__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

U M J LI A N

PRESORTED STandARD

. 9 203

AIL

CA

ED FR

O

6

M

1.

$

00

(92¢ + tax included)

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

For the Community, by the Community.

Wednesday

Covid Vaccine Comes To Julian

Back Country Covid-19 Positive Tests as of February 6*

(weeks new positives) Julian = 32 (+) ** Ramona = 1,533 (+) ** Ranchita = 10 (+0) ** Warner Springs = 61 (+0) ** Santa Ysabel = 62 (+0) Borrego Springs = 118 (+) ** Descanso = 69 (+) ** Alpine = 973 (+) ** Poway = 2,077 (+79) Lakeside = 1431 (+) ** Total Confirmed cases in Unincorporated San Diego County = 32,806 a total rise of 1,090. TESTING AVAILABLE Julian Library Friday, February 12 9am - 3pm If you believe you have symptoms please get tested. Most testing locations do not require an appointment. To find information on a testing location near you or call 2-11 (toll free) or on the web 211sandiego.org. Cases of the novel coronavirus have sharply increased since Thanksgiving and with the Christmas and New Year holidays around the corner, County health officials are concerned that no immediate end to the rise in cases is in sight. ** The County has changed their reporting of positive cases - We are unable to track additional cases added to the total we had last week. We are only reporting the numbers provided. Ranchita, Santa Ysabel and Warner Springs were not included in this weeks report and we have left the totals from last week as reference.

Covid - State Update Update to Places of Worship Guidelines Consistent with recent court orders related to indoor church services, interim updates to the state’s guidelines for places of worship have been issued. After reviewing the orders in more detail, additional updates will be provided. These updates are reflected on the covid19.ca.gov website here and on the CDPH website here. Statewide COVID-19 Data as of Sunday - California has 3,335,926 confirmed cases to date. Numbers may not represent true day-over-day change as reporting of test results can be delayed. There were 15,064 newly recorded confirmed cases Saturday. The 7-day positivity rate is 5.4% and the 14-day positivity rate is 6.1%. continued on page 12

4 Scholarships for Julian Residents

Today many people are looking at vocational programs as opposed to four-year college programs. There is a tremendous need for skilled workers and the cost of training is substantially less than the traditional fouryear college program. Thus, the Julian Woman’s Club is offering four scholarships of at least $1000 each for Julian High School seniors and an adult Julian resident. Three scholarships are designated for high school seniors who want to attend a vocational school or community college that offers an apprenticeship or vocational program. These students must have 2.0 GPA or higher. A fourth scholarship is being offered for an adult resident of Julian who wishes to improve his/her skills, change fields, or re-enter the work force. This person must also be interested in attending a vocational school or community college that offers an apprenticeship or vocational program. Examples of such vocational programs include but are not limited to: medical or dental assistant, construction trades, computer operations, pharmacy or veterinary technician, firefighter, automotive, cosmetology, or culinary school. Applications are due by April 14, 2021. They must be typed online. Go to julianwomansclub. org for more information and to complete the application form. A recommendation from a teacher, community leader, or employer is also required. It should be mailed to the Julian Woman’s Club, Box 393, Julian, CA 92036. Student winners will be announced at the Julian High School Scholarship Awards Ceremony. The adult winner will be notified personally. Winners will be invited to attend the September 1st meeting of the Julian Woman’s Club to share their plans. For further information and questions contact: Melana Brandt at ron.melana@gmail. com.

Volume 36 — Issue 28

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Tuesday and Wednesday of last week over 500 people over 65 took adavntage of a vaccination clinic at the library to get their first jab of the Moderna vaccine, plus an appoinment for their second. The clinic which ws only publisized on Monday through word of mouth and limited social media still filled up quickly as the word got out. Once a person got their first vaccine (Moderna) they were given a QR code to use their smartphone to schedule the second appointment, or one of the firefighters took their information and scheduled them on a laptop or tablet - making the process quick, easy and simple. Once your 15 minute wait time was up, you coild go adout your day. Operation Collaboration is a cooperative vaccination effort, under the guidance of SD County HSSA and supported by two dozen fire and EMS agencies in San Diego County. Since midJanuary, this partnership has provided vaccinations for EMT’s and Paramedics, as well as for residents and staff of long-term care facilities. Vaccinations are now available through Operation Collaboration for those 65+ years of age living in San Diego’s rural communities.

February 10, 2021

The Man Behind Black History Month

by Sarah Pruitt (History.com)

Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) dedicated his life to educating African Americans about the achievements and contributions of their ancestors.

Folks lined up to check in and fill out their paper work

post jad - wait 15 minutes to guard against a poor reaction and schedule their second shot.

National Burn Awareness Week February 7th-13th Electrical Safety from Amps to Zap (A to Z)

San Diego, CA – Burns from electrical accidents are one of the primary causes of burn related injury along with fire-flame, scalds, contact with hot objects, and chemicals. More than 73% of these burn injuries occur at home. As the pandemic continues to alter our way of living, many people in our communities are spending more time at home which can increase the risk these electrical burns. Vulnerable populations such as children under five are two times as likely be seen at a hospital emergency department for burn injuries. In conjunction with Burn Awareness Week, February 7th-13th, the American Burn Association and the Burn Institute are providing information relating to electrical safety for our community. Burn injuries may result in lifelong scarring and in some extreme cases, even death. Many burn survivors sustain serious scarring, life-long physical disabilities, trauma, and adjustment difficulties. Prevention of electrical burns is always preferable to treatment and can be accomplished through simple changes in behavior and small adjustments in the home environment. Each year, over 400,000 injuries occur in the United States due to severe skin burns, with young children, older adults, and disabled individuals most at-risk. Common risk of electrical burn and injury include • Unprotected electrical outlets, • Improperly used extension cords, • Lightning, • Workplace electrical injuries. Electrical burn can be reduced by following home safety guidelines: • Disconnect appliances by pulling on the plug, not the cord. • If an appliance has a three-prong plug, use it only in a three-slot outlet. Never force it or remove a prong to make it fit a two-slot outlet. • Check electrical tools regularly for signs of wear. If a cord is frayed or cracked, replace it. Replace any tool if it causes even small electrical shocks, overheats, shorts out or gives off smoke or sparks. • Never use electrical appliances near water • Before attempting any appliance repair, unplug it. • Attach extension cords to appliances before outlets. • Keep clothes, curtains and other potentially combustible items continued on page 5

In 1915, Carter G. Woodson traveled to Chicago from his home in Washington, D.C. to take part in a national celebration of the 50th anniversary of emancipation. He had earned his bachelor’s and master’s degree at the University of Chicago, and still had many friends there. As he joined the thousands of Black Americans overflowing from the Coliseum, which housed exhibits highlighting African American achievements since the abolition of slavery, Woodson was inspired to do more in the spirit of celebrating Black history and heritage. Before he left Chicago, he helped found the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH). A year later, Woodson singlehandedly launched the Journal of Negro History, in which he and other researchers brought attention to the achievements of Black Americans. Born in 1875 in New Canton, Virginia, Woodson had worked as a sharecropper, miner and various other jobs during his childhood to help support his large family. Though he entered high school late, he made up for lost time, graduating in less than two years. After attending Berea College in Kentucky, Woodson worked in the Philippines as an education superintendent for the U.S. government. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Chicago before entering Harvard. In 1912, three years before founding the ASNLH, he became only the second African American (after W.E.B. DuBois) to earn a doctorate from that institution. Like DuBois, Woodson believed that young African Americans in the early 20th century were not being taught enough of their own heritage, and the achievements of their ancestors. To get his message out, Woodson first turned to his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi, which created Negro History and Literature Week in 1924. But Woodson wanted a wider celebration, and he decided the ASNLH should take on the task itself. In February 1926, Woodson sent out a press release announcing the first Negro History Week. He chose February because the month contained the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, two prominent men whose historic achievements African Americans already celebrated. (Lincoln’s birthday was February 12; Douglass, a former slave, hadn’t known his actual birthday, but had marked the occasion on February 14.) As schools and other organizations across the country quickly embraced Woodson’s initiative, he and his colleagues struggled to meet the demand for course materials and other resources. The ASNLH formed branches all over the country, though its national headquarters remained centered in Woodson’s row house on Ninth Street in Washington D.C. The house was also home base for the Associated Publishers Press, which Woodson had founded in 1921. The author of more than 20 books, including A Century of Negro Migration (1918), The History of the Negro Church (1921), The Negro in Our History (1922) and his most celebrated text, The Mis-Education of the Negro (1933), Woodson also worked in education, as principal for the Armstrong Manual Training School in Washington, D.C., and dean at Howard University and the West Virginia Collegiate Institute. Clearly, Woodson never viewed the study of Black history as something that could be confined to a week. As early as the 1940s, efforts began to expand the week of public celebration of African American heritage and achievements into a longer event. This shift had already begun in some locations by 1950, when Woodson died suddenly of a heart attack at home in Washington. With the rise of the civil rights and Black Power movements in the 1960s, young African Americans on college campuses were becoming increasingly conscious of the historic dimension of their experience. Younger members of the ASNLH (which later became the Association for the Study of African American History) urged the organization to change with the times, including the official shift to a month-long celebration of Black history. In 1976, on the 50th anniversary of the first Negro History Week, the Association officially made the shift to Black History Month. Since then, every U.S. president has issued a proclamation honoring the spirit of Black History Month. Gerald Ford began the tradition in 1976, saying the celebration enabled people to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” Ronald Reagan’s first Black History Month proclamation stated that “understanding the history of Black Americans is a key to understanding the strength of our nation.” In 2016, Barack Obama, the nation’s first Black president, made his last proclamation in honor of Woodson’s initiative, now recognized as one of the nation’s oldest organized celebrations of history. “As we mark the 40th year of National African American History Month, let HSILBATSE us reflect on theDEsacrifices and contributions made by generations of 0 78and 1 let us resolve to continue our march toward African Americans, a day when every person knows the unalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” SRAEY

This is the week of National Pizza Day (2/9). Julian has such great offerings, we can celebrate all week. www.dineinjulian.com


2 The Julian News

February 10, 2021

HOME SERVICES

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

30352 Highway 78(at Hwy 79)

OPEN Thurs-Monday 11 am - 5pm

Congratulations to Susan C. for being the $50 Winner for January.

