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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

For the Community, by the Community.

Covid-19 Case Count

ESTABLISHED

1870

YEARS

Julian - 16, Santa Ysabel- 9, Warner Springs - 21, Borrego Springs - 17, Ranchita - 3, Ramona - 384 (through 10/11)

Wednesday

www.JulianNews.com

The New Normal: Teaching In Two Places At Once

October 14, 2020

Volume 36 — Issue 11

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

Fun Family Nature Activities Using On-Line Resources For Inspiration

By Valérie Cournoyer, VMF Board Member and Conservation Committee Co-Chair

Women’ Club Staying Active Through The Pandemic

Whether you are looking to feed your curiosity, take a break from your virtual classroom or home office, or simply learn more about our amazing natural world, there are a remarkable number of digital resources available. The past few months have brought many changes, one of them being a large increase in free digital content, allowing us to connect with nature on a local, state, and nation-wide scale. We, at the Volcan Mountain Foundation, are no exception. Our team continues to work hard on creating videos and live content on our Facebook page, Instagram account, and YouTube channel for your enjoyment. Many other organizations in the county have done the same, providing creative and valuable tools for all of us to use. Some of these resources are created specifically for children and are wonderful ways to learn about science and nature. Others are targeted to adults seeking to increase their knowledge or maybe just relax and watch beautiful and fascinating nature videos.

The Julian Woman’s Club held its regular October meeting in their parking lot, with ladies sitting 6’ apart and wearing face masks. Five more ladies joined the meeting through Zoom. The program for the day was Natalie Romano speaking about the Miss Julian program. Miss Romano was initiated into the program in her freshman year at Julian High School as Miss Teen Julian. She is a now a senior and Miss Julian. She described how the program helped develop her self-confidence, public-speaking skills and dedication to community service. Afterwards, Woman’s Club President Jonna Waite presented Miss Romano with a check for $500 which was accepted, tearfully, on behalf of Miss Julian Scholarship Pageant.

This photo shows two students discussing math in the new fifth grade classroom environment. Mrs. McFedries zooms with individual students, then pairs them up with students in the classroom, to keep everyone engaged and working together!

Keeping Or Encouraging Curious Kids

Are you unintentionally stifling your child’s drive to learn? by Leslie Crawford<GreatSchools.org>

Jonna Waite, Natalie Romano, Dana Petterson President Waite announced that other donations had been approved for Pathways, Friends of Julian Library, Julian Pioneer Cemetery, Community Resource Center Domestic Violence Program, and Mountain Manna, a food delivery program managed by Julian Community Methodist Church. The club has also set aside $3,000 for scholarships in 2021. Due to the pandemic, the annual Holiday Home Tour has been canceled. In its place, the women have planned the Holiday Boutique for November 28th and 29th. The boutique will feature a variety of quilted and hand-crafted items for sale. This event will take place at the Clubhouse located at 2607 “C” Street between the hours of 10:00 am and 4:00 pm. Proceeds from this event, as usual, will go toward scholarships and local charitable organizations.

You want your child to be curious, right? Of course you do! After all, curiosity is the drive to gather new information and experiences and it’s at the very heart of learning. Studies show that kids who exhibit a higher level of curiosity are at an advantage at school and beyond, benefitting socially, emotionally, psychologically, and intellectually. Curious souls tend exhibit a wide range of positive adaptive behaviors. They’re more likely to be open-minded, emotionally expressive, have strong coping mechanisms in daunting situations, and they’re predisposed to unconventional thinking (think: innovative problem solving). Whether it’s your toddler furiously exploring every inch of their new world, your 5-year-old asking “Why?” about everything, or your tween becoming myopically obsessed with the goings-ons of their peers, curiosity is an inherently human trait. It’s fueled by dopamine, the same reward-seeking neurochemical that’s behind the desire to eat and procreate. In younger kids, information-seeking abounds. One study found that between the ages of 2 and 5, kids ask about 40,000 questions. But as kids get older, this insatiable desire to know can lose some of its urgency. “What begins as a robust trait becomes more fragile over time,” says Susan Engel, a professor of psychology at Williams College and author of The Hungry Mind: The Origins of Curiosity in Childhood. “It’s shaped by experiences with parents, teachers, peers, and the learning environment.” Just as curiosity can be successfully fostered in any child, says Engel, it can also be squelched, often by the very well-meaning adults tasked with educating them. In fact, she points out, research shows that “kids whose intrinsic curiosity is comparatively low are the ones most sensitive to social cues that inhibit or encourage exploration.”

Save Money On Shipping (NAPSI)—Your company can get money from a surprising source: the Post Office. That’s because the U.S. Postal Service now has a program that gives credits to registered businesses that use Click-NShip® services. As of August 1, 2020, businesses can earn these credits when they buy Priority Mail® and Priority Mail Express® products. The credits can then be used toward future purchases of the products, using Click-N-Ship. How It Works • Registered business users of Click-N-Ship services will be automatically enrolled and automatically accrue the credits. • Companies that are already registered get a $40 credit for every $500 spent on Priority Mail and Priority Mail Express products using Click-N-Ship. • New Click-N-Ship users earn an additional $40 for the first $500 they spend. • Once earned, credits are added to the connected USPS.com account within 30 days. • Credits expire one year from the date of issuance. Make Your Money Go Even Further More good news from the USPS: Starting January 2021, the Postal Service will help your business grow faster by adding tiers to the USPS® Loyalty Program. Your tier will be based on your qualifying shipping totals from the previous year. A higher tier means a larger benefit. Learn More For further facts on how the USPS Loyalty Program can pay off for you, visit usps.com/loyalty.

While no parent or teacher would purposely set out to thwart a child’s natural inquisitiveness, they often do so unwittingly. Curious to find out how grown-ups discourage curiosity (and conversely, how they can foster it)? Here are nine sure-fire curiosity killers and how you can avoid them. 1. Freaking out over messes OMG! What happened to your kitchen? It’s been transformed into an 8-year-old’s version of a scene from Breaking Bad. There’s unidentifiable white powder all over the counters and floors, bright blue and orange fingerprints on the cabinet counters, and jars and vials overflowing with weird goo. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury: this crime scene is none other than curiosity channeled into the best form of creativity. For parents who are new to slime-making, the white substance is probably corn starch, and it’s really, really hard to clean up! The Day-Glo fingerprints are from food coloring, also a bear to remove. What’s a harried parent to do? “Let them make messes!” advises Engel. The slime-makers of today might be the scientists, engineers, inventors, and artists of the future. 2. Choosing a school for orderliness and calm One would think that a neat and tidy classroom (or bedroom) continued on page 8

If you are excited to connect with nature and learn something new, please visit one of these wonderful resources. Don’t forget to also get outside and explore our beautiful natural spaces in the “non-virtual” world. Happy learning and stay wild! California State Parks Online Resources for Teachers and Students offers free “virtual field trips” to several State Parks including AnzaBorrego Desert State Park, Tijuana Estuary Natural Preserve, and San Elijo State Park. http://www.ports.parks.ca.gov/ San Diego County Parks has an amazing Virtual Recreation Center featuring virtual tours of the County Park trails, educational videos and activities for students of all ages, and activities for the whole family! ht tps:// w w w.sdpar ks.org /c ontent /sdpar ks /en /par tic ipate/ VirtualRecreationCenter.html The San Diego Natural History Museum’s education resources include lesson plans and activities, resources to guide your own exploration of nature in your backyard, and The Exploration of Coast to Cactus website, which takes you to the amazing different habitats in our county! https://www.sdnhm.org/education/education-resources/ San Diego Zoo Global Virtual Resources provides access to Wildlife Cams around the Zoo and Safari Park, educational videos about wildlife, and engaging activities for kids and teens. https://zoo. sandiegozoo.org/were-here-together The Living Coast Discovery Center offers virtual field trips and animal encounters for the classroom and nature-focused crafts and activities. https://w w w.thelivingcoast.org/experiences/vir tual-wildlifeencounters/ The San Diego River Park Foundation’s distance learning resources include creative writing and drawing activities, environmental virtual lessons, and nature-themed story time. https://www.sandiegoriver.org/distance_learning.html

Access YouTube (www.youtube.com) and search for the following channels for more engaging and inspiring videos and activities: Volcan Mountain Foundation – Come learn more about the beautiful Volcan Mountain through nature stories, crafts, wildcrafting, and virtual interpretive hikes! San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy – Explore the wonders of a watershed with a series of videos sharing information about native plants and animals, virtual hikes, and visits to the Living Coast Discovery Center. Cuyamaca Outdoor School Home Edition – Join the Outdoor School’s instructional staff to explore native flora and fauna, learn songs, hear stories, learn to cook, and follow along on virtual hikes. San Diego Natural History Museum - “Nat Talks” feature Museum scientists and other experts speaking on a wide variety of topics, listen to wonderful readings of storybooks with “Nature & Me Storytime,” and much more!

