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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

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ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

Wednesday

For the Community, by the Community.

Back Country Covid-19 Vaccines Delivered

April 28, 2021

Julian, CA.

Volume 36 — Issue 39 ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Spirit Week At High School

(as of April 24)

Julian 92036 - 1270 Ranchita 92066 - 101 Santa Ysabel 92070 - 416 Warner Springs 92086 - 320

Positive Tests

as of April 24*

(weeks new positives) Julian = 109 (+0) ** Ramona = 2,493 (+26) ** Mt. Laguna = 2 Ranchita = 13 (+0) ** Warner Springs = 57 (+0)** Santa Ysabel = 64 (+1)** Borrego Springs = 133 (+0) ** Descanso = 78 (+1) ** Alpine = 1,106 (+7) ** Poway = 2,400 (+33) Lakeside = 1682 (+18) ** Total Confirmed cases in Unincorporated San Diego County = 38,821 a total rise of 225. If you believe you have symptoms please get tested. Most testing locations do not require an appointment. To find information on a testing location near you or call 2-11 (toll free) or on the web 211sandiego.org.

Wildflowers - This Weekend ‘Jewels of the Backcountry’ Julian Woman’s Club 95th Annual Wildflower Show

Homecoming Queen and King: Britney Vargas and Dakotah Audibert - Senior Court: Alex Gonzalez, Maria Hatch, Zen Hill, Elizabeth Denny, Alan Avila, Molly Dickinson.

State Statistics

State Officials Announce Latest COVID-19 Facts SACRAMENTO – Sunday, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) released the most recent statistics on COVID-19 and updates on the state’s pandemic response. Statewide COVID-19 Data as of Today California has 3,629,624 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There were 1,739 newly recorded confirmed cases Saturday. The 7-day positivity rate is 1.3%.

juniors: Alyssa Arias & Charlie Taylor

Sophomores: Nevaeh Weir & Ben Berry

freshman: Mac Moretti & Riley Stirling-Baucom

With everything that's gone on in the past couple year it's really taught me to make the most of everything. With our homecoming ceremony his year, it got to feel a bit more natural than things have been. I really

enjoyed getting to dress up and be with my friends and just getting to celebrate being a senior as well. I could tell by the gleaming smiles on people's faces that we all had a great time not only participating in the homecoming

spirit week, but getting to be a part of this year's homecoming court. Congratulations to everyone on this year's court and congratulations to Dakotah and Britney for being this year's homecoming king and queen!

The Julian Woman’s Club will present the 95th Annual Wildflower Show at the Julian Woman’s Club located at 2607 C St. Julian, CA. The show will be April 30th thru May 1st 10:00 to 4:00 daily. Due to COVID, the Wildflower Show is scaled down and following the guidelines presently imposed by the State of California but will still include the beauty of the various flowers that have made the show a success over its 95 years. The club members collect specimens from over 850 plant species in the area surrounding Julian. This year, the plant displays will be collected from the Cuyamaca Mountains and will also include the historic old mining town of Julian, Kentwood 1 & 2, Whispering Pines, Julian Pines and Pine Hills and Wynola. Permission to collect is obtained from private property owners. Each year flowers vary depending on weather and rainfall. The display is always colorful and informative as plants are labeled and arranged by area of origin. This year’s show is not just about beautiful flowers. It will focus on how we as a community can nurture these jewels by learning about the plants, conservation efforts, bees in our environment and what grows best in our climate and region. We will educate the public about our region, purposes of wildflowers, and how we can all have some of these jewels in our own backyards. The show will include displays of local school art and science projects related to flowers, expert gardening tips, The Volcan Mountain Foundation and information on our environment. We will also have items for sale including deer resistant wildflower seeds, books, plants, country store boutique items and opportunities to enter the Quilt Raffle. Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted as the Julian Woman’s Club provides scholarships and supports other local nonprofit organizations. For further information visit our website at julianwomansclub.org or contact Karen Kincaid at kincaidsk9@gmail.com

5th Grade Takes It Outside

There have been 59,095,717 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 199,392 during the prior 24hour reporting period. There have been 60,188 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic. As of April 25, providers have reported administering a total of 28,200,566 vaccine doses statewide. The CDC reports that 35,058,910 doses have been delivered to entities within the state. Numbers do not represent true day-to-day change as reporting may be delayed. For more vaccination data, visit the COVID-19 Vaccine Data Dashboard.• Vaccine Eligibility Update As of April 15, individuals aged 16+ are eligible to make an appointment to be vaccinated. To sign up for a notification when you’re eligible for a vaccine, please visit myturn. ca.gov. For more information on the vaccine effort, visit Vaccinate All 58. Blueprint Summary (as of April 13) 0 counties in the Purple (widespread) Tier 22 counties in the Red (substantial) Tier 33 counties in Orange (moderate) Tier 3 counties in Yellow (minimal) Tier Statewide

Learning about science in class, then experiencing science on Volcan Mountain! Thanks to the VMF our fifth grade has had their first science lab about Watersheds and the habitats they create! Our “classroom” walls have become blurry as we have first-hand adventures in science! Thank you to all that contributed! At Julian Elementary School, they are not trying to return to “normal” after dealing with the effects of the pandemic,

they are returning “better than ever!” Teachers are looking for innovative ways to engage students and keep them learning, so Mrs. McFedries is excited to be making changes to her fifth grade lesson plans that include a collaboration with the Volcan Mountain Foundation. The fifth graders completed the first of two science labs that are a joint effort of lessons in the classroom and hands-on experiences on Volcan Mountain. Lead by Greg Schuett

and Susan Meyers, the students became scientists exploring watersheds and the habitats that they create during the outdoor learning labs. ”Our classroom walls have become blurry,” Mrs. McFedries comments, “as our book and paper lessons become active adventures in science!” The second “adventure” is scheduled for April 28th and more collaboration is in the works for next year.

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Be Kind to our PCT Hiking Visitors! Give them a ride, host them, or share a story with them. These amazing folks are on a journey of a lifetime.


2 The Julian News

April 28, 2021

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Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com *** When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live. — Stuart Scott ***

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2021 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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April 28, 2021

Julian High School Senior Spotlight

Each week leading up to graduation the Julian News is shinning a spotlight on the graduation senior class at Julian High School. In part because with the pandemic protocols students have not had the opportunities to show their talents as they might during a normal year, with all activities being curtailed.

Sofia Munoz

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

1. Where did you go to elementary school?

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2. What do you think you are going to miss most when you get out of high school?

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I don’t think I’m gonna miss anything about high school In the long run, looking back I will say High school has taught me nothing but patience and resilience..

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3. What are your plans after high school? College/trade school/job?

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I plan on attending San Diego Mesa Community college then transferring to University of California Berkeley.

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4. Career plans?

Health and Personal Services General Dentistry & Orthodontics

Julian Elementary

The Julian News 3

I will be majoring in Marketing and Business management

5. Favorite memory?

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David Flick, MD Unneetha Pruitt, WHNP, Women’s Helath Silvia Searleman, Nurse Practitioner

My favorite memory will be playing soccer Freshman Year when we advanced to championships.

www.borregohealth.org

6. What words of advice would you give the class of 2022?

Keep on going! You’re almost to the end, don’t procrastinate!!!

Don’t hide in the comfort of society’s norms. People are temporary. Being in such a small school, you often get grouped into categories. Now that I’ve gone through these experiences I wish I could tell myself to not worry about what others think or if they like you. The wrong kind of company is a great deal lonelier for than being by ourselves I could have chosen to be in to be in all sorts of company. No one ever needs to be alone so long as they don’t mind who they are with. You are in control of who you let in your life.

When I was a freshman a lot of my closest friends were seniors and juniors. I think it was hard coping throughout the years without them and making new friendships. I also struggled balancing out work, my personal life, sports and school.

I recently got a job working for Footlocker, and I’m really excited to see where it takes me.

Eagle Time! haha

Kloude Faraj. She is one of the kindest, genuine, smartest people i’ve ever met. I’m very grateful to have had her in my last three years. Kloude is basically my unpaid therapist. If you ever go looking for me chances are you’ll find me wherever she is. She’s my biggest role model. Julian’s lucky to have her.

PROCRASTINATION! I cannot stress this enough.

