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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

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ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

(92¢ + tax included)

For the Community, by the Community.

Back Country Covid-19 Vaccines Delivered

Wednesday

Positive Tests as of April 3*

State Statistics

Statewide COVID-19 Data as of Sunday (April 4) • California has 3,580,351 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. • There were 2,400 newly recorded confirmed cases Saturday. • The 7-day positivity rate is 1.7%. • There have been 55,087,131 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 191,684 during the prior 24-hour reporting period. There have been 58,513 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic. As of April 4, providers have reported administering a total of 19,717,651 vaccine doses statewide. The CDC reports that 24,530,300 doses have been delivered to entities within the state. Numbers do not represent true day-to-day change as reporting may be delayed. For more vaccination data, visit the COVID-19 Vaccine Data Dashboard.ered to entities within the state. Numbers do not represent true day-to-day change as reporting may be delayed. For more vaccination data, visit the COVID-19 Vaccine Data Dashboard. With supply of vaccines expected to significantly increase in the coming weeks, the state is expanding vaccine eligibility to more Californians. Starting April 1, individuals aged 50+ will be eligible to make an appointment, and individuals 16+ will be eligible to make an appointment to be vaccinated starting on April 15. To sign up for a notification when you’re eligible for a vaccine, please visit myturn. ca.gov. For more information on the vaccine effort, visit Vaccinate All 58. CDPH modified Blueprint thresholds on March 12 after the state successfully met its first vaccine equity milestone of 2 million administered vaccine doses in some of the state’s hardest hit communities. Blue (as of March 23) 8 counties in the Purple (widespread) Tier, San Diego is currently one of 39 counties in the Red (substantial) Tier, 9 in Orange (moderate) Tier, 2 counties in Yellow (minimal) Tier 1.

www.visitjulian.com

ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Cross Country More Than Just Road Work

Coach Paul Cruz and Assistant Coach Ryan Lay 20-21 Julian High School Cross Country season... and then some. Before we begin we would like to give a special thanks to the parents of the team who had a direct hand in making this season possible and to the members of our community, school, and school board who pushed to keep sports open this year. Without your support and faith in us, this team wouldn’t have been possible this year. From robbing students of an intimate learning experience to athletes of their chance to smash records, the pandemic hit the Julian High School hard. However, even as COVID-19 halted school sports and scrapped socialization, Julian’s Cross Country Team would not let it steal another season. Temporarily reorganizing as an AAU Club Team in September, we found a way to safely convene and run as a team, taking advantage of the delayed racing season by training early. The results speak for themselves as we ended up placing 3rd out of

Julian, CA.

Volume 36 — Issue 36

Julian 92036 - 929 Ranchita 92066 - 75 Santa Ysabel 92070 - 324 Warner Springs 92086 - 231

(weeks new positives) Julian = 109 (+1) ** Ramona = 2,448 (+26) ** Mt. Laguna = 2 Ranchita = 13 (+0) ** Warner Springs = 56 (+2)** Santa Ysabel = 63 (+1)** Borrego Springs = 124 (+2) ** Descanso = 77 (+1) ** Alpine = 1,086 (+29) ** Poway = 2,323 (+34) Lakeside = 1629 (+17) ** Total Confirmed cases in Unincorporated San Diego County = 37,840 a total rise of 335. If you believe you have symptoms please get tested. Most testing locations do not require an appointment. To find information on a testing location near you or call 2-11 (toll free) or on the web 211sandiego.org.

April 7, 2021

12 teams in the competitive San Diego Frontier League this year-off from 2nd place by only 1 point. Our team’s continued excellence this year in our new league truly rounds off our decisive history in the Citrus League where we’ve won 9 of the last 10 titles. In a typical season, the cross country team runs 10-12 races from September to November. This year, our team still managed to run 4 races while the season was postponed from January to March. That gave us an extra 4 months worth to train. Even though cross country training implies just running, we know that cross-training is an essential ingredient for keeping things fresh so we found time for hiking, slacklining, mountain biking, and even cliff jumping! However, it wasn’t just the schedule that changed this year in the name of safety. Each race was only permitted to field 2 teams at any single time. That means it’s just one team racing against another. Spectators were conditionally allowed into designated zones as an extra

precaution. Julian’s Boy’s Team was represented by Corey Lay, Mac Morretti, Phoenix Cruz, Tyler Parker, Wesley Gratzer, and Zen Hill in a field of over 90 other racers. Phoenix Cruz, lead boy’s runner, placed 9th in the league; Corey Lay, the most-prepared, at 15th; Wesley Gratzer, the most improved, at 16th; Mac Morretti, the fastest freshman of the year; Tyler Parker, the resident engineenthusiast; and Zen Hill, the high-jumping track star, rounded out this band of boys. On the Girl’s Team we have Elizabeth Denny, Jessica Bakken, Noelani Vatthauer, and Acacia Reyes in a field of over 60 other racers. Jessica Bakken, our top girl’s runner, placed 3rd in the league; Elizabeth Denny, the musicconnoisseur, at 10th; Noelani Vatthauer, the most perseverant; and Acacia Reyes, the latecomer, sums up the gaggle of girls. Unfortunately, even though we had some of the fastest girls continued on page 5

Chamber Looking For Earth Day Volunteers

Julian Chamber of Commerce to Participate in the 19th Annual Creek To Bay Clean up in honor of Earth Day. This year’s clean up event is hosted virtually by I Love a Clean San Diego. What that means is; we as a community sign up with the I Love a Clean San Diego website as part of our group “Julian Chamber of Commerce.” Register Here: cleansd.org/event/creek-to-bay-cleanup/ Here are the plans for our Julian Group: · Meet at Nickel Beer at 8:45am · We’ll give direction on where we would like to see our group move through town (including side streets). · Buckets, Gloves, trash grabbers will be available on a limited basis (please be sure to register so we know to expect you) . Bringing your own gloves would be a great help! · Volunteers will proceed toward town filling their buckets with roadside and sidewalk trash. · Volunteers will end at the parking lot behind Town Hall, where their trash will be collected and accounted for, so that we can help I Love a Clean San Diego meet their goal of 30,000 pounds of trash collected, countywide. · Afterward, volunteers are welcome to come back to Nickel Beer company, where they will be treated to a “thank you beer” and a light lunch. We ask that you register with our group so that we can work to get supplies and lunch. If you are able to bring your own work gloves, that would be awesome.

Easter Bunny Spends Saturday At The Womens Club

Thank you to all of our members and supporters! Recently the Friends Board voted to accept our librarian's proposal to upgrade and refresh the Children's Area with new furniture and manipulatives. Josh Mitchell will be working with Facilities staff to order new items and possibly rework the set up. The library is about 17 years old! Jonna Waite presented a $5,000 check to Josh Mitchell on March 24, 2021. This follows a previous $6,000 check to enhance the purchase of books through SDCL's Matching Funds program. The letter and certificate from Supervisor Joel Anderson recognizes our contribution. It is thanks to our members who make this possible. The Friends mission is to support and enhance the Julian Branch Library, and we are making great progress this year. The Board has remained active despite the pandemic. The Community Room will be in the next fiscal year as the

Board of Supervisors needs to vote to supplement with an additional $3 million. It may be two years before we see a finished Community Room. The bequest from Jan Cornell Mattias is being held for future expenses related to the building of the room, including the desire for a concert grand piano. For the past two years, the Board has discussed a fitting tribute to Jan Cornell Mattias and a recent proposal is to rename the Bookstore for her. This was agreed upon and the County library approved our request. A new sign is being commissioned for over the Bookstore doors or above on the wall. Another activity is seeking submissions of photographs of Julian's seasons for permanent display in the Bookstore. Members of Julian Arts Guild have responded with interest. New art on the walls is something to anticipate. Thank you to all who continue to make book donations. Our

Books on the Go! carts have kept us active while the Bookstore has remained closed. Once County Public Health and the Head Librarian deem it safe, the Bookstore will reopen. Take time to thank the following for allowing a book cart at each establishment: Calico Cidery, California Wolf Center, Regulars Wanted, Julian Pathways, Inc., and Town Hall. The Board of Supervisors recently gave whole-hearted support to Little Free Libraries. Some of our overflow donations have been shared to supplement library boxes in Descanso and Pine Valley, and beyond. Mary Bowman, library technician,"book bombs" by filling free library boxes with books. Our books live on! (littlefreelibraries.org) Thank you to the FOJL Board for their volunteer service: Brian Kramer, Kristi Holt, Carol Pike, Dana Pettersen, Jeff Holt, Eileen Lightbody, Arlene Smith, and Brenda Campbell. We hope to see everyone soon at the library!

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The Miss Julian’s and the Easter Bunny all visited the Women’s Club, Saturday to pose for pictures, do some art and play some games. SRAEY

Wildflower Show April 30 @ 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Julian Woman’s Club 2607 C Street, Julian


2 The Julian News

April 7, 2021

HOME SERVICES

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Congratulations to Scott C. for being the $50 Winner for April.

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WHAT A CHILD LEARNS ABOUT VIOLENCE A CHILD LEARNS FOR LIFE. Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or visit www.actagainstviolence.org.