Analysis:

Trump’s Senate Trial Matters Regardless Of Outcome

by Steven Sloan(apnews.com)

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

WASHINGTON (AP) — This matters. The outcome may seem preordained in the unprecedented second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. Democrats prosecuting the former president for inciting a deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol will struggle to persuade at least 17 Republicans to convict Trump and bar him from office. Forty-five of the 50 Republican senators backed a bid last month to dismiss the trial, essentially telegraphing how the final vote will play out. But the trial set to begin Tuesday is ultimately a test of whether a president, holding an office that many of the nation’s founders feared could become too powerful in the wrong hands, is above the law. Senators will be forced to sit still, listen to evidence and wrestle with elemental questions about American democracy. There will be visual, visceral evidence, and the American people will also be sitting in their own form of judgment as they watch. The verdict and the process itself will be scrutinized for generations. “For historians, what that trial does is to provide additional evidence and documentation under oath,” said Carol Anderson, a professor of African American studies at Emory University. “It also gives us a sense of the strength, or the weakness, in American democracy as the senators are confronted with this evidence.” That record is certain to be grisly, a reminder on a human level of the horror at the Capitol on Jan. 6. Senators will review Trump’s call that morning to “fight like hell” before the mob of loyalists showed up to Capitol Hill to do just that. Senators will be reminded of the rioters’ chants calling for thenVice President Mike Pence’s hanging. House prosecutors could resurface the image of a police officer crushed between doors, blood trickling from his mouth, as the violent crowd moved in. There might be additional evidence of how another officer, Brian Sicknick, died defending the building. If that’s not enough, senators will be reminded of their own vulnerability as they fled the mob entering their chamber — one of the most rarefied spaces in Washington — in fear of their lives. And then they’ll have to decide whether there should be consequences. But the potential of an acquittal doesn’t mean the trial should be abandoned before it begins, said Rep. Val Demings, who was an impeachment manager in Trump’s first trial. “The jury not convicting is always a possibility,” the Florida Democrat said, recalling her previous career as the chief of the Orlando Police Department. “But decisions are never made solely on that.” Nearly two-thirds of Americans believe Trump bears at least a moderate amount of responsibility for the riot, according to a poll released last week by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. That includes half who say Trump bears a great deal or quite a bit of responsibility. Most Republicans absolve him of guilt, but about 3 in 10 think he bears at least a measure of blame for the events. Of course, Congress has more on its plate than another fight over the previous president. In the early days of his administration, President Joe Biden is pushing a $1.9 trillion package to confront the coronavirus pandemic. He’s also pressing lawmakers on immigration, health care and climate change. Lee Hamilton, a former Democratic congressman from Indiana who served during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, said a trial could be a “distraction” from larger priorities. He suggested censure could be a better use of time and that the historical record could be achieved through the creation of a commission like the one he helped lead to investigate the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. But, he said, that only works if Congress is united on the need for a thorough investigation of what happened during the insurrection and provides the resources to back it up. “If you’re going to do it, do it right,” Hamilton said. As much as the trial is about history, the implications are just as powerful in the present moment. Leaders in capitals across the world are watching what happens in Washington to assess whether the U.S. remains committed to democratic principles. Steadfast American allies, including Germany and the United Kingdom, expressed shock at the insurrection. U.S. foes seized on the violence to say that the United States could not now lecture others on the sanctity of democracy. “American democracy is obviously limping on both feet,” Konstantin Kosachev, head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia’s upper continued on page 12

TREE N C A O I M L U P J E HT Local Experience Since 1988ANY * Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed and Bonded Fully Insured for Your Protection

ERIC DAUBER H: 760-765-2975 C: 760-271-9585

License #945348

PO Box 254 JULIAN, CA.

WE-8690A

92036

Handyman Services

Grading & Demolition

Bruce Strachota Grading, Demolition, Underground Utilities, Dump Truck, Excavation, Loader, Bobcat Rental, Rock & Base

cell: 619-972-0152

Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com *** How did it happen that their lips came together? How does it happen that birds sing, that snow melts, that the rose unfolds, that the dawn whitens behind the stark shapes of trees on the quivering summit of the hill? A kiss, and all was said. — Victor Hugo ***

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2021 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

1453 Hollow Glen Road

In Person

Office Hours: 3pm — 5pm 3pm — 5pm 9am — 5pm

By Mail

The Julian News

Phone / Fax email

After Hours Printed on Re-Cycled Paper

Monday Tuesday Wednesday — Friday

PO Box 639

Julian, CA 92036

760 765 2231 submissions@juliannews.com The Julian News @JulianNews Information may be placed in our drop box located outside the office front door. The phone will accept succinct messages 24 hours a day. Member National Newspaper Association

Member California News Publishers Association


February 10, 2021

The Julian News 3

Julian High School Senior Spotlight

Each week leading up to graduation the Julian News is shinning a spotlight on the graduation senior class at Julian High School. In part because with the pandemic protocals students have not had the opportunities to show their taklents as they might during a normal year, with all activities being curtailed.

Health and Personal Services

Dakotah Audibert

1. Where did you go to elementary school?

Warner Springs Elementary/Julian Elementary

2. What do you think you are going to miss most when you get out of high school?

FFA

3. What are your plans after high school? College/trade school/job?

I plan to attend either Texas A&M or the University of Nebraska to major in Agriculture Education

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

4. Career plans?

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

High school Ag Teacher

5. Favorite memory?

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile !

Joining FFA, winning a CIF championship my freshman year

It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today !

6. What words of advice would you give the class of 2022?

Take every opportunity that comes your way.

Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Julian Medical Clinic 2721 Washington Street Julian, CA 92036

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health ( Smart Care )

760-765-1223

Now accepting covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP, Most PPO’s and Tricare. *Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assitance Available

Monday - Friday 8am-5pm (Closed 12-1 for lunch)

David Flick, MD Unneetha Pruitt, WHNP, Women’s Helath Silvia Searleman, Nurse Practitioner

7. If you could give your past self any advice what would it be?

I would have told myself to do everything I could to live to the fullest before COVID hit.

www.borregohealth.org

8. What has been the most challenging part of high school?

Living up to expectations

9. What has been the highlight of your senior year?

Becoming president of our High school FFA chapter and being chosen to play in the Blue Gray All-American Bowl 10. Favorite school activity? Welding in our high school shop class 11. What teacher do you feel has impacted your life the most? Mr. Martineau for sure 12. What’s a bad habit you have? I overthink things way to much

Take Advantage Of Telemedicine For Better Health (Family Features) If there is a silver lining to the challenges the past year created for families, it may be the growth, availability and affordability of virtual care for medical and mental health needs. The ability to see a doctor from home, with little notice, offers a level of flexibility in accessing health care that was historically quite rare. Virtual care, or telemedicine, can span a wide range of services to address a family's health needs without going to a doctor's office and provides easy access to experts and specialists via phone and video. Plus, telemedicine services are covered by most insurance providers. "Telemedicine is a safe and practical way to access health care for the entire family," said Dr. Desreen N. Dudley, a clinical psychologist and behavioral health quality consultant for Teladoc. "For example, Teladoc has thousands of care providers across all 50 states that let members quickly connect with a doctor or specialist who can provide peace of mind any hour of the day or night." From care for specific illnesses to managing ongoing concerns, learn how accessing telemedicine might be a good fit for your family's health care needs. Everyday Illnesses In the past, if your doctor's office couldn't get you in to help treat conditions like allergies,

sinus infections or other common illnesses, urgent care was one of your few remaining options. Now, virtual care can be increasingly relied upon to conveniently address non-emergency needs and everyday illnesses in place of urgent care. Specialty Care Even with a referral, it can take weeks or months to get an appointment with some specialists. One example is dermatology. Instead of waiting months to be seen by a dermatologist, with a virtual provider, you can seek and receive treatment a matter of hours. Mental Health As a result of the pandemic and related social implications, many organizations are reporting substantial upticks in requests for mental health support and anticipate telemedicine will outlive the pandemic. In fact, phone and video visits for mental health have been shown to be as effective as in-person treatment, according to the Telemental Health Institute. Wellness Care Most people think of their health needs in terms of reactive care for known problems, but it can also be useful for wellness care, such as nutrition. With more families cooking meals at home during the pandemic, registered dietitians can provide virtual consultations to help ensure everyone, including family members with special

dietary needs, receives proper nutrients. Expert Advice If you're unsure about a diagnosis, need help choosing treatment, have medical questions or concerns, or want an expert's advice or second opinion, some virtual care providers can connect you with leading specialists to give you the answers and confidence you need to make informed decisions about your family's health. Learn more about how virtual care may work for your family at Teladoc.com. Take Charge of Your Mental Health Between virtual school, safe playdates and working from home, lives have been interrupted in countless ways by the COVID-19 pandemic. Among those is the impact on mental health. These tips from Dudley can help make your mental health a priority. Engage in self-care. Self-care should be prioritized along with your work or family priorities. Make time to reconnect with family and friends by phone or video chat and allow kids to do the same. Remember asking for help, including seeking mental health counseling, is a form of self-care, too. Change expectations. Give yourself and your family grace, embrace flexibility and let go of your pursuit of perfection. Be patient and give yourself a "timeout" when challenges arise. For example, wait to address kids' negative behaviors until you are less frustrated and stop apologizing for things like children making noise in the background of calls. Keep a structured routine. Even if your regular schedule is off due to virtual school or other factors, maintaining routines like regular bedtimes allows for more time to get things done and unwind. Similarly, focus on your responsibilities during the day then catch up with kids and nonessential activities after work hours.

A Fresh Start In A New Location Julian Jewel Box After five business moves since 2003,Patricia McConnell, owner of Julian Jewel Box, has settled into her new location at 2126 Main Street, in the rear portion of the Old Julian Garage. It took two months for Patricia and helpers to move out of the lower level of the Warm Hearth and into her new location. The reopening took place May 15, 2020. The move inspired her to focus more intently on her custom jewelry designs in gold and silver. “ The new shop is a bit smaller than the previous location however, with thoughtful planning the interior actually appears to be larger,” according to Ms McConnell. At first glance, Julian Jewel Box, seems to sell everything that glitters. At ones second glance customers will discover many unusual treasures for sale. There are hand painted gourds by Laura Rubic featuring wildlife, hand thrown pottery mugs and bowls by Desiree Moring and assorted western paintings,bison skulls and photos by Wally Pacholka,who was featured in Time magazine December 2020 issue, notably for his outstanding “neo wise” comet night sky shots. Patricia enjoys feedback on her shop in reference to product and set up. One particular comment caught her attention ...”a gentleman walked in, paused, then turned to me and said,’ wow, this is the Tiffany’s of Julian’. What a delightful compliment.“ The planning process for the new location also involved input from Tyler and Chris Stamets, owners of the Warm Hearth and the Old Julian Garage. It was their desire to keep the “look” of yesteryears in Julian circa early 1900s to 1950. With that idea in mind Patricia purchased a 1910 National brass cash register and brought in a few bronze sculptures by C.M. Russell and

Frederick Remington. Patricia had noticed that before Covid-19 when travelers came to visit Julian they truly admired Western genre items. Late in January, 2021, a tourist and business man( estate dealer ), strolled in from New Jersey. After a while he said , “ I own a shop back home, but it doesn’t come close to this, your shop outshines mine and many others I have visited in my travels across the United States.” Patricia was curious and asked him why he felt prompted to pay her such a high compliment. His exact words were,” your selection of jewelry pieces are excellent and the manner in which you have arranged and displayed everything is unique and different“. Mission accomplished. “Comments like that helps us as owners knowing we are on the right track,”said Patricia. Tourism brings sales to Julian year round. It is equally important to Julian Jewel Box that local residents benefit from the services that are offered by Patricia. Watch batteries and Jewelry repairs, redos and custom designed pieces are offered with a local discount. McConnell has been known to “fix” broken items gratis for locals, she believes in helping others because as she puts it, “if you cannot contribute some goodwill for your community you should not be in business. Helping others includes you into a community. Anyone can just

exist for themselves, that’s easy. It takes effort to be kind and giving.” Patricia is extremely grateful that her business has survived shutdowns. As she looks back on her eighteen years of doing business in the beloved and quaint town of Julian she remembers the early days when it was a struggle to feel like she belonged. She joined the merchants association and the Julian chamber of commerce in hopes of strengthening her ties to the community. She remembers two people she met at a “mixer”. Mr. and Mrs. Hart, pulled her aside and said , “here are a few things you should know about the Julian business community.“ The advice was sound and prudent . Patricia never forgot their generous time and advice. She now passes on advice and information to newcomers who want to know if they can make it with a new start up business. “Sure, what can I help you with? ask away“, she tells them. Patricia cordially invites local residents to stop by during business hours which are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily - Closed on Tuesday - For additional information and questions contact by TEXT only. 760- 8259261

