of “50 Places of a Lifetime” to see, as the National Geographic says—its dramatic integration with nature more evidence of this region’s creative push. [fallingwater.org] And it keeps pushing. You can almost feel the unfurling of Pittsburgh’s rusty past to unveil a second coming. Old and new come together in a vibrant mix that’s especially evident by bike. Bikes and steel mills may not seem to go together, and yet this may be the best way to see the city. Golden Triangle Bike Rental offers a variety of tours that uncover Pittsburgh— from booze to bellows. Cycling past the relics of those steel-mill days is mesmerizing and, as you continue farther afield, disbelief sets in at how pretty Pittsburgh and its environs really are. Soon you’re biking through meadows and pastures, along the railway, past an old cemetery…until you reach Washington, DC (really!), via the Great Allegheny Passage. It’s all kind of epic (as you may have come to expect by now) in Pittsburgh. [bikepittsburgh.com] — B. Sligl For more on Pittsburgh, go to visitpittsburgh.com.

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

21


Cosmetics/Aesthetic/Restorative

Anesthesia

ce calendar ce when where

contact

website

Edmonton Alberta

IV Conscious Sedation Program – Level 1, Sep 18-21; Level 2, Oct 28 - Nov 3; Level 3, Dec 13 – 18; Two-Drug IV Sedation Certification Program – Nov 2 - 3

University of Alberta

780-492-4474 See Ad Page 16

ualberta.ca

Aug 22-23

Columbus Ohio

Local Anesthesia

Ohio State University

614-292-1472

dentistry.osu. edu

Various Dates

Edmonton and Calgary Alberta

Mini-Residency In Aesthetic Dentistry – Edmonton, 2015: Module 1, Oct 17; Module 2, Nov 28; Edmonton, 2016: Module 3, Jan 30; Module 4, Feb 27; Module 5, Apr 2; Module 6, Apr 30; Calgary, 2015: Module 1, Oct 16; Module 2, Nov 27

University of Alberta

780-492-4474 See Ad Page 16

ualberta.ca

Ongoing

Leuven Belgium

Biocompatible And Durable Restorations With Glass Ionomers From GC

GC Europe

See website

gceurope.com

Through 2015

Vancouver British Columbia

AAID Vancouver MaxiCourse

Vancouver Maxicourse

888-teeth-99

vancouvermaxicourse.com

Oct 01-03

Toronto Ontario

23rd Annual Scientific Meeting

Canadian Academy of Restorative Dentistry and Prosthodontics

902-435-1723 See Ad Page 25

cardp.ca

Dec 04-07

Key Biscayne Florida

Excellence In Bonded Porcelain Restorations

The Pankey Institute

800-472-6539

pankey.org

Dec 27-

Caribbean New Year’s Cruise

Cosmetic PearlsDentists For The General Practitioner Just For Canadian

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Cementation Sanity – Eliminating Confusion &

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

The Pankey Institute

800-472-6539

pankey.org

Jan 24-

Feb 04 Issue: 2016 Jan

Fax:31 2016

Tahiti & The Society Islands

new CE to be placed

Jul / Aug 2015 Problems With Indirect Restoration Placement

Key Biscayne Florida

Integrating Aesthetics Occlusion And

604 - 681 Restorative - 0456 Principles. Blending Form And Function

Ongoing

Vancouver British Columbia

Course #1 Shaping, Cleaning, And Obturation Of

Endodontics Unsponsored

ce@vancouverrootcanals. com

vancouverrootcanals.com

Sep 25-26

Vancouver British Columbia

Course #1: Shaping, Cleaning, And Obturation Of Root Canal Systems

North Shore Endodontics

604-987-2285

vancouverrootcanals.com

Sep 25-26

New York New York

Current Endodontic Therapy: How To Make It Simple And Reliable (Lecture And Model-Based Training)

Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia.edu

Multiple Dates

Geneva Switzerland

Geneva Summer School, Courses TBA

University of Geneva

41-22-379-71-11

unige.ch

Ongoing

Liège Belgium

Various Continuing Education Opportunities

University of Liège

32-4-3669701

ulg.ac.be

Various Dates

Edmonton and Calgary Alberta

Topic: Neuromodulators – Edmonton: Level 1, Oct 17-18; Level 2, Oct 16-18 Or Nov 20-22; Level 3, Oct 16-18 Or Nov 20-22; Calgary: Level 2, Oct 23-25

University of Alberta

780-492-4474 See Ad Page 16

ualberta.ca

Attn:

Endodontics

sponsor

Various Dates

05 For:Jan 2016

Email:

General Dentistry

topic

Root Canal Systems Advertising in#2Print Course Re-Treatment & Other Complex Cases

Copy sent to admaterial@advertisinginprint.com

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March 17 - 26, 2016 Dental Occlusion

November 21 - 28, 2015 Treatment Planning

October 28 - November 4, 2016 Oral Pathology & Dermatology

1-888-647-7327 22

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

www.seacourses.com

Canadian $ pricing


Infection Control

Geriatric Dentistry

General Dentistry

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Sep 25

London Ontario

Homecoming: What Expert Marriage Advice Can Teach Us About Creating Successful, Long Lasting Dentistry