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The Julian Daffodils would like to thank the army of volunteers that helped pull the Daffodil Show together this year!! We had wonderful prizes donated. We would like to thank: Mom‘s pie Kathy’s Dress Shop The Julian Grill Mountain Gypsy Julian Beer company Julian Tea and cottage arts Julian Pie Co. Oakwood Creek Orchard Hill Country Inn Hillside Comm. Church Nickle Beer Co. Alex and friends Julian Cafe Soups And Such Wynola Pizza Thank You All Please don’t weed whack us till the end of June..... Then we’ll see you all next year! The Julian Daffodils From the Editor: We have a correction. In the March 31st issue, page 8 we published an article sent to us from Greg Courson. Greg has since found a typo and wishes to correct it. In his article, he mentioned a book by Richard Hofstadter entitled Anti-Intellecturlism in American Life. The title should have read Anti-Intellectualism in American Life.

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

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Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

(NAPSI)—Spring isn’t just when we spring forward in time, it is also the time when we spring into action to clean those places that likely haven’t been cleaned at all: your heating and cooling air ducts. That can be a problem because that’s where dirt, germs, mold, mildew, pet dander and other allergens like to lurk. A six-room house can generate as much as 40 pounds of dirt, chemicals and pollutants in a typical year—which this wasn’t for many families. The contaminants make the heating and cooling system work harder, use more energy and wear out faster. That can get expensive. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, 25 to 40 percent of the energy used for heating or cooling a home is wasted. Fortunately, there’s an easy answer. Get the air ducts cleaned by a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA). They possess general liability insurance, are trained and tested, agree to a code of ethics, and clean and restore your heating and cooling system following NADCA standards, so they provide results with a high level of safety and security. Learn More For more information, visit www.BreathingClean.com. You can also find a nearby NADCA member at http://nadca.com/en/prosearch/all and enter your zip code.

*** We may not all break the Ten Commandments, but we are certainly all capable of it. Within us lurks the breaker of all laws, ready to spring out at the first real opportunity. — Isadora Duncan ***

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2021 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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760 765 2231 submissions@juliannews.com The Julian News @JulianNews Information may be placed in our drop box located outside the office front door. The phone will accept succinct messages 24 hours a day. Member National Newspaper Association

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April 7, 2021

Julian High School Senior Spotlight

Each week leading up to graduation the Julian News is shinning a spotlight on the graduation senior class at Julian High School. In part because with the pandemic protocols students have not had the opportunities to show their talents as they might during a normal year, with all activities being curtailed.

Corey Lay

The Julian News 3

Health and Personal Services

1. Where did you go to elementary school?

James K. Polk Elementary and Julian Elementary.

2. What do you think you are going to miss most when you get out of high school?

I’m certainly going to miss having a daily place to have fun with friends.

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

3. What are your plans after high school? College/trade school/job?

4. Career plans?

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today !

I plan on attending college at UCSD

ENothing specific yet

My freshman year cross country pie run, where Coach decided to throw up on me afterwards.

Enjoy high school while you can.

You should invest in Gamestop at the start of 2021

Waking up in time for school.

The creation of the Music club. It was essentially my first opportunity to properly learn music.

Afterschool Sports and Clubs

That’s a really hard question for me, as I feel several teachers have made profound impacts on my life. Mr. Munson has opened my eyes up to critical thinking and the joys of history, Mr. Martineau has introduced me to the world of agriculture and its various paths, and Mr. Fox has taught me music and the applications of science and maths.

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5. Favorite memory?

Julian Medical Clinic

6. What words of advice would you give the class of 2022?

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7. If you could give your past self any advice what would it be?

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8. What has been the most challenging part of high school?

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9. What has been the highlight of your senior year?

11. What teacher do you feel has impacted your life the most?

January 7, 1935 – March 21, 2021

How To Combat Social Isolation in Americans over the age of 50. Despite the physical implications of a global pandemic, research shows the mental health stakes are high, too. A nationwide survey, commissioned by Barclays, found that half of Americans over the age of 50 said the isolation from their friends and family has been more challenging than

(Closed 12-1 for lunch)

Dallas Monroe “Monte” Green

Forgetting to do things/Purposely not doing things (Procrastination).

(Family Features) Even before COVID-19 limited social contact with friends, family and colleagues, many adults experienced loneliness and depression due to limited contact with others. Now, a year after the pandemic forced many people into even greater levels of isolation, the issue of social isolation is especially prevalent

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12. What’s a bad habit you have?

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concerns over health risks they may face. Social isolation has provided plenty of time for Americans to reflect on their priorities. The majority of Americans surveyed (90%) have re-evaluated their post age-50 goals and put spending more time with family at the top of their lists. In fact, the most common first thing

50-plus Americans will do once COVID-19 is over is to see and spend time with their families (41%). "While restrictions are beginning to ease, many older adults are still isolated from friends and family, and that takes a toll on their mental well-being" said Lisa Marsh Ryerson, president of the AARP Foundation. "We must do all we can to help older adults, who have suffered greatly during COVID-19, strengthen the social connections that are so essential to their ability to lead longer, healthier lives." For example, AARP Foundation's Connect2Affect platform equips older adults with the tools they need to stay physically and mentally healthy and connected to their communities. The AARP Essential Rewards Mastercard from Barclays is helping fund the foundation's work to increase social connection with donations based on new accounts and eligible purchases, up to $1 million annually. A little creativity and a commitment to filling time productively can help reduce the strain of being alone until it's safer to resume social activities. Use technology to connect with loved ones. Video chats and traditional phone calls can help you feel connected even when you can't be together in person. While a drop-in call can be fun, consider arranging regular visits with kids and grandkids. If you continued on page 5

Dallas Monroe “Monte” Green passed away on March 21, 2021 at age 86 from complications from a fall. Monte was born in Vista, CA on January 7, 1935 to parents, Ward and Edna Green. Growing up, Monte was active in athletics at Vista High (class of ’53) and played baseball at Palomar Junior College. There he met Roberta “Bobbi” Hatheway, married in 1955, and had three children. Monte received his degree in Entomology in 1957 from Cal Poly Pomona. Following graduation, Monte went to work for the LA County Agricultural Department. Later, he joined Ciba-Geigy, a Swiss agricultural chemical firm (now Syngenta), and was promoted to a role that took the family to Kailua, Hawaii where they spent four years. It was during this time when Monte developed many friendships and an affection for the islands that lasted for the rest of his life. A promotion to regional manager of the western United States for Ciba-Geigy brought a return to the mainland. In 1978, Monte and the family relocated to Bobbi’s family ranch, Oak Ridge Stock Farm, in Julian, CA so that he could pursue the development of a multilocation agricultural supply firm, as partner and general manager. Monte maintained other business activities at this time including sitting on the Board of Directors for North County Bank (later acquired by Wells Fargo) and supporting operations associated with the family businesses, including the ranch, in partnership with his wife Bobbi. Monte and Bobbi enjoyed a long and happy marriage of over 57 years. Together they raised their children and led very active roles in their grandchildrens’ lives. In retirement, they enjoyed traveling near and far, and cherished their time in Kauai, where they went with family and friends until Bobbi’s passing in 2013. In 2014, Monte became reacquainted with a former colleague from his time working at LA County, Marilyn Lewis. Monte and Marilyn later married and spent a happy 6 years together, splitting their time between her home in Eagle Rock and the ranch in Julian. The two enjoyed traveling the US and Europe, attending church services, eating at his favorite Mexican restaurants, and visiting with their extended families. Monte will be remembered for many things, including his love of Hawaiian shirts, obsession with Tabasco sauce, incredible nicknaming ability, and deep knowledge of local and national sports. Most of all, those who knew him will miss the way he told stories, a man with exceptional charisma and an ability to delight, even until the very end. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn Green; daughters Tracy Lewis and spouse Steve of Tempe, AZ; Carolyn Allured and spouse Jim of Gardnerville, NV; and son, Dallas H. Green and spouse Heidi of Pasco, WA. He is also survived by his granddaughters, Shannon Lewis; Katherine Roberts and spouse Chris; and Laura Barnard; in addition to two great-grandsons Jacob Krone and William Roberts. A private family service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Julian Future Farmers of America, PO Box 417, Julian, CA 92036.

National Library Week: April 4-10, 2021 From the American Library Association: “The theme for National Library Week (April 4-10, 2021), ‘Welcome to Your Library,’ promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building – and that everyone is welcome to use their services. During the pandemic libraries have been going above and beyond to adapt to our changing world by expanding their resources and continuing to meet the needs of their users. Whether people visit in person or virtually, libraries offer opportunities for everyone to explore new worlds and become their best selves through access to technology, multimedia content, and educational programs.” “Let National Library Week be a time for the appraisal of community needs for library services and of the means for meeting them, for encouraging the development of a better-read, better-informed citizenry, and for rededication to that fine public service that has always been characteristic of the libraries of America.”