Supporting Your Local Businesses = Supporting Your Neighbors

ESTABLISHED

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October 14, 2020

2 The Julian News

HOME SERVICES

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

Handyman Services

Grading & Demolition

Bruce Strachota Grading, Demolition, Underground Utilities, Dump Truck, Excavation, Loader, Bobcat Rental, Rock & Base

30352 Highway 78(at Hwy 79)

OPEN Thurs-Monday 11 am - 5pm

cell: 619-972-0152

Residential • Industrial • Commercial I would like to write a heartfelt thank you to Charley and Gregg, the new owners of the Old School on 2nd and B street in Julian. They recently purchased the Old School (or apartments) of the above-mentioned location. They are to be commended for their contribution in improving an alley road that had fallen in great disrepair. Charley and Gregg paved the entire alley road (between 2nd and B street) with asphalt. Today, it is a joy walking the alley road as this had not been possible before due to the craters and exposed rocks caused by years of rain. I am very grateful for what they did. Not only did they do what was in the interest of their tenants but also for the immediate surrounding community. Sincerely, Ava L. Hornung

Serving Southern California Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com

TREE N C A O I M L U J E Experience Since 1988PANY HT Local * Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed and Bonded Fully Insured for Your Protection

Friends of the Julian Library thanks volunteers who are participating in monitoring the Ballot Mail Drop Off Box at the Julian Library. (October 6 - November 3.) The following have been scheduled as Monitors: Monica Peralta, Jarrett Jackson, Rhhonda Begley, Olive Kerr, Paula Hackman, Sherry Engberg, Debbie Bainbridge, Jeff Holt, Melana Brandt, Karen Jefferies, Karen Cruz, Mary Lou White, Eileen Lightbody, Jeanne Morett, Joyce Lawrence, Jonna Waite. Miguel Acosta, Head County Librarian, in a video conference with Friends of Libraries groups, strongly requested help at all County libraries. Libraries have been short staffed as many employees are reassigned to other locations. With COVID protocols, volunteers have not been allowed back into bookstores, nor any buildings. It is unknown when our FOJL bookstore will be allowed to reopen. However, volunteers were eager to be monitors. All bookstore volunteers undergo a County background check after submitting an application. In addition, for this event, each volunteer watched a mandatory online training video. Volunteers were scheduled by Liaison Carol Pike for an hour each day. Our branch manager needed oversight during the sanitation/lunch period from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Please continue to support Friends of the Julian Library. We look forward to the construction of the larger Community Room space in 2021. Our thanks to Diane Jacob and the Board of Supervisors for this project approval. Contact: FOJL President Jonna Waite, jonnawaite@gmail.com

Poll Watching

Reminder All Letters submitted must be signed by the author. The publisher reserves the right to refuse publication of anonymous and third party submissions.

MjH

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

Rules for observers in California vary by county, but in general they are designed to allow any member of the public to watch the election process, from the opening and closing of polling places to the counting of ballots. Observers can ask questions of poll workers who aren’t busy assisting voters, but they can’t talk to voters or challenge them about their eligibility. They can inspect the publicly posted roster of voters, to see who has voted and who hasn’t, but they can’t sit at the workers’ tables, touch voting materials, or go into booths where ballots are being cast. They can take notes, but they can’t photograph or videotape the inside of a polling place while it’s open and voters are present. They cannot “electioneer” — do anything that favors a particular candidate or proposition — within 100 feet of a polling place.

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PO Box 254 JULIAN, CA.

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*** Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea. — Robert A. Heinlein ***

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2020 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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October 14, 2020

Toni Lou Bastien

December 9, 1941 - September 26 2020 Toni Lou Bastien of Julian California passed away September 26th 2020. Born December 9th, 1941, she was preceded in death by her husband Renaldo and a grandson, Alexander. Mrs. Bastien is survived by her son and daughter-in-law James and Yukari Bastien, daughter and son-in-law Patti and Nathan Thornburg, brothers Michael and Jack Morgan as well as grandchildren Joseph Thornburg, Charlotte Booher, and Brianna, Leah and Natalie Thornburg. Originally from Carlsbad, Toni was active in the Carlsbad Historical Society where she was instrumental in providing memorabilia and historical insight relating to the family restaurant, the Twin Inns. Toni’s parents owned and operated the Twin Inns from 1914 until 1984. Famous for the food, hospitality, and history that it brought to the Carlsbad area, Toni took immense pride in her family’s legacy.

4 Tips To Help Prevent Electrical Fires At Home (StatePoint) Electrical fires often occur unexpectedly in locations that may be hidden from view. As the second most common type of home fire in the U.S., more than 40,000 electrical fires occur in American homes every year, resulting in hundreds of deaths, over 1,000 injuries and more than $1 billion in property damage, according to the National Fire Protection Association. “With millions of Americans working and learning from home amid COVID-19, it’s more important than ever to take a few simple steps to protect your home and loved ones from electrical fires,” says Ashley Bryant, National Electrical Manufacturers Association Low Voltage Distribution Equipment AFCI Task Force co-chair.

The Julian News 3

Health and Personal Services General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

To make needed updates at home, consider these safety tips from the NEMA LVDE AFCI Task Force: 1. Take Care with Cords: Inspect cords regularly for signs of damage or wear and tear. Use extension cords properly and according to the load ratings for the product. Never overload them or run cords under furniture, carpets or rugs. 2. Examine Appliances: When using appliances, inspect them for signs of damage. Only use the appliance in its intended manner. 3. Ensure Products Meet Safety Standards: To ensure the products you use at home comply with national safety standards, always look for the label of a nationally-recognized testing laboratory, like UL, CSA or Intertek. 4. Consider Additional Protection: Arcing was the heat source in approximately three of five electrical home fires from 2012-2016, according to the National Fire Protection Association. However, you can help prevent this dangerous condition from leading to a worst case scenario with Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs). AFCIs are designed to monitor the circuit for the presence of “normal” and “dangerous” arcing conditions in order to reduce the chance of your electrical system being an ignition source of a fire. An affordable, proven smart technology that provides a higher level of protection than standard circuit breakers, AFCIs have been a National Electrical Code requirement in new home building since 1999 for certain electrical circuits. To better protect your entire home, experts recommend requesting AFCI protection on all 15 and 20A branch circuits. To learn more about electrical fire prevention and AFCI technology, visit afcisafety.org. Electrical fires can be devastating and lethal. Fortunately, there are simple proactive steps every household can take that can help stop an electrical fire before it starts.

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Monday–Friday 8-5 pm closed 12-1 for lunch

Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

760-765-1223

Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management

CARE FOR WHAT’S NEXT

The care you need, when you need it most.

Choosing an exceptional health care network for you and your loved ones is more important than ever. Palomar Health is focused on the unique needs of the Julian community and committed to providing the care you need, when you need it most.

Explore and enroll today @ PalomarHealth.org/BetterHealth | 760.849.1953

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare.


4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 619.504.6301 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4:00pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 2:30pm - After School STEM Flex your brain muscles with fun, educational activities for kids & teens. Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm

Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every Thursday Beginning Spanish for Adults Learn basic Spanish at the library. - 2:30pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall

Every day during business hours – Vet Connect VA services available at Julian Library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment.