Schulich School of Medicine

888-281-1428

schulich.uwo.ca

Sep 25 2015 to Jun 12 2016

Newark New Jersey

MaxiCourse, A Comprehensive Training Program In Implant Dentistry (Ten Friday To Sunday Modules)

Rutgers School of Dental Medicine

cde@sdm. rutgers.edu

cde.sdm. rutgers.edu/ maxicourse

Sep 29Oct 11

Mediterranean Cruise

Dentistry At Sea: Healing & Healthcare In Historical Ports From Greece To Turkey

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005 See Ad Page 37

pestravel.com

Oct 16-18

Boston Massachusetts

Radiology Certification For Dental Auxiliaries

Boston University

617-638-5656

bu.edu

Oct 19-26

Rhine River Cruise

Current Dental Issues Cruise

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005 See Ad Page 37

pestravel.com

Oct 22-24

Kelowna British Columbia

Thompson Okanagan Dental Meeting

Thompson Okanagan Dental Meeting

250-832-5249

todsmeeting. com

Nov 07-10

Victoria British Columbia

Annual Current Concepts In Dentistry Conference

University of Victoria

250-472-4747

uvcs.uvic.ca

Nov 20-21

Edmonton Alberta

Dentists Role In Snoring And Sleep Apnea

Rondeau Seminars

630-573-8555 See Ad Page 24

rondeauseminars.com

Mar 02-12 2016

Tahiti & Bora Bora Cruise

Dentistry At Sea / Comprehensive Dentistry

877-737-7005 See Ad Page 37

pestravel.com

Apr 10-17 2016

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Comprehensive Dentistry

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 22

seacourses.com

Dec 26 2016 Jan 02 2017

Disneyworld Florida

Speaker & Topic TBA

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736

kennedyseminars.com

Feb 08-12 2016

Maui Hawaii

22nd Island Dental Colloquium

University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry

415-514-0778

dentistry.ucsf. edu

Oct 14-17

Minneapolis Minnesota

Miniresidency In Nursing Home And Long-Term Care For The Dental Team

University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

612-625-9439

dentalce.umn. edu

Sep 30Oct 01 2016

Los Angeles California

The USC Geriatric Dentistry Annual Symposium

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry

213-740-8381

uscdentalce.org

Oct 24

Los Angeles California

California Dental Practice Act & Infection Control

UCLA School of Dentistry

310-206-0878

dentistry.ucla. edu

Nov 10

Victoria British Columbia

Current Concepts In Dentistry - Infection Control: That Thing You Do

University of Victoria

250-472-4179

uvic.ca

Jan 29 2016

New York New York

Practical Infection Control For The Dental Office (AM session)

Columbia University

212-305-6881

columbia.edu

See Ad Page 23

Professional new CE to Education Society be placed

Rutgers School of Dental Medicine and The American Academy of Implant

MaxiCourse (AAID)

A COMPREHENSIVE TRAINING PROGRAM IN IMPLANT DENTISTRY

FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit our Website:

cde.sdm.rutgers.edu/maxicourse Or Call:

973-972-6561 or 866-720-1971

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

23


Occlusion

Medical / Dental Issues

Implantology

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Through 2015

Multiple Locations

Dental Implant Continuum - Seattle, WA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Boston, MA And Additional Cities Located In Warmer Locations!

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 26

implantseminars.com

Through 2015

Multiple Locations

Live Patient Program - Miami, Florida, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, San JosĂŠ, Costa Rica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Implant Seminars

305-944-9636 See Ad Page 26

implantseminars.com

Through 2016

New York New York

Comprehensive Implantology Continuum, Part 1 - 6 Weekends: Oct. 10-11 Through April 16-17; Course Directors: Drs. Tarnow And Fine

Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

212-305-7124

dental.columbia.edu

Aug 03-16

San Diego California

14-Day Continuous Fellowship Program

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 9

implanteducation.net

Aug 18-22

Rosarito Mexico

5-Day Live Patient Surgical Course

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 9

implanteducation.net

Sep 22-26

Rosarito Mexico

5 Day All-On-Four Live Patient Course

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 9

implanteducation.net

Sep 23-25

Columbus Ohio

Bone Grafting & Sinus Elevation

Midwest Implant Institute

614-505-6647

midwestimplantinstitute.com

Oct 16

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Complications In Oral Implantology

University of Pittsburgh

412-648-8422

dental.pitt.edu

Nov 12

Los Angeles California

Focus On The Maxillary Sinus: Lecture & Cadaver Hands-On Workshop

213-740-8381

uscdentalce.org

Jan 20 2016

San Diego California

1 Year Fellowship Program

California Implant Institute

858-496-0574 See Ad Page 9

implanteducation.net

Feb 06-13 2016

Sandals Barbados

Introduction To Implants (Hands-On Program): A Comprehensive Course For The Dentist New To Implant Placement