*** It is the passion that is in a kiss that gives to it its sweetness; it is the affection in a kiss that sanctifies it. — Christian Nestell Bovee ***


4 The Julian News

Julian

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

and

February 10, 2021

Back Country Happenings

BookBites

Historical Fiction, Real-Life Thriller And Lovable Characters To Round Out Your Reading List “Twine: A Novel”

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations Look for our return on the fourth to the Witch Creek Wednesday of the month School House The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

ESTABLISHED 1987

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

www.butterfieldbandb.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Calendar CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 2nd Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 619.504.6301 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist

Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

February

Friday, February 12 Lincoln’s Birthday (observed) Friday, February 14 COVID-19 Testing Julian Library Sunday, February 14 Valentine’s Day Monday, February 15 President’s Day/Holiday Sunday, February 21 SAL/American Legion Breakfast The SAL is going to have a benefit breakfast to raise money for our Scholarship program. Price $15.00. Tickets available through the Post’s website or at the door. all breakfasts served To Go. Monday, February 22 Washington’s Birthday

March

Wednesday, March 3 World Wildlife Day Monday, March 8 International Women’s Day Wednesday, March 17 St. Patrick’s Day Friday, March 19 Daffodil Show entries due

“The Ticket”

by Karen Schutte (Green Spring Publishing) (NAPS)—A touching account of a true American family, filled with ambition, promises, love, loss and a legacy of survival. Destined to a life of servitude, Karl Kessel, a turn-of-thecentury German immigrant from Yugoslavia, receives an unexpected gift: a ticket to America. Grasping his dream, he leaves behind his wife and two sons. In her debut historical novel, the first of a trilogy, Karen Schutte spins a compelling family story woven with rich historical detail. Her nuanced and unvarnished narrative exposes the harsh realities of life in the last century as the Kessels make their journey. Purchase at ht t p s: // k a r e n s c h u t te.c o m / product/the-ticket.

• On Feb. 14, 278 A.D., Valentine, a holy priest in Rome, is executed. Ruler Claudius the Cruel was having difficultly getting soldiers to join his military because of their strong attachment to their wives, and had banned marriages. Valentine continued to perform marriages in secret and was beheaded for it. • On Feb. 10, 1846, Brigham Young leaves Nauvoo, Illinois, and begins leading 1,600 Mormons west across the frozen Mississippi to a temporary refuge at Sugar Grove, Iowa. It was their first stop in a westward migration that eventually brought 12,000 of them to the Great Salt Lake in Utah. • On Feb. 12, 1912, HsianT'ung, the last emperor of China, is forced to abdicate. A provisional government was established, ending 267 years of Manchu rule in China and 2,000 years of imperial rule. The emperor was only 6 years old. • On Feb. 13, 1920, The League of Nations, the international organization formed at the peace conference at Versailles in the wake of World War I, recognizes the perpetual neutrality of Switzerland. • On Feb. 11, 1937, after a sixweek sit-down strike by General Motors autoworkers in Flint, Michigan, GM president Alfred P. Sloan signs the first union contract in the history of the American auto industry. • On Feb. 9, 1964, America meets the Beatles on "The Ed Sullivan Show," with an estimated 73 million Americans watching as the group made its live U.S. television debut. When they sang "She Loves You," the audience exploded in what was perhaps the most important 2 minutes and 16 seconds of music ever broadcast on American television. • On Feb. 8, 1983, gunmen steal champion Irish racehorse Shergar in County Kildare, Ireland. The 5-year-old thoroughbred stallion was worth $13.5 million. A $2 million ransom demand was never paid, and Shergar was never seen again. © 2021 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

“Better Dead Than Divorced”

by Lukas Konandreas (Hard Work Publications) “Better dead than divorced,” responds a young wife to those who urge her to divorce her adulterous, manipulative and abusing husband, who plans to kill her. She knows about his evil intentions and she is urged to leave him. But her love, devotion and societal prejudice against divorced women make her stay. And dead she ends up by a commissioned assassin. Her cousin, a principled man, fights beyond his modest means in a corrupt system to get justice. The author delivers a real pageturner. Purchase at http://betterdeadthandivorced. com.

by Monica Duncan (Wall & Emerson, Inc.) When Juniper Kowalski, a mediocre artist and graduate of one of the best art schools in the country, gets pregnant by her married lover, she ends up back in Gobles, Michigan, living in her dead grandma’s trailer. She fears that her new life as a hotel maid, and as the best friend of a sub-rural call girl, has fulfilled some bleak fate. But Juniper’s pregnancy also ignites a will to create. Every hurt that she’s ever suffered begins to emerge as confrontational, public art. “Twine” celebrates a quietly radical view of small-town life, ambition and motherhood. It’s the story of a young woman who needs no he-ro—and what she does when he shows up anyway. Purchase at http://bit. ly/2LxoUHF.

“Pursuits Unknown”

by Ellen Clary (SparkPress) Amy and her Kelpie-shepherd mix, Lars, work with a search team that specializes in finding continued on page 10

Automotive Marketplace Auto Services

Danny’s Truck and Auto 729 D Street • Ramona

LUBE, OIL & FILTER $29.95 with coupon

• MOST VEHICLES UP TO 5 QUARTS • PLUS DISPOSAL FEES

Most All Vehicles • No Other Discounts Apply WE PROUDLY FEATURE

760 789

6177

HOURS: Mon-Fri 8am - 6pm Saturday 8am - 4pm

CATALTIC CONVERTER REPLACEMENT or EXHAUST SYSTEM REPAIR

15% OFF

MOST VEHICLES

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION MOST VEHICLES and LIGHT TRUCKS


February 10, 2021

My Thoughts

EAST OF PINE HILLS

Things I Miss

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Chicken Weather The Hens are Unhappy. They are thinking of forming a labor union. Their complaint is the weather. We have pointed out that we don’t have much control over the weather but the hens, bless their hearts, think that anyone who showers them with scratch from the sky must be able to do everything. The problem, the hens aversion, is that winter isn’t being a proper, normal winter. That is, the hens have their seasonal vacation and don’t usually lay many eggs (or any eggs) when it’s winter. They figure out it’s winter when it’s consistently cold like, well, like winter. Short days and long nights also help but when the days are bright sunlight it’s hard to measure how short they are. And this season winter isn’t being winter because we aren’t having a lot of gray cold days. So the hens keep laying. This isn’t an issue for some hens, such as those in the factory farm on the road to Ramona. There the lights are on 24/7 because it means the hens lay more eggs in a shorter time, that they are, in short, productive. In a Stakhonovite sort of way (“Faster, Comrade hens, faster, more eggs, more eggs for the Fatherland or Motherland as the case may be, lay, Lay, LAY!!). Our hens wouldn’t put up with that, not that most hens have a choice…but ours do and they want their Winter Break. So badly that Lacey the Senior Hen (through longevity which was mostly luck in avoiding the Evil Raccoon but that’s another subject entirely) has asked for a hen pen and writing pad, with lines, please, to put forward a petition. Her writing, to be honest, looks like chicken scratches but, hey… ….we have plenty of eggs.

Julian Elementary School

Local Hero: Donna Garcia

There is a special volunteer at Julian Elementary. For two years retired teacher and reading specialist Donna Garcia has been volunteering her talent and skill with students in grades two through five. Currently working with individual students, Mrs. Garcia gives students special, additional instruction to assist their growing reading skills. She and her husband, Raul, moved to Julian after weekending here for years. They were seeking a quieter and slower paced lifestyle upon retirement, and they found it in Cuyamaca Woods. While Mrs. Garcia also actively volunteers with the California Wolf Center, it was her family that urged her to get back working with kids seeing how much she missed teaching students. Her joy is obvious. There’s always a glowing smile when she comes on campus, and even when it is covered by a mask her eyes are smiling bright. We have some lucky kiddos here at Julian Elementary. Thank you Mrs. Garcia.

Working Daughters Deserve Support (NAPSI)—For the approximate 23 million women who balance caring for an aging parent with going to work, and often raising children of their own, there is little recognition and not enough support. These women themselves often don’t think of what they do as caregiving; they When businesses support working just consider themselves dutiful daughters, it’s good for these women, daughters. Yet they average 24.4 their parents and the companies hours of unpaid care a week, from themselves. buying groceries, to managing medication, helping with household chores, assisting their parents with bathing and dressing, and driving to appointments. Many are even providing complex medical tasks, with little or no training, such as administering injections, monitoring vital signs, caring for wounds or cleaning feeding tubes. Collectively, they provide $470 billion in unpaid care, according to the AARP. Often, these women provide this care at great cost to their careers. Working daughters, much like working mothers, may need to switch to a less demanding job, take time off or quit work altogether. They lose wages and job-related benefits costing them, on average, $304,000 in lost wages and benefits while spending nearly 20 percent of their own income on caregiving. To give these unsung heroes recognition and much needed support, it’s important to make the care they give compatible with their careers. With 10,000 people turning 65 every day in the United States, the caregiving workforce is only going to grow. Smart businesses must examine policies and corporate cultures to create environments where caregivers can thrive. Working daughters need flexibility, paid family leave policies and expanding eligibility requirements. They need affordable, quality eldercare options. Learn more at www.workingdaughter.com. *** The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing. ***