October

Wednesday, October 14 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Friday, Oct. 16 COVID-19 Testing Julian Branch Library 9am-2pm

call 2-1-1 to schedule an appointment

Saturday, October 17 Virtual Star Party Getting to know our way around the autumn night sky, as well as go deep into some of the cosmic wonders. We may take a peek at Mars, which will be in opposition, which means it’s closest to Earth in two years. 8pm Tuesday, October 20 FREE Flu Shots Palomar Health will be conducting flu shot clinics outside the Julian library 1-3pm Wednesday, October 28 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Friday, October 20 COVID-19 Testing Julian Branch Library 9am-2pm

call 2-1-1 to schedule an appointment

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

www.butterfieldbandb.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

“Flag number one,” said Chodas, who is director of the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. The object is also in the same plane as Earth, not tilted above or below, another red flag. Asteroids usually zip by at odd angles. Lastly, it’s approaching Earth at 1,500 mph (2,400 kph), slow by asteroid standards. As the object gets closer, astronomers should be able to better chart its orbit and determine how much it’s pushed around by the radiation and thermal effects of sunlight. If it’s an old Centaur — essentially a light empty can — it will move differently than a heavy space rock less susceptible to outside forces. That’s how astronomers normally differentiate between asteroids and space junk like abandoned rocket parts, since both appear merely as moving dots in the sky. There likely are dozens of fake asteroids out there, but their motions are too imprecise or jumbled to confirm their artificial identity, said Chodas. Sometimes it’s the other way around. A mystery object in 1991, for example, was determined by Chodas and others to be a regular asteroid rather than debris, even though its orbit around the sun resembled Earth’s. Even more exciting, Chodas in 2002 found what he believes was the leftover Saturn V third stage from 1969′s Apollo 12, the second moon landing by NASA astronauts. He acknowledges the evidence continued on page 12

Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

ESTABLISHED 1987

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

(from AP) The jig may be up for an “asteroid” that’s expected to get nabbed by Earth’s gravity and become a mini moon next month. Instead of a cosmic rock, the newly discovered object appears to be an old rocket from a failed moon-landing mission 54 years ago that’s finally making its way back home, according to NASA’s leading asteroid expert. Observations should help nail its identity. “I’m pretty jazzed about this,” Paul Chodas told The Associated Press. “It’s been a hobby of mine to find one of these and draw such a link, and I’ve been doing it for decades now.” Chodas speculates that asteroid 2020 SO, as it is formally known, is actually the Centaur upper rocket stage that successfully propelled NASA’s Surveyor 2 lander to the moon in 1966 before it was discarded. The lander ended up crashing into the moon after one of its thrusters failed to ignite on the way there. The rocket, meanwhile, swept past the moon and into orbit around the sun as intended junk, never to be seen again — until perhaps now.

Every Saturday Ebook Workshop Learn how to download Ebooks & audiobooks from the library for free! - 11am Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance.

ACTIVITIES & LODGING Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

Back Country Happenings NASA Expert IDs Mystery Object As Old Rocket

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

and

October 14, 2020

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations Look for our return on the fourth to the Witch Creek Wednesday the month SchoolofHouse The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

This Sept. 20, 1966 photo provided by the San Diego Air and Space Museum shows an Atlas Centaur 7 rocket on the launchpad at Cape Canaveral, Fla. A telescope in Hawaii last month discovered the mystery object heading our way while doing a search intended to protect our planet from doomsday rocks. The object promptly was added to the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center’s tally of asteroids and comets found in our solar system, just 5,000 shy of the 1 million mark. The object is estimated to be roughly 26 feet (8 meters) based on its brightness. That’s in the ballpark of the old Centaur, which would be less than 32 feet (10 meters) long including its engine nozzle and 10 feet (3 meters) in diameter. What caught Chodas' attention is that its near-circular orbit around the sun is quite similar to Earth’s — unusual for an asteroid. NASA's leading asteroid expert, Paul Chodas, speculates that asteroid 2020 SO, as it is formally known, is actually a Centaur upper rocket stage that propelled NASA's Surveyor 2 lander to the moon in 1966 before it was discarded.

• On Oct. 18, 1767, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon complete their survey of the boundary between the colonies of Pennsylvania and Maryland, as well as areas that would become Delaware and West Virginia. The Mason-Dixon Line created the boundary at a northern latitude of 39 degrees and 43 minutes. • On Oct. 15, 1863, the C.S.S. Hunley, which would become the world's first successful combat submarine, sinks during a test run, killing its inventor and seven crewmembers. The Hunley was operated by a crew of eight -one man steered while the other seven turned a crank that drove the ship's propeller. • On Oct. 14, 1892, "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," by Arthur Conan Doyle, is published. The book was the first collection of Holmes stories, which Conan Doyle had been publishing in magazines since 1887. • On Oct. 16, 1923, Walt Disney and his brother Roy found the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio in Hollywood, California. With the 1928 release of "Steamboat Willie," the world was introduced to Mickey Mouse. • On Oct. 12, 1940, cowboymovie star Tom Mix is killed when his speeding Cord Phaeton rolls into a dry wash in Arizona. Mix died when he was hit in the back of the head by a heavy aluminum suitcase he was carrying in the convertible's backseat. • On Oct. 17, 1968, American Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith and bronze medalist John Carlos are forced to return their awards because they raised their fists in a black-power salute during the medal ceremony in Mexico City. • On Oct. 13, 1975, Charlie Rich stood at the Country Music Association of America show to announce the Entertainer of the Year -- and set fire to the envelope after he saw that John Denver was the winner. It was later said that Rich was on prescription pain medication and gin-and-tonics that night. © 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Life long Julian resident Franklin “Woody” Barnes’ stories and recollections about places, events and the people will entertain all who are interested in the history of Julian and San Diego County.

Available at the Old Julian Book House and on Amazon.com


October 14, 2020

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

We Have Upgraded

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Cats And Pest Control We were discussing gophers with the cats. Or, rather, we were directing gopher talk at the cats while the cats were comparing claws. “My middle claw is longer than the other ones,” said Toofie, examing her gold and white foot with catly satisfaction. “What about yours,” she turned to Scruffy Claws. Scruffy looked at his very own namesake claws and came to the same conclusion except, he remarked, “Mine are longer than yours.” Toofie took umbrage at this while Draga snickered. Ignoring Draga—why should the Senior Cat, and calico at that, take any notice of a junior tabby—Toof looked at us and asked, “Is your middle claw longer than the others?” Biting back a remark, biting perhaps being the operative descriptor when it came to nails, we turned the conversation back to gophers. “Look. The gophers have destroyed the squash, damaged a tomato and are starting in on the eggplants. Why do you think I keep you?” “Because we are adorable, why else?” Four cats looked at us in astonishment. What a question! “Poison? Traps?” we asked. Four cats looked away from us and at one another. “Uh,” Scruffy Claws began but Tabby Two interrupted the meeting as she pushed her head through the cat door, gopher in mouth. Marching past us in dignified quickstep, tail at full height with a satisfied curl at the tip, Tab settled under the dining room table on the Persian rug and contemplated her still warm catch. We began, just as quickly, toward her in the hope of evicting cat and presumably dead but possibly still alive gopher as quickly as possible. “Tabby…. not in the house…” “See,” Toof turned to the others. “You can’t please humans no matter what you do.” Four cats nodded in unison to the sound of munching from the Persian rug. “Just look at the political scene…” Toof added and the cats began a satisfying discussion of human irrationality. Cats would do it all so much better.