4 The Julian News

Julian

ACTIVITIES & LODGING JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations Look for our return on the fourth to the Witch Creek Wednesday of the month School House The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

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Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

and

Back Country Happenings Easter Celebrations

We all celebrate holidays differently, for instance we all celebrate Easter in our own ways. Since the pandemic, we have all had to change our ways of celebrating. Now I am not sure if you all do this, but when the pandemic began, we took to one close circle of friends. When the pandemic got rougher, we spent more and more time with these people. This year a couple from our friend circle invited us to an Easter BBQ, that they were hosting! The BBQ Started at 1:00, then at 3:30 everyone was going to drive down to the Oasis Camel Dairy. That is right folks we were going to visit camels! Because of the pandemic the Oasis Camel Dairy is only hosting private tours. Our tour was booked from 4:00 till 5:00! We had the entire place to ourselves for a whole hour! After the BBQ we all drove down to the Oasis Camel Dairy. When we got there, we waited until the people before us were gone. To pass the time we looked at the male turkeys and, a strange, but beautiful bird! When the owner of the Oasis Camel Dairy came out to greet us, we were ecstatic! We could not wait to start the tour! The first thing we did was get a closer look at the turkeys, they also had chickens! I could not believe what I was hearing when the owner said that one of the chickens was 15 years old. Next, we went and visited the parrots. Yes! Just in case you were wondering they talked and even, sang! The female parrot is named Raja, and the male is named Rio. Here is a fun fact for you. Did you know that young Rio can live to be a Hundred

years old? Then we went and fed the sheep. The sheep were easy to feed, but there were a lot of them! The sheep babies were super shy, and it was hard to pet them. After that We went to pet the camels. They all had genuinely nice names! Then we walked some more and visited the baby camels! They were SO CUTE! After seeing Them we walked over to a shaded area with lots of white benches. From that spot you could see all the camels in their pastures. What a sight to see! To get the camels to come over, we had to ring a very loud bell. It was awesome to see the camels come walking up the hill, while others ran. Who knew

Auto Services

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CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 2nd Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 619.504.6301 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist

Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

April

Sunday, April 4 - Saturday, April 10: National Library Week, ‘Welcome to Your Library’ Wednesday, April 14 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, April 15 Tax Day Tuesday, April 20 - Friday, April 23 Lake Cuyamaca CLOSED to Fishing. Wednesday, April 28 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Friday, April 30 - Saturday, May 1 Julian Women’s Club Annual Wild Flower Show 10-4 daily Julian Women’s Clubhouse 2607 C Street

May

Wednesday, May 5 Cinco de Mayo Sunday, May 9 Mother’s Day

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we got to feed them cut up apples on sticks to them. Our tour guide pointed out one of the female camels that is pregnant! Then he told us all about Mother camels, and their babies. After that we went to see his wife’s Coy fish. I guess you can say that they had their own pond. Their pond was a large Container that was meant for horses to drink from. What a smart way to reuse it! Then He went on to say that his wife had won them at a fair when they were still babies. Since then, they had grown exceptionally large, and had children of their own. I think that there were about twenty to thirty fish in the little pond. continued on page 8

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• On April 5, 1614, Pocahontas, daughter of the chief of the Powhatan Indian confederacy, marries English tobacco planter John Rolfe in Jamestown, Virginia. The marriage ensured peace between the settlers and the Powhatan Indians for several years. • On April 9, 1865, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 troops to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. The two generals met in the parlor of the Wilmer McLean home at 1 p.m. Grant arrived in his muddy field uniform, while Lee turned out in full dress attire, complete with sash and sword. • On April 10, 1906, O. Henry's second short story collection, "The Four Million," is published. It includes one of his most beloved stories, "The Gift of the Magi," about a poor but devoted couple who each sacrifice their most valuable possession to buy a gift for the other. • On April 6, 1968, Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" debuts in theaters. The film went on to win an Oscar for Best Visual Effects. Today it is regarded as one of the defining films of the 20th century. • On April 7, 1970, legendary actor John Wayne wins his first -- and only -- acting Academy Award, for "True Grit." Wayne played a drunken, foul-tempered but endearing U.S. marshal named Rooster Cogburn. • On April 11, 1988, actress and singer Cher collects the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in "Moonstruck" (1988). Cherilyn Sarkasian first became famous as the taller, female half of the 1960s singing duo Sonny and Cher. • On April 8, 1990, "Who killed Laura Palmer?" was the question on everyone's mind when David Lynch's surreal TV drama "Twin Peaks" premiered on ABC. The body of the blonde homecoming queen was found washed up on shore wrapped in plastic in the show's opening episode.

by Aryana Relaford

watching camels run could be so funny! When the camels arrived,

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April 7, 2021

My Thoughts

EAST OF PINE HILLS

Moving

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

A Time To Sort, A Time To ...

The photo is of me, Ambassador David Funderburk (on right) and head of the National Museum of Art at an exhibit opening in Romania. Our COVID induced retreat from the world is lurching toward an end and it is time to take stock of the past year. It was a year in which there was time to do all those things around the place that had been relegated to the Some Day category: Reorder cupboards, clean in the corners, sort through possessions, label and weed, pull real weeds and garden, paint, write, iron the tablecloths… So what REALLY got done? The cupboards initiative didn’t quite make it around the kitchen. The corners got dusty AGAIN and, really, once should have been enough. No painting, not enough writing…. We did cook. At first we cooked food from India, then moved on to a Southern American cookbook, then we went too near the bathroom scales. So much for that initiative. We zoomed, wrote e-mails, had illicit meetings over dinners at home with others who were similarly minded. At our age any illicit meeting is cause for rejoicing; you take your thrills wherever you can. We read. Mostly on India. Lots. And lots. And forgot most of it but it felt uplifting. Perhaps the major accomplishment was putting photos in albums. More recently photos are on the computer or on discs that no one will ever see because discs are now outdated and the ones on the computer or in the ethernet will also probably disappear, but these photos, a few going back nearly a century but most from twenty, thirty and forty years ago, have been sorted, labelled and pasted. Every time we ‘finished’ we’d open another drawer and find…more photos. We started out arranging them by subject but that initiative soon deteriorated into arranging by size. Then it just deteriorated. A life lived in several countries with many official functions as well as the snapshots one always takes combined with a packrat mentality meant… never mind. The most official type photos were from Communist Romania. Go figure. Many were evocative, reminding us of former friends and events. Many were simply puzzling… who was THAT? Could that slim, handsome guy be... Cousin Bob? And, always, “Why in heck did we take THAT one?” Now, barring another unseen drawer or two, we are almost done. One more album to order from Amazon. Maybe thirty more photos to arrange and label. Years of memories. Memories are good things.

Combat Social Isolation continued from page 3

schedule calls throughout the week, you'll have something regular to look forward to and can benefit from a check-in that affirms everyone is healthy and safe. Make time for physical activity. Staying closer to home may mean you're not getting the exercise you once did, but it's important for your health to stay active. Regularly using your muscles helps keep your body strong, and even light physical activity a few times each week can help keep your cardiovascular system fit for better heart health. Regular exercise can also provide a range of positive mental health outcomes, including reduced stress, anxiety and depression, and improved memory. Volunteer in your community or consider virtual volunteering. Helping others is a way to release feel-good endorphins for yourself. While your limited social calendar may afford you some extra time, inquire with local nonprofits about how you can contribute to their causes. Especially as funding for charitable organizations has dropped, volunteers are

still essential to most nonprofit organizations, whether the help comes in person or virtually. Even from a distance, you may be able to help with tasks like making calls to donors, assisting with mailings or planning fundraising campaigns. Learn a new hobby or skill. Another way to fill your free time, and reap some positive energy, is to explore a new hobby or skill. The personal satisfaction of learning and focusing your mental energy on something that interests you can help offset the disappointment of being away from those you love. Find more resources that support older adults at connect2affect.org.

START TALKING BEFORE THEY START DRINKING Kids who drink before age15 are 5 times more likely to have alcohol problems when they’re adults.

To learn more, go to www.stopalcoholabuse.gov or call 1.800.729.6686

by Michele Harvey

I have a friend who just moved her mother in with her. We did this when Mike’s Mom couldn’t live alone any longer. Moving can be so very difficult, especially when you have to leave a home that you love to go to a place that is strange to you. When my mother moved from the house that she lived in for thirty years, I don’t think it was very awful for her. The house that she raised us in had five bedrooms, a living room, a family room, a dining room, a breakfast room and one and a half bathrooms. I know that she got tired of cleaning her swimming pool and watering her nearly acre of rose bushes and fruit trees, though she loved looking at them. When Mom moved from that big house with the big yard, she moved into a two- bedroom condo with nice neighbors. She even found out the one of her sorority sisters lived in the complex. She enjoyed her new place and it had a swimming pool that was serviced by someone else, with a shallow end that my children could swim in. All in all, it was a good move for her. When my Mother-in-law moved in with us, I painted her new bedroom and we put some of her furniture and lamps in there so it would feel like her new home as much as possible. The home that Mike was raised in had lots of stairs inside and outside and our home has no stairs, so I know that pleased her when she moved in with us. She brought her two cats and they didn’t get along with our cats, so I felt bad for them all, but they all survived to ripe old ages of over twenty years. The last time I moved, I was very fortunate. I moved next door and I had a pickup truck. No one had lived in this house for over a year, so it needed a thorough dusting. Once that was finished, I could move things in. I moved my kitchen things into the cabinets and then took the empty boxes back to the other house to refill. Clothes that went in closets were super simple to move. I just grabbed a bunch and walked them over. The move I made before that was when I split up with my previous husband. I moved to a much smaller house and yet I ended up with things I needed that I had no specific space for. I came up with a solution that I still tell people about. When I packed my belongings to move, I packed them in apple boxes. Everything was in the same size boxes, so they were easy to work with when I couldn’t unpack them. I lined my dining room with those boxes and with a towel thrown over the top I had an instant end table. Moving is difficult whether you do it to a bigger place or to a smaller place. Sometimes people decide to clear out their houses as if they are moving. I have a friend whose husband died and a few years later she decided to clear her house out from top to bottom. She rented a dumpster and I shudder to think of all of the useful things she threw away including one hundred and fifty cookbooks. One hundred and fifty cookbooks! When moving, people tend to throw useful things out or take them to the dump if they no longer need them. To me, this is unbelievable! Here in Julian we have a rummage sale at the Methodist Church that helps people in need. We have monthly night time auctions presented by the American Legion Auxiliary where the profits help our community. We have a local thrift store called The Op Shop. Their profits benefit Julian Elementary School outreach programs. Ramona also has a thrift store, the Ramona Food and Clothes Closet. All of their profits stay in Ramona. When you plan to move, or when you plan to clear out clutter from your house, please don’t ever think of it as trash if the items are useful. Your trash may indeed be someone else’s treasure. These are my thoughts

