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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

For the Community, by the Community. (92¢ + tax included) Back Country Covid-19 Positive Tests

Wednesday

March 24, 2021

Julian, CA.

Volume 36 — Issue 34 ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Daffodils On Display - The First Sign Of Spring

as of March 14*

(weeks new positives) Julian = 108 (+2) ** Ramona = 2,404 (+138) ** Mt. Laguna = 2 Ranchita = 13 (+0) ** Warner Springs = 56 (+2)** Santa Ysabel = 61 (+0)** Borrego Springs = 126 (+0) ** Descanso = 74 (+1) ** Alpine = 1,063 (+6) ** Poway = 2,266 (+34) Lakeside = 1599 (+25) ** Total Confirmed cases in Unincorporated San Diego County = 37,297 a total rise of 323. A one-day VACCINATION EVENT conducted by CALFIRE will be in Borrego Springs Thursday, March 25. The event will be at the Borrego Springs Library, from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 pm. Pfizer COVID19 vaccine will be given. Open to ages 16-64 with underlying conditions*, those working with or selling food, farm & ranch workers (producing food commodities for human consumption), and anyone 65+. Declare your occupation (no written documentation required) when registering at the event. You must bring proof of residency or employment in San Diego County. TO Register for a vaccination: Register for both your 1st and 2nd dose: www.tinyurl.com/Borrego1 to register for the first dose; www.tinyurl.com/Borrego2 -- to register for the second dose. Go ahead and make your appointments. Do not delay, appointments will go fast! *For a list of eligible underlying conditions click the link and scroll down to Phase 1C: https://www. sandiegocounty.gov/content/ sdc/hhsa /programs/phs/ communit y _epidemiology/ d c / 2 0 19 - n C oV/ v a c c i n e s / phases.html Borrego COVID19 Task Force Supported by the Borrego Valley Endowment Fund For questions call the Covid Task Force at 612.866.7876 If you believe you have symptoms please get tested. Most testing locations do not require an appointment. To find information on a testing location near you or call 2-11 (toll free) or on the web 211sandiego.org.

State Statistics

Statewide COVID-19 Data as of March 14 California has 3,526,335 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There were 2,350 newly recorded confirmed cases Saturday. The 7-day positivity rate is 1.8%. There have been 52,250,830 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 230,712 during the prior 24hour reporting period. There have been 56,118 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic. As of March 21, providers have reported administering a total of 14,520,575 total vaccine doses statewide. The CDC reports that 18,234,500 doses have been delivered to entities within the state. Over 1.4 million in San Diego County have been administered, which includes 1st and 2nd doses. Over 5 million vaccinated statewide.

With over 300 total entries; Adult 249, Youth 67. Rebecca Morales had the award winner for x the Bulb of the Year (British Gamble). In the Court of Honor - Anita Nichols, Louse Galt and Chris Laidlaw took top honors.

Cuyamaca Outdoor School, The Original 6th Grade Camp, Turns 75

The school children entered drawings and poetry along with their daffodils.

2021 Daffodil Show - COURT OF HONOR: Best In Show – Anita Nichols (6 Y-Y) Best In Show Runner Up – Loise Galt (5 W-W) Best In Show 3 Stem – Anita Nichols (1 W-Y) Sweepstakes-Adult (Most Blue Ribbons Won) – Anita Nichols (18 Ribbons) Sweepstakes-Adult Runner Up – Chris Laidlaw (6 Ribbons) Youth - Best In Show – Alison Hernandez Youth – Best In Show Runner Up – Grace Cook Sweepstakes-Youth (Most Blue Ribbons Won) – Alison Hernandez (2 Ribbons) Sweepstakes-Youth Runner Up – Leela Hanna (3 Ribbons) (Most 1st 2nd And 3rd Place Ribbons Won) Best Bulb Of The Year – Rebecca Morales (British Gamble) Best Miniature In Show – Dianna Hess (Y-Y) Best Miniature In Show Runner Up – Kenneth Kilgore (Y-Y) Best Minature In Show, 3-Stem – Shraddha Knight (Rip Van Winkle) Best Trumpet (Div 1) – Bernadette Romero Best Trumpet 3 Stem (Div 1) – Anita Nichols Best Large Cup (Div 2) – Vicki Bergstrom Best Small Cup (Div 3) – Cindy Hedgecock Best Double (Div 4) – Dianna Hess (4a), Best Double 3 Stem (Div 4) – Loise Galt Best Triandrus (Div 5) – Loise Galt Best Cyclamineus (Div 6) – Anita Nichols Best Jonquilla (Div 7) – Shraddha Knight Best Tazetta (Div 8) – Debbie Bainbridge Best Poeticus (Div 9) – Natalie Galt Best Hoop Petticoat (Div 10) – No Entries Best Split Corona (Div 11) – Anita Nichols Best Miscellaneous (Div 12) – Joann Bernard Best Wild Variant (Div 13) - Anita Nichols

The School welcomed its first students on March 17 in 1946 Cuyamaca Outdoor School (COS), the oldest outdoor school in California, is celebrating its 75th anniversary today. To celebrate, COS is encouraging people to get outside and enjoy nature! If you’re one of the millions of students that attended one of the San Diego County Office of Education’s (SDCOE) camps over the years - Cuyamaca, Palomar, or Fox – you learned to appreciate the great outdoors while at camp and probably have a few memories from your experience. Take a hike and journey back to that week in the mountains when it was just you, your classmates, your hike leader, and nature. “Sixth Grade Camp continues to be an unforgettable experience, offering students the opportunity to learn and grow in many ways, get outdoors, and disconnect for a little while,” said Principal Kris Pamintuan. “We are looking forward to resuming to in-person activities as soon as it’s safe to do so, welcoming students back to camp, and continuing the tradition of connecting kids to science and nature." In the meantime, Cuyamaca Outdoor School is (COS) is enjoying bringing camp home to students in videos and virtually. Cuyamaca Home Edition offers more than 50 videos created by staff, as well as activities, lessons, and more, to engage students in science and connect them to nature right from their own homes. “Our staff thought it would be

fun to share videos of them out in nature in hopes that it would encourage students and families to connect to nature, as well,” Pamintuan said. “Our goal was to share science and nature with as many people as we can.” COS also recently launched its new distance learning program, Virtually Camp Cuyamaca: An Outdoor School Experience. The five-day program is modeled on what students would experience during a week at COS. At Virtually Camp Cuyamaca, students explore science and nature curriculum by participating in activities online and outside. Each day, the student experience includes virtual field trips, exploration time activities, evening programs activities, and completing activities in their COS science journal. Additionally, each student DEHSIreceives an LBATSE 0781 kit. exclusive COS science “We are excited about our virtual camp offering and think students will find it fun, engaging,

SRAEY

Welcome Spring!!!

and valuable,” said Dustin Burns, outdoor education program specialist, who has been with COS for 25 years. “It has optional evening activities where students can log in from home and even include their families in listening to stories, singing songs, watching silly staff skits, and making smores.” The first group of San Diego 6th graders journeyed with their classroom teachers to Cuyamaca Outdoor School for 6th Grade Camp on March 17, 1946. The experience of spending five days and four nights in the mountains as part of a 6th grader's science and social studies lessons was unusual at the time, only being done in a few other places throughout the United States. The concept was a good one: provide first-hand experiences in environmental education and natural sciences while, at the same time, introducing children to social situations requiring continued on page 8

Enjoy all the colors that Julian Boasts This time of year.


2 The Julian News

March 24, 2021

HOME SERVICES

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

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WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