Did You Know

You can find great used electronics in good condition online. It’s also wise to use Upsie for the most affordable warranties for your electronics, appliances and more. Upsie also offers warranties that include accident protection for used devices. Learn more at www. upsie.com. *** Powerful new technologies let homeowners use backup generators and clean energy systems to protect themselves in an emergency while cutting costs. For example, generator giant Generac’s PWRcell Storage System. It’s the only company with both battery storage systems and whole home backup generators. ***

For many years Mike and I have used the same company for our cell phone and internet service at home. We use a different service at his office because that has always seemed the best thing to do, until now. We have been loyal to them, telling people that they are the best companies to use in the back country for many years. Mike and I started Julian Web, our own Internet Service Provider in the beginning of 2000, actually a few months before he moved here to Julian. We served 3 clients until we knew we had a top-rated service and then in the summer of 2000 we opened up to all who wanted to be our clients. We gave particularly good service, accepting telephone calls from 7:00am until midnight if need be, though we really did not like getting non- emergency telephone calls after 10:00pm. Mike made lots of house calls helping clients and getting to know locals. During the Cedar Fire, we were only off-line for two hours and did our best to keep our clients in touch with each other and up to date on what buildings were still standing and what buildings probably were not. We let people know when a resource center was set up in the Julian Town Hall and we told them when it moved to the parking lot next to Saint Elizabeth’s Catholic Church. We notified people about important meetings and got as much information out as we possibly could, even while we were evacuated and living in San Diego. Some of our clients lost their homes to the fire and never rebuilt. They sold their mountain properties, moved away and quit using Julian Web as their ISP. Soon after the Cedar Fire our Federal Government announced that it would bring faster internet service to rural areas. We wanted desperately to get it for our clients, but we weren’t allowed. First, the government only allowed the service to go to large carriers, can you spell AT&T? and then they said the service was only for clients whose addresses were within two miles of downtown Julian. Mike and I live in the west end of Wynola, so we couldn’t even get the higher speed service for ourselves. We lost so many clients because of that government ruling that we had to shut down Julian Web and that was a very sad time for us. Thanks to our Federal Government, we saw it coming, so meantime we bought The Julian News and it has been a very good fit for us. Both Mike and I need internet service for newspaper work. He uses the internet many different times throughout the week and I use it for research to make certain that I get correct facts in my column when need be. We have had problems with both services from time to time. Sometimes we have troubles with one and sometimes we have troubles with both. Either way the entire situation has been really irritating for several years. Because of our need for decent internet service, this week Mike finally had a satellite dish installed on our roof. When he showed it to me, I was puzzled because he said it is pointed at a satellite and as I looked at it I told him I thought it was pointed at a pine tree. My mistake, I guess. We like living miles out of towns and yet we still live close enough to the highway that it doesn’t seem to take us very long to drive anywhere. Now we hope our rural internet service will catch up with the 21st century. These are my thoughts.

The Julian News 5

Thomas K. Gilhool

September 10, 1938 - August 22, 2020 Thomas K. Gilhool, part-time resident of Julian, died on August 22 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston after suffering a heart attack while on vacation. A lawyer, he fought for the rights of children, the disabled, the poor and the disempowered. Tom loved Julian, first having accompanied his wife and young children in the early ‘70s for Christmas celebrations at Stoneapple Farm with Gillian’s exhuberant aunt, Dorsa O’Dell. The family was living in Los Angeles at the time, where Tom taught at The University of Southern California Law School. They visited “Aunt Jane” and the town many times thereafter. Traveling back to their home in Philadelphia in 2004 after 10 months in Japan, they arrived just in time for Julian’s magnificent July 4th parade that year which celebrated the heroic preservation of much of the town from the Cedar Fire the year before. When Tom and Gillian inherited Stoneapple Farm after Ms. O’Dell died in 2008, the couple inherited the wonderful friends who surrounded her. They made many more, living ever since as much of the year in Julian as they could. Tom was born September 10, 1938 in Ardmore, PA to Thomas M. and Frances K. Gilhool, the first of three children, sister Elizabeth and brother Bob being born in the next few years. His father died when he was 15. Tom went to Lehigh University for his undergraduate years, then Yale University, taking a law degree and Master’s in Political Science together in 1964. The same year he married his law school classmate, Gillian Russell. After a year in London where he had a Fulbright, they settled in Philadelphia where they started their professional lives and happily welcomed and nurtured their two children, Bridget, born in 1967 and Nicholas, in 1971. Some of a tribute published shortly after Tom’s passing by the nationally-known public interest law firm he helped found and led for many years is shared below. “The Public Interest Law Center is sad to share that Thomas K. Gilhool, our former Chief Counsel and an inspiration throughout our history, died on August 22, 2020 at the age of 81. Tom helped bring about generational advances in the rights of people with disabilities nationwide, leading the first case establishing the right to public education and championing the movement for services based in the community. He was also a founding figure in civil legal aid, and he used the law throughout his life to give voice to all those who are underrepresented and ignored in public policy, advancing access to healthcare, police accountability, education, and more. Tom led our organization as Chief Counsel for more than 25 years, beginning in 1975. His contributions and his example are extraordinary, and we will miss him deeply. “Those who knew Tom recall his creativity, passionate spirit, perseverance, driving energy, and leadership. He was a force of nature. When he found a path forward for advancing justice, he inspired others to follow and gave them the tools and knowledge to do so. Tom was not content to simply win the day in court for his clients; he was tireless in his commitment to helping them make real change, even if it took decades. He understood that the law did not exist in a silo, but advanced rights in concert with social movements of people demanding recognition and dignity. With skill and determination, Tom continued on page 12

SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC & NO SUCH THING AS BEING TOO PREPARED There’s nothing more important to us than keeping you safe during wildfire season. But we need your help. Download our emergency checklists from our site, then make and practice your family’s preparedness plan. Next, be sure we have your current contact info so we can keep you updated. That way in the event of high fire risk weather conditions, you’ll be both ready and well-informed. For more information on emergency preparation and wildfire safety, visit sdge.com/wildfirekit.

© 2020 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved.


6 The Julian News

Julian

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October 14, 2020

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Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

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Breakfast served Thursday - Monday Open 7 Days a Week

*** It's a little known fact that one in three family pets gets lost during its lifetime, and approximately 9 million pets enter shelters each year. That's why it's a wonderful thing to get your pet microchipped and registered with your contact information because then they can be located and the owners can track where their pets are. — Betty White *** 1. GEOGRAPHY: In which mountain range is Mount Everest located? 2. AD SLOGANS: “What can brown do for you?” is a slogan for which company? 3. GOVERNMENT: What is the subject matter of the 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution? 4. MUSIC: In what year was Live Aid held, a relief concert to benefit the Ethiopian famine? 5. PSYCHOLOGY: What is a fear of flying called? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of porcupines called? 7. LANGUAGE: What kind of sentence is the following: “The five boxing wizards jump quickly”? 8. GAMES: What is the most frequently landed-upon property in the Monopoly game? 9. FOOD & DRINK: In which two U.S. states are coffee beans grown commercially? 10. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: Which modern author wrote, “Autumn seemed to arrive suddenly that year. The morning of the first September was crisp and golden as an apple”? Answers on page 11

Chef’s Corner

year in America. Although breast cancer occurs mainly in women, men can get it too. Many people do not realize that men have breast tissue and that they can develop breast cancer. About 1,970 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed among men. About 390 men will die from breast cancer. New medical research strongly

mammograms. Early detection allows doctors to treat the cancer while it is still small and confined to the breast. According to an independent study, the top-10 food items to fight breast cancer include easyto-enjoy carrots, apples and green tea. Carrots and other foods rich in beta-carotene may lower your relative breast cancer

suggests that you can eat and live proactively to prevent breast cancer before it strikes. Current anti-breast-cancer medical efforts are aimed at critical early detection with

risk, and lower the risk of invasive cancer. A natural substance in raw carrots called “falcarinol” can slow the growth of cancer cells. Falcarinol is inactivated by continued on page 6

Eating Right Can Help Fight Breast Cancer A pink ribbon is the symbol worn in October for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts from cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that may grow into (invade) surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. Tragically, more than 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die from it this


October 14, 2020

‘Modern Gothic’ Daybed

George Hunzinger (18351898) was born in Germany and trained as a cabinetmaker. In 1855, he emigrated to the United

This unusual daybed was invented and patented by George Hunzinger in 1879. It sold for $3,125 because of the historic look, the importance of the maker and the remains of the original fabric-wrapped wire used instead of upholstery.