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Through 2015

Multiple Locations

The 2014-2015 Medical-Dental-Legal Update Sun And Ski

American Educational Institute

888-725-8308

aeiseminars. com

Jun 2016

Grand France Rivercruise

Medical Emergencies: Medical Emergencies In The Dental Office

Schulich School of Medicine

888-281-1428

schulich.uwo.ca

Sep 27Oct 05 2016

Western Mediterranean Cruise

8 Night Spirit Of Spain CDE Cruise

University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry

415-514-0778

dentistry.ucsf. edu

Jul 24-28

Key Biscayne Florida

Splint Therapy And Occlusion In Everyday Dentistry

The Pankey Institute

800-472-6539

pankey.org

Jul 08-18

Greek Isles & Turkey Cruise

Demystifying Occlusion For Aesthetic Restoration

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Mar 17-26 2016

Caribbean Cruise

Dental Occlusion

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 22

seacourses.com

new CE toHerman Ostrow School be placedof Dentistry

Rondeau Seminars The Leader in Dental Continuing Education

24

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015


Pediatric Dentistry

Orthodontics

Oral Surgery

Oral Pathology

ce

calendar

ce

when

where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

Aug 03-06

Maui Hawaii

41st Annual Review Of Continuing Education In Dentistry (Hawaii)

Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry

213-740-8381

uscdentalce.org

Oct 23

St. Paul Minnesota

Oral Pathology: A Practical Review & Update

University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

612-625-9439

dentalce.umn. edu

Oct 30

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Beyond 32 Teeth: The Mouth As An Overall Health Indicator

University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine

412-648-8422

dental.pitt.edu

Mar 12-19 2016

Turks & Caicos

Oral Pathology, Oral Pain & Managing Chronic Periodontitis With Dr. Howard Tenenbaum

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Aug 22

Los Angeles California

Dentoalveolar Surgery

UCLA School of Dentistry

310-206-0878

dentistry.ucla. edu

Nov 09

Fort Washington Pennsylvania

Advanced Guided Surgery With Zygoma

Institute for Facial Esthetics

215-646-6334

iffe.net

Jan 25-29 2016

Kauai Hawaii

23rd Annual Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Symposium

University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry

415-514-0778

dentistry.ucsf. edu

Sep 11-12

Edmonton Alberta

Level I - Introduction To Orthodontics / 1 Of 4 Session Series

Rondeau Seminars

630-573-8555 See Ad Page 24

rondeauseminars.com

Sep 25-26

Toronto Ontario

Level I - Introduction To Orthodontics / 1 Of 4 Session Series

630-573-8555 See Ad Page 24

rondeauseminars.com

Sep 25-26

Toronto Ontario

new Rondeau CE toSeminars Level II - Advanced Orthodontics / 1 Of 2be placed Rondeau Seminars Session Series

630-573-8555 See Ad Page 24

rondeauseminars.com

Nov 27-29

Edmonton Alberta

Clinical Orthodontic Procedures Module

University of Alberta

780-492-4474

ualberta.ca

Oct 30Nov 01

Gainesville Florida

Orthodontics For The General Dentist Or Pediatric Dentist

University of Florida

352-273-8481

dental.ufl.edu

Oct 14-23 2016

France River Cruise

Early Orthodontics, Missing Teeth, Recent Advances With Dr. David Kennedy

Kennedy Professional Education Seminars

877-536-6736 See Ad Page 4

kennedyseminars.com

Sep 20-27

Western Caribbean Cruise

Pediatric Dentistry

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 22

seacourses.com

Sep 20-27

Western Caribbean Cruise

Pediatric Dentistry

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 27

continuingeducation.net

Sep 18

St. Paul Minnesota

9th Annual Robert J. Feigal Symposium: Pediatric Dentistry & Medicine—A Dynamic Synergy

University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

612-625-9439

dentalce.umn. edu

Sep 26

Boston Massachusetts

Lasers In Pediatric Dentistry: Hard And Soft Tissue Applications

Boston University

617-638-5656

bu.edu

Nov 06

London Ontario

Early Childhood Dental Disease, A Modern Day Crisis

Schulich School of Medicine

888-281-1428

schulich.uwo.ca

INSPIRING EXCELLENCE

TORONTO | OCT 1ST - 3RD | 2015

ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING

Dr. Keith Phillips Dr. Terry Donovan Dr. Glenn Johnson Dr. Basil Mizrahi Dr. Carlo Ercoli Dr. Van Haywood Dr. Kim Kutsch

REGISTER NOW

PLUS 11 OTHER LECTURES FROM LEADING CLINICIANS, SOCIAL PROGRAMS AND MORE!

CARDP | ACDRP CANADIAN ACADEMY OF RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY AND PROSTHODONTICS

Implant Prosthodontics Ceramics Materials Fixed Prosthodontics Implants Bleaching Dental Caries

www.cardp.ca July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

25


Hygienists/Assistants

Practice Management, Technology and Planning

Radiology

ce calendar ce when where

topic

sponsor

contact

website

University of Alberta

780-492-4474 See Ad Page 16

ualberta.ca

Various Dates

Edmonton Alberta

Cone Beam CT (CBCT): Certificate Program For Dentists, Nov 20 – 22; Program For RDAs/ RDHs, Nov 20

Sep 12

Richmond Virginia

Dental Radiation Safety Certification

Virginia Commonwealth University

804-828-4461

Nov 13

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

A Review Of Radiologic Procedures For The Dental Professional: DEP Recommendations