Long Time Pine Hills Mutual Water Company Employee Retires after 14 Years of Service. Every resident of Pine Hills knows Dave Southcott, superintendent of the Pine Hills Mutual Water Company. Dave is retiring at the end of March, 2021. Dave has been a driving force in maintaining and updating the infrastructure which nobody can see, namely the water distribution piping buried out of sight, and the complex operation of the Water Treatment Plant. Dave will be greatly missed as he is relocating to Montana. Dave is also well known in the community as a volunteer firefighter with the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District before it was disbanded. Dave will be greatly missed by all of us associated with the Pine Hills Mutual Water Company, and speaking for all the Shareholders, we wish him only the best in his retirement. Dave’s replacement is Brian Griffin, a local resident of Julian, who previously worked nine years at YMCA Camp Marston. Brian began work on January 4, 2021 alongside Dave learning all the Treatment Plant and Distribution System operational requirements. Dear Editor: To the people who wrote the Land Management article found in the March loth issue, about the extensive clearing of their favorite hiking/ walking area: anyone who has ever taken any interest in walking through a recent burn in our area will note, if they are observant, that it is the small dead dry branches on the chaparral plants and trees which burn during a fire. Those are the branches about the thickness of an index finger and smaller. At times, even the index sized branches often fail to burn. To protect chaparral groves from fire, one must go into the groves and carefully observe what exists there. A grove large or small can often be protected by removing all dead branches from the live plants, raking all kindling from the ground, and removing the "slash" to a safe place. It is the kindling which ignites and burns and causes fire to spread. Look at the chamise. During the summer and fall, half the plant is often gray in color. The gray is the thick multitude of dead extremely dry very fine threadlike branches, and it is these which give chamise its reputation for extreme flammability. When I lived in Wynola Springs, along Coleman Creek, we had on our north side a beautiful manzanita grove of about an eighth acre. I did the very work mentioned above to this grove. When the Cedar Fire burned up to the edge of the grove, it could not spread into the crowns of the plants and those manzanitas survived and still live today. I even have a witness to this, if necessary. My neighbor on the north side remained with his property during the fire. He later told me that my understanding of fire behavior was exactly what happened on the day the fire swept through Wynola on the west side of highway 78. A gentle ground fire went through the grove, burning along the ground through the dry grass stubble, fizzled out, never vaulting one bit into the crowns of the plants. How could it? The kindling and dry "ladder" fuels responsible for any sort of crown fire were gone. Not there. I want to mention, just below, some understanding of fire behavior. My wildland firefighting years were in the Northwest. West Side fire crews in Washington, Oregon, and Northern California, when not on a going fire, were a part of Timber Management. National Forest timber managed by the U.S. Forest Service. We prepared clearcuts on steep slopes for prescribed burning, and when the prescription was met we burned those slopes, 30 to 50 acres at a shot. The prescriptions often estimated hundreds and at times thousands of tons per acre of dead dry logging slash in those "units" to be lit on fire. We called it "light it and fight it." The only way to clear such enormous waste for future replanting was to burn it. I'm only recounting this here to indicate a good knowledge of fire behavior. After four long seasons of this, I transferred to strictly wildland fire, IHC, Interagency Hotshot Crews. If I never saw another clearcut, it was, to me, a good thing, although IH crews were occasionally called to help deal with a fire in logged over units. We went to chaparral fires in Southern California as well. About clearcutting: it is a bad practice and very damaging to the land, to the plant life, and to the humans and animals living there. All of them, insects, birds, fish, reptiles, mammals, soil bacteria, and so on. It is inimical to life, not a life affirming, life positive activity. When I look at the photo in The Julian News of the area "cleared," I see another version of clearcutting, plain and simple. I would encourage the local people affected by this decision to pursue their complaint further. Why? Because when Americans don't participate in their own governance, for instance land management decisions for PUBLIC lands, things like this can happen. About the Julian area in specific, it seems like any sort of land ethic which once existed here among the local population barely exists anymore. It's more or less gone, except perhaps for the Volcan Mountain Foundation, and an individual here and there. On my part, I loved that manzanita grove mentioned above, and in spite of my injuries I went out there with some simple handtools for 20 or 30 minutes at a time and took care of it quietly, gently. Protected it from fire, and used the kindling to help keep the trailer warm. I think it's an example of someone with a land ethic, who works at it on their own without the support of a large foundation. By saying things like this, I hope to inspire others. Greg Courson Whispering Pines

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cell: 619-972-0152

Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com *** In college, I got interested in news because the world was coming apart. The civil rights movement, the antiwar movement, the women's right movement. That focused my radio ambitions toward news. — Bob Edwards ***

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2021 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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March 24, 2021

Julian High School Senior Spotlight

Each week leading up to graduation the Julian News is shinning a spotlight on the graduation senior class at Julian High School. In part because with the pandemic protocols students have not had the opportunities to show their talents as they might during a normal year, with all activities being curtailed.

Zen Hill

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile !

Julian Elementary

2. What do you think you are going to miss most when you get out of high school?

It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today !

Sports

Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

3. What are your plans after high school? College/trade school/job?

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Go to Western Washington University

Get into Sports Business management

Freshman Year Soccer Team

Try to have fun

Go to Ramona freshman year

Math.

Leaving at lunch

The Retreat

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Health and Personal Services General Dentistry & Orthodontics

1. Where did you go to elementary school?

4. Career plans?

The Julian News 3

Julian Medical Clinic 2721 Washington Street Julian, CA 92036

5. Favorite memory?

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6. What words of advice would you give the class of 2022? 7. If you could give your past self any advice what would it be?

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Burrowing Owls Find Home In The Grasslands Of Ramona March 17 event marked the largest reintroduction of the species in the San Diego region, building on efforts by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance and key partners in restoring the population. San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance team members gathered with Ramona residents and representatives of natural resource agencies to welcome some new neighbors to the Ramona grasslands: 24 western burrowing owls. The grounddwelling raptors, which hatched at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park,

were reintroduced to a swath of suitable habitat preserved as part of the Regional Multiple Species Conservation Plan and managed by the San Diego Habitat Conservancy (SDHC). Native to western North America, resident populations of burrowing owls are very rare in San Diego County. A resident breeding population has not been documented in the Ramona area in recent history, though the grasslands provide prime habitat with underground burrows and abundant prey. The reintroduction is part of a larger

From The Supervisor’s Desk

Notes from Supervisor Joel Anderson

The New Butterfield RV Park Julian has a new “suburb” in the desert. Butterfield Manufactured Home and RV Community, about ten miles south of Shelter Valley, is a growing community of RVs and mobile homes on what used to be the old Butterfield campground. The Park, now a bit over two years old, currently has about 150 occupied spaces with approximately 250 residents. The goal is to expand to a bit over 300 spaces for approximately 1,000 people. The park has a small store, a clubhouse, 2 swimming pools, a dog park and, according Park Manager Kyle Newman and Assistant Manager Jaydee Peterson, great community spirit. There was a corral for tenant’s horses in front of the store which, together with the old wagon by the side, communicated a Western theme. The development has approximately half of its power coming from an extensive array of solar panels and a good supply of water from artesian wells. There is a generator to provide water and keep the store running when SDG&E shuts down power and the plan is to develop their own microgrid. Athens Real Estate Ventures founded the park with the goal of working with Homeless Outreach and Veteran’s programs to get people into housing. There are some Section 8 (US Government subsidized) tenants—these are rentals but many of the tenants are purchasing their trailers or houses. Julian is the nearest town for the residents and their post office. A number of the residents commute to work here, and about fifty students are bussed to Julian schools each day. There is a Feeding America drive at the Park every fourth Friday and outsiders are welcome to come. The park can also do a Diaper Bank though arrangements need to be made in advance. Butterfield affords people a low-cost alternative for housing, which is both scarce and

by Kiki Skagen-Munshi

expensive in San Diego County. It also gives them a beautiful and unique (if warm in summer) place

to live, tucked away in an almostforgotten corner of San Diego’s Back Country.

effort in the county that involves many partners, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance and SDHC. “This project is another example of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s long history of partnering with San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance to conserve San Diego County’s native species,” said Scott Sobiech, field supervisor at the Service’s Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office. “We cannot accomplish our mission without our valued partners.” “Actions like this are why we do what we do,” said Don Scoles, executive director of SDHC. “This is the perfect example of how planning and implementation of regional conservation goals has enabled SDHC to be ready to take this colony and manage the land specifically for the burrowing owls for generations to come.” Before March 17, 2021 reintroduction, the birds acclimated to the environment inside aviaries. As representatives from the organizations looked on, the temporary structures were removed, completing the owls’ reintroduction. While there are no guarantees the birds will remain in Ramona and start a resident population, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance and SDHC staff will continue to monitor and support the owls that remain through supplemental feeding and other management actions. “We are delighted to be able to bring a species to the Ramona area that will serve to enrich the grasslands area,” said Colleen Wisinski, wildlife recovery expert with San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance. “I am certain that these adorable owls will become celebrities and a beacon of hope in this region – being watched over by the community and everyone who loves birds.” Standing around 10 inches tall with a 2-foot wingspan, western burrowing owls are the only ground-dwelling owl on the continent. The owls often take over burrows from other species that dig holes (like

Hello friends. As you may know, I was recently sworn in on January 4 to represent you on the San Diego County Board of Supervisors after the retirement of former Supervisor Dianne Jacob who served our community well. I wanted to take a moment and let you know of the ways that my office can be of assistance to you. Many of you may know me from my service as an Assemblyman and State Senator in the California Legislature. I have been a longtime grassroots advocate for issues that I, and many East County San Diegans, care about. In every position I’ve held, I promised my constituents that I was not in office to become a potted plant and, regardless of the political environment I am in, my goal is to make government work for East County residents. With dozens of bills passed, landmark legislation authored, and thousands of constituent issues resolved, I am proud of the service my team provided and I will continue this same approach serving you now as Supervisor. In the first two months since being sworn-in, I have built out a wonderful staff and they are ready to serve you. Many are not aware how our office may be of assistance, so I’d like to share an example. Just days after coming into office, it was brought to my attention that residents of Alpine were being assessed and billed for fire services provided by both the County of San Diego Fire Authority and the Alpine Fire District. I immediately contacted the County Assessor’s office to investigate and act on the issue. I also sent letters to all the affected constituents, informing them of this situation. As a result, the problem was resolved, and Alpine residents are no longer being taxed twice for the same services. Since January, my office has been able to assist constituents with several issues and no task is too small, we want to do what we can to help as quickly as possible. Not only do I represent your concerns at the Supervisors’ board meetings, but my job and priority is to serve as a resource to you. If you have any County issues with which you need assistance, please contact my office as we are here to help. You can contact me using the form on my website at www. supervisorjoelanderson.com, which I will also keep updated with important information and helpful community resources. Again, it’s an honor to serve and I look forward to hearing from you.

ground squirrels) to use as their nest burrows. Insects and small rodents serve as their main food sources. This reintroduction extends San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance’s efforts to restore western burrowing owls to the Southwest region. Numerous burrowing owls have been moved out of development footprints and reintroduced in protected areas that can be managed to support them. In San Diego County, there was only a single breeding population, in Otay Mesa. Over the past few years, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance has worked with partners to establish a new breeding population at the Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve, managed by CDFW. This effort appears to be a success in the making, and the population continues to grow as reintroduced owls remain on site and produce offspring. It is hoped

that this success can be repeated at Ramona grasslands, adding a third population of this endearing and iconic grassland species and helping to secure their future in Southern California. Anyone with a computer or smartphone can help researchers better understand burrowing owls and improve conservation outcomes by participating in Wildwatch Burrowing Owl. Motion-sensing cameras collect images of owl families in Otay Mesa that citizen scientists can help classify. This serves a critical research function that informs science-based solutions for their recovery. For an owl-eyed view into a burrow, tune into the Burrowing Owl Cam streaming from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. About San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance is a nonprofit international continued on page 10