7. If you could give your past self any advice what would it be?

From The Supervisor’s Desk

Notes from Supervisor Joel Anderson

8. What has been the most challenging part of high school?

9. What has been the highlight of your senior year? 10. Favorite school activity?

11. What teacher do you feel has impacted your life the most?

12. What’s a bad habit you have?

New Blood Test Poised To Change How Cancer Is Found

(BPT) - Rare is the person who hasn't been impacted by cancer in some way. Maybe it's your parent fighting for their life. Perhaps it's a friend going through a difficult treatment. It could be a neighbor or colleague who was recently diagnosed and who now faces complex decisions. It also might be you. One in three people in the United States will receive a cancer diagnosis in their lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. Whether it impacts you directly or indirectly, cancer is a difficult journey. Despite the significant advances made in cancer care, the deadly disease is soon expected to become the No. 1 killer worldwide. Cancer kills nearly 1,700 people daily In January 1971, President Nixon declared war on cancer at his State of the Union address and signed the National Cancer Act into law later that year. Fifty years later, the nation observes World Cancer Day annually. Of course this growing health problem deserves attention yearround. In 2020 alone, Americans lost some of the most talented and iconic figures in the 20th century from cancer, from civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis to gender equality champion Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Just a few additional celebrities who died included game show host Alex Trebek and actor Chadwick Boseman. "Each day in the U.S., nearly 1,700 people will die from cancer and three times that number will

McDonnell, M.D., FACR, a radiologist at Sutter Health. "With early detection being so critical, a simple screening such as Galleri could save or extend many lives." The Galleri test will be available in the second quarter of 2021, initially through large employers, health systems and specialty physician practices. Learn more at grail.com/galleri.

learn they have it. Additionally, an estimated $201 billion was spent on cancer care last year," says Josh Ofman, M.D., MSHS, and chief medical officer and head of external affairs at GRAIL, a healthcare company whose mission is to detect cancer early, when it can be cured. "Currently in the U.S. there are recommended screening tests for only five types of cancers out of the more than 100 known to exist. Fortunately, new technologies are expected to expand screening options in 2021 and beyond." New advances in early cancer detection Experts agree that the most crucial factor of cancer survival lies in early detection. The sooner you learn you have cancer the sooner it can be treated, ideally before it spreads and advances into later stages. Early detection can help cancer treatments to be more effective and can increase survival rates. "Unfortunately, many cancers

are currently diagnosed after the cancer has already spread," says Andrew Hudnut, M.D., at Sutter Medical Foundation, Family Medicine. "Only 20% of people with late-stage diagnosis will survive five years. While cancer screenings exist for some cancers, for others the cancer diagnoses simply arrive too late." Thanks to emerging technology that is capable of identifying cancer signals in the blood, early detection is a possibility now more than ever. In clinical studies, Galleri, GRAIL's investigational multi-cancer early detection blood test, demonstrated the ability to detect more than 50 types of cancers and identified where in the body the cancer was located with high accuracy, all with a low false-positive rate of less than 1%. "This new cancer screening option has the potential to be an important addition to our current screening paradigms, such as for breast and colon," says Charles

Spring Is Here, Along With The Harshest Of Allergy Seasons (StatePoint) Experts predict allergy season to be exceptionally severe this spring, according to the Allergy & Asthma Network. Rising global temperatures and a forecast of warm, dry air this spring after a winter of heavy snow could significantly increase pollen production. This comes after a year many people spent mostly indoors in quarantine. As you head outside to enjoy the spring weather, allergens like pollen may come as a shock to the system. Spring allergens, which can lead to chronic and troublesome symptoms, such as respiratory irritation, itchy eyes, and nasal congestion, impact millions of Americans. “After over a year spent in the confines of our homes during the pandemic, we want to spend as much time outdoors as we can this spring,” says nationally renowned natural

Protecting Our Region from Wildfires Those of us who live in San Diego County know that the best way to protect our homes and property from wildfires is by doing whatever can be done, not during or after a crisis, but before an event occurs. I was pleased when my colleagues on the San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved two wildfire preparedness measures introduced by myself and Supervisor Jim Desmond regarding wildfire preparedness. Our first proposal directed the County to identify gaps in mitigating the impacts of Public Safety Power Shutdowns. These shutdowns occur when public utilities shut off power, during times of windy and dry conditions that increase the chance of fire outbreaks and can affect rural residents who rely on electricity to pump well water and operate necessary medical devices. To date, the County has directed the use of $1.8 million to mitigate the impacts of power shutdowns by purchasing emergency generators for libraries, fire stations and other facilities. Our measure directs County staff to seek additional funding that could be used for additional mitigation activities such as providing backup batteries for traffic signals at major intersections that need to be operational during evacuations. The second item we approved directed County staff to identify public roads where vegetation clearing should be increased to enhance public safety and suppress fire hazards. Currently, the County’s Defensible Space Ordinance requires property owners to clear 10 ft of “combustible vegetation” along the sides of roadways. The Board’s action will allow this clearance to be doubled to 20 ft in appropriate areas. The County of San Diego maintains 2,000 miles of public roadways, a majority of which is in rural areas prone to wildfires. I consulted with the fire chiefs throughout San Diego County to gain their perspective on this action and ensure it would help protect our communities and serve as a benefit to their fire suppression efforts. I want to thank Supervisor Desmond for working with me to introduce these measures and I appreciate my fellow Supervisors’ support to ensure we are doing all we can to protect against the destruction of dangerous wildfires that are, unfortunately, a part of living in San Diego County. There is much more work to be done and I will continue working with my colleagues to ensure we pursue every effort to not only be prepared for wildfires when they occur but hopefully, prevent them from occurring in the first place. As always, I am interested in your thoughts and ideas on this subject. Please visit my website at www.supervisorjoelanderson.com to view these two Board Letters, learn more about my efforts to serve our community, and leave any suggestions or comments you may have as well.

health physician and best-selling author, Dr. Fred Pescatore. “Don’t let allergies ruin your longawaited spring. There are steps you can take to alleviate your allergy symptoms.” • Rinse Your Eyes. Allergies can cause burning, itching, and tearing in our eyes as well as swelling of the eyelids. Washing your eyes with clean water or an eye wetting product moistens them to provide relief when they are dry and irritated. It also removes allergens that cause eye inflammation. • Wash Your Clothes Often. When worn outdoors, your clothes can carry small particles back into your home and cause

more exposure and allergic reaction. Washing your clothes and taking a shower after outdoor activity can remove lingering allergens. • Manage Your Stress Levels. Stress can be a powerful force on your physical and mental wellbeing, and it can pile on quickly. Stress hormones can negatively impact the immune system, increase oxidative stress levels, and inflame seasonal allergy symptoms. When you start to feel stressed, stop and take a breath. If you can, take a walk. Getting quality sleep also helps reduce the effects of stress. • Add a Natural Supplement. continued on page 8


4 The Julian News

Julian

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

and

Back Country Happenings

Exploring The Connection Between Math And The Arts

Grossman who uses 3-D printing and computer programming to design mathematical sculptures, there are many visual artists for whom math is the very basis of their work. Take time to explore their collections and get inspired. With a hands-on approach to mathematics and art, you can help your child foster a love of both subjects.

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations Look for our return on the fourth to the Witch Creek Wednesday of the month School House The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

*** There are two kinds of egotists: those who admit it and the rest of us. — Laurence J. Peter ***

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

ESTABLISHED 1987

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

April 28, 2021

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

(StatePoint) While often thought of as two completely distinct subjects, art and math are intrinsically entwined. Not only can learning the fundamentals of one subject help a student excel in the other, but combining the subjects can make the traditionally intimidating field of math more accessible and approachable. As more attempts are being made to integrate the arts into STEM learning at school, you can reinforce the intersection at home in the following ways: • Explore history: Encourage your child to read books that explore the collision of art and math, such as “The Golden Ratio: The Story of Phi, the World’s Most Astonishing Number.” While authored by an astrophysicist, it’s meant for readers of all backgrounds to enjoy. • Say cheese: Photography incorporates many mathematical principles. Take a photography course together to examine how focal length, aperture and shutter speed affect images. • Visualize it: Be sure your child is equipped with a top notch graphing calculator that provides visual support for mathematical exploration. Using a graphing calculator, students can apply mathematical formulas to create their own designs, art and even drawings. Look for a high-definition, easy-to-operate option, such as the fx-CG50 graphing calculator from Casio, which has the programming language Python built right into it, giving students the freedom to program the calculator to creatively arrive at solutions. Or check out Classpad. net, a free, all-encompassing online calculator alternative, with all the functionality of a handheld calculator. • Enjoy fine arts: From the Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher and his world famous lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings, to the contemporary American sculptor Bathsheba

Automotive Marketplace Auto Services

Danny’s Truck and Auto 729 D Street • Ramona

LUBE, OIL & FILTER $29.95 with coupon

Calendar CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm

Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall

Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm

Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 2nd Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 619.504.6301 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm

April

Wednesday, April 28 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Friday, April 30 - Saturday, May 1 Julian Women’s Club Annual Wild Flower Show 10-4 daily Julian Women’s Clubhouse 2607 C Street

May

Wednesday, May 5 Cinco de Mayo Saturday, May 8 - Monday, May 10 Julian Arts Guild, Spring Art Show and Sale Julian Town Hall - 10 to 4 Sunday, May 9 Mother’s Day

Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm

Wednesday, May 12 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Saturday, May 15 Mr. Julian and JHS Senior Class Auction Ticket $5 - Julian Town Hall, 5pm

Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm

Monday, May 31 Memorial Day

June

• On April 27, 4977 B.C., the universe is created, according to German mathematician and astronomer Johannes Kepler. Scientists in the 20th century developed the Big Bang theory, which showed Kepler's calculations were off by about 13.7 billion years. • On April 28, 1789, three weeks into a journey from Tahiti to the West Indies, the HMS Bounty is seized in a mutiny led by Fletcher Christian, the master's mate. Captain William Bligh and 18 of his loyal supporters were set adrift in a small boat. They reached the East Indies in June, after a voyage of about 3,600 miles. • On May 2, 1939, New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig benches himself for poor play and ends his streak of consecutive games played at 2,130. The left-handed slugger led the American League in RBIs five times. • On May 1, 1941, "Citizen Kane" makes its debut at the RKO Palace Theater in New York City. The film about a publishing tycoon's dying words consistently ranks at the top of film critics' lists of America's greatest films. • On April 29, 1974, President Richard Nixon announces that he will release transcripts of 46 taped White House conversations in response to a Watergate trial subpoena. In August, Nixon resigned to avoid an impeachment trial after proof of his guilt was found on the tapes. • On April 26, 1986, the world's worst nuclear accident occurs at the Chernobyl nuclear plant near Kiev in Ukraine. An estimated 4,000 clean-up workers died from radiation poisoning and a large area of land may not be livable for almost 150 years. • On April. 30, 1997, at 12:11 pm, London's iconic Big Ben clock, the most famous clock in the world, stops ticking for 54 minutes. In 1962, snow delayed the bells, causing Britain's capital to ring in the New Year 10 minutes late. © 2021 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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April 28, 2021

My Thoughts

EAST OF PINE HILLS

Ancestors

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

What Kind Of Cook Are You It’s possible to think of cooks in concentric rings. At the outer edge of the cooking universe, somewhere beyond a culinary Pluto, are those lost in space--who simply don’t eat in their own homes but dine in restaurants and cafeterias and other peoples’ houses and anywhere that doesn’t involve putting hand to oven door. Then you have the next inward ring with those who buy TV dinners. This is followed closely by those who live mostly on prepared foods but put the elements of dinner—main dish, veg, bread, dessert, etc.—together from different packages in creative ways. At this point, however, we take a large inward leap through cooking space to find a circle of cooks who actually do cook , perhaps out of necessity, maybe out of choice. At the unhappy outer edge is Bored Necessity: Prepared food is too hard on the budget and there is some knowledge of cooking so the tried and true is served on a regular basis. Sometimes it’s palatable tried and true, sometimes it’s not. Once upon a time a nice English lady confided that she couldn’t cook and ruined just about everything she served. How bad could cauliflower and lamb chops and boiled potatoes be, we thought as we murmured reassuring words. Bad. Truly awful. A tour de force. But most cooks are not like that. Most cooks present food that is edible if sometimes dull which dullness makes us grateful for the central group of our universe, the happily creative cook, the cook who likes to cook, to read recipes and try different things, cooks who invent, and who also like to eat. Even here, however, there can be differences. There are those cooks who rely on the internet for their inspiration and direction and there are those in our favored center who collect cookbooks. The storied Dorsa O’Dell, for instance, was a cookbook collector (okay, there wasn’t any internet back then but we believe she’d be the same today) as well as a cutting edge cook with quiche and such in the late ‘50s and the inspiration of her kitchen bookcase lingers in fond memory. Cookbooks are wonderful things. They conjure up pictures and tastes, imagined dinners and remembered ones. During COVID they have been especially good in providing inspiration and company and even now reign supreme. Immediately after lockdown it was an Indian (India Indian, that is) food kick centering on but not limited to Madhur Jaffrey’s Taste of India. This morphed into Georgian cooking (former Soviet Socialist Republic of, that is) and now Southern American. The current cookbook, Four Great Southern Cooks is well worn, so much so that it has lost its cover. Cousin Jane was visiting recently, liked the recipes and though she would get a copy of Four Great Southern Cooks for herself. One was, of course, available on Amazon. As long as you had $225 to spend. That lost cover was an expensive piece of cardboard.

Infant Immunizations Dropped During COVID-19 Pandemic

By José A. Álvarez, County of San Diego Communications Office

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has yielded another troubling result: a drop in routine childhood vaccinations. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report published nearly a year ago revealed the number of children receiving routine vaccines dropped immediately after the United States declared a national emergency due to the coronavirus. The trend continued during the pandemic because of families staying at home. April 24-May 1 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is urging parents to make sure their children are vaccinated against all vaccine-preventable diseases. “Vaccines help to prevent disease outbreaks,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County public health officer. “Parents should make sure their children have all the recommended vaccines to protect them.” Vaccines reduce disease, disability and death from a variety of infectious diseases. The CDC recommends that children get vaccinated against 16 diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases are not that common in the United continued on page 12

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by Michele Harvey

My family goes way back in this country. Stories on both sides bring us here before the revolution. On my maternal Grandmother’s side, we apparently had an ancestor who rode on the ship that came over directly after the Mayflower. I don’t remember the name of the ship and I have no clue what my ancestor’s name would have been, however, Mike and I have a friend here in Julian who has an ancestor who sailed on that same ship. Maybe we are somehow related. I once read that the original Mayflower descendants now number thirty-five million. That is a very prolific bunch of people! My mother’s mother had two brothers and three sisters. They were raised in Wisconsin and somehow most of them migrated to California. For years we thought that my mother’s father was born in Iowa, but about ten years ago my brother found out that he was actually born in Norway. He was born in the 1880s and his parents divorced at some time. We assumed that he was raised by both of his parents on a farm, possibly a dairy farm, because Grandpa told us stories of bringing in the cows and the geese. We didn’t ask questions because I was raised in a time when children were supposed to be seen and not heard. It’s too bad, because I feel as though I could have filled in so many family blanks if I had been allowed to do so back then. A few years ago my brother, sister-in-law and I visited some very elderly cousins. When we mentioned the farm, one cousin said that she never heard that story. She thought Grandpa’s father owned a hotel. See what happens when you get to ask questions? When my mother was a little girl, her father’s mother lived with her family. Apparently Grandma Thompson only spoke Norwegian and my Mom had no idea what her Grandma was saying. However, she sure did enjoy following her Grandma around so she could listen to her talk. Grandma and Grandpa met at a band concert. He played clarinet and she sat in the audience with her girlfriends. The two went for a buggy ride that evening and Grandma got home late so she had to climb in a window. When I told my Mom that story, she said she had never heard it. I said it was because she was Grandma’s daughter. You don’t tell your daughter stories about the times you were wicked and in the early 1900s that would have been considered wicked. Grandpa moved to Seattle for work. He was in the hardware business. When the time was right, he sent for Grandma and she told me that she rode the train by herself all the way from Wisconsin to Seattle. This was probably about 1908. Back then, that was a very long and probably dusty ride. Grandma and Grandpa, at that time known as Mary and Clyde, were married in Seattle with Mary’s brother Art and his wife as their witnesses. Grandma told me that she heard the harbor bell as Grandpa carried her across the threshold of their new home. I know a few stories about my grandparents, but not many about their childhoods. I especially don’t remember hearing about Grandpa’s childhood except for the cow and goose story. My cousin told me that Grandpa won a motorcycle in a contest, the first and only motorcycle in their town. Whenever he rode it near horses, he had to ride it into a ditch because it frightened the horses so much. Grandma told me that when she was seven, she was shipped to her older sister’s house to be a housekeeper and to tend the children. I’ve read that this wasn’t unusual in the 1800s. When her sister’s husband got angry at her he would send her back to her mother. When things settled down, Jessie, Grandma’s sister would send for her again and that is how she spent her childhood. You could say that Grandpa ran roughshod over Grandma in some ways and in other ways the reverse happened. Grandpa gave Grandma a small allowance to run the household which, by 1920 included three children. Grandma belonged to Eastern Star and was forever making and remaking formal dresses for evening events that she and Grandpa needed to atrtend. What Grandpa didn’t know was that Grandma also sewed for a living so she could make ends meet financially on her small salary from Grandpa. I’m sure that he often congratulated her on how well she ran her household. Another trick that Grandma played on Grandpa was that when he arrived home from work, he expected dinner to be cooking. Grandma didn’t always know what she was going to cook when Grandpa got home, however, the dinner table was set for dinner, so when Grandpa changed his clothes and went outside to water the yard, Grandma had plenty of time to come up with a workable idea. During the depression, Grandma and Grandpa did okay financially. Everyone needed hardware of one sort or another, so Grandpa kept working. My Mom told me that since Grandma and Grandpa were naturally frugal, she, in her teenage years, didn’t notice the depression within her house. Friends lost their homes, so Grandma and Grandpa attended a lot of foreclosure sales. They would buy things from their friends’ estates so their friends would know that at least a few of their things would get loving homes. At Christmas time Grandma Cooked and baked enough food for Grandpa to take boxes to every family that they knew of in need. That’s how she spent his money. If he complained, I never heard about it through the family. I’ve just written a few stories about my Mom’s side of the family and the little I know about my Dad’s side of my family could be even more interesting. For years I’ve seen a photo of seven men in law enforcement uniforms who I was told are related. I know that one is my Dad, one is my Dad’s brother and one is their father. Until about three years ago when my cousin sent me an article that had been printed in the San Diego Union; I had no idea that they all had the last name of Harvey. Apparently they all lived in San Diego too. But now I can’t find the newspaper article, though I have a copy of the photo. I wonder why our family never met them. I have lots of questions about both sides of my family, so I paid for ANCESTRY.com and should get some results of some kind in about two months. Ancestry. com won’t tell me who those men were, but it’s a beginning. These are my thoughts. *** It is not titles that honor men, but men that honor titles. — Niccolo Machiavelli ***

The Julian News 5

The Harvey police force - my father Robert far right, his father Mike Harvey in the center (Sheriff’s Dept.) and next to my father is his brother Roy Harvey. The other four are also Harvey’s.