The Julian News 7

States and started making his own style of furniture, chairs and tables made of wood or wire -- inspired by pipes, machinery and his 21 patented designs and methods. He invented or improved extension, swivel top and nesting tables; reclining and folding chairs; platform rockers; convertible beds; and a woven seat made of fabric-covered wire. A woven wire bed was sold recently by Neal Auction Company. It had an adjustable back and curved arms, but most importantly, it still had the original fabric-wrapped metal wire webbing Hunzinger patented in 1879. It sold for $3,125. This new material cut the cost of making a chair, and he sold his novel chairs for the low price of $30. Collectors have no trouble recognizing his work because most of it is stamped with his name and the patent date. He made copies of his furniture in a variety of wood finishes and upholstery materials that were

bought by a diverse range of customers. And he had sales offices, agents and catalogs in many countries. Hunzinger furniture was very different from the period designs, and the Neal catalog called the daybed a "Modern Gothic" piece. *** Q: I'd like some information and value for a toy washing machine I played with about 1932. It's labeled "Busy Betty Washing Machine, No. 354" and says, "Patent Applied for, the Hoge Manufacturing Co. Inc., New York, N.Y., USA." It's metal with white enamel paint, glass tub and removable wringer. It's 10 1/2 inches high and is in perfect condition. A: Hampden Hoge started the Hoge Manufacturing Company in 1909. At first, it made office supplies. It started making toys in 1931. Toy washing machines, sweepers, sewing machines, cars, trains and other toys were made. The No. 354 model Busy

Betty Washing Machine was listed in the company's 1936 catalog, which said the machine "actually washes" and "grownups can use it to wash handkerchiefs and other small items." A slightly different model was made later. Production ended in 1939, and the company was sold to the Mattatuck Manufacturing Co. The value of your toy washing machine is about $360, more if in mint condition. *** CURRENT PRICES Scarf, retro, silk, pink, blue and purple circles, black ground, Bob Mackie, 1960s, 20 x 69 inches, $20. Soda fountain canister, Carnation malted milk, milk glass, red and green letters, aluminum lid, 8 1/2 x 6 1/4 inches, $85. Sunderland pitcher, pink luster, transfer decoration including Mason's Arms, sailors' verses, England, c. 1810, 9 1/4 inches, $130. Sampler, needlepoint, cross-

stitch, houses, family, horse, carriage, flowers, frame, 1960s, 11 x 13 inches, $150. *** TIP: Never push antique furniture across the floor. Pick it up. Old furniture may have weak glue joints and may be damaged in the process. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. Fred Thurston, an offensive lineman for the Vince Lombardi-era Green Bay Packers, was better known by what nickname?

2. What team selected Georgetown Hoyas basketball standout Ruben BoumtjeBoumtje with the 50th overall pick in the 2001 NBA Draft? 3. Name the brothers who played college football for the Miami Hurricanes and were both on the 1997 Seattle Seahawks roster. 4. What Big Ten team did Lute Olson leave to accept the head coaching job for the University of Arizona Wildcats men’s basketball team in 1983? 5. What Heisman Trophy winner from the Florida State University Seminoles was selected by the New York Knicks in the first round of the 1994 NBA Draft? 6. “Brass Bonanza” was the popular theme song for what now-defunct NHL team? 7. What prolific actor was known as “The Hammer” during his eight-year pro football career in the 1960s? Answers on page 11


continued from page 1

author Paul Harris writes that information-seeking through questions can be thwarted or encouraged, depending on how parents engage with their kids. Even more interesting, writes Harris, “Mothers who asked a lot of questions had children who also asked a lot of questions. By implication, children may be influenced by messages they receive about how to have a conversation. If their mother uses language to gather information, they are more likely to do the same.” So, if you are curious about why ladybugs are called ladybugs or why colds always feel worse late in the afternoon or why Pluto isn’t a planet anymore, go ahead and ask! Out loud! “Role models have a big impact on kids,” says Engel. “When kids are around curious adults, they are more interested in things around them.”

8. Putting safety first A big reason parents may unwittingly discourage curiosity is because it can be dangerous. The hard truth is that curiosity and the need to resolve uncertainty and the unexpected is not without risk. Your bold and inquiring tween might decide to see what happens if she zaps a magnet in the microwave or how speedily she can navigate her skateboard down your steep street. Physical danger aside, curiosity can also lead to discomfort and embarrassment, says Engel, like “when a child asks their parents to explain that

Apples and falling leaves...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com Fall is a fun time to make a rhyme!

Will you remember to turn the clock back, Jack?

Fall is a ton of fun!

necessarily have to do anything. Supporting curiosity as a parent is more about letting it happen. Celebrate it and share it with your child, suggests Engel, but don’t add it to the list of ways you can improve your child’s prospects. Since curious adults and kids both tend to be happier than those who aren’t, notes Engel, “parents who begin to pursue their curiosity a little more self-consciously and become just a little more attuned to their children’s questions and urges to explore will probably be doing more than enough to promote their children’s curiosity.”

strange sound they heard from their bedroom last night.” The curious child, the one thirsty to seek out the new, even at some risk, can have an intellectual advantage. In a 2002 study of 1,795 3-yearolds, those who showed high stimulation-seeking scored an average of 12 points higher on IQ tests by the time they were 11. It’s a parental balancing act, to be sure, to keep children out of trouble while giving them room to grow intellectually. “Parents have to balance their tolerance for potential harm with their interest in giving their children room to explore,” advises Engel. “Children are better than we think at taking care of themselves. And [kids] need to learn how by doing it.” 9. Putting “encourage curiosity” on your parenting to-do list As a parent you don’t

*** Shelter dogs are the most loving, wonderful, sweet pets in the world. They understand being rescued, loved, and protected. — Faith Hunter ***

...scurrying squirrels and football! Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2020 V16-40

m i e T s l l e a n F d R hym

goos

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moon 1

In each clue find the s pkin silly word (in bold) m Fall as a rule is cool! u p then fill in the puzzle with Better get a sweater! 2 3 clocks a word that rhymes and makes sense. Read these fun fall rhyming 1. bumpkins dot fields waiting to be picked S clues to fill in the crossword. 2. families gather to watch new television toes 4 m 1. Some of them fly south s r 3. a full harvest tune glows in the night sky swe tea 6 Fit the an zzle! when the weather gets cold; 4. hawks are turned back one hour he pu t o t in 5 But they fly back north 5. families sit in hay and laugh as they when warm weather takes hold. bump along on the farmer’s dragon use 2. It flies through the air, 6. a moose flies south o 7 s w h o A Can you believe that h s the goal post it clears; 7. a family decorates the mouse with I guess this is my first hayride? pumpkins, wreaths and orange Chinese lanterns wagon the home team wins, I’m not 8 the crowd jumps and cheers! 8. practice is after school for the football dream very scary! 3. They swirl through the air, Fall Fall is in full swing. The word “fall” is used in many ways. Nice! crunch under your feet; Sayings Can you match the sayings to their meanings? A big pile to jump into A. doing all one can to please 1. fall all over someone just can’t be beat! B. to like someone very much 2. fall back on the first plan 4. The wind blusters and shakes C. not do the job well 3. fall behind the branches of the trees; D. turn to the first idea for help 4. fall down on the job Plop! Plop! Plop! He gathers E. fail to reach goal 5. fall flat caw all the acorns he sees! F. fail completely 6. fall for caw G. show too much love 7. fall over backwards 5. It forms crystal feathers on glass frost squirrel H. begin to work 8. fall short and freezes the leaves; leaves football I. leave one’s place after a military inspection 9. fall out Its deep cold can cause a strong birds J. to go slower than others and not keep up 10. fall to road to buckle in heaves.

rings jelly cake pie

I C M H G A J U T H A S A T I

juice baked butter candied chutney cobbler pancakes

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C I A H P I E B K A X J U P U S H I H R L C O J Y T I H J I F D A I