New Resources For Remote Music Learners (StatePoint) With many schools continuing to meet remotely, students nationwide have lacked access to on-campus music facilities and in-person instruction. Fortunately, there are some new avenues and resources that are making music education at home a viable prospect. • At Home Skill-Building: The growing library of online musical education classes provided by The Lincoln Center offers students everywhere with supplemental learning material they can revisit again and again. From body percussion to music composition, a wide range of educational content touching on a vast range of skills and genres is available for learners of all ages. • Instrumentation: Committed to the educational and academic community, Casio Musical Instruments has been working in partnership with local dealers to provide high-quality keyboards, digital pianos and workstations to students unable to use on-campus resources. The joy of playing an instrument is dependent on an instrument’s sound and feel, and Casio instruments are backed by 40 years of music expertise and are built to inspire students, educators and performers. Designed with learning in mind, Casio’s Education Keyboards are affordable, portable and durable, and have innovative features, including class-compliant USB ports that require no drivers or installation to connect to any Mac, PC, iOS or Android device. This opens up a world of possibilities with MIDI software, as well as Chordana Play apps. • New Funding: The recently passed COVID-19 Stimulus Package includes over $120 billion for K-12 education, some of which will be earmarked for music education. Music educators can put these funds toward equipment and connectivity that makes virtual learning possible for all families now, and paves the way for a safe return to classroom learning in the future. • Knowledge Dive: Students can take a free deep music theory dive at musictheory.net. The site features lessons -- starting with the basics up through advanced theory, learning tools to help make the material stick, as well as exercises to test one’s knowledge. While music is not necessarily the easiest subject to learn or teach remotely, a wave of

The Julian News 5

Orville Arnold Gray

November 25, 1936 – March 13, 2021 Orville Arnold Gray died peacefully in his home on March 13, 2021 in Fallbrook, CA at the age of 84. Arnold is survived by his wife, Margarita, four sons; Doug, Steve, Kenny, Tony, and his daughter, Tina. As well as nine grandchildren and one great granddaughter. He is preceded in death by his mother, father, and brother Max. Arnold was born on November 25, 1936 in Orcas Island, Washington to Britta L. Gray and Frank E. Gray. Arnold met Margarita while working together at the Julian school, they have been married since 1996. He served in the United States Navy for 4 years on the USS Lenawee. Arnold retired as a brick layer after 26 years. He owned antique shops in Pacific Beach in the 70’s. He lived in Shelter Valley for more than 20 years, and worked for Julian Unified School District as a school bus driver for almost ten years. During the 19 years he lived in Ranchita, Arnold worked in Borrego Springs for the school district in transportation, and also worked for the Anza Borrego State Park maintaining the native bird’s habitat. Arnold’s family will be holding a private ceremony in his honor. Condolences can be offered with donations to Alzheimer/Dementia research.

Julian Cross Country continued from page 1

in the league, we couldn’t even place on the league leaderboards because we were just one girl shy of a full 5-person girl’s team. Combined, this pack of lively high school students shared a great year of outdoor fun and competition even amidst the trying year of 2020/2021. In every sense of the saying, the team truly took lemons that life gave and made lemonade. Taking this difficult season one step, one breath, and one day at a time, we saw the team emerge on the other end of the finish line triumphing not only over the race, but over the pandemic. We saw that the true spirit of Cross Country isn’t found by crossing the finish line, but in the company of friends and the trails we took to get there. Cross country hasn’t ever really been about running, but about enduring. It’s in our nature to endure and cross country brings that out the best. You learn to dig deep and push forward or fall back and stagnate. We don’t learn just how to run, we learn how to live. That’s why we need to keep pushing to keep students involved in sports and especially in cross country. That’s why we’ve pushed so hard to keep sports open this year. That’s why Julian is home of the Soaring Eagles. Em omaiors firteri, nos actam omplis et inam

recently-introduced resources can help students and teachers continue to meet their educational objectives.


6 The Julian News

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*** Within a culture possessed by the myth of feminine evil, the naming, describing, and theorizing about good and evil has constituted a maze/haze of deception. The journey of women becoming is breaking through this maze - springing into free space, which is an a-mazing process. — Mary Daly Women *** 1. U.S. PRESIDENTS: The poem “O Captain! My Captain!” was written after the death of which president? 2. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the weight of a U.S. quarter? 3. MOVIES: What was the name of the skyscraper in the drama “Die Hard”? 4. TELEVISION: What city was the setting for the sitcom “Mork and Mindy”? 5. SCIENCE: What is the study of knowledge, reality and existence called? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What are male blue crabs called? 7. GEOGRAPHY: What is the highest point in Japan? 8. FOOD & DRINK: The acai berry is native to which continent? 9. LITERATURE: Who wrote the “Winnie-the-Pooh” book series for children? 10. MEASUREMENTS: What is an angstrom? Answers on page 11

Chef’s Corner Spring Onions Flavor the Season There’s nothing like the intense flavor (or the smell) of an onion. Wild onions were among the first foods that mankind gathered and ate and are one of the first signs of spring. Onions are in the allium family, along with garlic and shallots. Spring onions are one of my favorite varieties. Spring onions are also called green onions, young onions, pencil onion and scallions. stage of a mature onion. If left in may have limp or faded stalks Scallions aren’t as fully ripened as the ground to grow, they’ll form and a stronger flavor than the a green onion and should not have a into an onion bulb. smaller ones. Spring onions bulb. Spring onions are the milder, first Larger, older, spring onions continued on page 11


April 7, 2021

Vintage Sign

Iron doorstops have been very popular collectibles since 1985. They were first made in England, where they were called door porters. The invention of a hinge that let a door close automatically inspired the iron figure that stopped the door from closing. Soon after, doorstops became popular in the United States. Companies that had been making cast iron toys and other items began designing and making doorstops that resembled people, animals, flowers and other figures. Five companies were the largest suppliers, and each had a name or logo that was usually molded into the flat back. Look for Bradley and Hubbard's "B & H" mark; Hubley's paper

The Julian News 7

label with the name across a circle; and Judd Co.'s mark, "CJO." In the 1980s, iron doorstops went for high prices, and hundreds of copies were made and sold in gift shops, antiques events and auctions. Fakes usually have perfect bright paint; a rough texture to the unpainted iron on the back; modern slotted screws; and, if made in two parts, a seam that is not perfectly smooth. This 12 1/2-inch antique lobster doorstop was made early in the early 20th century. It sold for $1,800 at an Eldred auction in Massachusetts. *** Q: I have a bar pin that pictures two clenched hands doing a "fist bump." The pin is gold-colored metal and has a figural mallet, ax and something that looks like a block on the top. The hands, with shirt cuffs and part of the jackets showing, are on a white enamel piece attached to the metal. What does it represent?

Watch out for reproductions and fantasy cast-iron doorstops made since the 1980s. This rare lobster doorstop has what appears to be original faded paint and was offered in a sale by Eldred’s, a well-known auction gallery. It sold for $1,800. A: The log, ax, mallet and

wedge are symbols used by two fraternal organizations: the Modern Woodmen of America and WoodmenLife (Woodmen of the World). Joseph Cullen Root founded the Modern Woodmen of America in 1883 in Lyons, Iowa. He resigned after disagreements with other officers in 1880 and moved to Omaha, where he founded Woodmen of the World. Both organizations are still in existence and provide life insurance and other benefits to members. The fist bump has been found on other unmarked pins that date from the late 1800s or early 1900s. *** CURRENT PRICES Furniture, jelly cupboard, softwood, 2 paneled doors over drawer, interior shelves, bracket feet, Pennsylvania, 50 x 50 x 20 inches, $148. Staffordshire jug, Liverpool transfer, sailor and woman, ship, "What Should Tear Me From the Arms of my Dearest Polly," 11

inches, $420. Cane, whale ivory, mushroom form handle, inlaid copper 1877 Liberty coin, faceted stem, figured oak stem, 35 3/4 inches, $600. Kitchen dipper, coconut shell bowl, carved and inlaid whalebone and wood handle, heart-shaped mount, c. 1850, 13 1/2 inches, $780. ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. Jacksonville Jaguars punter Chris Hanson was injured by what object used as a motivational tool in the locker

room during the 2003 season? 2. What team selected Michigan’s Chris Webber with the No. 1 overall pick in the 1993 NBA Draft and immediately traded him to the Golden State Warriors? 3. What 1983 NASCAR Cup Series Rookie of the Year won the Daytona 500 in 1994 and 1995? 4. In 1982, South Korean boxer Duk Koo Kim collapsed and later died after a 14-round loss to what lightweight champion? 5. What NBA shot-blocking legend had his No. 53 jersey retired by the Utah Jazz? 6. In January 2001, the New York Giants defeated what team 41-0 in the NFC Championship Game? 7. Sebastian the Ibis is the official mascot of what university’s athletic teams? Answers on page 11


April 7, 2021

8 The Julian News

Read to enjoy and explore!