4 The Julian News

Julian

ACTIVITIES & LODGING JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations Look for our return on the fourth to the Witch Creek Wednesday of the month School House The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

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Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Calendar CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 2nd Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 619.504.6301 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist

Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

March

Wednesday, March 24 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

April

Thursday, April 1 Fools Day Saturday, April 3 Meet The Easter Bunny Julian Women’ Club 2607 C Street, 11am - 2pm Sunday, April 4 Easter Wednesday, April 7 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, April 15 Tax Day - Payments Due Wednesday, April 21 Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

May

Wednesday, May 5 Cinco de Mayo Sunday, May 9 Mother Day

and

March 24, 2021

Back Country Happenings

Simple Tips For A Better Wedding Registry (Family Features) For some couples, the idea of registering for wedding gifts is an exciting way to start planning for the home they'll be sharing as newlyweds. For others, the registry is just one more chore to check off the wedding to-do list. Regardless of where you fall on the love-it-or-hate-it spectrum, most experts agree a registry is a good idea, especially for couples who will be setting up a home together for the first time. Keep these tips and etiquette guidelines in mind to get the most out of your registry. Take inventory of what you have and what you need. For couples who've lived alone or together, the registry may be a way to fill in gaps for necessities neither of you already have. It's also a good way to begin upgrading the less expensive kitchen items and furnishings you had as college students or singles. Make a list of your needs and wants so you don't forget any essentials. If you're still in doubt, request a checklist from the store where you'll be registering so you can do some planning. Register for things at a wide range of price points. The whole purpose of a registry is to make it easy for your guests to get you things you'll like and need. Part of making it easy is recognizing your guests have diverse financial situations. While it's customary to gift the bride and groom, not everyone can afford an extravagant gift, especially if they've spent money on travel and attire to attend. While it's

• On March 23, 1839, the initials "O.K." are first published, in The Boston Morning Post. Meant as an abbreviation for "oll korrect," a popular slang misspelling of "all correct" at the time, OK steadily made its way into the everyday speech of Americans. • On March 26, 1920, "This Side of Paradise" is published, immediately launching 23-yearold F. Scott Fitzgerald to fame and fortune. While in Europe, Fitzgerald finished his masterpiece, "The Great Gatsby" (1925). • On March 25, 1933, the newly commissioned USS Sequoia becomes the official presidential yacht. Previously, the Department of Commerce had used the Sequoia as a decoy to catch Prohibition lawbreakers. • On March 22, 1947, President Harry Truman establishes a sweeping loyalty investigation of federal employees in response to public fears of communism in the U.S. Congress had already launched investigations of communist influence in Hollywood. • On March 28, 1958, William Christopher Handy, the famous blues musician known as W.C., dies in New York City. Jazz standards "The Memphis Blues" and "St. Louis Blues" are his most famous compositions, but his musical legacy can be heard in works of composers as varied as George Gershwin and Keith Richards. • On March 27, 1973, actor Marlon Brando declines the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in "The Godfather" as a protest against Hollywood's portrayal of Native Americans in film. The first performer to turn down a Best Actor Oscar was George C. Scott, for "Patton" in 1971. • On March 24, 1989, one of the worst oil spills in U.S. territory begins when the supertanker Exxon Valdez, owned and operated by the Exxon Corporation, runs aground on a reef in Prince William Sound in southern Alaska. An estimated 11 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the water, polluting more than 700 miles of coastline. © 2021 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

5 Ways to Spark Your Child’s Interest in STEM

a good idea to offer modest options, don't shy away from bigger ticket items that a small group might chip in on together. Keep access in mind when you choose where to register. Avoid stores that are local or regional if you have many guests who live out of the area. Also avoid the temptation to choose online only options, as some guests will prefer to see what they're buying. Aim for a mix of large national stores and online retailers. Plan to block off at least a few hours for an in-person registry. It will take time to get everything set up. Traveling through the store, debating options and making your selections could take longer than expected. Also be sure to ask how you can add to or edit your registry after your initial visit. Get your partner involved. There are bound to be some parts of the registry your partner may not care about, but asking for input and making decisions together lets you both share in the excitement. Focus on things you'll each find useful as you settle into your new home. For example, the person who will be responsible for taking out the trash should get to pick the new kitchen trash can. Find more inspiration for planning your way to wedded bliss at eLivingtoday.com.

The past year has revealed many things, and among them is the extent to which we rely on science to solve problems that impact our everyday lives. Scientists everywhere are making science cool and are an inspiration to kids. Children represent the future and are tomorrow’s scientists, so it’s in all our interests that they develop a love of science. As kids continue to learn virtually, however, the lack of connection to their teachers and peers can make it challenging for parents to find new and exciting ways to keep kids engaged. These challenges come at a time when it’s never been more important to encourage kids to lean-in to science. According to an independent research study, the 3M State of Science Index, 74% of people are more inclined to believe that the world needs more people to pursue STEM-related careers to benefit our future society.

To get there, kids need a strong STEM foundation. Here are five tips to help you inspire initial interest in science in your children that can bloom right in your own home: 1. Emphasize the impact science has on the world. Encourage kids to observe real-world problems and actively think about how STEM skills can address the issues they care most about, whether in their school, community or globally. As they observe, help your child understand the numerous ways STEM already impacts their lives. 2. Connect science to their interests. We often think of science as existing in a silo, but it can be connected to just about anything! Kids are much more likely to find a “way-in” to science if they can match it to their interests. For example, a love of cooking can easily lead to an continued on page 12

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March 24, 2021

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts

The Julian News 5

by Michele Harvey

Portable Phone Devices

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Snow And A Cat Goldie likes to go out after breakfast and peruse the hunting prospects or whatever it is that cats do when humans aren’t watching. Goldie likes to go out after breakfast A Lot. Goldie REALLY likes to go out after breakfast. Unless there is snow. Then it’s, “Whoa, what is this white, cold wet stuff that covers my ground… MY ground… How Dare It!” If there were ever an affronted cat, Goldie beholding snow is an affronted cat. He is a Persecuted Pussycat. He suffers and so does everyone else given Goldie’s ability to transmit his profound unhappiness at being confined to the house to all those anywhere near him. Goldie should read “Scottish Nurses in Romania in World War I”. The level of suffering in that book surpasses even Goldie’s profound misery at the sight of a white cold wet-paw world outside. Not only the soldiers who were brought in mainly to field hospitals without beds to die on straw pallets, or have legs amputated without enough anesthetic, covered in mud and fleas and probably lice. The nurses themselves, volunteers from Scotland to the Eastern Front, lived in makeshift quarters through a winter without adequate heat, happy for a hot cup of tea and bread, forget the cheese, unable to wash themselves or clothes for days on end, sleeping often on bare boards in train cars as the Eastern Front Allies retreated up through the Danube Plain to Iasi in 1916. Setting up bare bones “hospitals” to care for waves of bleeding and dying wounded then taking them down to move north yet again. And cold Always cold, Even for a Scot it was cold. Goldie, like most Americans in the 21st century, has only had the barest taste of real suffering which raises a question about what this does to character. What kind of view of life do people have who think that having their air conditioning on the blink for a day is a real problem? It’s an interesting question which has been posed to Goldie but he doesn’t listen. He sits at the door and meows, hoping the snow has gone away. Since ten minutes ago. The door is opened, he puts his catnose out into the frosty air, dabs at the white with a paw, and asks why we haven’t shoveled him a path to the barn. Spoiled brat.

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I remember pagers being popular in the late 1980s. Doctors needed them for emergency calls. When we saw high school age students using them, we assumed they could be using them for drug deals and maybe some of them were. When my pregnant daughter lived with us here in Julian and I was going to college at Grossmont Community College; I kept a pager with me in case she went into labor and needed to get ahold of me. She never quite understood the meaning of emergency calls because she would page me; I would rush out of class to call her just for her to ask when I planned to be home. About the time I was splitting up with my children’s father; I flew to North Dakota as a surprise visitor for my brother’s college graduation when he received both his Batchelor’s and Master’s degrees in Divinity. As my brother said, he had been preaching for many years, so it was time to complete the job. My then husband had me take a portable telephone with me just in case I needed it. What a mistake! It came with a five-pound battery pack and he didn’t tell me how to use it. That was when portable telephones had to roam, which he also didn’t tell me about. I had no use for a portable telephone for years until Mike and I got together. Before we owned The Julian News, we owned Julian Web, an Internet Service Provider. Julian Web was great until the Cedar Fire. Once the fire hit, many of our clients moved off the hill and were able to get faster service. AT&T was given the option of offering faster service six months before smaller companies were offered the service. On top of that, to get faster service, you had to live within two miles of town. We live four miles from town. Mike drove out on house calls, so naturally he bought himself a cell phone. He also bought himself a handspring which is like a Palm Pilot, but he left that somewhere and it never came home. Sometime through the years Mike gifted me with a cell phone. It was a flip phone which some people call a clamshell type phone. I loved using my little cell phone and eventually wore it out. My second cell phone was a good one too, but I have a lot of trouble plugging my phones into the chargers and apparently bent the prongs. Some of my friends urged me to switch to a Smart Phone. Mike bought me one and that was a really bad idea. With my hand tremors and with the phone working by barely touching it; I managed to go to screens I didn’t know were there. I also had a very difficult time getting where I wanted to go, so I asked my husband, my two sons and my three grandchildren for help constantly. I remember times when I meant to call a number that began with an area code of 619. With my tremors, using the smart phone, the area code may have looked like 61111111111199999999999. Not good. After just a few weeks I nearly begged Mike to get me a flip phone, telling him I just couldn’t use the Smart Phone. It took him a while to find one and find one he did. One thing I like best about my flip phone is that when I press any button or specific place on the face of the phone, I hear a clicking sound. If I don’t hear a clicking sound, then I need to press that button again. The Smart Phone made no sounds when I thought I was pressing, so I had no immediate idea if I was connecting. This newer flip phone is more advanced than any previous flip phones that I used, so it takes time for me to get used to it. For instance: when I look for a contact, the phone almost always takes me to an edit page. My eleven-year-old granddaughter had to show me how to get past that. Another thing it does when I’m looking for a contact is that it will automatically take me to the last person I called. Once again, my eleven-year-old granddaughter showed me how to circumnavigate that page. Now, none of this may interest you. However, I have recently found out that I really do need to have a portable telephone. One day I was sitting in my car in Santa Ysabel listening to the radio, not realizing that I was running my car battery all of the way down because I had turned the engine off. When I tried to turn the engine on, it wouldn’t, so I called my husband from my cell phone to his cell phone. He rescued me using the new battery cables I gave him for Christmas. Two days later I bought a new battery for my car. One day at home, I tripped on a carpet and couldn’t get up. I lack core strength, meaning my body parts are weak. I checked all of my body parts and decided nothing was broken or even exceptionally painful, so I called Mike at work to help me up. I keep my cell phone in my pocket whenever possible for these kinds of occasions. He came home within ten minutes, got me up on my feet and I didn’t go near that carpet for days. Sometimes I lose my balance, but not so much anymore. I’ve been getting physical therapy at Alpine Physical Therapy in downtown Julian, and they taught me exercises to do at home. It’s taken months, yet I finally feel my legs getting stronger when I don’t slack off of my few exercises and I always keep my portable phone in my pocket, just in case. These are my thoughts.