University of Pittsburgh

412-648-8422

dental.pitt.edu

Oct 02-03

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

The Ultimate Dental Office Emergency Course

Duquesne University

412-396-6000

duq.edu

Oct 16

Ottawa Ontario

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Oct 16-19

Galapagos Islands & Tour of Machu Picchu

The Art Of Aesthetics & Occlusion; Social Media Marketing & Branding To Promote Your Clinic

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Oct 30

London Ontario

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Nov

Montreal Quebec

The Business Of Dentistry

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Nov

Manitoba / Saskatchewan

Profitable Practice

ROI Corporation

905-278-4145 See Ad Page 10

roicorp.com

Nov 07-14

Hawaiian Cruise

Comprehensive Dentistry And The Dental Team: The Pursuit Of Excellence

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 27

continuingeducation.net

Nov 21-28

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

new CE to Predictable Treatment Planning: From The be placed Seemingly Simple To The Worn Dentition...And

Everything In Between

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 27

continuingeducation.net

Nov 21-28

Caribbean Cruise

Dental Treatment Planning

Sea Courses Cruises

800-647-7327 See Ad Page 22

seacourses.com

Jan 03-10 2016

Eastern Caribbean Cruise

Evaluation, Diagnosis And Treatment Of The Worn Dentition

Continuing Education, Inc./University at Sea

800-422-0711 See Ad Page 27

continuingeducation.net

Mar 02-12 2016

Cruise Tahiti & French Polynesia

Success=Where Preparation Meets Opportunity‌The Busier, Better, Blissful Practice

Mindware Educational Seminars

888-574-8288

mindwareseminars.com

Mar 10-14 2016

Bahamas Cruise

Dental Team Building & Practice Management Cruise

Professional Education Society

877-737-7005 See Ad Page 37

pestravel.com

Ongoing

Kelowna British Columbia

Certified Dental Assistant Certificate

Okanagan College

877-755-2266

okanagan.bc.ca

Jul 15-17

Las Vegas Nevada

RDH Under One Roof

PennWell Corporation

888-299-8016

rdhunderoneroof. com

Sep 26-27

Vancouver British Columbia

A Comprehensive Review Of Local Anaesthesia For Dental Hygienists

University of British Columbia

604-822-4636

ubc.ca

For feedback, requests or to have your course featured email dentalce@inprintpublications.com

26

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015


For more information—Call 800-422-0711 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Continuing Education, Inc. University at Sea™ Outstanding Value for your Time and Resources Combine Live, Accredited Continuing Dental Education and Personal Renewal Time with Family & Friends

September 20, 2015 Pediatric Dentistry 14 CE Hours 7-Night Western Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale on Royal Caribbean's Independence of the Seas Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff October 3, 2015 Boston University Goldman School of Dentistry - Medical Updates for the Dental Practitioner 9 CE Hours 7-Night Canada & New England, Boston to Quebec on Holland America's ms Veendam Course Fees: $495 for Dentists; $395 for Dental Staff November 7, 2015 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Hawaiian Islands Roundtrip from Honolulu on Norwegian Cruise Line's Pride of America Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff November 21, 2015 Predictable Treatment Planning: From Seemingly Simple to Worn Dentition & In between 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Miami, Florida on Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Reflection Course Fees: $995 for Dentists - $625 for Dental Staff January 3, 2016 Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Worn Dentition 14 CE Hours 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale on Royal Caribbean’s Allure of the Seas Course Fees: $1045 for Dentists - $700 for Dental Staff March 17, 2016 Dental Occlusion: It Can Make You or Break You! & The Total Wellness Dental Practice Model 14 CE Hours 9-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale on Royal Caribbean's Oasis of the Seas Course Fees: $895 for Dentists - $650 for Dental Staff April 10, 2016 Comprehensive Dentistry and the Dental Team: The Pursuit of Excellence 14 CE Credits 7-Night Eastern Caribbean from Ft. Lauderdale on Royal Caribbean's Allure of the Seas Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff October 28, 2016 Oral Dermatology and Pathology 14 CE Hours 7-Day Mediterranean Round-trip from Barcelona on Holland America’s ms Eurodam Course Fees: $795 for Dentists - $550 for Dental Staff All Activities are either AGD or ADA Approved For specific Continuing Education Program approval please visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET

Ask about our Guest Travels Free Program

We can plan or joint sponsor/accredit your next meeting Call 800-422-0711 or 727-526-1571 or visit www.ContinuingEducation.NET Our in-house travel division can handle your personal travel needs


practice management Timothy brown Timothy A. Brown specializes in dental practice appraisals, brokerage, consulting, locum placements, associateships and practice financing across Canada. You can reach Timothy at timothy@roicorp.com.

eyes wide open

Beware impossible promises and learn how to manage expectations

T

wo pressing issues have surfaced in recent discussions with clients—and they’re both very important and closely related. It’s like the two sides of a coin. Heads deals with impossible promises while the flip side, tails, involves managing expectations.