R G A C C E C T E D E K A B T C Y Y Y O

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is preferable to the one that invites measured chaos. Think again. “What attracts people’s interest, including children, is something more complex and unpredictable,” says Engel. In studying what inspires creativity in classrooms, Engel found that children were most interested “in the rooms that had wild and complex things that didn’t act in predictable ways,” be it outthere art on the walls, terrariums housing all manner of creatures, and spaces throughout the school that invite experimentation. Engel advises seeking out schools that have lots of “ambiguous” materials at hand, including books, images, objects, and tools that spark inquiry. Another reason to look for what Engel calls the “curious classroom”? In a 1984 study, developmental psychologists Barbara Tizard and Martin Hughes found that while kindergarten-age children asked 27 questions per hour at home, that number plummeted to only about three when they were at school. Some of this drop-off is unavoidable because kids at school don’t have the opportunity to ask questions endlessly as they might at home, but it’s not inevitable if the school environment tolerates a curious child. 3. Stamping out gossip Gossip, it turns out, is a natural expression of curiosity in both kids and adults (which is why you go straight for US magazine at the hairdresser). “People get kind of highfalutin about gossip,” says Engel. But if it’s done without malice, discussing complex social relationships can be a healthy and natural way to satisfy one’s curiosity about what other kids are doing. Especially in a school setting, where so much of the day is prescribed, kids relish talking to each other in ways that are unscripted and unexpected. 4. Overscheduling kids’ time It’s the curse of the modern parent — we want to schedule every nanosecond of our child’s day to make sure every moment counts. But guess what: strategic neglect is a better approach for fostering curiosity. “Let them be bored,” says Engel, who notes that unstructured time can, after the initial whining, lead to the most fruitful exploration, whether a box gets turned into a car or there’s a rainy-day discovery that painting is your child’s great passion. 5. Choosing what your child should learn You’ve schlepped your 10-yearold and his best friend to the local science museum to see the special exhibit on the Big Bang. The exhibit, which will only be there a month, is an outstanding learning opportunity! But all they want to do is climb the trees in front of the museum. These are valuable teachable moments — for parents. “You can’t legislate curiosity,” says Engel. The secret to encouraging curiosity, she says, is to avoid holding on so tightly to what you think your child should learn that you don’t allow them the latitude to explore where their inquisitiveness leads them. So if you don’t make it inside the museum this time, don’t fret. Your child is getting an education out on that branch even if he isn’t learning anything about the Big Bang today. 6. Celebrating achievement Perfection, it is said, is the enemy of innovation. Of course, it’s terrific if your middle schooler wins her fifth consecutive soccer game or your teen gets into a top college. And there’s nothing wrong with being happy about that. But take care that you’re not hyperfocused on the award, grade, or accomplishment, advises Engel. Carol Dweck, author of Mindset, explores how praising the process (the hard work it took to get there) rather than the person (as in, “You’re the best soccer player!”) makes kids more likely to seek out challenges and take intellectual risks. “The goal of success is often in opposition to inquiry,” says Engel. “I think many parents who care about curiosity find themselves conflicted when they have to make a choice between

encouraging their child’s curiosity and wanting their child to ‘do well.’ Most of us want our children to get the right answer and the good grade. A good grade is nice, but really wanting to learn something, and being so interested that you can’t let it go, is a much more powerful and enduring experience.” 7. Having all the answers For Einstein’s sake, answer the question already so you can get some peace! Not so fast. When your child asks you a question, says Engel, the best thing you can say in response is, “How can we find out?” It’s also fine to admit you don’t know the answer. In fact, what’s far more important than having the answers is to engender an environment in which questionasking is the norm. In a 2015 article in Education Leadership, Harvard child psychologist and

Apples . . . Yum! H E T F N I L

Apples are a favorite fruit! Can you look for and circle 15 ways we use apples when we cook? cider dried

crisp sauce

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Who’s Storing 53 52 Acorns This Fall?

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My friend, White Foot 50 mouse, uses the pouches 49 in his cheeks to carry acorns and store them in his nest to 47 48 eat later. I’ll bet you didn’t 45 43 39 46 know that some mice eat 41 acorns too! 44 42 40

A Football Is A:

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Follow the color key to see a fun pun.

Many animals are 36 working hard 34 this fall to store 35 enough food for the 37 long, cold winter months. 38 What animal is gathering acorns? Follow the dots to see! 33

Color Key

O = Orange Y = Yellow

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

Did you know that the first football game was played on Nov. 6, 1869 between teams from Rutgers and Princeton universities?

Y Y Y O OY Y YO Y O O O Y O Y Y Y O O Y O Y Y O O O Y Y Y

O Y O O O Y O O O Y Y YO O Y O O O Y O O O Y O Y O Y O O O Y O O O Y O YO O Y O O O Y O O O Y O YO

O OY Y YO O Y O Y O Y O Y O Y Y Y

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O Y O O O Y O Y O O O Y O Y O Y O O O Y O O O Y O Y O Y O Y O Y O O O Y O Y O O O Y O Y O Y Y Y O Y Y Y O Y Y YO O Y O Y O Y Y Y O Y Y O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O Y O

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Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2020

Curious Kids

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October 14, 2020

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

The Special Interests Behind Proposition 15

by Jon Coupal

Voter interest in the 12 measures appearing on the November ballot is growing as election day gets closer. This is particularly true with Proposition 15, driven, no doubt, by the media attention and the amount of spending by both sides on political advertising. No one disputes that Proposition 15 would be the largest property tax increase in California’s history. It would alter one of Proposition 13’s primary protections, the 2 percent limit on annual increases in the taxable value of property. But a common question voters are raising is who is responsible for putting Prop. 15 on the ballot and who is funding the campaign? It would be too easy to say that Prop. 15 is backed by the “usual suspects” who simply want higher taxes, although that is certainly true. More details are illuminating. First, it is no secret that publicsector unions were behind the drafting of Proposition 15 (and an earlier version that they withdrew) and are now the primary source of campaign funds for the yes side. As their legally required campaign disclosures reveal, the California Teachers Association and their local affiliates are the largest contributors. Also listed in the top three is SEIU, another powerful labor organization. CTA swears up and down that its only motivation is the best interests of students. While we have no doubt that individual teachers care very much for their students, keep in mind that union leaders have different priorities. Al Shanker, the former head of the American Federation of Teachers, a large national labor organization, encapsulated CTA’s approach best when he said, “When school children start paying union dues, that’s when I’ll start representing the interests of school children.” The motivation here is getting more tax dollars for salaries and benefits. A recent publication from the United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) reveals the true intentions of the public employee unions: “Passing [Prop. 15] in 2020 is key to winning the aggressive, comprehensive demands we will bring forward in 2022 full contract bargaining.” UTLA has never been shy about flaunting its political power.

A recent UTLA publication to its members said: “If we win this in November 2020 . . . our contract demands can be more aggressive and far-reaching.” And the union brags about its influence over the LAUSD Board of Directors: “The School Board is our boss. We have a unique power — we elect our bosses. It would be difficult to think of workers anywhere else who elect their bosses. We do. We must take advantage of it.” Proposition 15 is also supported by far-left progressive and socialist organizations. In “Majority,” a publication of the Democratic Socialists of America, East Bay Chapter, socialist activist Fred Glass writes, “Proposition 15 offers California socialists an opportunity to raise class consciousness through an electoral campaign….The “tax the rich” slogan — and its more precise corollary, “close corporate tax loopholes” — helps get the conversation started on the right foot, opening the possibility for discussions about economic inequality and social class with voters, with the ultimate destination a conversation about why we need a socialist society to replace the increasingly dysfunctional capitalist mess we’ve been saddled with.” Another large source of campaign funding supporting Prop. 15 comes from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Advocacy which has contributed more than $6,000,000 to the effort. And yes, if the name Zuckerberg sounds familiar it is indeed the same Mark Zuckerberg, who is married to Chan, who founded Facebook and has a net worth in the tens of billions of dollars. If the Zuckerbergs want to give more money to local governments and California’s inefficient education system, perhaps they should open their own checkbook and fund these directly rather than spend millions on a political campaign. These organizations and interests behind Proposition 15 and its $12 billion tax hike are many and varied. But they have one thing in common: When it comes to your money, they want it and they will use any means possible to take it. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA).