— Blaise Pasca

by Michele Harvey

I was born in 1950 and I have seen many changes in my lifetime. I miss car radios that have dials. With dials we could dial in remote stations. Today’s digital car radios zoom past stations that don’t give a clear signal. I miss cars that came in many different colors. It seems like each year we have new fads now. In a full parking lot with nearly new cars, the predominant colors are red, white, black and silver. How boring. I miss the days of my childhood when television series lasted for thirty-nine episodes per year. That’s why they can run so many reruns now. These days it seems like a new show has about six episodes which begin in January and are finished by March. I miss variety television shows. We used to watch the Ed Sullivan Show every Sunday night from 1948 through September of 1971. It ran 1048 different episodes and twenty-four seasons. How many television shows on today could hold anyone’s attention that long? Even Downton Abby only lasted six seasons. Ed Sullivan’s show introduced mimes, dog and pony acts, plate twirlers, gymnasts, opera singers, classical musicians, popular musicians and black musicians when no other show would. Ed Sullivan liked the Supremes and called them The Girls. The list of black musicians who became well known because of the Ed Sullivan Show is vast. The first time most of us in the U.S. saw the Beatles was on The Ed Sullivan Show. Elvis Presley, The Rolling Stones and many other English musicians made their U.S. television debuts on Ed Sullivan’s show. I miss Drive-In movies. When I was a child and a teenager, San Diego had a plethora of Drive-in theaters. On a Saturday night, we would pop enough popcorn to fill a brown grocery bag, add salt and butter, shake them all up, and we were ready to go. Some drive-ins had playgrounds for children under the giant screens. They all had concession stands and decent bathrooms. I always felt safe getting into either of those lines no matter how squished I got between taller people. I miss variety shows. These were television shows that showed talent, the way Ed Sullivan’s show did, however, they usually had a main talent like Andy Williams or Dean Martin who sang. Then there were skit shows like Carol Burnett and Flip Wilson. When I was growing up, we had silly comedy television shows and quite a lot of them can be seen in reruns now. Ozzie and Harriet featured the Nelson family. We were never certain if Ozzie Nelson had a job. When Ricky Nelson was old enough, he sang on the television show at school dances and that launched an actual singing career for America’s first Rock Star that only ended when his DC-3 airplane crash landed. Rick Nelson was forty-five at the time. If you think I LOVE LUCY reruns are silly, you aren’t alone they were silly back in the 1950s too. After World War ll was over in 1945 we needed silly. Lucille Ball was a really smart businesswoman though and she fought for royalties for actors whose shows went into reruns. Prior to that, they were paid small amounts when they recorded the shows and that was that. I miss shopping in grocery stores that sell paper back books. When I was in Junior High, now called middle school, I read all of Edgar Rice Burroughs books because I was able to buy them at the grocery store. Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote all of the Tarzan books and besides Tarzan he was well-known for creations including, John Carter of Mars and Carson Napier of Venus. After I graduated from high school, I got a job working at Alpha Beta, a grocery store that sold paper back books. Although I read a variety of books, I got hooked on reading Thomas Tryon books which were extremely weird. I read The Other, Harvest Home, Crowned Heads, which was a collection of novellas, and that was all of the weird reading I could handle. I never was a library person. When I was a child, Mom would take us to the La Mesa library, but I found it completely overwhelming and every time someone was shushed, I thought that meant I couldn’t make a sound, so I was too timid to ask any questions. I am grateful for the Julian County Library because it is a very comfortable place, and I can have normal conversations without getting shushed. I miss buying cotton fabric remnants. When I was in high school, my Mom bought used zippers somewhere near her workplace in downtown San Diego. I could buy discounted cotton ¼ yard fabric remnants and made nearly all of my school clothes which were a much easier design than today’s clothes. Today, cotton remnants are priced higher for quilters and they are called fat quarters. Of course, all fabric costs a great deal more than it did when I was in high school in the 1960s. I don’t remember ever getting bored. These days of computers, kindles, chrome books and cell phones, I wonder what people do without their electronics. The few times that we have power outages are not a big deal in our home. We have a battery powered radio to hear the news, we have oils lamps and candles for light, and I have books to read. Our stove is propane and can be started with a match. We have a fireplace to keep us warm and lots of non-perishable food in our house. I miss going to church and I miss seeing my friends, yet I know that too will come in time. These are my thoughts.

The Julian News 5

Memories of Johnny

by Ed Glass

There are so many moments, so many memories over many years, when we think of Julian’s Johnny Hake. Johnny’s recent departure from our world focuses us on a sense of sadness, but also happy memories. It’s difficult to recall a time when I did not know Johnny and Diane Hake. When my wife and I arrived in Julian 22 years ago, it seemed as if they were already reliably involved in the layers and textures of this mountain town. When did they start the Community Emergency Response Team? Who knows, but CERT grew through the years, as the Hakes trained residents to assist others who needed help. A couple of my favorite emergency response stories: * A Julian couple was “down the hill” shopping. The cell phone rings, and it’s their young daughter. She tells them that her younger brother had fallen and may have broken his arm. She calmly prepared a splint for the arm. At the hospital emergency room later in the day, the doctor was quite impressed with the skills of this 13 year-old girl who had been trained by the Hakes in the Teen CERT program. * Another Julian couple was having dinner on their rear deck one beautiful evening. They were each talking about their day while enjoying their meal together. Suddenly, the husband is choking; the wife asks “are you okay?”…“I’m fine” he says. But he continued choking! She stood up immediately, walked behind his chair, and performed the Heimlich maneuver to dislodge the food. That second incident was me, being saved by my wife Dawn, who had completed her CERT training with the Hakes several months earlier. I have often thought that maybe I talk too much, not a good habit while eating. I am convinced that Dawn likely saved my life that evening. Years ago, I joined my first of many community event projects in Julian. This was Country Christmas, beginning with the decorating crew and then adding the late November tree-lighting ceremony to my list of holiday passions. Years ago, Johnny became our Santa Claus for our tree-lighting event. When the tree was lit following the countdown (10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1) by the huge crowd in Pioneer Park, Santa would then arrive in a Julian fire truck, cheered by the crowd. The kids line up to tell their wishes to Santa, while Mrs. Claus (Diane) and the Julian Queens and Princesses patiently assisted with the Country Christmas duties.

Johnny…whoops!...SANTA…spent as much time as each child needed. Often there were 400-500 kids waiting for their visit with Santa; yes, we DID count a couple of times! But no, we could never count on an early finish to Country Christmas tree lighting day, ever! Families from down the hill would come each year to enjoy this event, and take photos of their children year by year with Santa. Family scrapbooks prior to Facebook and Instagram. Every now and then “older kids” would get in line to see the jolly elf. A favorite example: a couple, both in their early~mid 20’s, finally reached Santa…each one gently sits on each of Santa’s knees. Santa looks at them both and asks “ho ho ho, and what would you like for Christmas?” The young man steps away and drops to one knee to ask his companion, “Will you marry me???” It was such a combination of smiles and tears!... and of course, a friend nearby was shooting a video of the moment. The young woman said “yes!!!” Johnny cheerfully gave of his time year-round. My focus here has been on his santa clause, pun intended. But the community could always count on him for the July 4th parade, for numerous events at Menghini Winery, to be there with his CERT staff. CERT and the Hakes were deep in the fabric of our community. Thank you, Johnny. Thank you, Diane. A deep gratitude to all who worked with them and who were inspired by Johnny Hake.

National Burn Awareness Week continued from page 1

at least three feet away from all heaters, whether electric, gas or kerosene-fueled. • If an electric power line is down on or near your home, keep everyone out of the area and call 9-1-1 or your local electric utility. The American Burn Association also provides guidelines for parents to help further reduce the risk of electrical burns for young children: • Don’t allow children to play with or near and keep them away from electrical appliances such as space heaters, irons and hair dryers. • Use plug covers on any electrical outlets accessible to small children. Outlet caps that attach to the outlet plate with screws give better protection than those that plug in. • Make sure plug-in caps are a similar color to the outlet. • Make sure such caps are not big enough to be a choking hazard. • Make sure any night lights used in child’s room do not resemble toys. • Teach children to respect electricity as soon as they old enough. This is usually about age three. • Two thirds of electrical burn injuries occur to children aged 12 and under.

About the Burn Institute: The Burn Institute is a local non-profit dedicated to education and inspiring our communities to reduce burn injuries and empowering those affected by burn trauma through supportive services. The Burn Institute continues to reach tens of thousands of children and adults each year with lifesaving fire and burn prevention education and burn survivor support programs that help individuals and families cope with the devastating psychological and physical effects of their burn injuries. For more information on the Burn Institute, visit www.burninstitute.org You can connect with the Burn Institute on Facebook at facebook.com/ Burn-Institute and on Twitter @Burn_Institute.

*** I do not want horses or diamonds - I am happy in possessing you. — Clara Schumann ***


6 The Julian News

Julian

and

Back Country Dining

Lake Cuyamaca

Julian

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

8am - 8pm

760•765•0700

15027 Highway 79 - at the Lake

Check Out Our New “Social Distancing” Tent Julian

d

en k e Q We BB

Valentines Teas Feb 11-15 served outside or available To Go

(served outside or To Go)

760 765 0832

2124 Third Street

www.juliantea.com

one block off Main Main Street

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

1485 Hollow Glen Road

RESTAURANT

ITALIAN & SICILIAN CUISINE

Julian

Santa Ysabel

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

Wynola

Julian

Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

Casual, Relaxed

Open Daily 11am Until 7:00pm

Full Menu - Take Out Only

Curb Side Pick Up

Lunch and Dinner • Patio Dining 765-0173 2224 Main Street •

Mid-Week Dinner Specials

2718 B Street - Julian Reservations 760 765 1003 Dine In or Takeout • Wine and Beer See our menu at www.romanosrestaurantjulian.com

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS/WEEK

Family Friendly

MORE THAN JUST GREAT PIZZA!

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR

Julian

onditioned Tea C r i A 1921 Main Street 760 765 2900

Julian

ROMANO’S Two locations to serve you:

JULIAN GRILLE

s n o i t a v d r e e t s s e e R ug g S

Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

offering - tasters - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go

dog friendly Patio

Brewery Guide

Julian

Julian and Santa Ysabel

open 2pm Thursday open 11:30 Fri - Sun

and

Serving Organic Coffee, Tea, Breakfast, Beer, Wine & MORE.

February 10, 2021

SENIORS THURSDAYS

$6 —

YOUR CHOICE + SOFT DRINK COLEMAN CREEK CENTER (2 BLOCKS OFF MAIN ON WASHINGTON)

OPEN 7 DAYS

Breakfast served - Monday RThursday oo

m

Open 7 Days a Week

& PIZZA BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

11AM - 8PM Drive Thru Service 760 765-1810 For To-Go Orders Julian and Wynola

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

Ask About Our Specials

(760) 765-1004

3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

Call In Your Order

Over 35 varieties of beer, ale and hard cider

ENTERTAINMENT

Returning Whenever

2119 Main St. Julian

4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

760-765-2472

*** I just think Valentine's Day is a day to really appreciate the person you love, no matter who it is, and to spend time with them. I don't think it's all about fancy presents or whatever. I think it's about spending that quality time with that special person. — Prince Royce *** 1. GEOGRAPHY: The United States shares a land border with how many countries? 2. HISTORY: When did the Great Fire of London take place? 3. MEASUREMENTS: What does a sphygmomanometer measure? 4. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of food has varieties called castelvetrano, manzanilla and nyon? 5. TELEVISION: What was the name of the Coneheads’ home planet (“Saturday Night Live”)? 6. MOVIES: How many versions of “A Star Is Born” have been made? 7. LITERATURE: The title of William Faulkner’s novel “The Sound and the Fury” is taken from which of Shakespeare’s plays? 8. SCIENCE: What does the acronym DNA stand for? 9. MUSIC: What is a diggeridoo? 10. CURRENCY: Whose likeness is depicted on the U.S. $50 bill? Answers on page 11

Chef’s Corner

These were supplemented by sheep cheese, vegetables (leeks, mallow, lettuce, chicory, mushrooms) and a little meat, and among Romans, a strong preference for fish and seafood. According to a National Center of Biotechnology Information article, the discovery of the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet is attributed to American scientist Ancel Keys, who researched the correlation between cardiovascular disease and diet for the first time. In the 1950s, Keys was struck by a phenomenon, for which he could not, at first, provide a full explanation. The poor population of small towns of southern Italy

was, against all predictions, much healthier than the wealthier citizens of New York, many of whom had Italian ancestors who emigrated to the United States. Keys suggested that this depended on food, and tried to validate his original insight, focusing on foods that made up the diet of these populations. This study proved that populations that had adopted a diet based on the Mediterranean diet presented a very low rate of cholesterol in the blood and, consequently, a minimum percentage of coronary heart disease. This was mainly due to the plentiful use of olive oil, bread, pasta, vegetables, herbs,

Mediterranean Diet Stands The Test Of Time

The Mediterranean diet is in the news again, not only because it’s the start of a new year, but also because it was named as one of the most popular and healthiest diets by several publications. The origins of the “Mediterranean diet” are lost in time because it’s based on the eating habits of the Middle Ages, in which the ancient Roman tradition -on the model of the Greeks -- identified in bread, wine and oil products a symbol of rural culture and agriculture.

continued on page 11


February 10, 2021

Paul Evans Chairs

These unusual chairs were designed by Paul Evans. His furniture is selling for higher prices each year as collectors understand his importance. Paul Evans (1931-1987) is one of the famous midcentury designers in America. He made unique furniture that fit into the buildings and houses being introduced after World War II.