On the other hand, the buyer also suggested that his/her offer would be the highest of any offer—but if a practice does not go to open market, then this is an absurd claim because it cannot be validated. Why? The reason is also simple: if no other buyers are given the opportunity to make an offer, how can anyone prove that the first offer Impossible promises was the best? Impossible promise! A client I’ve known for years called to This type of behaviour is prevalent say that he had been approached by a because there is a limited supply of good corporate entity to buy his practice. Later, practices for sale. The investor-dentist he called me again for a second opinion to community—an actual, organized entity, make sure he was doing the right thing. Investor Dentists™—is very flexible and The investor dentist/corporate has dedicated senior managebuyer had promised to pay the ment soliciting and focusing highest price for the practice on practice acquisition. Keep those compared to any other the other hand, the expectations On traditional marketplace, in which there are just over in registered 1,100 buyers—inheads or cluding many investor dentists—is made up of full-time tails

check— !

Adopt a wellconceived, balanced and careful plan when you’re in the process of buying or selling a practice private-sale offers or open-market sales brokered by any firm. So, is this a legitimate and fully defensible claim? The first and key thing to remember is that if a practice does not go to open market, the price paid by the buyer will be the highest offer that the seller receives, simply because the seller is not accepting other offers. In that respect, this purchaser made a correct claim.

28

dentists, raising families and practising in various locations, who don’t have the time or resources to invest when searching for a practice. These traditional buyers rely upon brokers to introduce them to the various opportunities. Managing expectations And then, on the flip side of today’s dental practice sales market, it’s about juggling sellers’ expectations. In the normal course

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

of appraising and selling a dental practice, many parties are consulted and, early on in the process, the seller should seek legal and accounting advice on sale structure and allocation of sale price as shares or assets. In today’s multilayered corporate structuring, we are still finding old management companies, hygiene companies, technical service corporations and multiple dental professional corporations, as well as sole proprietorships. Each of these scenarios has different and unique tax implications and, in some cases, complex legal implications. Vendors often tell us that they’ve consulted with their advisors, so we proceed to the market (and we often consult with advisors at this early stage). However, as we near the completion of an offer to purchase or closing date of a practice sale, sometimes advisors will realize that there may be some last-minute opportunities to affect tax savings for the benefit of the vendor. In many instances, there is no harm to the buyer and, in some cases, there’s actually a significant benefit to the buyer. But the serious dilemma with bringing these matters to light in the final days and hours, is that advisors on both sides start seeking to re-negotiate a contract or even re-enter a conditional period—perhaps when all other conditions have already been removed—and this puts a transaction in serious jeopardy. Our advice to both buyers and sellers of dental practices, is to begin consultations and preparations of tax and legal matters a year in advance of a possible sale and, at the very least, prior to the preparation of the appraisal of the practice. Any delay in making this investigation or process happen with your tax and legal advisors will likely cause significant delays, high fees and could jeopardize the sale of your practice. In short, poorly managed expectations. It takes two sides It is important to not be misguided by an impossible claim to sell a dental practice at the highest possible price. Be levelheaded. Adopt a well-conceived, balanced and careful plan when you’re in the process of buying or selling a practice. And save that coin for your pocket.


TURNING VISION INTO VALUE ACCOUNTING, TAXATION & BUSINESS SOLUTIONS For Dentists, Doctors and Healthcare Professionals

4Buying & Selling Dental Practices 4Setting Up Professional Corporations 4Corporate Tax Returns & Personal Tax Returns 4Tax Strategies For Dentists 4Assistance With CRA Audits 4Business Plans & Bank Financing 4Financial Statements Guru is a Chartered Accountant from the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants and a Certified Public Accountant from the State of Illinois, USA. He is also a Certified Management Accountant & Certified Financial Manager from the Institute of Management Accountants, USA.

G.E. Pujari

Chartered Accountant

Guru has Healthcare Professionals in his family, who also own Dental Offices in Canada. He is conversant with tax strategies and financial planning for Healthcare Professionals and Dentists having their own practice or working as an Associate. Dentists need an Advisor who understands their business. The right advisor can mean the difference between success and failure in your practice. We believe in being a partner in your growth. Please contact us for an initial consultation.

TRUST A PROFESSIONAL TO DO IT RIGHT!

Gurunath E. Pujari

CA, CPA, CMA, CFM, LLB (G)

G.E. PUJARI CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT 165 Dundas Street West, Suite 902 Mississauga, ON L5B 2N6

www.gepujari.com

Off: (905) 232-9393 / (647) 800-4345 Cell: (416) 876-7489 Fax: (905) 232-9456 e-mail: guru@gepujari.com


t h e h u n g r y d e n t i s t d r . h o l ly f o n g Dr. Holly Fong is a practising speech-language pathologist with three young children who’s always trying, adapting and creating dishes.