*** A happy arrangement: many people prefer cats to other people, and many cats prefer people to other cats. — Mason Cooley ***

• Some adult details made it into the final cut of the PG-rated film "The Santa Clause." In one scene, Tim Allen's character jokes that his wife's number is "1-800-SPANK ME." It turned out, however, that was a real line that you could call and hear some naughty stuff -- as many overly curious children found out. The line was removed from future releases of the film. • According to Hasbro, the tallest Jenga tower ever was 40 levels, plus two additional blocks on top. • There have been more than 300 different Kit Kat flavors in Japan, including soy sauce, "European cheese" and wasabi. Some of them are limited or regional editions. Because the candy bar's name coincidentally sounds like the Japanese expression "Kitto Katsu," which translates to "You will surely win," it is a popular good-luck gift for students ahead of their university exams. • Astronauts cannot cry in space, as the tears need gravity to flow. They also lose their sense of smell in space. • The fingerprints of a koala bear are so indistinguishable from those of humans that they have on occasion been confused at a crime scene. • Winston Churchill had a doctor's note permitting him to drink "unlimited" amounts of alcohol while visiting the U.S. • Speaking of beverages, in 16th-century Turkey, a woman could initiate a divorce if her husband didn't pour coffee for her. • Because they both lost so many players to World War II military service, the Pittsburgh Steelers and Philadelphia Eagles combined to become the "Steagles" during the 1943 season. • The Anglo-Zanzibar War (August 1896), between the United Kingdom and the Zanzibar Sultanate, is the shortest war in recorded history, clocking in at a mere 38 minutes. *** Thought for the Day: "Every strike brings me closer to the next home run." -- Babe Ruth ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Children, old crones, peasants, and dogs ramble; cats and philosophers stick to their point. — H. P. Lovecraft


October 14, 2020

10 The Julian News

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New Construction Room Additions Decks Remodels

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Dear EarthTalk: Do wild animals have any rights under the law in the U.S. (or other countries) the way human citizens do? -- John Hamilton, Raleigh, NC

729 D Street • Ramona

LUBE, OIL & FILTER $29.95 with coupon

Howdy From Lake Cuyamaca

Winnie the Pooh said it best: “Some people talk to animals. Not many listen though. That's the problem.” While attention to animal rights has increased over the past few decades, animals are still largely underrepresented and unprotected under the law. Most laws that protect animals do not recognize their “sentience”—the capacity to feel and perceive, and show awareness—but rather protect them as property. If a living thing can hear, see, touch, smell, or communicate, it is considered to be sentient. But whether that applies to all animals depends on who you ask. Aside from our pets, animals are almost exclusively considered not to be sentient in the court system or under U.S. law. In a court, an inanimate company or corporation has rights and privileges (“corporate personhood”), but a living, breathing creature does not. In the eyes of the law, animals are treated as property. Domestic animals belong to their owners, animals in labs and agricultural industries belong to the company or institution that owns them. Wild animals belong to the state or federal institution which presides over the land they live on. When animals are harmed, it is considered ‘property damage.’ The real dilemmas in the courts arise when those with ownership over these animals are the ones hurting or abusing them. That is usually when “animal rights” are called into play. Progress for animal rights under the law has been slow moving. In the U.S., the movement for animal rights began in 1866 when Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). The New York State legislature authorized the organization to investigate cases of animal cruelty in the state and make arrests. By 1888, almost every state had joined New York and passed laws against animal cruelty. The first federal animal rights laws in the U.S. were the “28 Hour Law” of 1873, the Lacey Act of 1900, and the Animal Welfare Act of 1966. The first two regulated animal transport and banned illegal wildlife trafficking. The Animal Welfare Act (AWA) was created to regulate the research, transport, exhibition and dealing of animals in the U.S., but farm animals in agricultural laboratories are excluded from protections under the AWA. The AWA is still considered the minimum standard for acceptability today. Another federal law for animal rights was the Humane Slaughter Act first passed in 1958 and then amended in 1978. While chickens, turkeys and other birds feel pain as any other animal, they are excluded from protections from this law. The most recent federal law that has passed has been the PACT (Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture) Act of 2019 which makes crushing, burning, suffocating, impaling and sexually exploiting animals a federal crime. Globally, animal protection and rights laws vary widely. European countries along with Australia and New Zealand have the strongest animal rights laws because they formally recognize non-human animal sentience. Countries with no official recognition of animal sentience or suffering are ranked lowest for their animal rights, such as Russia and a number of East African countries. CONTACTS: Laws That Protect Animals, aldf.org/article/laws-thatprotect-animals/; Current Animal Welfare Laws,.animalhumanesociety.org/ advocacy/current-animal-welfare-laws. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https//earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

I had been told that the training procedure with cats was difficult. It's not. Mine had me trained in two days. — Bill Dana ***

“Dusty Britches” here along with “Big Gamefisher” and “Snuff”. By checking out the gut barrels, we are still in the “plenty of fish” category. The trout bite has tapered some, but not much, with limits still coming out of the ole pond. In addition to limits of trout… limits of crappie, bluegill, and red-eared sunfish are also coming out. Chambers Park seems to be the location of choice with mini-jigs, mice tails, night crawlers, and power bait… all producing fish. Lures are working too as Kastmasters and Thomas Buoyants are reported as the best ones to use on the troll or casting from a boat or shore. As the number of anglers remain good, we are seeing a greater number of day users during the day who want to just get out somewhere and experience nature. The tree colors are changing in the deciduous trees, so fall is falling. The guys got together and jumped on a pesky pontoon boat that just wasn’t running good enough to give the word to rent out. Now we have two on the water and one left to convert. Thanks to “Skip” for his help on the project. The Lake will be closed to FISHING on December 8, 9, 10, and 11… but our camping, housing, day use, restaurant, and store will still be open to the public. Did I say “Oscar” the Osprey is back? Well, he is! There is a pipe replacement project taking place at Pump House Cove and some work being done on the Main Dam so there will be some tractor and back-hoe work being done. If you are hiking or for any other reason in the area of the Pump House Cove, be aware of the working equipment and keep a safe distance away. Waterfowl Hunting is just around the corner with what looks like 7 blinds to start out the season. Jay Blaylock would be the point of contact if interested. Just call (760)765-0515 and leave a message for Jay and he will get back to you. The weekly motorcycle crashes on the weekends seem to be ever more increasing in frequency. A lot of times you find out afterwards that the motorcycle you bought, and looked too good to pass up, maybe has a little more power than you bargained for….or can handle. So, take it easy on the

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roadways and remember….. rubber side down. Sometimes, when you spit in a stiff wind to try and get out of its way when it comes flying back at you… doesn’t always work. I have found that my young and goofy Labrador can eat an entire package of uncooked brats… I found it out the next morning at about 1:30 a.m. …and I have found that I shouldn’t expect him to protect me … because he won’t… fight or flight… flight baby, flight. “Happy Trails”… “Worrying is like paying a debt you don’t owe” … Mark Twain “Tight Lines and Bent Rods… Take a Kid Fishing” Dusty Britches

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Family Caregivers Of Veterans Eligible For Free Professional Help

(NAPSI)—The Elizabeth Dole Foundation and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs have launched an emergency respite care fund for the family caregivers of wounded, ill, and injured veterans. The program, Respite Relief for Military and Veteran Caregivers, will provide nonmedical, no-cost, professional home care to veteran caregivers who are struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic. CareLinx, a nationwide professional home care network, helped launch the fund with a donation of $1 million worth of services. Wounded Warrior Project then contributed an additional $1 million to expand the program. The Foundation expects to provide 75,000 hours of care to more than 3,000 veteran caregivers. “The lack of affordable, convenient, professional respite care has always taken a significant toll on the emotional and physical well-being of veteran caregivers,” said Steve Schwab, CEO of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation. “Now, due to the increased health risks and limitations created by the pandemic, we are seeing a spike in the need for shortterm relief.”   continued on page 12


October 14, 2020

Chef’s Corner

Solutions To Reduce Out-Of-Pocket Costs For Insulin At The Pharmacy encourages people to learn about available options, take action to save money at the pharmacy and share these resources with others who need it most. During enrollment season for Medicare Part D, it is especially important for people to take a close look at what plans are participating in the Senior Savings Model – a government initiative to help lower copay costs for seniors. More than ever, this year will be critical for Medicare enrollees: once they are enrolled in a participating Part D plan, enrollees can get their Lilly insulin for $35 per monthly prescription starting January 1, 2021. Collectively, this means anyone using Lilly insulin, regardless of their insurance status, will be eligible to access

Fall is a fun time to make a rhyme!