Newspaper Fun!

Learn to Read! Read to Learn!

We’re nuts...

E

...about reading!

We read using our eyes. We use the D C B alphabet. People who cannot see well or are A blind can read Braille, a system of raised dots, Braille Reading gives with their fingers. People who are deaf may 2 3 us such joy! read lips or fingers spelling out hand signals, X habet lp a Read the clues about reading in addition to the printed word. 1 to fill in the crossword puzzle: pictures 4 1 1.) We read using the letters of the _____. ideas learn 2.) When we read ______ we are able to share stories. sentences travel 6 7 3.) We read for fun and to ______. We’ll help 5 4.) We read signs by seeing the words or ______. notes you to learn 5.) We read words, ______ and paragraphs. 9 how to read! 10 right 6.) We read using our ______. 7.) Some people, who cannot see well or are blind, may 8 read using ______, a system of raised dots. eyes aloud 8.) We learn new words and ______ when we read. spelling 9.) We read from the left side to the ______. We enjoy 12 10.) We can read about places we can reading on 11 ______ to and places we might not. our new tablet. 11.) We read music by reading the ______. 1 N A D E 2 1 2 12.) People who are deaf may read finger______, or hand 4 4 signals as well as the printed word! 3 3 B There are 3 letters in my puzzle. Connect 10 9 5 6 C 13 F dots in the first one by following the numbers. M 8 7 5 8 Then, follow the alphabet in the middle one. I J 10 Finally, connect the numbered dots of the 9 Do you know what word is used G last letter to see the word we use the most. L K H 11 6 7 12 the most in written materials?

...

C...

xY z

What Word Do We Use the Most?

A Recipe for Reading!

We Read: recipes poetry symbols signs notices websites articles comics

labels maps charts flyers letters books diaries plays

I S W N B F E S B I B Q S E B S I T E S N H K A L I M E E S Z U G T L B Y U W A G B V P O T R I N G A L Read for fun! W N H C Y U S E B I L U J E R T G L A P Q O T C P A E W T V Y L I N E E W S P A P E R S N I N A Read to learn! V B T S O E U S N I L T Q Y Q S C I M O I U X D C Chatter’s recipe C A T E R B T B U I T X M D O P S W T Q I D I X O R for reading is not a B U I Y R E V I L K S Q S C R A P B O O K V N S N A secret. Find and circle R I O N G S Y B N P L E W O V I U B D V F X S O O A all of these items that N S J L L B L L F B P O I T A T I V N I T F B I S we read every day: V B I O P S T F N O V R R U I O Y R T E O P P T L E M E C N U O N N A S B U B S D F G H S T N B C W S M M V N J U W P R T I love puzzles! C C O O M V O I U D G J U R T S O D R P E A A W E N M X S P announcements M O X T S O T N P L A B E L S A P R V I G F S E X K bulletin boards U P Q I B I N X P O S W T Y Y S H K R I B V P S S I invitations R U N O O D I A P R Y U C N S T D C H L S I E L T Y directions S N Y I O Z I I N O T I C E S P D G P C C L O P B M S W newspapers O B M Y S O T D I W S O A Z S L S E N I Z A G A M magazines I N V E S Q P O N M O I L M E X B R A V Y T W P B instructions scrapbooks

Read Right! Read Left!

We read English words and sentences from left to right. The languages of Arabic and Hebrew are read from right to left. Here are some fun English words that can be read in both directions and still have meaning for us. Study the words and fill in the vowels that make sense: CAN YOU READ FROM LEFT TO RIGHT? ?TFEL OT THGIR MORF DAER UOY NAC

Did You Know (NAPS)—Your house can have a profound effect on your health and well-being. Many home buyers are getting help keeping their new house energy-efficient and pollution-free from the experts at Delos and House X. Learn more at www.delos.com and www.housex.com. *** Zero-turn machines such as the Raptor series from Hustler Turf can make mowing easier on you and your lawn. For further facts and tips about lawn mowing, visit www.hustlerturf.com. *** A new program offered by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation provides veteran caregivers with trained professionals to perform daily tasks, including housekeeping, meal preparation,

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grocery shopping, and grooming. For more information about military caregiving and available services, visit hiddenheroes.org/ respite. *** For many women, the biggest obstacle they face in their careers is the first step up the ladder—and the COVID crisis hasn’t helped, according to a recent Women in the Workplace study supported by the Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association (HBA). Learn more at www.genderparity.hbanet.org. *** Zero net emissions of carbon dioxide from energy and industry can be achieved by 2050—and it could cost only about $1 a day, according to the peer-reviewed journal AGU Advances. For more information and to read the

study, visit news.agu.org. *** Effective, economical generic antibiotics such as Norbrook’s Norfenicol can play a significant role in helping livestock producers treat a wide range of expected and unexpected illnesses among their animals. Learn more at www.norbrook. com. *** By working closely with their veterinarian to have an effective treatment plan and proven therapeutic products such as Norfenicol from Norbrook, ranchers can control major health problems in newly weaned calves even when the weather is cold. Learn more at www.norbrook. com. ***

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Easter Celebrations continued from page 4

After Seeing all the animals, we went into the gift shop. Each person took their turn shopping for something to buy. My family, and I bought a One-dollar soda each. My Dad also bought camel milk chocolate. Then the couple

who invited us surprised me and my two brothers by buying us each a small camel milk soap! I used that soap that very night. I am glad that we had that experience. The next day we went to

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Solution page 11

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2021

clergy serving Community United Methodist Church at 2898 Highway 78, Julian. Direct all questions and correspondence to: Faith and Living, c/o CUMCJ, PO Box 460, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

www.readingclubfun.com

Tortoise and the Hare

Every day we get multiple reminders of the threat of COVID. We conform to new ways of doing our errands, our work and our interpersonal interactions. We keep masks and hand sanitizer with us all the time. Even at home, there are numerous stories on the news to remind us how many have died, where the virus is spreading rapidly and how the virus is mutating. Some of us have friends and/or loved ones who have gotten sick from COVID and some of them have died. For many of us, this threat to life has led to greater awareness of our bodies and greater appreciation for life. Lauren Winner, in her book Mudhouse Sabbath, lamented that Christians often give the body too much attention or inappropriate attention or no attention. We see this when human identity is viewed as residing only in the spirit and the body is seen as simply housing the spirit or as harming the spirit by leading it to sin. I see this utilitarian view of the human body reflected in my own neglect of my physical well-being. My body is too often used as a tool for my mind and spirit rather than valued in and of itself as an expression of God’s creative work. I expect a lot of my body without always giving it the rest, food and exercise it needs. Maybe you do too. Winner explained that “Judaism connects physical acts to spiritual practice without suggesting that the spirit is superior to the body.” Based on the story of Creation, Jews see humans as bodies enlivened by spirit. Christians, on the other hand, tend to see humans as essentially a soul housed by the body. This is a subtle but important difference that results in greater appreciation for the body and integration of the body into spiritual practice. Though valuing and caring for the body isn’t a prominent aspect of Christianity, our belief in the incarnation is certainly consistent with it. God chose to reveal himself in the body of Jesus, in the life he lived in that body and the suffering he endured through that body. Jesus showed that he valued human bodies when he fed and healed them. We also believe our bodies now house his Spirit and that in resurrection our spirits will experience a new body. Recently, caring for my body has taken on theological as well as practical rationale. The insights of Winner’s book in this time of COVID have motivated me to better attend to the needs of my body – reducing stress, being more active, getting adequate rest and eating healthy foods. Cindy Arntson is ordained

Kids: color stuff in!

Treasure Hunt

Pastor Cindy Arntson

Read to learn and understand!

Whale of a Tail

Faith and Living

Church, now I know that that does not sound remarkably interesting but, our church has been closed for a long time. This Sunday for Easter, our church was open for outdoor service! The service was going to be held at Camp Stevens. Just a short drive from home. When we arrived, we had to walk down to where the service was beginning. The walk was easy. When we got there, we got our temperatures checked and put some hand sanitizer on. Then we went and set up our chairs and blankets. After the service all the kids got to go on an Easter-egg hunt. Then we all went home and relaxed. I hope you had a wonderful Easter! *** Spring Break is very strange. I grew up in France, so I don't know Spring Break. That doesn't exist in Europe. — Alexandre Aja ***