tasty tang

Take advantage of rhubarb’s tangy flavour well into the summer

R

hubarb is plentiful during early summer. The bright red stems are usually added to strawberries for pies or jam or compotes (minus the poisonous high-in-oxalic-acid leaves), but rhubarb is also great in savoury dishes. In salads, it provides a crunchy sour foil when paired with something sweet such as corn, peaches or mangos. And it makes a fantastic salsa or sauce for fish or pork—an alternative to the red dye and cloyingly sweet-and-sour pork found in most Chinese restaurants. Pan fry some double-thick pork chops (bone-in for best flavour) and top with a rhubarb-and-caramelized-onion 4 double-thick pork chops (bone-in tenderloin, if sauce. Take the time to caramelize onions to a rich brown to bring out their full sweetness. possible) Add the rhubarb and cook until tender but still crunchy. Stir in the pan juices from the ½ teaspoon each of ground dried sage and thyme pork to create a mouth-watering sauce. Serve with rice, steamed asparagus and a dry or 2 teaspoons fresh ground pepper off-dry Riesling for an easy summer dinner. The Selbach-Oster 2012 Zeltinger Himmelreich 1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt Riesling Kabinett Halbtrocken is so well balanced that you don’t notice its 2 tablespoons olive oil sweetness. The scent of dry herbs, green apple and kiwi flavours with a 1 large sweet onion, peeled and diced hint of citrus complement the pork and asparagus perfectly. Enjoy ! salt to taste Riesling and approx. 4 stalks rhubarb rinsed, ends trimmed, summer just go sliced on the diagonal to yield 2 ¼ cups together. Pair this tangy 2 tablespoons water rhubarb-and-pork dish with ¼ cup sugar the well-balanced Selbach-Oster chopped chives to garnish, if desired 2012 Zeltinger Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett Halbtrocken Preheat the oven to 475˚F with a rack set in and its herbaceous bouquet and hint of citrus. the middle. Add 1 tablespoon oil to a large frying pan set over medium-high heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the onions. Stir frequently to prevent burning. When the onions begin to yellow, turn down the heat to medium-low and continue browning, stirring often. Lightly salt and let the onions caramelize to a deep brown, approximately 25 minutes. Add the sliced rhubarb, sugar and water. Increase the heat to medium-high and stir fry for about 4 minutes until the rhubarb is tender but still retains some bite or crunch. Remove from heat and set aside. In a small bowl, combine the dried herbs, pepper and salt. Pat the pork chops dry and sprinkle both sides with the herb mixture. Set aside on a plate to marinate for 5 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon oil to a large oven-proof pan that’s large enough for the meat to brown and develop a flavourful crust. Set the pan over high heat. Add the chops when the oil is shimmering. Brown well for about 5 minutes, turn over and brown for another 4 minutes. Transfer pan to the oven and roast pork for about 8–9 minutes until a thermometre inserted into the centre of a chop from the side registers 145˚F. Transfer the meat onto a warm serving platter. Add the rhubarb mixture to the pan used to cook the pork. Set the pan over high heat, stirring to combine with the pan jus. Turn off heat and spoon the sauce over the pork. If desired, garnish with a sprinkle of chopped chives to serve.

30

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

istock / Sarsmis

Pan-fried Pork Chops with Rhubarb and Caramelized Onion Sauce (serves 4)


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travel at home

this page, clockwise from top

Houseboats line the shore of Happy Days Houseboats’ home base in the Kawarthas. > Piloting the 50-foot houseboats from the top level allow pilots to join the party on the top deck. > View from the dock of Happy Days Houseboats, blue skies meet the open waters of Pigeon Lake. > The SS Happy Too prepares to enter Lock 32 in Bobcaygeon. > A warm day for a dip, kids cool off by bridge jumping in Fenelon Falls. > Tim Johnson enjoys a refreshing plunge into Sturgeon Lake off the waterslide. opposite page Steady at the helm, Captain Tim Johnson finds his stride piloting the SS Happy One.

34

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015


travel at home

home on the Water

Houseboating through Ontario’s stunning Kawartha Lakes

I

story by

Tim Johnson | photography by Jenn Smith Nelson

didn’t know what the Waterway, a canal system and linear helm was, exactly—that National Historic Site of Canada is, until I was in it. A that cuts through 386 kilometres seasoned expedition of prime Ontario cottage country cruiser—I’ve been on that includes 45 locks—36 convenboard ships bound for tional, two flight locks, two lift locks Antarctica, the Galapagos and a marine railway—connecting and plenty of other Georgian Bay with the Bay of Quinte. remote lands and islands—but I was here to tour my old backyard, never on the bridge or behind the on board a boat. wheel. But before I knew it, I was As evening closed in, I piloted us piloting a 50-foot monster, 40,000 across picturesque Pigeon Lake to floating pounds of pleasure craft, the north side of Big Island, cruising a tri-level floating home, complete in tandem with another group of with kitchen, lounge and multiple friends on a separate, identical boat bedrooms. I have been appointed (the SS Happy Too). We tied up the official captain of the SS Happy to some trees, then rolled out the One—and that terrifies me. gangplank and went on shore for a Still close to shore, in a small campfire. Then we bedded down for marina owned by Happy Days the night in our compact but comHouseboats, owner Frank Quast fortable cabins—the massive boat keeps a watchful eye over my included four bedrooms, a barbecue, shoulder, giving instruction in short, a fully equipped kitchen (complete staccato bursts as I seek to prove with stainless steel appliances) and a my proficiency behind the wheel by huge rooftop deck for stretching out docking her amongst many similar and watching the stars. vessels. “Stay on the high side of In the morning, we set sail for the wind!” he tells me. “Now feather the two busiest locks on the entire your way—just shimmy up there!” waterway, soon coasting through Furiously cranking the wheel to the the narrows—called Big Bob left and right, my eyes dart around Channel—past the waterside homes . . .before I knew it, I was like a madman, watching my rear and cottages in the charming village through the back door (just past Bobcaygeon. Its name a derivapiloting a 50­-foot monster, of the microwave), the port side via a tive for a First Nations word meaning 40,000 floating pounds of closed-circuit camera and the star“shallow rapids,” this was the locaboard through an open window, as tion of the first lock on the system, pleasure craft. . . my trusty deckhands—two friends, one poorly built by lumberjacks in also with no prior experience 1833 to float logs bound for nearby I was in the Kawarthas, a chain of whatsoever—prepared the ropes. Feeling railway. Handing over the wheel and trying picturesque lakes strung about 90 minutes’ like a 747 on final approach to the runway, I my hand at being a deckie, I hummed a few drive northeast of Toronto. A native son angled the hulk toward the flat edge of the lines of the famous Tragically Hip song of the of Peterborough—the largest city in the dock, carefully gearing back my power as same name while looping a rope around a region—I grew up watching houseboats the behemoth closed the last final inches, mooring cable at the side of Lock 32. Driving pass by from the shore. They were makfriends at front and back hopping out and a houseboat can be stressful—it literally ing their way through the Trent-Severn tying the vessel off. Perfect landing. feels like you’re driving an entire house, often July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