Tips To Boost Girls' Interest In Math And Science (StatePoint) The global challenges of the future will require kids today to have a strong STEM foundation. Unfortunately, girls are not always expected or encouraged to pursue these fields of study. Here are some great ways to boost girls’ interest in math and science: • Celebrate female scientists: Throughout history, female scientists have helped change the world, although sometimes they did so behind the scenes, from Rosalind Franklin whose work -- though largely unrecognized at the time -- was critical in the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA, to doctor, engineer and NASA astronaut Mae Jemison, the first African American woman to travel in space. Highlighting the vital contributions female scientists have made can show young girls what is possible for themselves. • Give them the right tools: Give girls the best chance of success in their high level math and science classes by equipping them with the latest tools. Graphing calculators that bring mathematics to life allow for a more comprehensive learning environment in any classroom. The fx-CG500 from Casio, for example, not only offers a high-resolution touchscreen LCD display with over 65,000 colors, but its expanded features and improved catalog function supports math exploration. Using quick commands and a wide range of features, students have the ability to easily draw three dimensional graphs, such as planes, cylinders and spheres, and view them from various angles, and a cross-section option with a special zoom function enables them to further examine the graph for deeper analysis. • Make home a learning lab: Math and science are not just for the classroom. Make your home a learning environment too by providing your child with science and robotics kits. You can also check out free online resources that can help kids get a leg up in the classroom, like the Casio Education website. Found at casioeducation.com, the site features tons of resources to assist with remote learning and helps incorporate technology into mathematics learning. • Go the extra mile: Extracurricular programming can make continued on page 11

Shirley Helen Beyer April 17, 1941 - March 13, 2021

It is with great sorrow we announce the passing of Shirley Beyer on March 13, 2021. She is survived by her husband of 57 years, Marv Beyer, daughters Tracy and Tammy, their husbands Mike and Steve, sister Carole Wilson, and grandchildren Nicholas and Brigette. Shirley was born in Mott, North Dakota to Henry and Helen Roemmich on April 17, 1941. As a teenager she moved to San Diego. She graduated from Crawford High School in 1959 and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from San Diego State University in 1963. She married her college sweetheart in 1963 and they created a home and family in San Diego. Shirley worked as a school secretary for San Diego Unified School District until she retired in 1998. In the year 2000 she and Marv moved to Julian. They found a house on a beautiful piece of land in Pine Hills and both she and Marv took a lot of pride in creating a beautiful home. Shirley enjoyed being active in her community and volunteered for her church and the Julian Woman’s Club, writing both their newsletters for more than 10 years. Those who knew Shirley knew she liked nothing more than to be camping with her husband and family. Some of her very favorite places to camp were Yosemite and Yellowstone National Park, and Anza Borrego State Park. She loved hiking, bicycling, sitting around a campfire, and creating amazing dinners in their motorhome. Shirley was kind, loving, smart and had the perfect amount of spice to make those around her laugh. She put effort and took pride in everything she did, and made everything around her beautiful, neat, and orderly. She deeply loved her family, and her passing leaves a great emptiness in all of us. She left us much too soon, but she loved her life and lived it to the fullest. Bonham Bros & Stewart Mortuary and Cremation Service is assisting the family.

Gerald D. Sanner

January 3, 1946 - February 6, 2021 Gerald D. Sanner died peacefully at his home in Ramona on February 6, 2021 at 75 years old. Gerry was born January 3, 1946 in Decatur, Illinois. He and his wife, Mitzi, grew up together and were married for 58 years. He entered the Army in September of 1963 and was honorably discharged in September of 1971 with a rank of SP6. Gerry was someone you never wanted to play Trivia Pursuit with, you would never get a turn, but he'd give you a small chance when playing dominoes. He had a passion for trains and sure loved his Grateful Dead music! Gerry is survived by his wife, Mitzi Sanner, son, Gerry Sanner (wife, Kimberly), daughter, Melissa Brean (husband, Johnny), Brother, Gary Sanner, three granddaughters, Chevielle SannerHughley (husband, Scott), Brooke Brean and Brenna Brean and one great-granddaughter, Emilee Hughley, who great Grand-Dad was so proud he taught her how to wink! A private family service will be held at Miramar National Cemetery.


6 The Julian News

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*** I was tremendously fortunate to be alive and a lawyer, working at a university so I had more flexible hours, when the women's movement was coming alive and when it became possible to argue successfully for a view of the equal protection clause that included women. — Ruth Bader Ginsburg *** 1. LITERATURE: Which 19th-century novel begins with the sentence, “There was no possibility of taking a walk that day”? 2. CHEMISTRY: Which element’s Latin name is hydragyrum and goes by the symbol Hg? 3. HISTORY: Who was the first female detective in the United States, hired by the Pinkerton Detective Agency in 1856? 4. ADVERTISINGS SLOGANS: What product’s 1970s advertising slogan was, “I can’t believe I ate the whole thing”? 5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Only two Catholics have served as president of the United States. Who are they? 6. MOVIES: The “Star Wars” movie series was partly filmed in which African country? 7. LANGUAGE: What does the name Boca Raton (Florida) mean in Spanish? 8. U.S. STATES: The highest and lowest points in the contiguous United States can be found in which state? 9. ENTERTAINERS: Which American actor and comedian was born Eric Marlon Bishop? 10. TELEVISION: Which 1950s Western series featured the theme song “Happy Trails”? Answers on page 11

Chef’s Corner Spring Mix Greens Herald A New Season

Years ago, when bags and bins of spring mix lettuce greens first appeared in the grocery stores in early March, I must admit, I was skeptical. To me, spring mix looked like small leaves of multicolored lettuce mixed with lawn clippings. The variety of colors and flavors, textures and varieties were radically different from my traditional (and quite frankly boring) salad consisting of iceberg and romaine leaves, and maybe a tomato or two.

After trying spring mix, I’ve become a fan of the interesting combination of flavors and textures. Now one of my favorite spring pastimes is visiting my local farmers market and looking at all the varieties of lettuce greens at their colorful best. spring mix, also known as “mesclun,” is a name used for a salad mixture of leaves of various species. The name comes from the Spanish word “mezclar,” which translates as “to mix.” Traditional mesclun usually consisted of chervil, arugula, lettuce and endive. Now, spring mix is typically made up of 16 fresh greens and lettuces of varying tastes and

textures, including red romaine, baby spinach, radicchio, green romaine, red oak leaf, mizuna, red leaf, lollo rosso, arugula, red mustard, green mustard, red chard, frisee and tatsoi. About half of the greens and lettuces are sweet and mild, while others provide a complementary, slightly bitter edge. Spring mix is available yearround with a peak season in spring and summer. These delicate greens contain a punch of flavor and are packed with vitamins A, C and E, calcium and potassium. Here’s an overview of the many types of spring mix lettuce continued on page 11


March 24, 2021

Decorative Stove

Even though the auction catalog warned that the shipping cost would be high because of the weight of the 29-by-38-inch cast iron stove, the winning bid was $4,688. Stoves were often the largest objects in the room of 18th- and 19th-century homes. They were