Volunteers Help Clean Up Town

This year’s clean up event was hosted virtually by I Love a Clean San Diego. What that means is; we as a community sign up with the I Love a Clean San Diego website as part of our group “Julian Chamber of Commerce.” Here are the plans for our Julian Group: · Meet at Nickel Beer at 8:45am · We’ll give direction on where we would like to see our group move through town (including side streets). · Buckets, Gloves, trash grabbers will be available on a limited basis (please be sure to register so we know to expect you) . Bringing your own gloves would be a great help! · Volunteers will proceed toward town filling their buckets with roadside and sidewalk trash. · Volunteers will end at the parking lot behind Town Hall, where their trash will be collected and accounted for, so that we can help I Love a Clean San Diego meet their goal of 30,000 pounds of trash collected, countywide.


6 The Julian News

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*** I truly believe that everything that we do and everyone that we meet is put in our path for a purpose. There are no accidents; we're all teachers - if we're willing to pay attention to the lessons we learn, trust our positive instincts and not be afraid to take risks or wait for some miracle to come knocking at our door. — Marla Gibbs *** 1. GEOGRAPHY: What is the deepest point in Earth’s oceans? 2. COMICS: What is the name of the newspaper in the “Shoe” comic strip? 3. LITERATURE: Which 19th-century novel features the characters Catherine and Heathcliff? 4. MOVIES: What was the name of Yoda’s home planet in the “Star Wars” movie series? 5. BUSINESS: When did the social media service Facebook launch? 6. MUSIC: How many strings does a cello have? 7. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of alcohol is distilled from juniper berries? 8. HISTORY: In what year did the first human heart transplant take place? 9. SCIENCE: Which plant can be processed to make linseed oil? 10. LANGUAGE: What is the scientific study of diseases and their effects on population called? Answers on page 11

Chef’s Corner Welcome Spring With Fresh Artichokes

Artichokes are strange and lovely. It’s a thistle, a flower and its pale green blossoms are one of the first signs of spring. Artichokes are in season, so it’s time to go to the market and get some thorny deliciousness for yourself. Artichokes may be a food you already think you know, stripped down to its heart and frozen and packaged in a box, a jar or a can. The wonderful thing about artichokes is that they are delicious in all their forms. But if

you’ve never had the chance to buy them in their full, sculptural beauty, fresh off the plant, mature or tender and young, then you are missing something special. The artichoke is a member of the cardoon family, which is native to the Mediterranean, and cultivation began there as early as the ninth century. The plant likes mild, dry climates, and in the United States it seems to like California’s central valley almost exclusively. Being what it is, which is a leafy flower, it is a great source of fiber. It’s also high in vitamin C and magnesium.

If you live in California, you’ve probably had the opportunity to savor a fresh artichoke. However, the artichoke might be a little exotic to the rest of us. The big round globe, with all its layers, might seem a little intimidating. What to do with it? What is edible, and what is not? Use fresh artichokes within a few days of purchasing. You may want to trim off the prickly points of the leaves before preparing them. Surprisingly, most of the artichoke flower is edible. The only exceptions are the more continued on page 11


April 28, 2021

The Julian News 7

Unusual Paint Sign Part of the fun of collecting and going to shows and auctions is how often you see something that is a mystery. It's a learning experience. We took our children to shows as soon as they knew how to behave: Don't touch, hands behind your back, ask if you want to see something. We checked with the dealer before taking them into a booth and explained they knew how to behave and if there should be an accident, of course we would pay for any damage. Each child had a collection -small heart charms or tin spice boxes. We showed them the jewelry and named the colors of

This unusual sign advertising paint was made to be shown in a store. It had an easel back so it could be displayed on the counter and a metal chain so it could be hung. the stones, then the name of the stones, and by kindergarten, they were experts. They helped us buy things for the country store by asking the dealer the price of a sign or a box that they liked. Big, colorful signs with old-fashioned pictures were the favorites.

This tin paint sign is 27-inches tall and is unusual because it has a row of wooden color sample blocks at the bottom. The old car and the "quaint" porch picture also had appeal. But although we agreed it would look great at our house, several bidders liked it, so when it sold at $3,186 we were not the buyers. Our children learned that you don't always get what you want at an auction; sometimes the bidding goes past our limit because someone else wants it more. *** Q: What is the resale price for a Fiesta 60th Anniversary pitcher with four matching cups in new condition? A: Fiesta has been made by the Homer Laughlin China Co. since 1936 and has been made in many colors since then. To mark the 60th anniversary in 1996, Fiesta was made with the words "Still Proudly Made by The Homer Laughlin China Co., Genuine Fiesta, 60th

Anniversary, 1936-1996" and the logo of a dancing lady. The Anniversary line includes a pitcher, mugs (cups), tumblers, a cake plate, a clock face plate and other items. The price depends on color and condition. Pitchers sell online for $25-$48, mugs for $3-$10. A set with four mugs could sell for $37 to $88. Higher prices are asked but don't sell. *** CURRENT PRICES Kitchen, kettle, copper, arched swing handle, goose neck spout, crimped seams, domed lid, J. Getz, Lancaster, Pa., c. 1830, 11 inches, $148. Redware, bean pot, sgrafitto flowers, ribbed strap handle, Pennsylvania, 1800s, 5 x 8 inches, $384. Toy, phonograph with horn, fairy tale graphics, key wind, spring motor, Keimola, Germany, 1920s, 7 x 3 inches, $575 Silver bowl, Art Deco, hammered, footed, Reed & Barton, 1929, 5 7/8 x 9 1/2

inches, $855.

***

"Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide" -- the 2021 edition with more than 11,500 prices, 3,000 pictures and many helpful tips -- is available in bookstores and online, or visit www.Kovels.com for a special offer. ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. What Pittsburgh Penguins goaltender set an NHL record for the longest unbeaten streak to begin a career, going 14-0-2 in his first 16 games during the 1996-97 season? 2. Left-handed pitcher Vida

Blue won the AL Cy Young Award and was named AL MVP in 1971 as a member of what team? 3. What 7-foot 7-inch Romanian-born center played with the Washington Bullets (1993-97) and the New Jersey Nets (1998-2000)? 4. What boxer, known as the “Cincinnati Cobra,” amassed a 95-25-1 record in a pro career spanning 1940-59? 5. What three New York Yankees became the first players in MLB history to hit back-to-back-to-back home runs in the postseason when they did it versus the Cleveland Indians in Game 1 of the 1997 AL Division Series? 6. Cornelius “Dutch” Warmerdam held the world record in what athletic sport from 1940-57? 7. In 1975, who became the first African-American golfer to play in Masters tournament? Answers on page 11


April 28, 2021

8 The Julian News

We like to play baseball and softball!

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

for Everyone!

HOME

anship

m sports

Yay! The baseball season has started. Grab your gloves, bats and baseballs and head for the yard, park or field. Let everyone join in playing this great game!

Little Lea

gue

aining

Spring Tr

Read the clues to fill in the crossword puzzle:

1. playing the game with a good attitude toward your team and the opposing team 2. large wall in the stadium that records the points of each team coach 3. when a ball hit by the batter flies too far to the right or the left 4. sphere covered in white leather 5. to hit the ball lightly so that it rolls only a short distance pop fly 6. sunken room the team gathers in during the game 7. the runner steps on the base 8. official in charge of enforcing the rules 9. group that sets rules and guidelines to help young children play organized baseball 10 10. the number of balls and strikes a batter has 11. period when baseball players warm up, shape up 12. the basemen, shortstop, and pitcher stand here 13. each game has 9 of these, teams take turns batting and fielding 14. a hit that goes so far that it leaves the bounds of the park 15. place we visit to watch a game of baseball 16. players here are on guard for big hits 18 Cr Ja acke ck r 17. person who trains the team s Hey! That player just 18. after 3 of these, a batter is out stole something... 19. ball that travels high in the sky when hit third __ __ __ __ . 20. nine players working together

outfield stadium

L O H H

J E R E

N H R D L

I S C O R E E

C I M A E E T

O T N S T H S

A R K N E M A

C E U S I V Z

Who’s Who?

1. New York 2. Chicago 3. Houston 4. Toronto 5. Boston 6. Los Angeles 7. Detroit 8. Atlanta 9. Colorado 10. Minnesota

Match the names of the teams above.

H D P N L N X

K G S W S H G T

I G T A M H E S

A. Braves B. Red Sox C. Yankees D. Blue Jays E. Rockies F. Astros G. Twins H. Tigers I. Angels J. Cubs

K A T N A M

L E E H Z D M E R I P M U T U N I F O R M S

L B A S E B A L L S T A R A I Y M J S G B

C E Y K D R D G J B I H S H C T A C O A J

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11

14

D O P F R B Y T Y O M O A T T V J T

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T K O A T K P I T C H A P A

strike team 12

8

15

17

bullpen

tag

infield

bunt

scoreboard

20

When you play or watch baseball, it’s good to know the words people use. Find and circle these baseball words: bats runs team

A. p __ p c __ r n B. F r__n c h f r__ __s 1

25 26

count

home run

score pitch catch

gloves coach umpire

throw innings helmets

Fill in the missing vowels to see snacks at the ballpark. Then, follow the dots to see a favorite one! O R N F

7

19

baseballs cleats uniforms P T F A T M I B A I

6

9

16

Playing Baseball! W S E V O L G H A U K R G J L E D B S K

umpire 4 5

3

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N W M E A F M

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2 23 22 24

27

28

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29

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C. p __ __ n __ t s

8

D. n __ c h __ s 4

6

5

20

19

30

31

9 10

7

11

13 18 17 16 14 15 35 34 33 32

12

Baseball Banter!