April 7, 2021

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

War Against Taxpayers Never Ceases

by Jon Coupal

The “Hundred Years War” was a series of conflicts for control over Western Europe and England during the middle ages, circa 1337 to 1453. The relentless hostilities against California taxpayers by progressive politicians may not have a 100-year history, but it sure feels like it. Just last week, far-left legislators and their ideological allies proposed another increase in the income tax on high earners. Assembly Bill 1253 would impose tiered tax increases on residents with annual incomes over $1 million. If approved, the income tax rate for Californians making over $1 million would increase from 13.3% to 14.3%. Those who earn more would be hit with even higher increases. (Never mind that California already has the highest income tax rate in America and Californians are leaving the state in droves.) There are two reasons why all this may sound familiar. First, it is identical to a proposal from the same progressive legislator — Miguel Santiago, D-Los Angeles — that was introduced last year. Fortunately, that bill died due to lack of support, not only from Republicans, but from both moderate Democrats and Gov. Gavin Newsom. Nonetheless, Santiago and his far-left organizations such as Courage California are trying again with, coincidentally he claims, the same bill with the same number: AB 1253. The second reason this may seem like déjà vu is that just last week this column reported on a novel $22 billion “wealth tax” proposal that would tax as much as 1.5% of a person’s “household wealth” above a certain threshold. ACA 8 would be the first tax of its kind in America. The “justification” for the tax is less for the generation of needed revenue (California is already swimming in tax revenue) but to “equalize” wealth in a way that would do Lenin proud. The point here is that progressives are relentless in their pursuit of other people’s money. And it makes no

difference if there is a severe budget deficit or a massive budget surplus. The guiding principle for the spending lobby is simple: You have it, they want it, and they will use whatever means necessary to take it. It is for that reason that, each year, taxpayer advocates must fight many of the same battles we have fought in previous legislative sessions. The best example of “Groundhog Day” recurrence of tax increase proposals is Assembly Constitutional Amendment 1 by Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, D-Winters (HJTA Legislative Report Card: F). ACA 1 repeals one of the most important protections in Proposition 13 by lowering the vote needed to pass costly local bonds and special taxes. Currently it takes a twothirds vote of the electorate to impose these higher costs on taxpayers. ACA 1 would cut that vote threshold to just 55 percent to pass tax hikes for a myriad of purposes. If that too sounds familiar, it’s because it is the same bill taxpayer groups had to fight last year. That is when ACA 1 was defeated on the Assembly floor thanks to unified opposition from both homeowners and the business community. And if ACA 1 sounds familiar from last year, it is because the identical proposal was introduced as ACA 4 the year before. These repeated assaults on taxpayers are harder to kill than a bad guy in a Bruce Willis action movie. Those who fight for the interests of taxpayers, homeowners, private property and free enterprise are often asked whether we get weary of having to fight the same fights year after year — especially because, as California becomes more progressive, those battles grow more difficult. The answer is simple: It is irrelevant that these battles are reoccurring. We fight them because we remember how great California used to be and believe it can be once again. *** Jon Coupal is the president of Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

• One dung beetle can drag 1,141 times its own weight. • Italian banker Gilberto Baschiera was a modern-day Robin Hood. Over a period of seven years, he secretly diverted 1 million euros from wealthy clients to poorer ones so they could qualify for loans. He made no profit from these dealings and avoided jail in 2018 with a plea bargain. • In 2006, a Coca-Cola employee offered to sell Coca-Cola secrets to Pepsi. Pepsi took the high road and responded by notifying CocaCola. • Ever wonder why there's no period in "Dr Pepper"? It was removed because the old logo font made it look like "Di: Pepper." • Wildlife technician Richard Thomas took the famous tongue twister, "How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?" and calculated a rough estimate of the actual answer. It came out to around 700 pounds! • For years your dentist has no doubt advised you to be sure to floss. But the benefits extend beyond your teeth. Researchers have discovered that flossing can also help your memory. It prevents gum disease, which prevents stiff blood vessels, which in turn cause memory issues. • The future Queen Elizabeth II's wedding dress was entirely paid for with ration coupons. • Red Solo cups have not only been honored in a song by country singer Toby Keith, they're a common souvenir to bring back from the U.S. The novelty comes from their appearance in numerous movie party scenes. • American children are given an average of $3.70 per lost tooth. • To properly write adjectives in order, list them by amount, value, size, temperature, age, shape, color, origin and material. *** Thought for the Day: "No matter what path you're on in this life, if that path isn't about love, you're on the wrong path." -- Lawrence Overmire ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** For many, graduation marks the end of formal student life - the end of long spring breaks and of thinking that a 10 A.M. class is far too early. — Alexa Von Tobel ***


April 7, 2021

10 The Julian News

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Reaching Carbon Neutrality For $1 A Day

®

Howdy From Lake Cuyamaca

GPS nav apps may be good for individual drivers' commute times but may be slowing traffic overall and ruining neighborhood vibes across the nation. Dear EarthTalk: What are the environmental pros and cons of so many of us relying on GPS apps (Waze, Google Maps, etc.) to get around these days? -- B. Rogers, Newark, NJ It’s hard to measure whether having GPS apps on our smartphones is positive or negative for the planet and its systems overall, but some environmentalists are skeptical that they are helping at all. Indeed, the rise of Waze, Google Maps, Inrix and other apps that respond to live traffic data to reroute drivers accordingly—not to mention the concomitant proliferation of app-following Uber and Lyft drivers—has turned millions of formerly main-route-following drivers into sneaky shortcut seekers. Formerly quiet peaceful neighborhood may never be the same again. On the plus side, the widespread use of these apps saves individual drivers some time and may slightly reduce the amount of time we all spend burning extra fuel by idling in congested traffic. But the data on this is mixed and warrants further research. While you may have gotten to work three minutes faster this morning, what was the cost? Neighborhoods everywhere are miffed at the proliferation of cars racing through formerly quiet back streets to circumvent the latest highway logjam. The problem has been especially noticeable in already car-crazed Los Angeles, where neighborhood streets filled up with traffic once Waze hit the market in 2011 and started alerting Angelinos of the fastest, least congested routes to and fro. As more and more drivers followed Waze’s directions, the app sent them deeper and deeper into formerly forlorn byways. With Google Maps, Inrix and others following Waze’s lead, the problem has only gotten worse in recent years. Research out of the University of California’s Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) concludes that while GPS apps are helping individuals get from point A to B faster, they are also making congestion worse overall. ITS’s traffic simulations show how freeway flow changes in response to an accident when no drivers use GPS apps versus when 20 percent of drivers have them activated. With more app-using drivers, congestion builds up at off-ramps and traffic on the highway slows. “The situation then gets much worse because hundreds of people just like you want to go on the side streets, which were never designed to handle the traffic,” says ITS director Alexandre Bayen. “So, now, in addition to congesting the freeway, you’ve also congested the side streets and the intersections.” Critics of these apps blame the software designers—not us consumers just trying to get to and from work or the grocery store— for the negative effects on traffic flows and neighborhood peace. If the apps are so smart, why can’t they disperse drivers onto different routes and away from back streets and quiet neighborhoods to smartly reduce congestion overall? To wit, later this year Google Maps will start routing drivers to the most fuel-efficient route—not necessarily the fastest—to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save drivers money in fuel costs. If the greener route is significantly slower than another way, the app will give users the option to choose for themselves, but at least this move is a nod to how much greenhouse gas busting power a little bit of code on your phone can have to help save the planet. CONTACTS: The Impact of GPS-enabled Shortest Path Routing on Mobility: A Game Theoretic Approach, https://trid.trb.org/ view/1495267; “Your Navigation App Is Making Traffic Unmanageable,” spectrum.ieee.org/computing/hardware/your-navigation-app-ismaking-traffic-unmanageable; “The Perfect Selfishness of Mapping Apps,” theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/03/mapping-appsand-the-price-of-anarchy/555551. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https//earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

THE LAKE WILL NOT BE OPEN FOR FISHING APRIL 20, 21, 22, 23. THANK YOU, FOR YOUR CO-OPERATION. LAKE CUYAMACA RECREATION AND PARK DISTRICT.

(NAPSI)—Zero net emissions of carbon dioxide from energy and industry can be achieved by 2050—and it could cost only about $1 a day. That’s the finding of a new study by James Williams at the University of San Francisco and Margaret S. Torn at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory. The study can be found in the peerreviewed journal AGU Advances, which publishes high-impact, open-access research and commentary across the Earth and space sciences. Why It Matters According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world must reach zero net carbon dioxide emissions by mid-century to avoid the most dangerous effects of climate change.

How Prison Education Programs Transform Lives And Communities (StatePoint) In 2014, Benito Castro was sentenced to six years in prison for passing bad checks as a result of a gambling habit he’d developed. Today, he’s the director of operations for a grocery store chain and runs freedomrides.org, a nonprofit he started that provides transportation for those recently released from prison. Castro credits his transformation to the education he received through Ashland University while in prison. “I earned my degree while I was still incarcerated, and that made all the difference in the world when I was released. It gave me a sense of purpose and led to a whole new life.” After early release, Castro took a job as a dishwasher at a Huddle House restaurant and met someone from Ideal Market grocery stores, who hired him as a night manager. From there, Castro quickly rose to district manager, director of marketing and then director of operations for the chain. “I’m a different person today thanks to the Ashland program. I have financial security. I’m contributing to society. And most of all I have self-respect,” said Castro. Ashland University operates the largest correctional education program in the nation. It has more than 4,000 incarcerated students enrolled at 120 facilities in more than a dozen states and has graduated nearly a thousand students since 2016, when the school began offering distance learning beyond its home state of Ohio. continued on page 11

Vehicles will need to be mostly electric. Residential space and water heaters will need to be powered by heat pumps or electric heaters. How To Do It The researchers say it can be done by:

• Increasing energy efficiency. • Switching to electric technologies. • Using clean energy (especially wind and solar power).  • Deploying a small amount of carbon capture technology.  Why It Works The cost of rebuilding the U.S. energy infrastructure to run primarily on renewable energy is lower now than even five years ago, according to the study. The net costs range from 0.2% to 1.2% of GDP, depending on different trade offs, including how much land is given to solar and

In the least-cost scenario to achieve net zero emissions of carbon dioxide by 2050, wind, solar, and battery storage capacity will have to increase several-fold. wind farms. Transforming Infrastructure “The decarbonization of the U.S. energy system is fundamentally an infrastructure transformation,” explained Margaret Torn, a senior scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. “It means that by 2050 we need to build many

gigawatts of wind and solar power plants, new transmission lines, a fleet of electric cars and light trucks, millions of heat pumps to replace conventional furnaces and water heaters, and more energy-efficient buildings— while continuing to research and innovate new technologies.” In this transition, very little infrastructure would need “early retirement,” or replacement before the end of its economic life. “No one is asking consumers to switch out their brand-new car for an electric vehicle,” Torn added. “The point is that efficient, low-carbon technologies need to be used when it comes time to replace the current equipment.” Doing Well By Doing Good There’s even an economic upside to doing all this. “All that infrastructure build equates to jobs in the U.S., as opposed to sending money overseas to buy oil from other countries,” Torn said. “There’s no question that there are a lot of jobs in building a low-carbon economy.” The cost figures should be lower still considering the economic and climate benefits of decarbonizing energy systems. For example, less reliance on oil will mean less money spent on oil and less economic uncertainty due to oil price fluctuations. Climate benefits include the avoided effects of climate change, such as extreme droughts and hurricanes, avoided air and water pollution from fossil fuel combustion, and improved public health. Learn More For more information and to read the study, visit news.agu. org.