35


travel at home in relatively tight spaces—but being a deckhand is easy work, and I chatted casually with bystanders as the rising water raised us just five-and-a-half feet, the doors soon opening to release us into Sturgeon Lake. We spent the next couple days moving at a leisurely pace, swimming, kayaking, paddle-boarding and making ample use of our onboard slide during the day, even wakeboarding with The Wake Institute, a company that will actually deliver the board to your boat and give you a lesson behind their own speedboat. At nights, we barbecued steaks and played cards by the gas fireplace. At our Located just off the main route from final lock—Lock 34, in the Toronto to Bobcaygeon, South Pond village of Fenelon Falls, I Farms offers delicious meals that are only exceeded by the atmosphere of the place. chatted with Adam Kay, the Chat with Peter, the farm’s fascinating, Parks Canada lockmaster. bearded gardener, say hi to Millie, the He noted that my own exresident, adorable goat, and then tuck perience is typical. “We get into some of the freshest food plenty of first-time boaters, in the Kawarthas. and lots of them are nervous,” southpondfarms.ca he said, noting that they typically load the houseboats first, so they have plenty of room to get into the lock chamber safely. Kay recounted a story about one particular houseboat that actually managed to wedge itself, sideways, into the chamber. “He couldn’t move forward or back, at all,” he remembered. “I had to climb down a slimy ladder and free it with my legs. There were about 200 people watching, and when I pushed off and it floated out, everyone was shouting and cheering.” Fortunately, no such fate befell the SS Happy One at Lock 34—but, it should be noted, I was not at the controls. Happy, I sat on the top deck, the sun shining down, as we ascended to the top of the lock. The gates slowly opened, granting us access to Lake Cameron, and we steamed forward—another day, another lake, plenty of fun still ahead. clockwise from top Local character,

farm life

and South Pond Farms gardener, Peter Timmermans. > Millie and her goat friends peer through the doors of their red barn. > A calm day invites houseboaters to hop into the water for some stand-up paddle boarding. > Rustic country beauty on display at South Pond Farms. > The sun goes down on the SS Happy One docked at Lock 34 Fenelon Falls.

+

if you go plan your houseboating vacation at explorekawarthalakes.com and rent your own Happy One (or Too!) with happydayshouseboats.com. do including wakeboarding in your houseboating vacation with the Wake Institute: thewakeinstitute.com. indulge with a meal pre-houseboating adventure at South Pond Farms, which serves up fresh, local cuisine in a beautiful pastoral setting. Open only on select days, check their website for times: southpondfarms.ca. more Check out the other half of the Kawartha Lakes, which surround the City of Peterborough: thekawarthas.ca.


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1. Entry form must be accompanied with solved puzzle. Only correctly solved puzzles entered into random draw. 2. Send puzzle + entry form to Just For Canadian Dentists, 200 – 896 Cambie St., Vancouver, BC, V6B 2P6 or fax 604-681-0456. Entries must be received by August 14, 2015. 3. Prize: $50 VISA Gift Card. 4. Contest can be changed and/or cancelled without prior notice. 5. All entries become property of In Print Publications. 6. Employees of In Print Publications and its affliates are not eligible to participate.