The Julian News 7

needed for heat and cooking. Cast iron stoves came in many styles, most cast with curlicues and pictures formed by a mold. Special stoves had extra trim, a few tiles on the front or a complete set of tiles showing people, architecture or greenery. A very unusual stove made about 1895 was covered in English Minton and Wedgwood tiles picturing the 12 months of the year, fairy tales and nursery rhymes created by Walter Crane for two of his 1887 children's books, and other Crane drawings of fairy tales and Aesop's fables. Additional tiles were copies of pictures of the month by Helen Miles in the 1870s. The buyer also got the stove's impressive provenance: a family scrapbook that identified previous owners, including the founder of Hobart Brothers of Troy New York, and a pictured article in Colonial Homes Magazine from 1994. Even though the stove had been converted to gas and

would cost a lot to ship, it sold for $4,688. *** Q: I bought a miniature Stetson hat and hat box at a yard sale several years ago and paid $2 for it. A friend told me when he was a young boy, his job was to stand outside a department store and when anyone left the store with a real Stetson box, give them one of these small boxes with the hat. Can you give me any idea of age and value? A: These miniature hats and hatboxes were not free. They were gift certificates someone paid for. The box included a gift certificate for a new hat, so you could give someone a gift of a hat and they could choose it themselves. Miniature Stetson hats are the most often found but other hat manufacturers also made miniature hats and hat boxes to promote their brands. Miniature Stetson hats were made in felt and in plastic. Hatboxes were usually made

of paper or cardboard, though some were made of tin. Some boxes just have the brand name, some are decorated. A check of recent sales shows a felt hat in a tin hatbox for $40 and a plastic hat in a cardboard hatbox for $24 to $40. *** CURRENT PRICES Shaving mug, occupational, D.K. Oliver M.D., rose, leaves, gold trim, marked, France, 3 1/2 inches, $48. Advertising sign, chicken farm, New Musser Leghorn Farms Pullet, images of chicks and hens, metal, 1940s-1950s, 13 x 10 inches, $165. Poster, "What'll You Do After You Graduate?" Dustin Hoffman as The Graduate, Volunteers in Service to America, 1968, 24 x 18 inches, $420. Scientific instrument, yardstick, maple shaft, whalebone end caps, diamond-shaped inlay, inch hash marks, 1800s, 36 inches, $469.

*** TIP: Large mirrors should not be taken down to be cleaned. Get an assistant to hold the mirror steady while it is being wiped. *** Looking to declutter, downsize or settle an estate? Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2021 by Terry and Kim Kovel has the resources you're looking for. ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

I have come to understand that in order to effectively advance women's rights, we need to galvanize a global women's movement. — Zainab Salbi Women

1. The Territorial Cup is a trophy awarded in the college football rivalry series between what two teams? 2. What nickname did Stevie Wonder bestow on Philadelphia 76ers legend Darryl Dawkins? 3. What endurance race did drivers Hurley Haywood and Scott Pruett each win a record five times? 4. Craven Cottage stadium in London is the home ground of what English Premier League football club? 5. Figure skating legend Sonja Henie hailed from what country? 6. What infamous corporation held naming rights to the Houston Astros’ stadium from 2000-02? 7. What team selected Purdue running back Mike Alstott in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft? Answers on page 11


March 24, 2021

8 The Julian News

We like to play harmless pranks...

Newspaper Fun!

Pastor Cindy Arntson

Years ago, when I attended a series on violence, I learned how vital it is for people to be meaningfully connected to other people. Often times, a tragic result of being disconnected is a violent action. We were told that one common characteristic of the youth who were involved in school shootings is feelings of isolation. This need for connection seems to be important to all areas of violence prevention, including self-harm. A study done in Chicago showed that in communities where a high percentage of people know their neighbors, the violent crime rate goes down significantly. Certainly, in cases of domestic abuse, secrecy and isolation from others are needed to perpetuate the violence. In single parent families, one study found that simply sending in a public health nurse once a week to help support the parent decreased the rate of abuse 80%. The risk of suicide is greater for those who have recently lost a loved one or who feel especially isolated. Our human connections have lifesaving potential. This past year of isolation because of the pandemic has been especially challenging for all of us but especially those who started the year with challenges of mental health, domestic abuse or addiction. I recently saw an interview with five veterans who struggled with PTSD. All of them were healing and coping before the pandemic through increased social contact and involvement. All of them got worse and felt suicidal at one point or another during the pandemic. All of them were able to reach out for the help they needed and offered hopeful words of encouragement to others in similar circumstances. Most of us probably assume that as the pandemic subsides and the restrictions ease, these challenges of social isolation will disappear. But I recently read an article in the Huffington Post (March 9,2021) in which therapists warned that the effects of this long isolation will continue to threaten mental health for a while. They said that we should be on the lookout for worrisome symptoms in ourselves and those around us. Some people may experience extreme anxiety and reluctance to go back out into the world even after it’s “safe.” Depression and suicidal impulses may not disappear immediately. Rory O’Connor, director of the Suicidal Behavior Research Laboratory at the University of Glasgow said, “With regards to suicide, although a rise in suicide is not inevitable, experience from previous epidemics and economic recessions suggests that suicide rates could increase, especially in vulnerable groups.” And children are especially vulnerable to long-term mental health effects. To help our children, Denise Daniels, a child development expert said, “Offer comfort and reassurance for their safety. Increase physical contact during times of uncertainty. Talk about all the people that are working hard to keep them safe.” Unfortunately, many people feel that they cannot tell others about their mental illness, their depression, their suicidal tendencies or the abuse within their families. They fear judgment and rejection. Needing to keep a significant part of their life secret intensifies their feelings of isolation. This hesitancy means we need to be more observant for signs of distress and protect their confidentiality. As a small community, we tend to know more about our neighbors and maybe see more of what might otherwise be hidden in a more urban setting. We need to be ready to really listen when we ask, “How are you?” We need to take seriously and without judgment someone’s admission of hopelessness, depression or loneliness. We need to be ready to set aside our busy agenda to help meet someone’s desperate and urgent need to feel accepted and connected. I believe that

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underst and Jesters were people who would entertain crowds at 10 marketplaces or festivals. Read the clues below to Today we learn about jesters and have clowns to entertain us. to fill in the puzzle: We put a 1. ________ jesters entertained the king 6. some jesters used ________ or props rubber 2. ________ jesters entertained crowds 7. sometimes they were allowed to ________ in ducky in of people in marketplaces or at festivals ways that were not allowed for other people the fridge. 3. some people thought jesters were 8. dressed in many kinds of ________ “unlucky” and others thought they 9. sometimes they helped people or a king to would bring good ________ ________ what was going on by telling stories 4. jesters might wear ________ to 10. a man or a ________ could be a jester surprise people 11. the _________ day of April is April Fool’s Day 5. they told stories and ________ 12. it is a day to play fun, harmless ________

Really? Can I see it?

Mustard

Ketchup

• trickster • clown • magician • jester • fool • joker • prankster • buffoon • entertainer • actor • acrobat • puppeteer • juggler • storyteller • fire-eater • contortionist • tightrope walker • animal trainer

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D I B B T I G I H T W N I R O T C A J O

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All in Good Fun!

April Fool’s Day is a lighthearted celebration. Many countries around the world have special days of fun, with people playing good-natured jokes on one another. These surprise-filled days almost always occur when the season of spring is coming. Do you think that the sunnier, warmer weather puts people in a lighter mood? Below are some things we like to use to fool or kid our friends. Can you match each item to its description? 1. joke 2. riddle 3. hoax 4. wisecrack 5. pun

A. a puzzling question or problem posed: the answer is hard to figure out B. a “fresh” or “smart” remark C. a false story told in such a way as to make people think it is real D. something done for fun; a jest E. clever use of a word to have more than one meaning

with sincere desire and by God’s grace, we can. May it be so. If you’re experiencing serious emotional distress related to COVID-19 and are considering self-harm, call 1-800-2738255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Cindy Arntson is ordained

clergy serving Community United Methodist Church at 2898 Highway 78, Julian. Direct all questions and correspondence to: Faith and Living, c/o CUMCJ, PO Box 460, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

The Original 6th Grade Camp continued from page 1

the application of democratic principles and individual responsibility. Seventy-five years

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Help me find my bag of pranks. Then find and circle the words in the puzzle that describe jesters and some of the talents or skills they display.

Boy, little kids are easy to fool.

I love to make people laugh!

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Hey! A spaceship is landing on the school parking lot!

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2021 V17-12

April Fool‛s Day Surprises The first day of April is April Fool’s Day. It is a time for lots of fun. People like to play harmless jokes and pranks. One favorite trick is to point out something that’s not really there! April Fool’s Day used to be called All Fool’s Day. It is thought to have started in France. A long time ago, March 21st was the date of the New Year. A little over a week of parties and fun followed. On the last day of the festivities, April 1st, formal visits were paid and gifts exchanged. In the 16th century, the Gregorian calendar was introduced. March 21st was no longer New Year’s Day and April 1st was no longer the right day to visit and give gifts. News traveled slowly in those early times, so many people continued to celebrate April 1st as the last big day of the holiday season. Many others did not like the change of date and refused to change their ways. People who clung to the old ways were called “April fools.” Today, on April 1st, you might hear someone call out, “Poisson d’Avril!” They have fooled someone and are calling them an “April fish.” The person took the “bait” and was easily “caught.” April Fool’s Day is a day for tricks that hurt no one. It is a time for laughter.

...on our friends on April Fool’s Day.

later, the tradition continues. SDCOE's 6th Grade Camp program is the oldest outdoor

school in California. Until 2010, SDCOE hosted 6th Grade Camp at three sites: Cuyamaca Outdoor

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2021

Faith and Living

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School, Camp Fox near Santa Ysabel, and Camp Palomar on Palomar Mountain. Now, 6th Grade Camp occurs solely at the Cuyamaca site, about an hour east of San Diego. Approximately 12,000 students attend camp each school year, with up to 432 students participating each week. The program is open to public, charter, and private schools in San Diego County and beyond. “In the Santee School District, we take learning seriously, which is why we continue to support the week-long outdoor education program provided by the SDCOE for our 6th grade students,” said Superintendent Kristin Baranski. “We know the delivered curriculum is top notch and staff is highly qualified. Our students will never forget their camp experience and we love hearing their stories when they return.”