The Julian News 7

His studio was in New Hope, Pennsylvania, and in the 1960s he was making furniture from steel and other metals. He had to learn to weld, torch cut and create a patina to make his boxy chests and tables. Unexpected woods and metals were used in the furniture he made at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. He was successful as a sculptor and as a designer and maker for the company Directional Furniture. After his death, his work was forgotten for a few years, but soon it was realized that Evans' designs were important, and prices have been going up. His Cityscape pieces seem to be the most popular, but Argenta chairs and tables are wanted for dining rooms in modern houses with large windows and plain walls. Each piece is handmade, all are heavy, difficult to move, unusual and sure to be noticed. A pair of armchairs made in the 1960s of steel paired with flowered upholstery sold at a

Rago Modern Design auction. The chairs estimated at $9,000 to $14,000 sold for $20,000 -- well over the estimate. Each chair is 26 x 25 1/2 x 20 inches. *** Q: I have a whale's tooth scrimshaw made by Frank Barcelos in very good condition. I want to sell it but don't know if I should use eBay or an auction. Would you be able to help? A: Scrimshaw -- carvings or etchings on whale's teeth, bone or ivory -- was first carved by North American whalers and others about 1800. A scrimshander is someone who makes scrimshaw. Frank Barcelos was born Francisco Jose de Barcelos. He came to the United States from the Azores in 1969. Some of his scrimshaw sells for high prices. There are federal laws governing the sale of whale ivory, and it can't be shipped between states. You should contact an auction house to see if they can sell it. ***

CURRENT PRICES Underwood Standard Typewriter, No. 5, round keys, ruler, half-moon opening, black, 11 x 12 inches, $120. Coverlet, "Manufactured on the Latest Fashion," trees, urn, flowers, circles, blue and white, fringe, Seifert & Co., 89 x 96 inches, $330. Baccarat vase, cut glass, gold enamel, leaves, 19 x 5 inches, $375. Wrought iron gate, 4 sections, scrollwork, repeating kidney shapes, center hinged gate, 73 x 97 inches, $800. --TIP: You can tell a piece of jade by the feel. It will be cold, even in warm weather. *** Kovels’ “A Diary: How to Sell, Settle and Profit from a Collector’s Estate” is a step-by-step guide on what to do when settling an estate -- from gathering legal papers to dividing antiques among heirs and selling everything else, even the house. Available only from Kovels

for $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or write to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122. ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. What NFL wide receiver holds the record for most yards from scrimmage in a game with 336, set in the 1989 season? (Hint: Despite his nickname, he never played for the Miami Dolphins.)

2. What ABC sportscaster had the unfortunate task of reporting “They’re all gone” in the aftermath of the 1972 Munich Olympics hostage crisis? 3. The Autodromo Internacional do Algarve is a racetrack located in what country? 4. Name the 1980 Scripps National Spelling Bee champion who became the event’s official pronouncer in 2003. 5. What two English Premier League football clubs play each other in the Second City Derby rivalry match? 6. What Michigan Wolverines running back was selected by the New York Giants in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft? 7. What Oklahoma City Thunder player led the NBA in blocks per game for two straight seasons from 2011-13? Answers on page 11


February 10, 2021

8 The Julian News

Newspaper Fun!

Pastor Cindy Arntson

www.readingclubfun.com

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2021 V17-6

Chinese New Year Celebration

Year of the Ox

The Chinese New Year celebration begins with New Year’s Day and lasts for 15 days, ending with the Lantern Festival. The Chinese Calendar has a 12-year cycle with an animal representing each year. This year it is the ox. Each day of this festival has its own traditional customs and events, and more modern ones too, depending upon where people live. Join in the fun – make decorations or a dinner to celebrate the Chinese New Year.

3

strong

4

als 9 festiv 14 snake 5 Zodiac ox 1

10

lucky

11 Read the clues to fill in the crossword puzzle: Jade gy o l o h t my 7 13 1. This year, is the Year of the ________. 2. The ox is the second animal in the Chinese ________. meat 8 3. In one story, the ox didn’t follow the ________ Emperor’s instructions. He was punished 12 by being forced to help farmers on the Earth. But, the people loved the hard-working ox. colors 4. People born in the Year of the Ox are said to be ________, hardworking, and active. 6 5. Their careful planning and strength help to make them great ________ or carpenters. 6. The ox has a hard time talking to people and can be ________ and set in their ways. stubborn 7. An ox can be friends with a ________ or a “rooster,” but won’t get along with a “dragon” or a “tiger”. cutting farmers 8. The ox’s ________ numbers are 1, 4 and 9. But, watch out for 5 and 6 – they’re unlucky! 2 9. An ox should wear – and decorate with – white, yellow, green or red ________. They can bring good luck. charm 10. ________ is a popular food in China. More beef is being eaten than ever before, but still not as much as pork. Beef is very expensive. The person born in the year of the ox may Lucky Col ors 11. Chinese ________ has a character called Gozu, an ox-headed wish to wear special colors. Can you match f o r creature, similar to the famous minotaur from Greek mythology. an “Ox” the colors to what they stand for? 12. The ancient art of paper ________ - shaping red paper into an ox or 1. White A. river of flowing water (news will flow or move fast) other Zodiac animals - is a popular activity during the New Year. 2. Yellow B. spring, trees, being creative, jade jewelry is good 13. People wear red ________ necklaces and bracelets for good luck; 3. Green C. may bring fame, power, royalty, prosperity in the year of the Ox, a small metal ox will be dangling from jewelry. 4. Red D. powerful color for luck, success and good fortune 14. Temple ________ are events where people pray, eat, dance and buy 5. Black E. metal, purity, innocence, death crafts. This is all to honor the Zodiac, the gods and the New Year.

Festivals, Food and Fun

Stiltwalker roaming above the The Chinese New Year is the longest holiday in China. Family, friends, fireworks and lots of fun – like crowds.

stiltwalkers above the crowds – are all part of the festivities of the holiday. Can you find and circle all these things that are important to families during this holiday? rs fish visitin stiltwalke g red prayers gifts cleaning

fl

dinners

ancesto

owers

rs

dumpling

oranges

dragon dancers

family

shopping

friends

s

lantern

long noodles

als zodiac anim

calendar

singers

Good Wishes and Gifts I love surprises, don’t you?

s

fireworks crowds

lion dancers good wishes rice cakes

S D C F V A N V G B C F A L O N G N O O D L E S A R K

Q D B E I V E P I

G T R F D D E W S I X W Q I Y V V N B G T E I R L S M U A Q P A Z D P D O F W F P R A D I W A M U V L N I K V W G L D C I E Y I O E S T Q A X U F E I A C P

C I H X Z O D I A C A N I M A L S H T M N

L H F R D N D C M L R L H G T Z E N W X C

P L X T U S A L B D Y A O F G L Y M A N E

P X F Q S L A Y U F K N F I O S L C L N S

R H O U E N I M R B D G L R O H F N K C T

A A T N T S P I P A K N O E D O R G E L O

Y L D E U L C J N W R H W W W P I C R E R

E A R P I E Y C X Q Y S E O I P E K S A S

R N E N C N E D P J R A R R S I N R F N L

S S G A V R R B X F Q L S K H N D M D I R

W S K X S Y L G I I K E O S E G S A A N Q

I E E M D N U O F I Y S V I S I T I N G D

S T L I O N D A N C E R S D I N N E R S U

Y = Yellow R = Red

R Y R R YR R R R Y YR R R R R R Y R Y R YY Y Y R R R Y Y R R R R Y Y R R R R R R R Y Y R R Y R Y R R R Y Y R Y R Y RR Y RY Y R R R R R R Y R R Y Y Y R R R R Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y R R R Y Y Y R R R

R Y R

R

clergy serving Community United Methodist Church at 2898 Highway 78, Julian. Direct all questions and correspondence to: Faith and Living, c/o CUMCJ, PO Box 460, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

G Z K H T I G H Q N K G D I M R D Q L C A

Y

R R R R R R R R R Y R R Y R R R Y R R R Y R R Y R Y R Y R R Y Y Y R R R R R R Y Y R R Y Y Y R R Y R Y Y R R R Y R Y Y Y Y Y R Y R R Y Y R R R R Y R Y Y R R Y R R R R R R R R R Y Y R R R R R R R R R

The authors of the Harvard Business Review article suggested that creating ordinances that limit the number of short-term rentals by percentage might be a solution but I’m not convinced these sorts of changes should be mandated. I tend to believe that it is better if these changes are influenced by conscience and belief about what’s best for our community as a whole and thereby better for each one of us as residents of this community. Cindy Arntson is ordained

G J S Q U T S E O E M Q C R O W D S I F X

What gift is given for the New Year in little red packets or envelopes? It is called Tao Hongbao or Lai See and is given for good luck. Use the color key to see what it is: R

A cousin of ours was selfemployed for most of her career and ended up without adequate funds set aside for retirement. Renting out the downstairs bedroom and bathroom of her home in Portland through Airbnb to weekend visitors has helped her have a more secure retirement with a little extra income for occasional trips of her own. In a Wall Street Journal article in October 2017, a spokesperson for Airbnb said, “Airbnb makes housing more affordable— countless families depend on Airbnb to pay their rent and stay in their homes—and in an opinion survey, 95% of economists and housing experts said they don’t believe home sharing has a significant impact on rents. The authors of this study agree that home sharing can provide important economic benefits for families and support smart rules that allow home sharing to continue.” But in that same WSJ article, the author Lisa Ward cited other studies that indicate that as Airbnb short-term rentals increase in an area, the number of long-term rentals decreases and the average amount of rent charged for long-term rentals increases. Lisa Ward quoted Dr. Edward Kung, an assistant professor of economics at the University of California Los Angeles who explained the results of his research. “We hypothesize Airbnb takes supply out of the long-term rental market, which caters to residents looking to rent permanent homes, and reallocates it to the short-term rental market, which caters to tourists or other temporary visitors. This reduces the supply of long-term rental units and increases the price for residents looking for long-term housing.” A more recent article (April 2019) in the Harvard Business Review by Barron, Kung and Prospero confirmed the findings of the earlier study. The authors admit that drawing direct correlations between the rise of Airbnb short-term rentals and the decrease in the number homes available for long-term rentals with increased rents charged is difficult because many factors influence the rental market. They did however, by looking at housing vacancies, find evidence that Airbnb supply is positively correlated with the share of homes that are vacant for seasonal or recreational use and negatively correlated with the share of homes in the market for long-term rentals. We are seeing this trend on an anecdotal level here in Julian. I am familiar with four households this past year who had to move out of their rental for reasons not related to them. One of those four had to move so that the owner could convert the home to an Airbnb. All of these households had a very difficult time finding a long-term rental at similar cost here in Julian. Looking at the Airbnb website for Julian for the first week of February, I found 190 units advertised as available. Some of those were in neighboring towns like Warner Springs, Mesa Grande and Descanso, and some were only rooms, so not all 190 would have been appropriate for long-term rental in Julian. But at least 100 were vacant houses. On that same day, there were no rentals listed on Zillow. com available for Julian, Warner Springs or Borrego Springs. There were two for Descanso and four in Ramona. Julian is a tourist town. Our economy is heavily dependent on hospitality to visitors. It makes sense to have adequate accommodations for them. But at some point, we harm our own interests by not having adequate housing for the employees of our businesses. It is also important to have enough percentage of permanent residents to create safe, stable neighborhoods and have adequate enrollment to sustain our schools.