We use sayings and expressions that come from the game of baseball every day. Match the baseball phrases below with what they mean when we use them: A. failed I hope I get hit A. presented something unexpected 1. on the ball 1. hit a home run B. brand new situation out of the ballpark. B. someone who really gets things done 2. a ballpark figure 2. struck out C. go along with others I like to see new C. estimate of how much something will cost 3. out in left field 3. way off base D. one who takes places! D. good, but not the very best 4. bench warmer 4. play ball someone else’s place E. can’t get something done in the right way 5. can’t hit the broad side of a barn 5. step up to the plate E. not even close F. thinks or behaves strangely 6. swing for the fences 6. pinch hitter to being right Me 7. threw a curveball

too!

G. go as far as you can

Alergy Season continued from page 3

bite ointments, sunburn spray and multi-symptom products like Mucinex Sinus-Max to help temporarily relieve sinus and congestion symptoms in one dose. Also be sure to replenish your first aid kit with plenty of bandages and wound care supplies.

For more information, visit Mucinex.com. *** A strong, positive self-image is the best possible preparation for success. — Joyce Brothers ***

Try adding a natural antiinflammatory daily oral supplement. Pycnogenol, an extract from French maritime pine bark, is shown in research to reduce the body’s response to histamines without the side effects typically experienced with allergy medications, such as drowsiness. Studies show that supplementing daily with Pycnogenol can substantially reduce the symptoms associated with seasonal allergies, like burning, itchy, or watering eyes, and stuffy, runny, or itchy nose. “For the many people seeking alternatives to conventional treatment for seasonal allergies, Pycnogenol may represent an effective and completely natural solution, void of any sideeffects,” says Dr. Pescatore.

7. a whole new ball game

Pycnogenol is available in more than 800 products sold in stores and online. To learn more, visit pycnogenol.com. With a tough allergy season ahead, remember these tips to manage your allergy symptoms and enjoy the spring season you deserve.

F. did a great job G. get ready to do the job

Solution page 11

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2021

(Family Features) As seasons change, there's often a great deal of shuffling and movement, including common allergy triggers like trees, pollen, mold spores, dust and dander along with pesky sinus pressure. Combined with changes in barometric pressure and weather patterns bouncing up and down, spring can be one big pain - literally. "This is the time of year when most of us are excited to see the change of seasons, but millions of allergy and sinus sufferers welcome spring with trepidation," Dr. Ian Smith, M.D., said. "Common triggers such as trees, pollen, mold spores, dust and dander can wreak havoc for many. Having a trusted multi-symptom reliever of upper respiratory allergies like Mucinex Sinus-Max is absolutely key in making the season more enjoyable for all suffering from sinus and congestion issues. With a reliable multi-symptom product stashed in your medicine cabinet, and the combination of simple modifications like being mindful of your indoor climate, eating more fruits and veggies, and staying hydrated, can help limit sinus discomfort this season." Take steps this spring to ease the impact of sinus and allergy problems and focus on your overall wellness for a smooth transition with these tips: Control your allergy and sinus triggers. Knowing what flares your allergic reactions can help prevent discomfort. For many people, monitoring pollen counts and limiting time outdoors on high-pollen days can help reduce reactions. You might also avoid hanging laundry outside, as pollen can stick to clothes and sheets as they dry, and ask for help with yardwork to limit your exposure. Find some pressure release. When nasal congestion or sinus pressure build, it can feel like a ton of bricks have landed on your head. However, you can find relief with products designed to help clear up your stuffy nose, relieve headaches and thin and loosen excess mucus. Often, if you're experiencing sinus problems, you're dealing with multiple symptoms. From congestion to headaches and sinus pressure, an over-the-counter medicine like Mucinex Sinus-Max can break up your sinus symptoms with just one dose or your money back. Manage your indoor climate. Even when you start spending more time outdoors, it's important to keep close tabs on the quality of the air inside your home. If you're prone to allergy flareups or sinus infections, manage the humidity level by using a humidifier or dehumidifier. If outdoor allergens are a concern, avoid opening windows and doors, and instead rely on air conditioning on warmer days. Also be sure to change filters regularly and use an air purifier for added protection. Keep fluids flowing. More time outdoors in warmer weather can quickly lead to dehydration, especially if you're working up a sweat. Drink plenty of water to stay well hydrated and keep your body operating in top shape. Staying hydrated can also help keep mucus moving, allowing you to ease through allergy or sinus problems. Update your medicine cabinet. A seasonal change is a good time to take stock of your medical supplies and medications to ensure you have what you need for the months ahead. Discard any expired prescriptions or over the counter medicines and be sure restock common spring and summer essentials like bug

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2021

Baseball Fun

5 Tips to Promote Health During Spring

We love hot dogs and peanuts!


April 28, 2021

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

The Great Gas Tax Ripoff Continues “State needs billions to fix highways despite gas tax,” was just one headline in reaction to a report issued by Caltrans last week. The response from California taxpayers was, “you’ve got to be kidding.” California has the highest gas tax in the nation and yet, if one believes the bureaucrats, it just isn’t enough to fix our roads and highways and $6 billion more is needed annually. But the truth is we have plenty of money to meet the need if the money were spent for its intended purposes. The claim that billions more are needed was revealed in Caltrans’ draft State Highway System Management Plan (SHSMP) for 2021. Luckily, I’m fluent in Bureaucratese and in Taxpayer. Allow me to translate from one to the other: “The SHSMP presents a fiscally constrained allocation of available funding (translation: not enough money) for the maintenance and rehabilitation of the SHS (translation: for road repair). The 2021 SHSMP identifies a $6.1 billion annual shortfall that imposes a constraint requiring transportation objectives to be prioritized (translation: Give us the money or we’ll kill the project in your district).” The gross misspending, waste and diversion of gas tax revenues into projects having nothing to do with roads or highways. In fact, Caltrans admits that as it tries to focus “available funding on core system assets,” it is “simultaneously increasing our investment in bicycle and pedestrian transportation modes to help achieve climate goals and provide more equity in transportation system access.” Where is the “equity” in a regressive gas tax, now the highest in the nation at 62.47 cents per gallon? For average Californians, the ability to drive to work, take kids to school and run errands is not a luxury, but the state’s Legislature priced it like a luxury when it raised gas taxes and vehicle registration fees by passing Senate Bill 1 in 2017. How does California’s gas

by Jon Coupal

tax compare with the states to which Californians are fleeing in droves? Here’s the data from the Tax Foundation: Texas, 20 cents per gallon; Florida, 42.29 cents per gallon; and Nevada, 33.78 cents per gallon. (These three states have no income tax, and their roads are better). Although SB 1 raised taxes with the promise that the money would be used to repair crumbling roads and bridges, about 30 percent of the revenue raised by the tax hike is designated for other transportation priorities, including public transit, bike lanes and walk paths. And the law includes not one reform to address the well-documented waste at the California Department of Transportation. The California State Auditor has repeatedly cited Caltrans for a lack of cost controls, leading to waste, fraud and abuse. And in November, the Reason Foundation Annual Highway Report ranked California’s highways 43rd in the nation in overall cost-effectiveness and condition. It’s infuriating to hear Caltrans moan that it needs more money for road repair when, in a move that incensed both taxpayers and drivers in the Central Valley, Governor Newsom signed an executive order in 2019 that redirected gas tax money to fund railway systems and other nonroad projects. Assemblyman Jim Patterson, R-Fresno, noted that the diverted funds would have increased stretches of Highway 99 from four to six lanes in the Central Valley to alleviate what Caltrans itself called a “bottleneck” along this major freight corridor. When it comes to highway construction and maintenance, California delivers a low level of service at an inflated cost. We can fix this by directing gas tax revenues to projects that do the most good for the state’s driving public and by reducing our transportation bureaucracy. *** Jon Coupal is the president of Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