SDCOE is celebrating Cuyamaca's anniversary all year, and is encouraging 6th Grade Camp alumni to share their memories and learn how they can help more San Diego County students attend 6th Grade Camp. Send camp stories, photos, and journal entries to cuyamaca@ sdcoe.net, and consider joining the nonprofit Outdoor Education Foundation. Connect with 6th Grade Camp on Facebook and spread the word with friends, family members, and colleagues who grew up in San Diego. *** Women have a lot to say about how to advance women's rights, and governments need to learn from that, listen to the movement and respond. — Charlotte Bunch ***


March 24, 2021

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

Senate Bill 668 Needed To Buy Time For California Families It’s hard to imagine anything more callous than the government sending a giant tax bill to a bereaved family, but thanks to Proposition 19, many California families will have that unfortunate experience. Prop. 19, which passed by a razor-thin margin in the November election, expanded a tax break for some homeowners but repealed an important taxpayer protection for families. The effective date of this change was February 16, before most Californians even knew what had happened. Here’s what happened: homes that are transferred between parents and children are no longer excluded from reassessment. Previously, children would continue to pay the same property tax bill that their parents had paid, with increases in the assessed value capped by Prop. 13 at a maximum of 2% per year. Not anymore. Now children inheriting their parents’ home or other property will receive a new tax bill based on a current market-rate assessment. There are only limited exclusions for a family farm and for a home that is the primary residence of the parents if the home becomes the primary residence of the child within one year. Otherwise, the home and any other properties such as small businesses or rental homes will be reassessed as of the date of transfer. The new annual tax bill will be 1% of the market value which will easily double or triple the property tax bills of most transferred properties. Unfortunately, the costly advertising campaign pushing Proposition 19 never mentioned the loss of this “intergenerational transfer” protection and the fact that this happened to families in the midst of a pandemic made it difficult or impossible to get information from government employees or even to record documents. There was little time to consult an attorney or revise an estate plan before the February 16 deadline arrived. As families discover the harm of Prop. 19, more and more people are contacting the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and telling us that they want to see the exclusion from reassessment for parent-child transfers of property reinstated. We agree. We are urging lawmakers to support

by Jon Coupal

a legislative constitutional amendment that reverses the damaging part of Prop. 19 and restores the constitutional protections that it quietly removed. HJTA is also sponsoring Senate Bill 668, authored by Sen. Patricia Bates, R-Laguna Niguel, to delay the effective date of this portion of Prop. 19 for two years, until February 16, 2023. Such a delay is within the Legislature’s power. Even though the effective date of the measure is now part of the state constitution, a 2007 court ruling in the case of Strong v. State Board of Equalization ruled that the definition of “change of ownership” may be altered by legislation. This offers a path to a reprieve for pandemicweary Californians now at risk of a sudden and unaffordable tax increase during a time of bereavement. We now know that Proposition 19 blindsided voters who were never informed as to its real impact. The parentchild transfer exclusion from reassessment was written into the state constitution in 1986 by Proposition 58. California voters had already abolished the state inheritance tax and prohibited any future inheritance taxes, but with property appreciating in value so quickly, children who inherited their parents’ property faced the equivalent of an inheritance tax when the property was passed to them and reassessed to market value. Children who couldn’t afford to pay the taxes were forced to sell the family property. The uproar was such that the state Legislature unanimously passed a proposed constitutional amendment enacting the parentchild transfer exclusion and put it on the ballot as Proposition 58. It was approved by more than 75% of voters. Prop. 58 also wrote into the constitution what had already been written into state law: property passed between spouses was excluded from reassessment. Senate Bill 668 would extend the period of time before a “change of ownership” would be defined as including parent-child transfers of a home and other property. This is an extremely important bill, not only to California families that will suffer under continued on page 12

• Attention, "Lord of the Rings" fans: the dark region on the north pole of Pluto's moon, Charon, is called Mordor. • A common issue with blood donation -- along with other types of charitable contributions -- is that if donors don't know the recipient, it's harder to convince them that donating is beneficial. Therefore, in an effort to encourage more young people to give blood, Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, sends a text when their donation has been dispensed to someone in need, providing proof that it's going to good use. • The Twitter bird actually has a name -- Larry, after Hall of Fame basketball player Larry Bird. • In the 18th century, Napoleon Bonaparte and Benjamin Franklin were both defeated at chess by a machine called the Mechanical Turk -- or at least they thought they were. It was later revealed to be quite the elaborate hoax, with a highly skilled chess master hiding inside the "machine" and moving the pieces against the opponent. • In a move to keep diseasewary Nazis away, Polish doctor Eugene Lazowski faked a typhus outbreak, saving over 8,000 people from slave labor camps and death. • The longest song title ever is Hoagy Carmichael's 1943 "I'm a Cranky Old Yank in a Clanky Old Tank on the Streets of Yokohama with my Honolulu Mama Doin' Those Beat-o, Beat-o Flat-OnMy-Seat-o, Hirohito Blues." • Duncan Hines was a real person -- a popular restaurant critic who also wrote a book of hotel recommendations. • Eight of the 10 largest statues in the world are of Buddhas. • Pittsburgh is the only city where all the major sports teams (MLB, NHL, NFL) have the same colors: black and gold. *** Thought for the Day: "Many are stubborn in pursuit of the path they have chosen, few in pursuit of the goal." -- Friedrich Nietzsche ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** The women's movement in the 1970s led more women into the workforce and got them closer to pay equality. — Rebecca Traister ***


March 24, 2021

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®

How The Pandemic Is Impacting Children And Families

Dear EarthTalk: Were frozen wind turbines the reason for Texas’ historic power outages recently? If so, how can we make renewables more reliable moving forward? -- G. S., Hartford, CT

Wind power provides a small fraction of electricity in Texas; frozen natural gas lines caused the state's power grid to go down recently. Credit: Athena, pexels. As Winter Storm Uri wreaked havoc on the American Midwest this past February with bitter cold snow, entire power grids shut down and states like Texas faced a crisis like never before. Conservative politicians put the blame on renewable energy, particularly wind and solar. “Our wind and our solar got shut down, and they were collectively more than 10 percent of our power grid, and that thrust Texas into a situation where it was lacking power on a statewide basis," Governor Greg Abbot told Fox News. Contrary to this argument, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) reports that renewable energy is responsible for less than a fraction of the state’s power supply—with wind power making up a mere seven percent of energy losses. While issues such as frozen wind turbines did contribute to the widespread power grid failures, wind turbines tend to generate less power in the winter anyway, leaving the chief culprit of the statewide power shortages to natural gas. Natural gas provides more than a third of Texas’s power and heats over 40 percent of homes. The ERCOT reported that over 80 percent of the state’s total winter capacity is generated by natural gas, coal and nuclear power. Natural gas power plants don’t usually store fuel on site, and a lack of cold insulation because of the rarity of severe cold in Texas left most pipelines frozen and unable to maintain a continuous transferring of gas. The ample evidence of fossil fuel energy failures behind Texas’ electricity crisis points to the broader issue of climate change denial and its devastating consequences. “It is an extreme weather problem, not a clean power problem. If anything, it shows why we need to be investing in building out more renewable energy sources with better transmission and storage to replace outdated systems," says Heather Zichal, CEO of the American Clean Power Association. Regardless, everyone is in favor of making renewable energy more reliable as well. One short-term solution is to modify wind turbines with anti-icing methods to withstand extreme temperatures, which Texas grid operators have yet to invest in. In the long run, however, the nation needs to drastically decrease its reliance on fossil fuels in order to make renewable energy more reliable. In the case of wind energy, the inconsistent demand of wind power makes wind power output fluctuate and thus less reliable. As more wind power is added to a localized grid, wind energy output is more easily predicted, decreasing wind variability and increasing the efficiency, flexibility and reliability of the grid. In the end, the disastrous level of under-preparation resulting in a cascade of failures in Texas highlights the nation’s dependence on fossil fuels and failure to build resilience by investing in a sustainable infrastructure. Though developing clean energy may come at a high cost, climate-linked disasters will only intensify and cause dangerous fallouts. Let’s hope that Winter Strom Uri can serve as the final wakeup call for our nation to begin a firm transition to renewable energy and fight for a habitable future. CONTACTS: “Rick Perry says Texans would accept even longer power outages ‘to keep the federal government out of their business’,” washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/02/17/texas-abbott-wind-turbinesoutages/; “Don't blame wind turbines for Texas' historic power outages,” cbsnews.com/news/wind-turbines-texas-power-outageelectrical-grid/. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https//earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