April 7, 2021

Prison Education Programs

Chef’s Corner

continued from page 10

The program features the same academic rigor and learning outcomes as the university’s on-campus curriculum, and is free for students who qualify for Pell Grants or receive Ashland University scholarships or other assistance. There is also no cost to the prison. “Providing access to this underserved community is an integral part of our mission to transform people’s lives through education so they can go on to work, serve and lead in their communities,” said Dr. Carlos Campo, president of Ashland University. “And in many of the places where we operate, there are no other options available to inmates who want to use their time in prison to further their education and invest in themselves.”

Andrea Buttross, Louisiana Department of Corrections education director, says Ashland’s distance-learning program is deployed on an easily managed platform providing those about to re-enter society an opportunity to access education that they may not traditionally have received in the prison setting. “Ashland has decades of experience working within prison systems and they know how to operate in this unique environment,” said Buttross. “They provide all necessary aspects of the program: the technology, all of the curriculum and resources for the classes, direct contact with professors, and even an on-site academic coordinator to help students progress toward their degrees.” There are advantages to distance learning in prisons—

especially in the age of COVID. Classes are available to more students in places where inperson options are unavailable. Students can take classes anytime during the day, and their education can continue once they’re released, regardless of where they live. To learn more about Ashland University Correctional

1

L E T 4 A 6 R N T E N Y 9 R E Reading gives us 8 I D E A S G such joy! H 12 11 N O T E S

These fun English words can be read both ways and still have meaning for us. 1. keep = peek 2. stop = pots / step = pets 3. pals = slap 4. top = pot / tap = pat / tip = pit 5. star = rats 6. live = evil

P I 7 C E S T 10 U T R R E S P E L

Read Right! Read Left!

7

Treasure Hunt

3

Castles

2

A A L P H A B O U 5 S E D

Tortoise and the Hare

We’re nuts...

Whale of a Tail

Learn to Read! Read to Learn!

X

Education, visit ashland.edu. “The incarcerated face a lot of obstacles in attaining an education because they often have limited access and fewer choices,” said Dr. Campo. “We want to change that, one successful student at a time.”

My recipe for reading is not a secret. Did you find and circle all of these items that we read every day?

...about reading!

A Recipe for Reading!

B Q S I S B E W N B F E S B I A L K H N S E T I S U W I M E Y A E S Z U G T L B W N I R T O P V B G L U G A L I B E T N H C Y U S J E R T G L A P Q O L I N E C Y V T W E S N I P A A N E W S P A P E R E U S N I Q Y Q T L V B T S O I U X D C O M I C S T B U I T O D M X C A T E R B D I X O I Q T W S P I L K S R V E C S Q B U I Y R V N S K O O B P A R N P L N A B Y S W E R I O N G X S F V D B U I V O B P O O A F L L B L O N S J L F T I N V I T A T I O V B I S P V B I O P S T F N R R U I O Y R T E O A S P T L N N E M E C N U O N B U B S D F G H S T R T B C W P W G S M M V N J U C C O O M V O I U D D R P E A O S T R N E W A J U X T S O O M P S X M S A P R T G I V N P L A B E L Q I B P U K X E S F S H K I N I R X P O S W T Y Y N O U R I S S P V B D C O D I T H A P R Y U C N S Y N S Y T L E I S L P D I O Z S E C G I I N O T I W S M B P O L C C P O B M Y S L S Z A T D I W S O M A G A Z I N E S O N V E S Q N M O I L M E X B I B P W T Y V A R P O

B R A V E L I L L I N G E

7. now = won 8. not = ton / net = ten / nit = tin 9. saw = was 10. reed = deer 11. but = tub / bat = tab 12. mood = doom

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wood stove, Smudge Pot. 3/24

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Cigarettes don’t know when you are asleep. Every year, men, women and children are killed in preventable home fires caused by cigarettes and other smoking materials. Most victims of smokingrelated fires never thought it could happen to them. If You Smoke, Put It Out. All the Way. Every Time. Smoking & Home Fires: A campaign by the U.S. Fire Administration to prevent the #1 cause of home fire deaths. For tips on how to prevent home fires caused by smoking materials, visit www.usfa.dhs.gov/smoking.

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continued from page 6 should be small and thin, with a firm base at the root tip and crisp, bright green leaves. Select spring onions that are not fully developed with a white bulb end and long green stalks. The flavor of the leaves is milder than the root end. Spring onions will keep for five to seven days when wrapped in plastic and stored in the refrigerator. Spring onions are a great source of vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, calcium and fiber. They also contain a substance that prevents the formation of blood clots. Eating onions also helps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. To prepare spring onions, cut off the roots and peel away the outer layer to remove any lingering dirt. Next, rinse the leaves, spreading them gently with your fingers to get at the dirt in the crevices. Both parts are edible. Although the white bulb is most often listed as part of recipes, the green leaves should also be incorporated in the recipes and as a garnish. You also can use the leaves to add a wonderful burst of green color, to tie up appetizers into a package or to use as a frilly, edible garnish. To curl the ends, cut off the roots and all but about 3 inches of the green tops. Slice the tops lengthwise down from the green end into the white section. Put the leaves in cold water and chill for several hours to curl them. While spring onions are best served raw, they’re also delicious grilled or sauteed. Spring onions should be added during the final stages of a recipe for maximum flavor. This Spring Onion Pesto is the perfect way to flavor couscous or orzo pasta, to tuck under the skin of chicken, or to place on fish or pork before grilling or baking. SPRING ONION PESTO 6 green onions, root ends removed, white bulbs and tops chopped 3 cloves garlic, peeled

The Julian News 11

2 tablespoons lemon zest 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 cup olive oil Using a food processor or a blender, finely grind the spring onions, garlic and lemon zest. Add the lemon juice, salt and pepper. Slowly drizzle in olive oil until everything is well-combined and creamy. Make up to 24 hours before using. Place the pesto in an air-tight container and refrigerate. ***

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*** I know what kind of books I read on vacation, and it is not necessarily 'Diplomacy' by Henry Kissinger. No disrespect to that book; I have read that book. But not on spring break. — Meghan McCain ***

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continued from page 7 1. An ax. 2. The Orlando Magic. 3. Sterling Marlin. 4. Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini. 5. Mark Eaton. 6. The Minnesota Vikings. 7. The University of Miami Hurricanes.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Abraham Lincoln 2. 0.2 ounces 3. Nakatomi Plaza 4. Boulder, Colorado 5. Philosophy 6. Jimmies 7. Mount Fuji 8. South America 9. A.A. Milne 10. One ten-billionth of a meter, used to measure very small distances ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

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Volume 36 - Issue 36

Your Weekly Horoscope

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Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to April 1, 2016; 2016; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00008392-CU-PT-CTL

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00009938-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON TO: MARGARET ROSE

PETITIONER: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG TO: ARI RIVER MEHRBERG

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 13, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 1, 2021. LEGAL: 08710 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 27, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 8, 2021. LEGAL: 08714 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With change dominant this week, don't be surprised to find new facts emerging that could put another slant on a situation and offer you another choice. Think it through before you decide. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) There could be some lingering problems from a previous matter that involved a decision you felt you had to make. Resolve the situation with your strong Taurean no-nonsense approach. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) The Gemini's carefully made plans could be undone by someone's unexpected decision. Getting the full story behind that surprise move can help you decide how to deal with the matter. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Recently uncovered information might put a new light on a situation you thought had been resolved. Keep an open mind about possible changes that you might have to consider. LEO (July 23 to August 22) With a potential revision of an old agreement, you can't beat the Big Cat for knowing how to sharpen a "clause" to the best advantage. Someone close could have the news you've been waiting for. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Certain issues in the workplace could put you in the middle of a dispute you'd rather not deal with. Express your honest feelings before the pressure to take sides builds up. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might feel uneasy disagreeing with someone

© 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Everyone has a breaking point, turning point, stress point, the game is permeated with it. The fans don't see it because we make it look so efficient. But internally, for a guy to be successful, you have to be like a clock spring, wound but not loose at the same time. — Dave Winfield ***