...dinner and try many new dishes.

We’re going to make a Chinese...

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2021

Faith and Living

Solution page 11

Planning, Early Treatment Key To Successful BRD Control In Cattle (NAPSI)—Newly weaned cattle don’t always handle changing temperatures and environments well, especially in the fall and winter when conditions can be more extreme. But by working closely with their veterinarian to have an effective treatment plan and proven therapeutic products on hand before cattle arrive, producers can more successfully control major health problems. According to Dr. Eric Moore, director of technical services for Norbrook Laboratories, respiratory diseases in cattle— specifically Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD)—is one that producers will most likely encounter in the fall and winter. “It’s important producers immediately treat sick animals as soon as they are identified,” explains Dr. Moore. “The sooner producers can get sick animals

treated with a fast-acting, broad-spectrum antibiotic such as Norfenicol, the better the chances are for getting those animals healthy and back to being productive.”

Norfenicol from Norbrook has been on the market for four years and is labeled for the treatment and control of BRD in cattle, as well as foot rot. As Dr. Moore explains, the proven antibiotic

Ranchers can treat their cattle for respiratory disease and foot rot with one antibiotic.

has some unique differences, including being available in a convenient and durable plastic bottle with the ability to hang, and it is formulated to be less viscous and easy to syringe. “With Norfenicol, producers now have an antibiotic option for treating and controlling BRD that’s much more convenient to administer than the pioneer, especially in colder weather when product viscosity can be a problem,” Dr. Moore says. “It’s also a fast-acting antibiotic, getting to the lungs in as little as 30 minutes after injection, making it a highly effective and convenient product to use in treating respiratory disease. As always, producers should consult their veterinarian for the treatment plans and products that best fit their operations.”


Frbruary 10, 2021

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

The Limits Of Interactive Budget Tools

by Jon Coupal

Did you ever want to write your own state budget? Maybe not, but some media outlets and progressive organizations have created interactive websites where ordinary citizens can do just that. These are intended, we suppose, for educational purposes and perhaps, more specifically, to demonstrate how difficult and complex it is to create a budget for the nation’s most populous state. For example, in 2019, CalMatters created a “Budget Decider” that allowed anyone to input various dollar amounts on both the revenue side and the expenditure side to create a state budget. The website states that it was designed “to improve your understanding of where taxes come from and where all that money goes.” A similar interactive website was created by the progressive organization Next 10 called the “California Budget Challenge.” Its stated purpose is “to educate citizens about the state budget and the tradeoffs that are made to bring the budget into balance.” Any attempt to educate the public about public policy and the tradeoffs that come with fiscal issues and state budgeting should be applauded, as long as it does not deceive the users. But an argument can be made that the superficiality of these models doesn’t paint a complete picture about how government taxes its citizens and businesses and how it spends that money. First, these exercises assume a zero-sum game. If you add revenue to one program, such as education, you must either raise taxes or reduce spending on something else, such as transportation. But budgeting is not a zero-sum game because changes in tax policy and spending have secondary impacts. This is the problem with what is known as “static scoring.” For example, it is assumed that if a current proposal to impose a big increase in California’ corporate income tax passes,

it would generate about $2.4 billion. But businesses frequently react to higher taxes either by changing their business models, reducing their business activity or moving out of the state. In order to properly project what might happen if there is a change in tax policy, “dynamic scoring” must be used, which attempts, as best as possible, to predict changes in behavior due to changes in law. Second, the real issue here is how efficiently public services are delivered rather than how much we spend. Obviously, the provision of public services requires funding. But many Californians who travel out-of-state wonder how it is that other states provide a higher quality of public goods at a much lower cost. California has the highest gas tax in the nation and yet ranks near the bottom in the quality of our roads. Also, we rightfully spend a lot of money on education, but how much of our K-12 and higher education spending is either wasteful or actually counterproductive to the education of our children? What got us thinking about these interactive budget challenges is the current scandal regarding the staggering amount of fraud in the distribution of unemployment funds. According to the State Auditor, it could be as high as $30 billion. To put this in context, the level of fraud far exceeds twice what was projected to have been collected annually had Proposition 15, the split roll initiative, passed. Inquiring taxpayers who visit the “California Budget Challenge” might justifiably ask “where is my option to eliminate that fraud so that we can actually spend the $30 billion on public services or reduce taxes?” Interactive “budget challenges” can serve a useful purpose. Just give us more options that actually address the dysfunction that is California. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA).

• The human brain would be able to perform 38 quadrillion (38 thousand trillion) operations per second if it were a computer. • Lisa Jakub, who played teenager Lydia Hilliard in "Mrs. Doubtfire," was kicked out of her Toronto school for taking the five-month-long film gig. When co-star Robin Williams found out, he wrote a letter to the school asking them to reconsider. School officials framed his letter, but didn't change their mind about Jakub. • Pope Francis was once a nightclub bouncer in his native Argentina. • Neptune was the first planet to be found through mathematical predictions rather than telescopic location. • The Iberian ribbed newt uses its own bones as weapons! Special tubercles in its abdomen allow its ribs to poke out through its skin when the newt is frightened. As an added bonus, the skin secretes a toxic chemical, turning this little creature into a killer of anything that tries to bite it. • Allodoxaphobia is the fear of opinions. • In Ghana, people like to be buried in something that represents their lives. These include coffins shaped like planes for pilots, fish for fishermen and a Mercedes for a businessman. • Many companies try to be as ethical and environmentally friendly as possible, but Stella McCartney bags took that initiative a step further by making some of the accessories out of corn. • "Psycho" was the first movie to show a toilet flushing. • As part of standard convention, pilots and co-pilots do not eat the same food before a flight in case of food poisoning (or worse). If one of the pilots is incapacitated (in other words, unable to leave the bathroom), the other pilot can take over. *** Thought for the Day: "The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson ® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt. — Charles M. Schulz ***

*** Love will find a way through paths where wolves fear to prey. — Lord Byron ***


February 10, 2021

10 The Julian News

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

CONTRACTORS

• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G • Heating / Air Conditioning Service

Excavation / Site Work

Water Treatment Services

GOT WATER PROBLEMS?

Julian Mini Storage

Serving the CoMMunity of Julian GATED - SECURE STORAGE SITES

Outside Storage - Trailers, Boats, Cars, RV’s Unit Sizes - 5x10, 10x10, 10x15, 10x20, 10x30

3582 Highway 78 at Newman Way

765-2601

(760)

Fax

(760)756-9020

email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

Access 7 Days - 7a.m. to Dark • UNITS AVAILABLE NOW! Carpet / Flooring / Window Treatment

Electric

Licensed Contractors Wanted

Gus Garcia’s

Home and Business Electrical Service  New Meters  New Panels  Fans & Lighting  Additional Circuits  Water Well Electrical

cell (760) 271 0166 License # 678670

SALES • SERVICE

Residential & Commercial Water Treatment Systems Water Testing

License No. 415453

2 x 4 Advertising Space Available 13 weeks only $200 Call The Julian News for details. We Can Design the right ad for you!

760-765-2231

WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS www.haguewatersandiego.com

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

CONTRACTORS

• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G • • FISHING REPORT • ® Dear EarthTalk: What is the “Field of Dreams” ecology restoration theory? -- Mary W., Austin, TX The “Field of Dreams” hypothesis is a premise that restoration ecologists use to support arguments in favor of restoring plant diversity in that doing so will also lead to the return of wildlife. The hypothesis name comes from the 1989 film of the same name in which Kevin Costner heeds the “if you build it, they will come” call, building a ballfield in his cornfield which leads to all-stars from the ages showing up for an epic game. Conservationists would like to believe they can do similar things with land by reintroducing native plants so that animals will also return given the more hospitable surroundings.

Researchers studying Tallgrass prairie restoration at Illinois' Nachusa Preserve found that reintroducing Bison there ended up bringing back other native wildlife much faster than merely reseeding bunchgrasses. Credit: Ralph Earlandson, FlickrCC. “The Field of Dreams stems from the notion that all one needs is the physical structure for a particular ecosystem, and biotic composition and function will self-assemble...” reports Robert Hilderbrand of Brazil’s Laboratório de Ecologia e Restauração Florestal. Restoring plant biodiversity is an important part of ecological restoration no matter what, but researchers have found time and again that animals returning is far from guaranteed, given the many factors at play that will dictate a different outcome from the original composition restorationists are trying to replicate. “Restoration sites do become re-vegetated, but may be of different species composition and degree of cover,” says Hilderbrand. While revegetating a disturbed site is no doubt the best course of action if the goal is ecological restoration, expecting the same native wildlife species to return in similar numbers as before is unrealistic; more likely a new makeup of species will develop based on more recent influences. Indeed, a recent study at Northern Illinois University (NIU) looking into best practices for restoring tallgrass prairie in the Midwest found that replanting alone is not enough to attract wildlife to return, thus debunking the Field of Dreams hypothesis. The researchers studied 17 plots of restored tallgrass prairie in the Nature Conservancy’s Nachusa Grasslands in Franklin Grove, Illinois, measuring biodiversity in snakes, small mammals and ground and dung beetles in response to different management techniques. They were surprised to learn that replanting alone was a poor indicator for future animal biodiversity. Much more effective ways to bring wildlife back included prescribed burns as well as the reintroduction of bison, a keystone species that affects everything else up and down the food chain. Overall, these “active” management strategies were some six times more effective at bringing back native snakes, small mammals and beetles than just reseeding and waiting for the wildlife to return. “Seeding alone gets us started, but extra management supercharges the animal communities that are critical to maintaining healthy prairies," says Pete Guiden, a post-doctoral researcher at NIU and lead author on the study. Granted, replanting and tending a disturbed site will likely bring back a semblance of the former wildlife there if we have decades or longer to wait. But conservationists wanting to see results in our own lifetimes are better served augmenting such a strategy with more “active” restoration techniques. CONTACTS: “Study challenges ecology's 'Field of Dreams' hypothesis,” sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/02/210202164522.htm; “The Myths of Restoration Ecology,” lerf.eco.br/img/publicacoes/ Hilderbrand%20et%20al_2005.pdf. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https//earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