(StatePoint) More than 2.7 million American children are growing up in grandfamilies -- families in which grandparents, other adult family members, or close family friends are raising children. A new report highlights how the pandemic has amplified their unique challenges, and offers solutions to better serve them. The report, “Facing a Pandemic: Families Living Together During COVID-19 and Thriving Beyond” authored by the non-profit Generations United and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Casey Family Programs, points out that at a time when older adults are being cautioned to keep their distance from children because of the heightened risk of infection and death from COVID-19, for grandfamilies, that distance is impossible. Advocates point out that these caregivers are the first line of defense for children during the pandemic, having stepped in when parents cannot raise them for many reasons, including cases where children’s parents have died from COVID-19. At the same time, 30 percent of kin caregivers lack an alternative caregiving plan if they should die or become disabled, a troubling statistic in the face of the pandemic, which disproportionately affects older adults. While grandfamilies are diverse in geography, income and race, the report finds that caregivers in grandfamilies are disproportionally Black or Native American; nearly half of grandparent caregivers are over age 60; and one in four grandparent caregivers has a disability. These are the same populations that are more likely to be impacted by the pandemic and die as a result. “While we’re all impacted by COVID-19, grandfamilies, especially, have had tough realities, with limited support systems,” says Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a non-profit with the mission of improving the lives of children, youth and older people. “State and local child welfare and other agencies must better support them during COVID-19 recovery and beyond.” Federal, state and local governments recognize foster families and provide them with access to resources, but there is little available for grandfamilies raising children outside of foster care. While Congress included support for grandfamilies in the December 2020 COVID-19 relief package, including better access to kinship navigator programs, which help connect families to information and community support as well as provide some direct help to families to meet emergency needs, advocates say this is just a start. “With so many families continuing to struggle with impacts from COVID-19, it’s critical that state and local child welfare agencies distribute the funds in this package,” says Butts. “Congress also needs to ensure families have ongoing financial support so that caregivers can meet the basic needs of children as they live with the long-term impacts of COVID -19.” The report also finds that about 19 percent of grandparents responsible for grandchildren live in poverty and 38 percent of grandfamilies are unable to pay or are worried about paying mortgage or rent. Among the solutions to these figures, Generations United is calling for grandfamilies to be specifically named in the next COVID-relief package as an eligible population for financial relief such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). To access the report, visit www. gu.org. To hear grandfamilies discuss the pandemic’s impacts, visit everyfamilyforward.org. While the pandemic has heightened the inequities different types of families face, advocates say that sufficient support can help grandfamilies recover and thrive.

Burrowing Owls continued from page 3

conservation leader, committed to inspiring a passion for nature and creating a world where all life thrives. The Alliance empowers people from around the globe to support their mission to conserve wildlife through innovation and partnerships. San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance supports cuttingedge conservation and brings the stories of their work back to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park—giving millions of guests, in person and virtually, the opportunity to experience conservation in action. The work of San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance extends from San Diego to strategic and regional conservation “hubs” across the globe, where their strengths— via their “Conservation Toolbox,” including the renowned Wildlife Biodiversity Bank—are able to effectively align with hundreds of regional partners to improve outcomes for wildlife in more coordinated efforts. By leveraging these tools in wildlife care and conservation science, and through collaboration with hundreds of partners, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance has reintroduced more than 44 endangered species to native

habitats. Each year, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance’s work reaches over 1 billion people in 150 countries via news media, social media, their websites, educational resources and the San Diego Zoo Kids channel, which is in children’s hospitals in 13 countries. Success is made possible by the support of members, donors and guests to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park, who are Wildlife Allies committed to ensuring All Life Thrives. About San Diego Habitat Conservancy San Diego Habitat Conservancy is a nationally accredited land trust working since 2004 to acquire, manage and protect land that supports sensitive habitats and species. SDHC’s mission is to conserve and manage sensitive habitats and species while inspiring land stewardship through education and outreach. The vision is a healthy, natural environment that engages the commitment of people and communities, creates a legacy and improves the quality of life for all living things. SDHC now manages 31 preserves totaling almost 2,000 acres in San Diego County.

A screen shot from the web cam with the owl in the upper right.


March 24, 2021

Boost Girls’ Interest In Math And Science

Chef’s Corner

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the challenge of math and science fun and engaging. At a young age, enroll your daughter in coding and science camps, as well as STEM-related after school activities. When she is older, encourage her participation in groups like the astronomy club and math team. Starting in high school, look into internships in STEM fields. Promoting early development of math and science skills for girls and young women will go a long way toward building their confidence and setting them up to succeed.

April Fool‛s Day Surprises Aw! C’mon, I’m not that easy to “hook”! P R A N K S T E R B T C N A I C I G A M

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Did you match each word to its definition? A. a puzzling question or problem: 1. joke the answer is hard to figure out 2. riddle B. a “fresh” or “smart” remark 3. hoax C. a false story told in such a way 4. wisecrack as to make people think it is real 5. pun D. something done for fun; a jest E. clever use of a word to have more than one meaning by Annimills LLC © 2021

continued from page 6 greens. Arugula or Rocket -- Typically has long, spiked, dark green leaves and a strong, peppery flavor, especially when the leaves are larger and wild-harvested. Cultivated arugula varies in intensity of flavor, so taste before using. Arugula adds a bold punch to salads or an intense note as an ingredient in hearty dishes. Little Gem lettuce -- A mixture of soft leaves with a slight crunch, similar to butter lettuce in texture. Mesclun -- A combination of tender, wild-harvested or cultivated young greens. Most mesclun varieties include greens with texture and peppery flavor such as curly endive, mezzaluna, mustard leaves, watercress, arugula, purslane, cress, Asian greens like mizuna, red kale and chicory, and a few herbs such as cilantro, basil or parsley. Mache, Corn Salad or Lamb’s Lettuce -- Grows in a tight bunch of 4 or 5 leaves attached to a root. It has more flavor and texture than most salad greens, but requires more care when cleaning because grit and dirt tend to settle in the rosetteshaped leaves near the roots. Dandelion -- Greens are a dark emerald color and are bitter. They add a distinctive flavor component when added raw, but lose some of their sharpness when cooked low and slow. Escarole -- Has a subtle bite, hearty texture and a longer growing season. During the spring months, escarole is sweeter and at its tender best. Add it raw to provide complexity to a salad or as an interesting addition to cooked dishes in place of spinach. Pea Greens -- These are the giant, tangled vines on which peas grow. Pea greens are typically available at farmers markets in spring and early summers. Break out the salad bowl and try a variety of spring mix lettuce greens in nontraditional ways. This recipe showcases spring

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The Julian News 11

mix salad topped with crunchy cucumber slices, seeds or nuts, tart cherries, creamy goat cheese and a drizzle of Maple Balsamic Dressing. It’s a delicious way to welcome spring! SPRING GREENS WITH GOAT CHEESE AND CHERRIES 1 (12-ounce) bag spring mix greens 12 cherry or grape tomatoes or 2 small/medium tomatoes, cut into wedges 1/2 large cucumber, sliced 1/3 cup dried cherries or cranberries 3 tablespoons roasted, salted sunflower seeds or roasted almonds 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese Add the greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, dried cherries or cranberries, and sunflower seeds into a large bowl or platter. Sprinkle with the salt and pepper, and toss lightly with desired amount of dressing (recipe follows), then top with crumbled goat cheese. Serves 4. MAPLE BALSAMIC DRESSING 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup or maple-flavored agave syrup 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper Whisk everything together in a medium bowl until emulsified, or place all the ingredients into a jar with a tight-fitting top and shake until everything is well-combined. Store remaining dressing in the fridge for up to 1 week. Shake to recombine the ingredients before using. Makes about 1/2 cup. *** Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

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*** Twenty years later, twenty years after I joined the women's movement, we're still talking about the same issues. We're still talking about reproductive rights for women, and we're still talking about getting equal pay for women. And that's just frustrating. — Corin Tucker ***

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continued from page 7 1. The Arizona Wildcats and the Arizona State Sun Devils. 2. Chocolate Thunder. 3. 24 Hours of Daytona. 4. Fulham F.C. 5. Norway. 6. Enron. 7. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers 1. “Jane Eyre” 2. Mercury 3. Kate Warne 4. Alka-Seltzer 5. John Kennedy and Joe Biden 6. Tunisia 7. Rat’s mouth (named for sharp rocks where ships docked) 8. California: Mount Whitney and Death Valley 9. Jamie Foxx 10. “The Roy Rogers Show” ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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NOTICES

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to March 1, 2016; 2016; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9002156 EAST COUNTY HOME INSPECTIONS 34373 Wolahi Rd, Julian, CA 92036 The business is conducted by An Individual Stephen Eric Warmenhoven, 34373 Wolahi Rd, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 5, 2021. LEGAL: 08702 Publish: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9002268 CANDLEWOOD SUITES SAN DIEGO 1335 Hotel Circle S, San Diego, CA 92108 (Mailing Address: 445 Hotel Circle S San Diego, CA 92108) The business is conducted by A Corporation Koraam Hospitality, 445 Hotel Circle S, San Diego, CA 92108. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 9, 2021. LEGAL: 08703 Publish: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00008392-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MARGARET JOAN MATTERSON TO: MARGARET ROSE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 13, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 1, 2021. LEGAL: 08710 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9002659 ACE INSPECTORS 6290 Lake Atlin Ave., San Diego, CA 92119 (Mailing Address: PO Box 19729 San Diego, CA 92159) The business is conducted by An Individual Derek Edward Claytor, 6290 Lake Atlin Ave., San Diego, CA 92119. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 17, 2021. LEGAL: 08704 Publish: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9002808 KIDSTER-INK 1045 E. 4th Ave., Escondido, CA 92025 The business is conducted by An Individual - Shannon Lori McCray, 1045 E. 4th Ave., Escondido, CA 92025. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 19, 2021. LEGAL: 08707 Publish: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00009062-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JESSICA ELIAS MARTINEZ TO: JESSICA ELIAS IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 20, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 3, 2021. LEGAL: 08711 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00005862-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: LISA MICHELE MC KEANDE FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: LISA MICHELE MC KEANDE HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: LISA MICHELE MC KEANDE TO: MICHELE MC KEANDE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 24, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 9, 2021. LEGAL: 08708 Publish: March 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9003087 BEYOND A HUNCH 4245 Mentone St., San Diego, CA 92107 The business is conducted by An Individual - Sheri Lynette Rosalia, 4245 Mentone St., San Diego, CA 92107. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 1, 2021. LEGAL: 08709 Publish: March 10, 17, 24, 31, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9003243 KHASIM INSURANCE AGENCY 1310 E Valley Pkwy 104, Escondido, CA 92027 (Mailing Address: PO Box 301773 Escondido, CA 92030) The business is conducted by An Individual Richard Edward Khasim, 1310 E Valley Pkwy 104, Escondido, CA 92027. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 3, 2021. LEGAL: 08712 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00009938-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: RACHEL LOUISE MEHRBERG TO: ARI RIVER MEHRBERG IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 27, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 8, 2021. LEGAL: 08714 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