LEGAL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00009062-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2021-000010708-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME

you've been close to. But your relationship should be able to withstand and even thrive when confronted with your true feelings. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A romantic situation seems to be creating more confusion than you can handle. If so, own up to your feelings. The sooner you do, the better your chances are for working things out. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) With change directing the Archer's aim, consider a second look at your plans and see where they might benefit from a revision. A workplace matter is close to a resolution. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) New contacts help you learn some important information about upcoming developments. The week calls for the Sea Goat to be more flexible than usual in a number of matters. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) With both change and uncertainty in your aspect, you might feel less confident in a previous decision. That's OK. Check it out and see where it could be modified, if necessary. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Old relationships that seemed to be sinking are buoyant again, and new relationships are benefiting from Cupid's loving care. This could be a good time to make a major move. BORN THIS WEEK: While you prefer to tread your own path, you'll go out of your way to help someone in need.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00010798-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2021-00011332-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: KILEY CHRISTINE SPRIGG FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ROSALBA ORTEGA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ TO: JESSICA ELIAS

PETITIONER: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO TO: MICHAEL DELGADO

PETITIONER: KILEY CHRISTINE SPRIGG HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: KILEY CHRISTINE SPRIGG TO: KILEY CHRISTINE TAYLOR

PETITIONER: ROSALBA ORTEGA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ROSALBA ORTEGA TO: MA ROSALBA ORTEGA

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 20, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 3, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 4, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 11, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 4, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 11, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MAY 5, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 18, 2021.

LEGAL: 08711 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9003243 KHASIM INSURANCE AGENCY 1310 E Valley Pkwy 104, Escondido, CA 92027 (Mailing Address: PO Box 301773 Escondido, CA 92030) The business is conducted by An Individual Richard Edward Khasim, 1310 E Valley Pkwy 104, Escondido, CA 92027. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 3, 2021. LEGAL: 08712 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9003825 RAMONA HOME JOURNAL 1410 Main Street, Suite E, Ramona, CA 92065 (Mailing Address: PO Box 2214 Ramona, CA 92065) The business is conducted by An Individual Michael Patrick Raher, 24731 Bjon Road, Ramona, CA 92065. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 6, 2021. LEGAL: 08713 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

LEGAL: 08716 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

LEGAL: 08720 Publish: March 31 and April 7, 14, 21, 2021

Wednesday - April 7, 2021

Volunteer Safely At Home Or In Person During Global Volunteer Month

(StatePoint) April is Global Volunteer Month, a time to recognize the power of volunteers to tackle society’s greatest challenges. Launched last year by Points of Light, the world’s largest nonprofit dedicated to accelerating people-powered change, Global Volunteer Month serves to activate volunteers and support the most vulnerable populations. And over the past year, volunteers have joined the ranks of frontline workers and first responders to fight against COVID-19, support the vaccination roll-out, address systemic racism and ensure equity and opportunity for all. “We launched Global Volunteer Month last year during a time of great uncertainty that made it even more important for us to find ways to unite communities and connect people despite distance,” says Natalye Paquin, president and CEO of Points of Light. A recent survey demonstrates that despite all the obstacles, 2020 marked one of the most civically-engaged years in history. Fifty-two percent of Americans surveyed volunteered for the first time during the pandemic. However, seven out of 10 respondents reported that while the effects of COVID-19 on their community made them more eager to volunteer, they’ve hesitated due to safety concerns. To volunteer safely during Global Volunteer Month and beyond, consider these ideas and tips from Points of Light: 1. Offer vaccination assistance. Scheduling vaccinations can be tricky, particularly for those who aren’t web-savvy or don’t speak English as a first language. Whether you work with individuals in your extended network or volunteer with organizations helping to centralize vaccination information, there are many ways to be involved from home. On-site opportunities to help people navigate their vaccination appointment also exist, and your assistance may be especially needed if you’re multilingual. Vaccination distribution centers follow all CDC social distancing guidelines to ensure the health and safety of volunteers. 2. Give rides to medical appointments. Seniors without transportation often need rides to life-sustaining medical appointments. With the roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccine, this need has increased. Connect with a local organization near you that follows protocols to keep drivers and the elderly safe. 3. Support food distribution. The concurrent medical and economic crises have made grocery shopping dangerous for some, and unaffordable for others. Drive-through food distribution centers and contactless drop-off services are essential social protection programs you can support. As more people get vaccinated, an increasing number of in-person volunteer opportunities will likely open up and be needed in food banks. 4. Comfort the grieving. Those who are grieving often need critical emotional support. While some organizations are searching for licensed counselors to make comfort calls, others are looking for anyone with a big heart and a listening ear. 5. Maintain public spaces. As warm weather arrives, communities are looking for volunteers to beautify and improve the local environment of public parks and spaces. 6. Help students succeed. Even in normal years, many families need assistance with school supplies and homework help, and the pandemic has only exacerbated these issues. Help students succeed by providing virtual tutoring through a homework helpline or by contributing to or hosting a donation drive for school supplies. 7. Support health initiatives. After facing long periods of isolation, there is a growing demand to help build strong communities by supporting local fitness and nutrition programs. Virtual and in-person opportunities abound for people of all professional backgrounds and skillsets, ranging from coaching youth runners to widening access to nutrition information in low-income neighborhoods. 8. Show gratitude. Recognize and thank first responders, volunteers and frontline workers. Many say that handwritten letters are the most cherished items received in care packages. This is also a great way to get kids involved! 9. Make connections. During the pandemic, homebound people have been more isolated than ever. Organizations are looking for volunteers to make regular phone calls to provide companionship and determine if individuals are in need of additional assistance. 10. Just volunteer! Visit Points of Light at pointsoflight.org/volunteer to find a local affiliate in your area, search the world’s largest digital hub for volunteering and community engagement opportunities, as well as to find tips and best practices for safely volunteering from home or in communities. And be sure to inspire others to uplift their communities by sharing your experiences using #GlobalVolunteerMonth on social media.

LEGAL: 08721 Publish: March 31 and April 7, 14, 21, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00011012-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MINA ROSE MORALES FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: MINA ROSE MORALES HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MINA ROSE MORALES TO: MINA ROSE MAURNAIS IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 26, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 12, 2021. LEGAL: 08719 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9004489 SERENITY AND COMPANY 506 Gillingham Ct., Oceanside, CA 92058 The business is conducted by An Individual - Rachel Marie Jackson, 506 Gillingham Ct., Oceanside, CA 92058. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 12, 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9004677 PRP CLAIMS 13425 Plumeria Way, San Diego, CA 92130 The business is conducted by An Individual Gregory R. Badger, 13425 Plumeria Way, San Diego, CA 92130. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 13, 2021.

LEGAL: 08717 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

LEGAL: 08718 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO JULIAN COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP P. 0. BOX 249 JULIAN, CALIFORNIA 92036 REGULAR MEETING MONDAY • April 12, 2021 • 7 P.M. *JULIAN TOWN HALL, Washington and Main Street, Julian, CA * * * PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA * * * A. ROLL CALL OF MEMBERS B. REVIEW & APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF March 8, 2021 C. APPROVAL OF AGENDA D. PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS: Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the group on subject matter within the Group’s jurisdiction that is not on the posted agenda. E. ACTION ITEMS 1. Whole Housing Generation Program – Rudy Rikansrud 2. R.P.O. – Resource Protection Ordinance (Grading Ordinance) 3. General Plan Element Update – Climate Action Plan- Safety Element; Environmental Justice Element; Income Housing Study 4. SDG&E Public Safety Power Shutoff Event November 26 to December 9, 2020 – Rudy Rikansrud 5. Gilbert Pritchard – Julian Flag 6. Confirm Appointment of Pat Brown to the ARB F. GROUP BUSINESS - INFORMATION 1. Assignment of Tasks Among Planning Group Members/Organization 2. General Plan Element Update 3. Expanding JCPG planning area – Kiki 4. Meeting updates a. Future Group Meeting Dates (May 10th, 2021) G. ADJOURNMENT ALL ITEMS ON THE AGENDA ARE FOR DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE DECISION BY THE GROUP, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

*** A FINAL AGENDA WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD ON THE PORCH OF THE TOWN HALL and at The POST OFFICE 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE REGULAR PLANNING GROUP MEETING. *** The Julian Community Planning Group (JCPG) is a voluntary organization representing the community. The function for the JCPG is advisory to the County Planning Department, Planning Commission, and the Board of Supervisors with regard to land use matters. Members: Pat Brown, Chair; Bob Redding, Vice Chair; Kiki Skagen Munshi, Secretary; Woody Barnes, Herb Dackermann, Eric Jones, Keith Krawiec, Rebecca Morales, Katherine Moretti, Kenny Mushet, Rudy Rikansrud LEGAL: 08725 Publish: April 7, 2021

LEGAL AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00035633-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2021-00013586-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: FATEMEH SADAT TAHERI HASENIN FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: FATEMEH SADAT TAHERI HASENIN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: FATEMEH SADAT TAHERI HASENIN TO: MARJAN TAHERI

PETITIONER: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: REBECCA ANN CARSTENS TO: REBECCA ANN VIRELLES

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 26, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 9, 2021. LEGAL: 08722 Publish: March 31 and April 7, 14, 21, 2020

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 18, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 29, 2021. LEGAL: 08723 Publish: April 7, 14, 21, 28, 2021

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - April 7, 2021 (36-36)  

Wednesday - April 7, 2021 (36-36)