Howdy From Lake Cuyamaca “Dusty Britches” here with … they call me “Lemon Yellow”, “Black Bird” singin in the dead of night , “Purple Rain” , and the “Red Red Robin” goin bob bob bobbin along. Seems like we are getting some strange characters visiting the Lake lately… like the double breasted whatchamacallit, and the white pelicans which have beaks that hold more than their belly can. We are getting a cadre of photographers hanging around with hopes of catching a snap, or two, of the local bald eagles. One interesting gentleman waited all morning at the boat launch with his beyond Christmas zoom lens, tri pod, and various other cameras and pieces of video equipment that he wheeled in on a small wagon. Eventually getting hungary, and a little bit discouraged… picking up and packing everything … he was walking away when one of the eagles flew by just above the surface of the Lake. Timing is everything. The “lightning trout” that were stocked last December are still coming out… I guess they were resting. Pretty good size. They are hooking up at Chambers Park just below the tent camping area and with the loosening of the Covid restrictions, we can now rent our R.V. and tent camping sites. Billy Egan of “Western Outdoor News” touched base with us to catch up on the particulars of , although postponed , but inaugural , “Trout Cast” trout tournament here, yes , here at Lake Cuyamaca. It is rescheduled for the weekend of April 24-25 with some hot prizes. The grand prize is a 15 foot “Klamath” aluminum welded boat with a 68 BT ‘easy loading’ trailer , a 12 position swivel seat, rod grippers, cup holders… oh yeah… and a Df-20-A 4 stroke / 20 horsepower “Suzuki” outboard motor… to boot. So the big boys are coming to town ! There are quite a few locals who have already thrown their hat into the ring, so we will be well represented. Cuyamaca Lake will be stocked for the event. Western Outdoor News will be giving more information regarding registration, prizes, and… how you win those prizes… in upcoming Western Outdoor News publications so… stand by.

Switching gears here a little… the waterfowl hunting is winding down with the “Junior Waterfowl Hunt”. Jay Blaylock has done another 5-star top notch job of ram-rodding the herd of hunters who have come to Lake Cuyamaca and braved the elements to get chance at the waterfowl we have here at the Lake. Sometimes Jay reminds me of a young Clint Eastwood in the 60’s series “Rawhide” as Rowdy Yates working for Gil Favor as they drive their cattle across the country to market. The hunts occurred on Wednesday’s and Sunday mornings since the first weekend in December. In the “Junior Waterfowl Hunt”, the grand prize was a 12 gauge pump shot gun… but everybody received a camo “dry bag” filled with stuff… lots and lots of stuff. Many thanks to Sunny Trent and Turners Outdoors for their help in some of the prizes. So, everybody was a winner. The participants were Samantha Corless, age 13, with Peter Corliss… her father as her guide; Palmer Barnett, age 14, with Steven Barnett… her father as her guide; Simon Jones, age 12, with Kevin Jones his father as his guide; Jake and Alexander Saint, ages 13 and 12 respectively, with Jon Saint their father as guide; Yusuki and Yuji Murofushi, ages 13 and 9 respectively, with Gen

Murofushi serving as their guide; and last but not least… Nela and Slate Moody, ages 14 and 8 respectively. The grand prize winner of an EAA- (European American Arms) MC 312 Inertia 12 gauge shot gun was 9 year old Yuji Murofushi ! Jake Saint brought down the only bird (a mallard hen) and Nela Moody made a video of some resident Canada Geese flying over their lay-out blinds in the (east) upper lake basin. Good show !!! Have you ever heard a duck fart? Most people say they haven’t or that ducks don’t fart , but if you listen very closely when you are near a body of water with ducks around on a quiet, snowy day….. you’d be surprised !.. although my wife and Teri from up the hill don’t believe me… told them to “Just try it”… Happy Trails to you , until we meet again… happy trails to you… keep smiling on til then… happy trails to you… til we meet again. Of all God’s creatures there is only one that cannot be made a slave of the lash… that one is the cat. If man could be crossed with the cat, it would improve man, but it would deteriorate the cat… — Mark Twain “Tight Lines, and Bent Rods take a kid fishin”…Dusty Britches

Round Out Your Reading List continued from page 4

lost people. Lars is no ordinary dog. He and Amy have a telepathic connection that lets them communicate and increase their success rate. When the two are tasked with finding a missing scientist, they discover him suffering from an Alzheimer’s-like disorder “disorientation,” and quickly realize this is not a typical case. Instead, this assignment appears to be an attempt to steal the man’s highly sensitive research on nano-technology—which, in the wrong hands, could be used to wipe out “undesirables” from their overpopulated world. Forced to go undercover to seek out the truth, Amy will have to confront—and surpass—her own limitations. Purchase at https://amzn. to/2FZJCeX. BookBites is a continuing series bringing readers information and ideas for their next read. For more reading ideas, visit BookTrib.com, where readers and writers meet, and subscribe to the weekly newsletter. *** The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing. — Blaise Pasca ***


February 10, 2021

5 Ways To Help Prevent The Spread Of Illness

Chef’s Corner continued from page 6

Keep your family safe and slow the spread of germs within your home. Consider an informal "household contract," where each member will alert the household if he or she comes in contact with an infected person or starts showing symptoms. This is important to help protect everyone in the house as well as visitors to your home, particularly those who are at-risk (such as older relatives) and can allow you time to prepare should any family member need to self-quarantine. Don't Skip the Flu Shot: Your first line of protection against illness is a flu shot, which not only reduces your risk of getting the flu, but also helps protect your community and conserve health care resources. This is especially important this year, since some of the symptoms of COVID-19 and the flu overlap and can be difficult to tell apart. Because accessing the flu vaccine may

be more challenging this year for many Americans due to the pandemic, Clorox has donated $1 million to Direct Relief, Visiting Nurses Association of America and Families Fighting Flu to help provide access to, and spread awareness of, the importance of flu vaccinations. Maintain Regular Healthy Habits: One of the best defenses is a good offense, and the same is true when preparing for cold and flu season. Aiming for a well-balanced diet full of non-processed foods, staying hydrated, exercising and keeping a regular sleep schedule are all keys to keeping illness at bay. Disinfecting high-touch surfaces with a disinfectant that's approved by the Environmental Protection Agency to kill SARSCoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can also help support

Chinese New Year!

Year of the Ox

Lucky Colors in the Year of the Ox Stiltwalker roaming above the crowds.

1. white 2. yellow 3. green 4. red 5. blue (black) S D C F V A N V G B C F

Q D B E I V E P I

3

G J S Q U T S E O E M Q C R O W D S I F X

G Z K H T I G H Q N K G D I M R D Q L C A

C I H X Z O D I A C A N I M A L S H T M N

L H F R D N D C M L R L H G T Z E N W X C

P L X T U S A L B D Y A O F G L Y M A N E

P X F Q S L A Y U F K N F I O S L C L N S

$30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

R H O U E N I M R B D G L R O H F N K C T

A A T N T S P I P A K N O E D O R G E L O

Y L D E U L C J N W R H W W W P I C R E R

E A R P I E Y C X Q Y S E O I P E K S A S

R N E N C N E D P J R A R R S I N R F N L

S S G A V R R B X F Q L S K H N D M D I R

W S K X S Y L G I I K E O S E G S A A N Q

I E E M D N U O F I Y S V I S I T I N G D

7 S T L I O N D A N C E R S D I N N E R S U

S

N

A

J

11

A

10

K

M

D

C

14 F

O

T I

A

V

T

A

A

Good Wishes and Gifts

S

S

R M

E

R

S

O H

1

N

O

L

O

G

X

8

L

U

U

13 C

K

Y

A

C

T

Y

H

12

L

2

R

E

E

6

O

T

S Y

L

4

B

B O

R

N

M

T T

Z

O

What gift is given for the New Year in little red packets or envelopes?

D

I

A

C

N G

M ON E Y

Y

A L O N G N O O D L E S A R K

5

A. river of flowing water (news will flow) B. spring, trees, being creative, jade jewelry is good C. may bring fame, power, royalty, prosperity D. powerful color for luck, success, good fortune E. metal, purity, innocence, death

G T R F D D E W S I X W Q I Y V V N B G T E I R L S M U A Q P A Z D P D O F W F P R A D I W A M U V L N I K V W G L D C I E Y I O E S T Q A X U F E I A C P

9

prevention, especially if you have members of the household leaving frequently for work or school. Attend Necessary Medical Appointments: It's important for you and your family to attend annual physical exams and other necessary medical appointments - whether it's virtually or while following appropriate safety precautions in person. These checkups are crucial for keeping up to date on your prescriptions and general wellbeing, identifying any potential medical issues and monitoring recurring issues. Contact your doctor's office to see if it is open for in-person or telehealth appointments in order to make the best decision for receiving care for you and your family. Create Prevention Packs: continued on page 12

Annimills LLC © 2021

(Family Features) This year, as cold and flu season converges with the COVID-19 pandemic, it's important to take precautions to help prevent the spread of illness and infection both in and out of the home. The similarities between cold, flu and COVID-19 symptoms can be confusing, and a spike in the seasonal flu could place additional strain on already tight health care resources. To help ease confusion and provide guidance, Dr. Darria LongGillespie, ER physician and Clorox spokesperson, outlined these best practices that can help keep you and your family healthy. Develop a Household Plan: Make sure everyone in your household and immediate family is on the same page about how to best prevent the spread of illness

garlic, red onions and other foods of vegetable origin, and a rather moderate use of meat. The modern Mediterranean diet is characterized by the emphasis on plant foods such as grains, vegetables and fruits. Olives, olive oil, nuts, beans, legumes, seeds and herbs/spices are also part of the Mediterranean eating style. The Mediterranean lifestyle also recognizes the importance of physical activity and social interaction at mealtimes. Grains should be mostly whole grains and can include whole-wheat breads, wholewheat pasta, oats, brown rice, couscous, quinoa or barley. Fruits and vegetables can be fresh, frozen or canned. The nutrients are similar between the three forms. Canned vegetables can have more sodium, so rinse before using or buy lower sodium options. Fruits and vegetables can be cooked or eaten raw. Olives and olive oil are staples of the Mediterranean eating style. Olive oil is the main source of fat and is used in cooking, as salad dressing, as a light drizzle on vegetables or as a dip for bread. Olive oil is higher in hearthealthy unsaturated fats and should replace saturated fats like butter or margarine. Nuts, beans, legumes and seeds are the main sources of protein, healthy fats and fiber. Common beans include chickpeas (garbanzo beans), cannellini beans, kidney beans, lentils and black beans. Nuts are good as a snack, on a salad or added to other dishes. Herbs and spices add flavor and aroma to foods. They reduce the need for salt and can be rich in health-promoting antioxidants. This delicious baking-pan recipe for Salmon Roasted with Broccoli and Tomatoes is an effortless way to incorporate the Mediterranean diet eating plan into your lifestyle. SALMON ROASTED WITH BROCCOLI AND TOMATOES