Interest in STEM

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

Wednesday - March 24, 2021

Volume 36 - Issue 34

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Consider moving beyond the usual methods to find a more creative means of handling a difficult on-the-job situation. Avoid confrontation and, instead, aim for cooperation. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Seasonal change creates a new look for the outdoors. It also inspires Taureans to redo their own environments, and this is a good week to start redoing both your home and workplace. Enjoy. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A misunderstanding needs to be straightened out so the wrong impression isn't allowed to stand. If necessary, offer to support the use of a third party to act as an impartial arbitrator. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A career change offering what you want in money and responsibilities could involve moving to a new location. Discuss this with family members before making a decision. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Feeling miffed over how you believe you were treated is understandable. But before you decide to "set things straight," make sure the whole thing wasn't just a misinterpretation of the facts. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Showing you care makes it easier to build trust and gain an advantage in handling a delicate situation. What you learn from this experience also will help you understand yourself better. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Planning for the future is fine, especially if you include the roles

that family members may be asked to play. Don't be surprised if some hidden emotions are revealed in the process. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Making choices highlights much of the week, and you have a head start here, thanks to your ability to grasp the facts of a situation and interpret them in a clear-cut manner. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Carrying a torch can be a two-way situation: It can either keep you tied to the past or help light your way to the future. The choice, as always, has to be yours. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your watchwords this week are: "Focus." "Focus." "Focus." Don't let yourself be distracted from what you set out to do. There'll be time later to look over other possibilities. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A workplace opportunity might require changes you're not keen on making. Discuss the plusses and minuses with someone familiar with the situation before you make a decision. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Love and romance are strong in your aspect this week. If you've already met the right person, expect your relationship to grow. And if you're still looking, odds are you'll soon be finding it. BORN THIS WEEK: You approach life in a wise and measured manner, which gives you an edge in many areas.

© 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

LEGAL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9003825 RAMONA HOME JOURNAL 1410 Main Street, Suite E, Ramona, CA 92065 (Mailing Address: PO Box 2214 Ramona, CA 92065) The business is conducted by An Individual Michael Patrick Raher, 24731 Bjon Road, Ramona, CA 92065. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 6, 2021.

NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9004489 SERENITY AND COMPANY 506 Gillingham Ct., Oceanside, CA 92058 The business is conducted by An Individual - Rachel Marie Jackson, 506 Gillingham Ct., Oceanside, CA 92058. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 12, 2021. LEGAL: 08717 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

LEGAL: 08713 Publish: March 17, 24, 31 and April 7, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-000010708-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2021-00011012-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MINA ROSE MORALES FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: EYVEL MICHAEL DELGADO TO: MICHAEL DELGADO

PETITIONER: MINA ROSE MORALES HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MINA ROSE MORALES TO: MINA ROSE MAURNAIS

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 25 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 4, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 11, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 26, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 12, 2021.

LEGAL: 08716 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

continued from page 4

5 Ways to Use Your Spring Break Wisely (StatePoint) With certain travel options difficult to execute this year, you may find yourself staying put for spring break. But you don’t need to idle away the time. Here are five ways to use the vacation wisely: 1. Volunteer. From delivering food to the homebound to organizing a park clean-up, there are many socially-distanced community service project ideas perfect for spring break. You can even volunteer from the safety of home, as many organizations around the globe are making it possible to lend a hand virtually. 2. Keep math skills sharp. Whether you are preparing for AP Testing or simply want to hone your skills for the last few months of the academic year, use great tools like the fx9750GII Graphing Calculator from Casio. Beyond standard graphing calculator functionality, it allows you to take your learning to the next level with its advanced statistics functions, such as test, interval and distribution, and financial calculation functions. Pair your studies with the webinars available on Casio’s YouTube channel. 3. Read a book for fun. Demanding academic schedules can keep students occupied 24/7. Now is the time to finally crack open that novel on your bedside table. 4. Learn a musical instrument. If you’ve ever wanted to learn an instrument, the downtime of spring break is a great time to give it a go. One way to fast-track your progress is with a keyboard designed to help novices get started, like the line of Casiotone keyboards, which feature built-in learning systems. And because they are portable, you can even enjoy spring weather and take the learning outdoors. 5. Get some sun: Go on a run. Pack a picnic and enjoy it on the lawn. Take a short day trip to a state park. You don’t need to travel to spend your spring break under the sun. Your spring break may not look like it did during previous years. However, there are plenty of ways to make the most of the time.

LEGAL: 08719 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

LEGAL:08715 Published: March 17, 24, 2021

*** I am grateful to the activists and women who created the Black Lives Matter movement because I feel like they let me know I wasn't crazy. — Jesmyn Ward ***

California Commentary

continued from page 9

Notice of Provisional Appointment To the Governing Board of the Julian Union School District NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to Education Code Section 5092, that On February 2, 2021, a resignation was filed with the County Superintendent of Schools; and containing the deferred effective date of March 10, 2021; and On March 10, 2021, the remaining members of said governing board appointed Jenifer Eggert as the provisional appointee who shall hold office until the next regularly scheduled election for district governing board members on November 8, 2022; and at which time the vacancy shall be filled for the remainder of the unexpired term; and The provisional appointment confers all powers and duties upon the appointee immediately following his or her appointment; and Unless a petition calling for a special election is filed with the County Superintendent of Schools within thirty (30) days after the date of the provisional appointment, it shall become an effective appointment; and A petition calling for a special election shall be filed with the County Superintendent of Schools, 6401 Linda Vista Road, San Diego, California 92111-7399 not later than April 9, 2021 and shall contain the following: 1. The Registrar of Voters’ estimate of the cost of conducting the special election. 2. The name and residence address of at least one, but not more than five, of the proponents of the petition, each of which proponent shall be a registered voter of the school district. 2. The text of language of the petition shall not appear in less than six-point type. 4. Signatures of at least one and one-half percent (1-1/2%) of the number of registered voters of the district or twenty-five (25) registered voters, whichever is greater, at the time of the last regular election for governing board members. In districts with registered voters of less than two thousand (2,000) persons, a petition shall be deemed to bear a sufficient number of signatures if signed by at least five percent (5%) of the number of registered voters of the district at the time of the last regular election for governing board members. A petition calling for a special election shall be prepared and circulated in conformity with the requirements of sections 100 and 104 of the Elections Code. Date: March 11, 2021 Julian Union School District By: Brian Duffy Title: Superintendent

interest in food science. A love of cars can inspire the pursuit of automotive engineering. Helping draw these connections will attract kids to pursue STEM by making it relevant to their hobbies. 3. Make science social. STEM exploration is inherently social. It helps kids develop practical skills like communication, collaboration, and decisionmaking, all while fostering great friendships. Parents can get their kids engaged by enrolling them in science camps and encouraging them to join competitions. 4. Make science accessible and fun. You don’t need a lab to be a scientist – STEM is all around us, even at home! Through youngscientistlab.com, kids can explore free resources offering science project ideas and directions for grades K-8. With experimentation and exploration, it’s simple to make scientific principles more relatable for young minds. 5. Expand your child’s world with STEM. STEM is not only found everywhere, but it’s also for everyone. Our new virtual normal makes it easy to connect with others to learn, share and problem solve – no matter where you live. STEM exploration also opens up opportunities for kids to learn about and work with peer groups from different backgrounds and cultures, offering an inclusive environment where success is achieved by working toward a shared goal. One opportunity on the horizon is the 3M Young Scientist Challenge, held in partnership with Discovery Education, a premier national science competition for grades 5 through 8 that asks students to identify a problem impacting their school, community, or worldwide, and come up with a unique innovation to solve it. Young inventors have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work one-on-one with a 3M scientist, compete for $25,000, and earn the title of “America’s Top Young Scientist.” Last year’s winner, Anika Chebrolu, 14, collaborated with nine other finalists to solve problems collectively in a series of fun, group challenges as part of the competition. Anika’s individual innovation used molecular research to show how science could reduce the invasion and spread of COVID-19 in the body. Encourage your budding scientist to get involved and start exploring! To learn more about this year’s competition or to enter, visit www.youngscientistlab.com. The next big invention or discovery could be anywhere. Ignite that spark of passion for science and unleash your child’s curiosity. (StatePoint) 3M Sponsored Content.

LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9004677 PRP CLAIMS 13425 Plumeria Way, San Diego, CA 92130 The business is conducted by An Individual Gregory R. Badger, 13425 Plumeria Way, San Diego, CA 92130. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 13, 2021. LEGAL: 08718 Publish: March 24, 31 and April 7, 14, 2021

Proposition 19, but also to county assessors and the state Board of Equalization. The speedy implementation date for Proposition 19’s changes to inter-generational transfers left assessors and BOE members scrambling to get answers to a long list of specific questions that the measure left unclear or ambiguous. SB 668 would temporarily enable a more orderly and equitable process for taxation of property that is passed to the next generation. Longer term, the Prop. 58 parent-child transfer exclusion should be reinstated in its entirety. Californians who are ready to join this fight should contact their state representatives— look them up at findyourrep. legislature.ca.gov—and urge them to restore Prop. 13 for our children.

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Wednesday - March 24, 2021  

Wednesday - March 24, 2021