• Alligators will give manatees the right of way if they swim near each other. • A day on Mars lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes and 35 seconds. You'd assume therefore that there are fewer days in a Martian year than an Earth year, right? Nope -- because Mars orbits the sun more slowly than Earth, a Martian year actually comprises 687 days. • The board game Cranium was the first non-coffee product to be sold at Starbucks. • A Mickey is the smallest detectable movement of a mouse cursor on a screen. The term was coined by computer scientists, who use it when programming mice and other input devices. • And while we're on the subject of "small," the tiniest item ever photographed is the shadow of an atom, captured via a superhigh-resolution microscope by a team at Australia's Griffith University in 2012. •* The Welsh word for jellyfish is "Psygod wibli wobli." • Out of the millions of creatures that inhabit planet Earth, humans are one of just three species capable of laughter, the other two being chimpanzees ... and rats! • "The Galop Infernal," composed for an opera as a soundtrack to a man descending into hell, is better known to most of us as "The Can-Can" song. • Proof that some things never change: the world's oldest known joke is a Sumerian fart joke. • The most expensive pizza in the world will set you back a cool $12,000. Why? Well, it takes 72 hours to make, can only be produced in your home by three Italian chefs, and is topped with three types of caviar, bufala mozzarella, lobster from Norway and Cilento, and pink Australian sea salt! *** Thought for the Day: "Don't worry about failures, worry about the chances you miss when you don't even try." -- Jack Canfield ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** The most important thing is to try and inspire people so that they can be great in whatever they want to do. — Kobe Bryant ***

® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose. — Lyndon B. Johnson ***


April 28, 2021

10 The Julian News

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

CONTRACTORS

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Outside Storage - Trailers, Boats, Cars, RV’s Unit Sizes - 5x10, 10x10, 10x15, 10x20, 10x30

3582 Highway 78 at Newman Way

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Gus Garcia’s

Home and Business Electrical Service  New Meters  New Panels  Fans & Lighting  Additional Circuits  Water Well Electrical

cell (760) 271 0166

email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

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License No. 415453

WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS www.haguewatersandiego.com

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

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• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G •

® Dear EarthTalk: I’ve heard of XPRIZE, which funds innovations in space exploration technology. Is XPRIZE used to address climate change or other environmental problems? -- J.D. via e-mail XPRIZE was launched in 1996 to spur innovation in the commercial aerospace sector. Back then, entrepreneur Peter Diamandis offered $10 million to the first privately financed team that could build and fly a three-passenger vehicle 100 kilometers into space twice within two weeks. That first contest—officially dubbed the Ansari XPRIZE for Suborbital Spaceflight—attracted 26 teams from seven countries. The winner didn’t emerge for another eight years, when Mojave Aerospace Ventures’ SpaceShipOne successfully completed the challenge. All told, the contest led to $100 million in aggregate R&D investment by the teams involved, spurring a new track in private commercial space development.

XPRIZE founder Peter Diamandis has steered several competitions toward solving pressing environmental problems. Credit: XDRIVE Foundation. Given the success of this first contest, Diamandis then leveraged the concept and platform to fund innovation in a wide range of sectors, with the mission being to bring about “radical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity” through incentivized competition. No longer focused on just aerospace, XPRIZE now fosters high-profile competitions to motivate individuals, companies and organizations across all disciplines to develop innovative ideas and technologies that help solve the world’s grand challenges. Subsequent XPRIZE competitions since Ansari have distributed $140 million in prizes. Several of the competitions focus on specific niches within aerospace, but the majority tackle other issues. Multimillion-dollar prizes have gone to teams working on designing superefficient vehicles, accelerating the use of sensing technology to tackle health care problems, and creating a mobile device that can diagnose patients better than or equal to human physicians. Several others have focused on solutions to vexing environmental problems. A $7 million XPRIZE went to a team building better technologies to map the Earth’s seafloor. A $1.75 million prize went to a project harvesting fresh water from thin air to help alleviate fresh water shortages. A $2 million prize went to researchers developing better ways to study ocean acidification, which prevents some shellfish from forming their skeletons and shells. And a $1 million prize funded a technology for cleaning up seawater surface oil resulting from spillage from ocean platforms, tankers and other sources. Another recently launched competition, XPRIZE Rainforest, is offering $10 million for the best autonomous technology that can assess the biodiversity of the tropical rainforest and utilize rapid data integration to unlock the secrets to conservation of this vanishing treasure trove of life. And a $20 million prize is still waiting to be claimed by the team that develops the most impactful breakthrough technology to convert CO2 emissions into usable products. This year will see the launch of the biggest XPRIZE competition to date, with $100 million on the line to those who can develop the most efficient way to help humanity achieve funder Elon Musk’s goal of removing 10 gigatons of CO2 from the atmosphere every year until 2050 to help mitigate climate change and restore the planet’s natural carbon balance. Registration for participating teams opened on Earth Day 2021 (April 2021), with the winner to be announced in 2025. CONTACTS: XPRIZE, xprize.org; Here’s How Elon Musk’s $100 Million Xprize For Carbon Removal Will Work, techcrunch. com/2021/02 /08/heres- how- elon- musks-100 - million-xprizecompetition-for-carbon-removal-will-work/. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https//earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

How to Drive Safely with Pets (StatePoint) Pets are beloved members of many families. In the U.S alone, about 85 million families own a pet. According to the American Pet Products Association, many of us also drive with our furry friends, from quick trips to the veterinarian’s office to longer road trip adventures. A recent national survey by Erie Insurance found that more than half of its respondents plan to take at least one road trip this year and 4% plan on traveling with pets. However, traveling with an animal can be dangerous if appropriate safety measures are not taken. Celebrated in May, this National Pet Month is a good time to brush up on a few safety precautions: Tips for traveling with a dog: 1. Restrain your pet. A proper restraint will protect your dog if an accident should occur. The Center for Pet Safety recommends using a quality crash-tested harness to keep your dog safe. 2. Rein in your pooch. Allowing your dog to stick their head out the window is more dangerous than it seems. It can cause road debris to get into their eyes, nose and mouth and potentially lead to serious injuries. 3. Minimize distractions. Erie Insurance found in its recent national survey that 5% of respondents are distracted by their dog when driving. To avoid disruptions, keep them in the back seat and never allow your dog to sit on your lap. Use a barrier to avoid a dog making its way to the front, and avoid feeding and playing with your dog while driving. Tips for traveling with a cat: 1. Use a proper carrier. Cats become easily stressed when traveling. To keep them safe and comfortable, you’ll want to place them in a sturdy carrier that provides enough room for them to move around. 2. Practice safe exits. Only let your cat out of the carrier when parked. Make sure your cat is wearing a harness and leash before exiting the vehicle. Should your cat get startled and run, a harness and leash will allow you to rein them in, keeping them out of harm’s way. General tips for traveling with pets: 1. Never leave a pet in a hot car. Leaving any kind of pet alone in a vehicle is extremely dangerous. According to the Humane Society of the Unites States, a vehicle’s temperature can quickly exceed 120 degrees in warm weather, leaving your pet at risk of brain damage, heat stroke and suffocation. 2. Be prepared in case of emergency. Should anything go wrong, plan to contact a nearby vet. Healthypet.com allows you to search by ZIP code for American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) accredited clinics. Even when taking appropriate

Want To Go Green? These 3 Energy Choices Have Big Impact (BPT) - This Earth Day, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is celebrating climate action, partnering with companies and organizations that are leading the way to a clean energy future and a healthier planet by investing in energy efficiency with ENERGY STAR and green power with the Green Power Partnership. Companies that partner with EPA through these programs make investments that are good for their bottom line and good for the communities they serve. Earth Day is the ideal time to follow their example and join the celebration by exploring ways you and your family can make a difference. Purchasing renewable energy, choosing ENERGY STAR certified products, or driving an electric vehicle (EV) are three ways you can make smart energy choices that help the environment. Learn more at energystar.gov/earthday. 1. Tap into green power Green power has never been more available with options expanding every day. Wind power provides the largest renewable generation capacity in the United States today, creating enough electricity to offset the energy consumption of 29.5 million average American homes. There is currently enough solar power installed in the U.S. to power over 12 million average American homes. Because green power has become increasingly accessible nationwide, many homeowners can now make the choice to switch to renewable, sustainable energy sources. Interested in tapping into green power for your home? Research local green power options or contact your utility provider directly. Even if

nothing is available, you will have taken an important step in voicing your interest in future options, which supports investment in expansion. 2. Choose energy efficiency The typical household spends nearly $1,900 each year on energy bills. Products that earn the ENERGY STAR label are independently certified to save energy. A home outfitted with these products can save 24% or about $450 on household energy bills. Plus, you will avoid more than 4,100 pounds of carbon pollution. ENERGY STAR certified products include not only kitchen and laundry appliances, water heaters and HVAC systems, but also doors and windows, consumer electronics, ceiling fans and light bulbs. You can search for certified products at energystar.gov/productfinder and purchase many online or at local retail stores. 3. Explore electric cars In the market for a new vehicle? An electric vehicle is Mother Nature approved. Thanks to technological advances,

the number of plug-in EVs on the road in the United States is rapidly increasing - as are charging stations nationwide. Fully electric cars produce no tailpipe emissions, plus for every mile driven, the average cost to drive an EV is typically less than half the cost of driving a standard gasoline vehicle. In addition to saving on fuel, fully electric vehicles also have fewer moving parts, so typically require less maintenance - and no emissions testing. All-electric vehicle driving ranges are increasing, with some models able to drive over 300 miles on a single charge. Depending on your driving needs, you may be able to rely completely on plugging in only at home. And when you do plug in at home, make sure you have an ENERGY STAR certified electric vehicle charger for even more cost savings and environmental benefit. What you do now will impact the wellness of the planet for generations to come. Make your energy choices count this Earth Day and every day.

in our auto policy.” To protect your beloved companions and your vehicle, talk to an insurance agent or visit ErieInsurance.com. May is National Pet Month, be sure you have all the knowhow needed to comfortably and safely take any length car trip with your pet.

*** Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results. — Willie Nelson ***

precautions, accidents still happen. An auto insurance policy can protect you financially and provide peace of mind. Some companies, including Erie Insurance, offer coverage to help with vet treatment costs if your

pet is hurt in a car accident. “We recognize that pets are a valued part of many families,” said Jon Bloom, vice president of personal auto at Erie Insurance. “This is why we believe it’s so important to include pet coverage


April 28, 2021

Ice Cream Made With Love For Mom

(Culinary.net) Few relationships are as special as a bond between a mother and her child. There is often so much laughter, so much love and so many good times spent around food and family over the years. From trying new foods together and cooking lessons at a young age to time-honored family recipes, there are few things better than mom’s cooking. This delicious Very Berry and Creamy Coconut Ice Cream was created with mothers in mind. It’s melt-in-your-mouth delicious, especially when it’s made with fresh ingredients right at home for a perfect addition to Mother’s Day festivities. This ice cream features the rich tartness of frozen fruit and a sweet creaminess from the coconut milk. The two flavors of ice cream create a unique combination that’s out-of-thisworld delicious.

To make the Berry Ice Cream, blend 2 pounds of frozen berries, sweetened condensed milk, honey and salt until smooth then freeze for four hours. To make the Coconut Ice Cream, beat 2 cups of whipping cream in a mixer until stiff peaks form. In a bowl, combine sweetened condensed milk,

coconut milk, salt and 1 cup of the whipped cream. Whisk then add remaining whipped cream and whisk until combined. Place in a dish and freeze for four hours. Once properly chilled, both ice creams are ready to scoop and serve. Garnish with mint leaves for an extra pop of color,

Baseball Fun

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if desired. Enjoy a delightful treat with your mom as you make memories year after year. This time it may be mom’s turn to ask for the recipe. Find more sweet treats for Mother’s Day at Culinary.net. Very Berry and Creamy Coconut Ice Cream Yield: 11 cups Berry Ice Cream: 2 pounds frozen berries (such as raspberries, blueberries, strawberries and blackberries) 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk 1 tablespoon honey 1/2 teaspoon salt Coconut Ice Cream: 2 cups heavy whipping cream 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk 1/2 cup coconut milk continued on page 12

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discard thorny tips. Trim stem Chef’s Corner to about 1/2 inch and peel tough continued from page 6 fibrous end of the stem (although outer skin from remaining stem. the upper part of the stem is very Halve artichoke lengthwise; good) and the fuzzy center, or scoop out and discard fuzzy, redbeard of the flower, called the tipped choke. Put hearts in cold “choke.” This part of the large, water with a little lemon juice and set aside until you’re ready mature artichoke is not edible. There are many tasty and to cook. To Prepare the Recipe: attractive ways to prepare fresh 1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Heat artichokes. Large heads are oil and butter in a large Dutch delicious stuffed and roasted. oven over medium-high heat. Or artichokes can be steamed 2. Sprinkle chicken all over and the leaves removed and with poultry seasoning, salt served for dipping into any sauce and pepper; lay chicken in hot your imagination can dream up. oil, skin-side down. Cook until Once the “choke” is removed, the browned, about 5 minutes. Turn hollowed-out core can be used chicken over. Pour the chicken as a serving dish for salads or broth around the outside edges soups. Small, young artichokes of the chicken. Add the garlic, don’t need to have the fibrous onion, artichokes, lemon and center choke removed, and it can lemon peel. be cooked and eaten whole. 3. Roast chicken in the This recipe for Lemon Chicken oven, uncovered, until cooked With Artichokes and Olives is through, about 1 hour, or when the perfect showcase for fresh the temperature reaches 165 F artichokes and the vibrant flavors on a thermometer placed in the of spring. Just follow my step-bythickest part of the thigh without step instructions for preparing touching the bone. them. 4. Remove the bird from the LEMON CHICKEN WITH oven and let it rest 10 minutes. ARTICHOKES AND OLIVES The thigh meat is forgiving, even 1 large (4 pound) chicken, if overcooked. In fact, it becomes halved, backbone removed more tender when cooked to at 2 tablespoons olive oil least 160 F. Add the olives and 1 tablespoon unsalted butter parsley, and serve immediately. CLNTS 1 WV B/W 127093 22:03 1/15/02 2 tablespoons poultry Serves 4-6. seasoning *** 1 teaspoon salt Angela Shelf Medearis is an award1 teaspoon freshly ground winning children’s author, culinary black pepper historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook 1 cup low-sodium chicken is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic broth Cookbook.” To see how-to videos, 6 whole garlic cloves with recipes and much, much more, Like skins on Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen 1/2 medium yellow onion, Diva! on Facebook. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc., peeled and roughly chopped and Angela Shelf Medearis 5 large artichoke hearts, quartered, 3 1/2 pounds total (See “How to Prep Hearts” below) 2 tablespoons grated lemon peel WHAT A CHILD LEARNS 2 teaspoons lemon juice ABOUT VIOLENCE A CHILD LEARNS FOR LIFE. 1 cup pitted green or black olives Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or 5 flatleaf parsley sprigs visit www.actagainstviolence.org. How to Prep Artichoke Hearts: Snap off thick green outer leaves down to yellowish core. Halve artichokes crosswise;

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa and Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

MOVING\YARD SALE

BUSINESS FOR SALE

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

MOVING SALE - Lots of good stuff, furniture, household, clothing, Antiques. Friday/Saturday - April 23/24 8am to 4pm - NO Early Birds. 4/21

HIGHLY PROFITIBLE - 35 year local Julian Business, Computer driven, lots of room to put your signature on it. Respected in the community, currrent owner needs to sell for health reasons. Contact Julian News for more information - 760 765 2231 or email: letters@juliannews.com tfn

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

PERSONAL SUPPORT

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

(Position assigned to the Special Education program to work with students with all types of special needs)

LOCATION: Julian High School Julian Union High School District San Diego County JOB REQUIREMENTS: Support the instructor in the daily activities; Assist with recess/lunch duty/reinforcement; Travel periodically for Workability; Work with local employers to develop ongoing student employment; Work well with others. EXPERIENCE/EDUCATION: Demonstrated successful ability: •To work with young adolescents; • General academic and behavior needs of students in special instructional programs; • to teach, enforce, advocate, and model appropriate behavior, character traits, and educational values to student; SALARY: Based on a step and column pay scale, based on education and experience and includes an additional stipend for the Workability Grant. Benefits package available. APPLICATION DEADLINE:Until filled HOW TO APPLY: Paraeducator (Instructional Aide) Applications are available on EDJOIN www.edjoin.org 5/5

Film at Horan Imaging 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127093

WORSHIP SERVICES Worship Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 We are and meeting at 9:30 - single service

Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 In

JULIAN HOTEL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES. We are looking to add to our team two positions. 1. Manager/Innkeeper 2. housekeeper/breakfast server. Both positions are starting above minimum wage. To apply or inquire more call 760-315-3179 or visit us at 2032 Main St Julian Ca 92036 5/5

POSITION: Special Education Instructional Aide/Workability Grant Coordinator

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS.

Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the Julian News prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. The Julian News accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall The Julian News Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Julian News is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

EXPERIENCED Auto Repair Mechanic - Apply at Danny’s Truck & Auto, 729 D St Ramona, CA 92065 5/5

HELP WANTED: GENERAL MAINTENANCE WORKER - We are looking for a general maintenance worker. To help out with a variety of work related tasks around Lake Cuyamaca. We are a county special district, So drug testing is a requirement of the position. If you are interested, you can pick up an application at our main bait and tackle shop, or see Ann at the office, or call (760)765-0515 Thanks ButchPaddock, General Manager

$30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

(just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Person Phone: 760-765-0114 Services E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com Sunday MEETINGS Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to

AA Meetings

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

Shelter Valley Community Center

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

1•888•724•7240

Monday - 11am

(Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

information: 760-765-2331

Tuesday - 7pm

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911 www.sandiegoga.org

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Julian Union High School District Office 1656 Hwy 78, Julian, CA 92036 (760) 765-0606 Ext. 103 Online at – Edjoin.org

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

*** A cat improves the garden wall in sun.shine, and the hearth in foul weather. — Judith Merkle Riley ***

Sunday - 5:30pm

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

continued from page 7 1. Patrick Lalime. 2. The Oakland A’s. 3. Gheorghe Muresan. 4. Ezzard Charles. 5. Tim Raines, Derek Jeter and Paul O’Neill. 6. Pole vault. 7. Lee Elder.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. The Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean 2. The Treetops Tattler 3. “Wuthering Heights” 4. Dagobah 5. 2004 6. Four 7. Gin 8. 1967 9. Flax 10. Epidemiology ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DOL


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Volume 36 - Issue 39

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to April 1, 2016; 2016; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00013586-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2021-00014882-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: AZAR KHAZAIAN FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS TO: REBECCA ANN VIRELLES

PETITIONER:

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 18, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 29, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MAY 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON April 6, 2021.

AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

LEGAL: 08723 Publish: April 7, 14, 21, 28, 2021

AZAR KHAZAIAN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: AZAR KHAZAIAN TO: AZAR KHAZIAN

Case Number: 37-2021-00006255-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ROBERT WAYNE SANDERS GOOD FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MIGUEL ANTONIO CAMPOS FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: ROBERT WAYNE SANDERS GOOD HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ROBERT WAYNE SANDERS GOOD TO: ROBERT WAYNE STRIFE

PETITIONER: MIGUEL ANTONIO CAMPOS HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MIGUEL ANTONIO CAMPOS TO: MICHAEL ANTHONY CAMPOS

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MAY 19, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON April 2, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 18, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON April 12, 2021.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00014587-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: KELLY ANN SPRATT FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: KELLY ANN SPRATT HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: KELLY ANN SPRATT TO: KELLY ANN STEVENS IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MAY 19, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON April 5, 2021. LEGAL: 08727 Publish: April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 2021

a problem could have a good chance of succeeding if it's based on a solid foundation of fact to strengthen its potential for standing up to scrutiny. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A favorable report should give your optimism an important boost as you confront another phase of a challenge. Don't be timid about accepting advice from someone you trust. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You might want to target another goal if your current aim is continually being deflected. But stay with it until you find that first sign of an opening, and then follow through. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Although offers of advice might not always please the usually surefooted Goat, good counsel is always worth considering, especially from those whose experience can be invaluable. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Don't rush to make up for lost time. Your productivity can be measured not only by what you do, but how you do it. Move carefully until the job is done the way you like it. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Emerging facts about someone you know might cause you to rethink your relationship. But remember to make judgments in context of a full situation, not just on scraps of data. BORN THIS WEEK: You are known both for your love of acquiring beautiful things as well as for your generosity to others.

© 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

LEGAL: 08728 Publish: April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 2021

Case Number: 37-2021-00010570-CU-PT-CTL

LEGAL: 08726 Publish: April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 2021

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Whether a waiting period is taking longer than expected, or just seems that way, the anxious Lamb would do well to create a center of calm within her- or himself, and not do anything rash. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Practical matters dominate the week, but cultural activities also are favored, especially those that can be shared with someone special in the Bovine's life. Some important news might be forthcoming. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You need to know more about a possible career move in order to see if it offers a real opportunity or just a change. You're sure to get lots of advice -- some of it good -- but the decision must be yours. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The arrival of hoped-for good news about a loved one dominates most of the week and provides a great excuse for the party-loving Moon Child to plan a special event to celebrate. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Leos and Leonas rushing to finalize their plans might want to think about slowing down the pace, or risk overlooking an important consideration that could become a sore point down the line. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) The week's challenges call for logical approaches. But sentiment also has its place. Sharing memories with a special someone, for example, strengthens the bond between you. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A brand-new approach to

LEGAL: 08730 Publish: April 21, 28, and May 5, 12, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-900679 UNDRAWN LINE 1233 Tourmaline, San Diego, CA 92109 The business is conducted by An Individual Jonathan W. Garrison, 1233 Tourmaline, San Diego, CA 92109. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 10, 2021. LEGAL: 08734 Publish: April 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9007360 ALL DAT LUMPIA 7383 Broadway #213, Lemon Grove, CA 91945 The business is conducted by An Individual Ashanté René Coleman, 7383 Broadway #213, Lemon Grove, CA 91945. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 16, 2021. LEGAL: 08735 Publish: April 28 and May 5, 12, 19, 2021

Wednesday - April 28, 2021

10 Facts About Women In The Military

(StatePoint) American women have been making military history for centuries. Their service to the United States stretches back to the country’s very beginning, when many cared for wounded Revolutionary War soldiers. Since then, women have blazed countless trails within the military – from the first to enlist during World War I to those filling combat roles today.

Photo by 2nd Lt. Margaret Burneske Here are 10 facts about the many contributions women have made to the U.S. military. 1. Although not officially enlisted at first, women have served in the U.S. Army since 1775. In the 18th century, women tended to the wounded, washed and mended clothing, and cooked for male troops. 2. After the Civil War, Dr. Mary E. Walker was awarded the Medal of Honor for her work as a contract surgeon in the Union Army. 3. In 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt established the Navy Nurse Corps. The first 20 women of the Corps were known as “The Sacred Twenty.” 4. Women were officially allowed to join the U.S. military during last two years of World War I, and 33,000 of them signed up to work as nurses and in other support roles. More than 400 nurses died serving America during the Great War. 5. During WWII, hundreds of women participated in the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program. These pioneer female pilots helped test and ferry military aircraft around the country and were led by Jacqueline Cochran, the first woman to break the sound barrier. 6. Navy Rear Adm. Grace Hopper was one of the first and most influential computer programmers. Hopper played an important role in the development of the COBOL programming language and helped shape how programmers code today. 7. Women were allowed to begin attending the four service academies in 1976. Four years later, the first 54 female students graduated from these academies. 8. In 1998, Cmdr. Maureen A. Farren became the first woman to lead a combatant ship, the USS Mount Vernon. 9. Adm. Michelle Howard (Ret.) made history in 2014 when she became the first four-star woman in Navy history. Howard served as commander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe before retiring in 2017. 10. In 2016, Capt. Kristen Griest became the first female Army infantry officer in the nation’s history. A year earlier, Griest and Lt. Shaye Haver were also the first women to graduate from the Army’s famed Ranger School. Visit USO.org/Stories to learn more about the legacy of women in the United States military. Women have joined every military branch, held ranks from enlisted personnel to four-star general, and performed critical jobs from nursing to cybersecurity. Their service and their sacrifice have left an indelible mark on the country’s military history. ***** The USO is a not-for-profit organization and not part of the Department of Defense (DoD). The appearance of DoD visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

RECYCLING JUNK MAIL IS GOOD, STOPPING JUNK MAIL IS BETTER Learn how to unsubscribe from catalogs, credit card offers, phone books and coupons Recycling and Household Hazardous Waste Hotline and Redesigned Database

1-877-R-1-EARTH WasteFreeSD.org LEGAL

NOTICES

THE JULIAN UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT GOVERNING BOARD VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

The Julian Union High School District is seeking applications from interested residents within the school district’s boundaries to serve as an appointed member of the Governing Board. A vacancy occurred due to the resignation of Board Member Meredith Brooks, effective March 23, 2021. Interviews will be conducted at the regular Board meeting on May 20, 2021, and the appointment will be made immediately following the interviews. The successful candidate will be sworn into office Regular Board Meeting on May 20, 2021, and will serve for a term, ending in December 2024. If you are interested in being considered for appointment to this vacancy, you can obtain an application from the District office or the District website at www.juhsd.org. If you would like more information, please contact Melissa Krogh in the District office at 760-765-0606 ext.108 or email mkrogh@juhsd.org . Please submit your application to: Secretary of the Board/Superintendent Julian Union High School District 1656 Hwy. 78 / PO Box 417 Julian, CA 92036 Fax: 760-765-2926

Applications must be received in the Superintendent’s Office not later than 3:30 p.m. on May 14, 2020. Publish: April 21, 28, and May, 5, 12, 2020 Legal: 08732

Infant Immunizations Dropped During COVID-19 Pandemic

continued from page 5 States thanks to vaccinations. However, these diseases continue to sicken people around the world, and cases of diseases like mumps, measles and pertussis, also called whooping cough, can and do happen in San Diego County. Seasonal influenza is more common and requires a new vaccine each year and is recommended for all children 6 months and older. According to the CDC, when children get vaccinated, an estimated 381 million illnesses, 24.5 million hospitalizations, and 855,000 deaths are prevented. “Vaccinations and doctor visits are essential to keep children healthy,” Wooten said. In addition to infant immunizations, children need the following: Ice Cream Made Children 4 to 6 years of age are due for boosters of With Love For Mom DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and continued from page 11 pertussis), chickenpox, MMR 1/2 teaspoon salt (measles, mumps and rubella) mint leaves, for garnish and polio (optional) Preteens and teens need a To make berry ice cream: In Tdap booster shot to protect blender, pulse frozen berries, against tetanus, diphtheria and sweetened condensed milk, whooping cough honey and salt until smooth, Parents can obtain the scraping down sides. vaccines for their children Pour mixture into 5-by-9-inch through their regular medical loaf pan. Freeze uncovered 4 provider. People with no medical hours, or until set. insurance can get vaccinated at To make coconut ice cream: In a County Public Health Center at large mixing bowl, beat whipping no cost. Local retail pharmacies cream until stiff peaks form. also offer some vaccinations for In medium bowl, whisk a fee. sweetened condensed milk, For more information about coconut milk, salt and 1 cup vaccines, National Infant whipped cream until combined. Immunization Week, or back-to- Add remaining whipped cream school vaccine requirements, visit and whisk until combined. the Health and Human Services Pour into 5-by-9-inch loaf pan. Agency Immunization Unit Freeze uncovered 4 hours, or website at www.sandiegocounty. until set. gov/iz or call (866) 358-2966. To Scoop desired amount of each find the nearest County Public ice cream into bowls to serve. Health Center or community Garnish with mint leaves, if clinic, call 2-1-1. desired.

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - April 28, 2021 (36-39)  

Wednesday - April 28, 2021 (36-39)  

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