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa and Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

The Julian News 11

1 pound fresh or frozen skinless salmon fillet 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons Italian or poultry seasoning 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper 2 cups grape or cherry tomatoes 2 cups broccoli florets 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 lemon 2 tablespoons snipped fresh basil and/or parsley 1 tablespoon honey 1. Line a 15-by-10-inch baking pan with parchment paper. Rinse salmon; pat dry. Place salmon in prepared pan. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the oil and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of the Italian or poultry seasoning, and 1 teaspoon of the salt and the pepper. 2. In a medium bowl, combine tomatoes, broccoli, garlic and the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil, the Italian or poultry seasoning, and the salt and pepper; toss to coat. Place in pan with salmon. Roast 15 to 18 minutes or just until salmon flakes. 3. Meanwhile, remove 1 teaspoon zest/peel from the lemon (do not use the white flesh or pith) and squeeze 3 tablespoon juice from lemon. In a small bowl, combine lemon zest and juice, the basil and/or parsley, and the honey. Spoon the mixture over salmon and vegetables before serving. TIP: To thaw frozen fish, place in a sealed bag and submerge in a bowl of cold water for 30 minutes. ***

Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

*** Love is our true destiny. We do not find the meaning of life by ourselves alone - we find it with another. — Thomas Merton ***

$30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the Julian News prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. The Julian News accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall The Julian News Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Julian News is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

MEETINGS

AA Meetings www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - Saturday 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 No (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Services Phone: 760-765-0114 This E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com Sunday PERSONAL SUPPORT

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

information: 760-765-2331

Tuesday - 7pm

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Men’s Meeting

WYNOLA PIZZA is interviewing for part time janitorial and miscellaneous maintenance and repairs. Call Sabine @ 760.550.3737 2/24

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

*** Love will find a way through paths where wolves fear to prey. — Lord Byron ***

Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

(across from Fire Station)

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

3407 Highway 79

Thursday - 7pm Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

1•888•724•7240

continued from page 7 1. Willie “Flipper” Anderson. 2. Jim McKay. 3. Portugal. 4. Jacques Bailly. 5. Aston Villa F.C. and Birmingham City F.C. 6. Tyrone Wheatley. 7. Serge Ibaka.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Two, Mexico and Canada 2. 1666 3. Blood pressure 4. Olives 5. Remulak 6. Four 7. “Macbeth” 8. Deoxyribonucleic Acid 9. An Australian wind instrument 10. Ulysses Grant ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

Volume 36 - Issue 28

NOTICES

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to February 1, 2016; 2016; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00000488-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2021-00002214-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ALEXANDER WILLIAM LAWRENCE DODGE and EMERALD HOPE DODGE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MELISSA ANNE MARIE VERDUGO STERK and ROBIN JAMIE BASSETT FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: ALEXANDER WILLIAM LAWRENCE DODGE and EMERALD HOPE DODGE and on behalf of: JOHN GIDEON RAPHAEL DODGE, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JOHN GIDEON RAPHAEL DODGE, a minor TO: GIDEON RAPHAEL DODGE, a minor

PETITIONER: MELISSA ANNE MARIE VERDUGO STERK and ROBIN JAMIE BASSETT HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) MELISSA ANNE MARIE VERDUGO STERK b) ROBIN JAMIE BASSETT TO: a) MELISSA ANNE MARIE ROGUE b) ROBIN JAMIE ROGUE

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on FRBRUARY 18, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 5, 2021.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 3, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 19, 2021.

LEGAL: 08683 Publish: January 20, 27 and February 3, 10, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9000230 a) WYNOLA PIZZA & BISTRO b) WYNOLA FINER WINES & SPIRITS c) JULIAN FINER WINE & SPIRITS d) WYNOLA PIZZA EXPRESS 4355 Hwy 78, Julian, CA 92036 (PO Box 1449, Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Wynola Springs LLC, 3455 Hwy 78. Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 8, 2021. LEGAL: 08685 Publish: January 13, 20 and Fedruary 3, 10, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9001432 a) 678 PAGEANTS b) MISS LAKESIDE c) TEEN MISS LAKESIDE d) PRETEEN JUNIOR MISS LAKESIDE e) LITTLE MISS LAKESIDE f) MISS LAKESIDE SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT g) MISS LAKESIDE PROGRAM h) MISS RAMONA SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT i) MISS RAMONA j) TEEN MISS RAMONA k) PRETEEN JUNIOR MISS RAMONA l) MISS JULIAN SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT m) MISS JULIAN n) TEEN MISS JULIAN o) PRETEEN JUNIOR MISS JULIAN 11434 Valle Vista Rd., Lakeside, CA 92040 The business is conducted by An Individual - Jill Patrice Fleming, 11434 Valle Vista Rd., Lakeside, CA 92040. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 29, 2021. LEGAL: 08691 Publish: Fedruary 3, 10, 17, 24, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00001501-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: GASS-RAAGE AHMED GASS HERSI FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: GASS-RAAGE AHMED GASS HERSI HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: GASS-RAAGE AHMED GASS HERSI TO: GASS ADAM HERSI IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on FEBRUARY 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 13, 2021. LEGAL: 08686 Publish: January 27 and February 3, 10, 17, 2021

LEGAL: 08687 Publish: January 27 and February 3, 10, 17, 2021

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2021-00000519-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: REBECCA BECERRA GUTERREZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: REBECCA BECERRA GUTERREZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: REBECCA BECERRA GUTERREZ TO: REBECCA GUTERREZ BECERRA

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A gracious Lamb can learn more about a problem-filled situation than one who is openly suspicious of what could be happening. A friend might offer some well-directed advice. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting adjusted to an unexpected change might be difficult for the Bovine, who prefers things to go according to plan. But help could come from a most welcome source. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) This could be a good time to get a head start on those career-related plans. The sooner you check out the pluses and minuses, the sooner you can act on your information. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A personal situation you thought would no longer present a problem could suddenly produce some surprises. Try to sort things out with the help of trusted colleagues. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An upcoming move holds both anticipation and anxiety for Leos and Leonas who have some big decisions to make. Advice is plentiful, but it's up to you to decide which way you want to go. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone from a previous project could provide valuable guidance on how to handle a current problem, especially where it might involve a legal matter.

© 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Prevent The Spread Of Illness

continued from page 11 Keep illness prevention items, such as face masks, hand sanitizer, disposable gloves and disinfecting wipes, in one centralized spot at home. Also keep additional kits in easyto-reach areas like the center console of your vehicle or inside your purse or backpack for when you're on the go. Find more tips for fighting illness this cold and flu season at Clorox.com. *** I just think Valentine's Day is a day to really appreciate the person you love, no matter who it is, and to spend time with them. I don't think it's all about fancy presents or whatever. I think it's about spending that quality time with that special person. — Prince Royce ***

LEGAL

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 3, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 6, 2021. LEGAL: 08688 Publish: January 27 and February 3, 10, 17, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2021-9001494 THE ACTORS: ONLINE COURSES 1717 Lodgepole Road, San Marcos, CA 92078 The business is conducted by An Individual Michaela Elizabeth Pistilli, 1717 Lodgepole Road, San Marcos, CA 92078. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 1, 2021. LEGAL: 08692 Publish: Fedruary 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 2021

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Majestic Pines Community Service District PO Box 266

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A business situation presents some unexpected complications. But rather than try to handle them all at once, it would be best to deal with them one at a time. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You just might get what you want, despite the odds against it. In any event, be sure to thank all those people involved who believed in you and went to bat for you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Before you even hint at an accusation, remember that you'll have to prove what you say. So be sure you have what you need to back up your comments. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A romantic situation takes an unexpected turn that favors some Sea Goats, but causes others to reassess how they've been handling the relationship. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A surprise turn of events could unsettle the Water Bearer. But it also might help open up an entirely different way of working out an important matter. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A smoothly running operation could bump up against an obstacle. This is where your ability to assess situations and make adjustments can restore things to normal. BORN THIS WEEK: Your kindness is legendary, and so is your strong sense of responsibility.

Julian, CA 92036

PROPOSED RATE INCREASE The Board of Directors will be discussing increasing the deposit required when opening a new account or for accounts that are often in arrears. The current charge is $120 and an increase to $200 is being proposed. This helps protect the District from nonpayment after an account is closed. Holding deposits until a customer closes their account is also being proposed. The Board of Directors will also review the fees charged for all other District services including meter removal and reinstallation, account transfer fees and locking/unlocking meters for nonpayment. One or more of these fees may be increased. A hearing on these proposed changes to the Majestic Pines Community Services District fee structure will be held at 7:00 pm, Wednesday, February 17, 2021 at the Julian Sheriff Substation conference room, 2907 Washington St., Julian, CA 92036. A mask and social distancing are required. These proposed changes would go into effect March 1, 2021. LEGAL: 08689 Publish: February 3, 10, 2021

NOTICES

Senate Trial Matters

Wednesday - February 10, 2021

continued from page 2

house of parliament, said after the riot. “America no longer charts a course and therefore has lost all rights to set it — and even more so to impose it on others.” It’s telling that Republicans aren’t going into the trial with a robust defense of Trump. Few are publicly defending his behavior in the runup to the insurrection, whether it’s his baseless insistence that the election was “stolen” or his more specific — and troubling — calls to supporters to rally on his behalf. Instead, the GOP is narrowly focused on a more technical constitutional issue, arguing that a president can’t face an impeachment trial once out of office, a path they believe is easier to defend than trying to rationalize Trump’s actions. Anticipating that posture, Democrats filed a pretrial brief noting there’s no “January exception” in the Constitution. “Presidents do not get a free pass to commit high crimes and misdemeanors near the end of their term,” the House impeachment managers wrote. The trial comes as the GOP is struggling with its future. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, has flirted with the possibility of purging Trump from the party. If Trump is convicted, the Senate could vote to bar him from seeking office again, a notable punishment for someone who has dangled the potential of a 2024 presidential run to keep bending the party to his will. McConnell hasn’t yet said how he’ll vote, and, so far, only a few moderate Republicans seem certain to convict. They’re running into the reality that Trump’s supporters remain a dominant force in the party. The trial “really will only reinforce what we already know about American politics,” said Brendan Buck, a top adviser to former House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis. ”And in that, I mean we are so tribal and divided that there’s really no question where people will fall down on something that should generate thoughtful discourse and reflection about a fundamental democratic principle.” EDITOR’S NOTE — Political Editor Steven Sloan has covered politics for The Associated Press since 2018. Follow him at http://twitter.com/ stevenpsloan

Covid - State Update continued from page 1

There have been 43,994,322 tests conducted in California. This represents an increase of 275,167 during the prior 24-hour reporting period. As case numbers continue to rise in California, the total number of individuals who will have serious outcomes will also increase. There have been 43,942 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic. As of February 7, providers have reported administering a total of 4,650,637 vaccine doses statewide. Numbers do not represent true day-to-day change as reporting may be delayed. The CDC reports that 6,963,500 doses have been delivered to entities within the state, and 7,392,300 vaccine doses, which includes the first and second dose, have been shipped.

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - February 10, 2021 (36-28)  

Wednesday - February 10, 2021 (36-28)