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

37


dr. greg chang is both dentist + chef… and if he could, he’d be a Broadway show producer too. For now, he has enough on his plate with SuperChefs, an initiative he founded that promotes healthy eating for kids. It’s making a difference on a global scale with a Kids Eat Well menu at Westin Hotel & Resorts (some 200 worldwide!). ”After all, since dentists are experts of the mouth, we should know what goes in there!” says Dr. Chang. The menu even features a SuperChefs character holding a toothbrush as a reminder to brush after meals. And the SuperChefs Cookery for Kids program teaches kids most in need at no cost (a partnership with UBC Dentistry and contributions from the dental community are key—go to superchefs.tv/superchefs-for-good.php to help or make a tax-deductible donation). My name: Greg Chang I live, practise in: Surrey, BC My training: DMD Why I was drawn to dentistry: Wanted to help and work with people My last trip: Bandon Dunes Golf Resort­—7 rounds of golf in 4 days! Paradise

Best meal anywhere: Lotte Bon Femme— monkfish in Lausanne, Switzerland—went back three days in a row for same dish! Memorable restaurant: French Laundry in Napa— unbelievably good, unique and precise! A “wow” hotel/ resort I’d happily

I always travel with: Balloons… never know when a child needs a balloon animal! Favourite city: New York—can’t get enough of the food, Broadway and the people Favourite book: The French Laundry Cookbook

Gadget or gear I could not do without: My videocamera I’d describe my home as: My Culinary Palace— teaching kitchen in the basement,

Most-frequented store: Gourmet Warehouse

while watching NFL Sunday games— Sunday Funday!

I have too many: Recipes I haven’t practised

I talent I wish I had: Sing…ah, to be on Broadway!!!

My fridge is always stocked with: Fresh yeast

A big challenge I’ve faced: Coordinate a delicious and healthy global menu with Chefs from Europe, Asia Pacific, South America and North America…and a dietitian—yikes!

My guilty pleasure: Dr. Greg Chang Raspberry having fun in the kitchen Beignets at with kids during the Bouchon Indigenous Cookery Camp Bakery at the on Quadra Island, BC, and his Venetian Hotel favourite cookbook by another in Vegas!!!!!! chef, Thomas Keller. Find out about SuperChefs events + initiatives at superchefs.tv.

One thing I’d change about myself: Be a vegetarian…tried but failed miserably The word that best describes me: Overly enthusiastic I’m inspired by: Passionate people My motto: A Good Chef is Never Without Friends

Most exotic place I’ve travelled to: Ballymaloe Cookery School in Cork, Ireland—internationally renowned cookery school situated on a 100-acre organic farm The best souvenir I’ve brought back from a trip: huge Black Mahogany chopping block from Ballymaloe Cookery School

38

stay at again: Any Westin Hotel & Resort in the worldask to see the kids menu! LOL! A favourite place that I keep returning to: Prince Rupert to fish with my buddy Dr. Rick Tabata from Terrace, BC Dream vacation: Cooking school… anywhere in the world!

Must-see TV: Anything on Food Network Favourite band/ album or song: Fleetwood Mac… best band in the world! My first job: Busboy at Top of the Mandarin Restaurant in Vancouver’s Chinatown

Just For Canadian dentists July/August 2015

Chef’s paradise on the main floor! Most prized possession: Grey Cup ring (2006) from serving as BC Lions’ dentist for over 20 years Last purchase: Fresh lychee Last splurge: A new Ping Driver… made my golf game much worse though

My go-to exercise/sport: Golfing/skiing/ working out in gym

Favourite people: My family, my dental staff, and my SuperChefs Advisory Board who help me do the things I love and believe in (promoting health—dental and overall health—to kids everywhere!)

Favourite spectator sport: CFL/NFL Football

A cause close to my heart: Teaching kids to cook

I’d want this with me if stranded on a desert island: My Chef’s knife and chopping board

On my mustdo list: Cook in Thailand

My secret to relaxing and relieving tension: Cooking/baking

If I wasn’t a dentist, I’d be: Producing a Broadway Show about a Chef wanting to be in Cirque du Soleil

photos courtesy of Dr. greg chang

s m a l l ta l k

dentists share their picks, plans + pleasures


find isolation

you could be

here!

michael defreitas

caribbean dreaming Tobago Cays Marine Park is made up of five cays or islets, a sand-bottomed lagoon, coral reefs (one of which, Horseshoe Reef, is four kilometres long!) and fittingly known as the “Jewel in the Crown” of the Southern Grenadines. tobagocays.org

pa r t i n g s h o t

Isolation can be a good thing…in terms of a summer escape away from it all and photography composition, where leaving some negative space around your subject gives it more dramatic impact. Case in both points: Tobago Cays and Mayreau Island, St. Vincent & The Grenadines…the ultimate Caribbean hideaway—and photo op. Another key photographic technique at play in this image: a shutter speed that’s fast enough to freeze the plane’s propeller. Get more photo tips on page 8. And to discover more water adventures, go to page 6 (rafting in Costa Rica), page 17 (dipping in the Mediterranean) and page 34 (houseboating in the Kawarthas). Get wet!

July/August 2015 Just For Canadian dentists

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OpenRoad honda Burnaby 6984 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. V5E 1E6 (5 minutes East of Metrotown)

Tel: 604-525-4667 OpenRoadHonda.ca

Profile for Just For Canadian Dentists

Just For Canadian Dentists July 2015  

Just For Canadian Dentists July 2015 -On the water in the Kawarthas -From Paris to Provence

Just For Canadian Dentists July 2015  

Just For Canadian Dentists July 2015 -On the water in the Kawarthas -From Paris to Provence

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