their prescriptions for $35 per month starting in January 2021. “Many people have lost their jobs and health insurance. Lilly offers a broad suite of solutions for people who need help affording their insulin,” said Andy Vicari, senior director & U.S. brand leader, Insulins Portfolio, Lilly Diabetes. “The Lilly Insulin Value Program and our participation in the Medicare Part D Senior Savings Model are crucial steps forward as we aim to fill gaps in the healthcare system and, ultimately, help people reduce out-of-pocket costs at the pharmacy.” If you’re in need of assistance affording your Lilly insulin – whether you have commercial insurance or no insurance at all – call the Lilly Diabetes Solution Center at 833-808-1234 (8 a.m.

to 8 p.m. EST Monday through Friday). Representatives can also direct qualifying individuals to free clinics that can provide donated insulin or share more information on lower-priced insulin options. You can also visit www. insulinaffordability.com to download your Lilly Insulin Value Program copay card and access a number of other resources like a Medicare enrollment checklist and more background on Lilly’s comprehensive suite of affordability solutions. At a time when many are struggling to pay for their medicines, insulin affordability options can ease the burden for people with diabetes, no matter their circumstances.

imes T l l e a nd F m y h R

s

(StatePoint) Across the U.S., the COVID-19 crisis is financially impacting people in many ways, including their ability to pay for their medicines. Eli Lilly and Company wants to ensure that any person with diabetes who uses Lilly insulin can afford it, even beyond the crisis. In addition to recently committing the Lilly Insulin Value Program’s $35 copay card to its comprehensive suite of affordability solutions, Lilly launched a national grassroots campaign called “Insulin Affordability: Learn. Act. Share.” to help people with diabetes understand all affordable insulin options available to them. Collaborating with numerous national, state and local organizations, this campaign

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heat or cooking, so it is critical to eat raw carrots, too. A few apples a day may truly keep the breast-cancer surgeon away. Specifically, studies show that natural substances found in apples decrease the number of tumors, the size of tumors and tumor growth rates in animal models. The more apple extracts the animals were fed, the greater the reduction in cancer. Green tea consumption may reduce your relative breast cancer risk by more than 50%. Green tea is rich in potent “polyphenol” antioxidants that protect your DNA from damage and shortening, reduce inflammation, reduce estrogen and reduce breast tissue density. The recommended amount to consume is two to four cups per day, or you can take a green-tea supplement. Enjoy this Apple and Carrot Salad with a cup or glass of green tea, and you’ll incorporate three delicious cancer-fighting ingredients into your diet. APPLE AND CARROT SALAD 1/2 pound carrots, coarsely grated (about 2 cups) 2 large organic apples (Baldwin, Cortland, Granny Smith or Red Delicious), unpeeled, cored and sliced into matchstick pieces 3 stalks of celery, cut into matchstick pieces 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon sweet paprika 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 4 large Hass avocados, peeled, cut in half and pitted 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

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MEETINGS

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

AA Meetings

CAMPGROUND HOUSEKEEPER needed - Cabins and restrooms must have flexible hours, part time, seasonal, min wage, apply at Stagecoach trails RV resort. 7878 Great Southern Overland Stage Route of 1849, Julian, CA. 92036 Ph# 760.765.3765 10/14 JULIAN HOTEL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - Innkeeper/Front Desk Manager. Friendly attitude, quick learner, able to multitask, must be good with computers, good with people. 30-35hrs/week. Call 760-315-3179 to inquire more. 10/21 DELI ASSOCIATE - Stagecoach Trails Rv Resort & Event Center 7878 Great Southern Overland Stage Route of 1849 (760)765-3765 Job details Salary $12 an hour Job Type: Parttime Job Description: Slicing meats/cheeses Making sandwiches, Pizza, Hamburgers, Hotdogs Stocking shelves Merchandising Cleaning the department Qualifications: Must be available to work weekends and holidays Able to lift up to 40 lbs. without accommodation Able to stand for entire shifts Willing to work/train in other departments when needed. Excels at customer service. Deli experience is preferred. The chosen individual should enjoy working with the public and like working as a team! 10/28 CAREGIVER/COMPANION - Part time(24 hrs/week, we’ll work with your schedule as much as posible), light housekeeping, light patient care, $16/hr. No experience necessary, Primary requirements, Sober, honest, reliable - Shelter Valley, email your infomation/background to: tetuanui2008@ gmail.com or text 760 419 6169 11/4

Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis T: 11.5 in

www.smallstep.gov

*** Pets have more love and compassion in them than most humans. — Robert Wagner ***

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EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

DISHWASHER - Part Time, could become full time with expanded duties. Apply in persom, Wynola Pizza. 10/14

The Julian News 11

1. In a large bowl, mix together carrots, apples, celery, oil, lemon juice, parsley, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, paprika, and salt and pepper. Cover and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours to allow flavors to meld and permeate the ingredients. 2. Place 1/2 cup of the salad on each avocado half. Sprinkle with apple cider vinegar. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Serves 4. ***

www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - Saturday 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 No (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Services Phone: 760-765-0114 This E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com Sunday PERSONAL SUPPORT

information: 760-765-2331

Tuesday - 7pm

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Men’s Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

1•888•724•7240

continued from page 7 1. “Fuzzy.” 2. The Portland Trail Blazers. 3. Bennie and Brian Blades. 4. The University of Iowa Hawkeyes. 5. Charlie Ward. 6. The Hartford Whalers. 7. Fred Williamson.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. The Himalayas 2. United Parcel Service (UPS) 3. Election of the president and vice president 4. 1985 5. Aviophobia or aerophobia 6. A prickle of porcupines 7. A pangram, in which every letter of the alphabet is used. 8. Illinois Avenue 9. Hawaii and California 10. J.K. Rowling ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Volume 36 - Issue 11

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to October 1, 2015; 2015; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9014162 GOOLSBY FAMILY SERVICES 993 Neighborly Lane, Ramona, CA 92065 The business is conducted by an Individual Thomas Joseph Goolsby, 993 Neighborly Lane, Ramona, CA 92065. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON August 27, 2020. LEGAL: 08613 Publish: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9014224 JW SHIPPING 500 La Terraza Blvd., Suite 150 Escondido, CA 92025 The business is conducted by A Corporation - Jump Rails and More, Inc. 500 La Terraza Blvd., Suite 150, Escondido, CA 92025. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON August 29, 2020. LEGAL: 08614 Publish: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00033313-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ANGELO ARNOLDO GARCIA FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ANGELO ARNOLDO GARCIA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ANGELO ARNOLDO GARCIA TO: ANGEL ARNOLDO PRUNEDA IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on NOVEMBER 5, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 22, 2020. LEGAL: 08619 Publish: September 30 and October 7, 14, 21, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015241 LAN WORKS 970 W. Valley Parkway, #441 Escondido, CA 92025 The business is conducted by An Individual Douglas Randolph Tucker, 423 Calabrese St., Fallbrook, CA 92028 . THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 12, 2020. LEGAL: 08615 Publish: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015023 a) MEMOS & MAYBELLS b) MEMOS AND MAYBELLS 6711 Ketch Way, Carlsbad, CA 92011 The business is conducted by An Individual Kimberly Haines, 6711 Ketch Way, Carlsbad, CA 92011. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 5, 2020. LEGAL: 08620 Publish: September 30 and October 7, 14, 21, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015029 CASANOVA HOME FURNISHINGS 8157 Commercial Street, La Mesa, CA 91942 The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Robert Gene Casanova III and Monique Celine Casanova, 6365 Amber Lake Avenue, San Diego, CA 92119. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 5, 2020. LEGAL: 08616 Publish: September 30 and October 7, 14, 21, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015202 PAWLICO 7919 Silverton Ave. Ste. 405, San Diego, CA 92126 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Facade Fencing Products, LLC, 7919 Silverton Ave. Ste. 405, San Diego, CA 92126. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 12, 2020. LEGAL: 08617 Publish: September 30 and October 7, 14, 21, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00033903-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: CLARISSA JANE CISNEROS-HENDERSON FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: CLARISSA JANE CISNEROS-HENDERSON HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: CLARISSA JANE CISNEROS-HENDERSON TO: CLARISSA JANE HENDERSON IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on NOVEMBER 10, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 25, 2020. LEGAL: 08622 Publish: October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2020-9015271 In reference to the activity doing business as: a) CC&I b) CRTPTOCURRENCY CONSULTING & INTEGRATING c) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INTEGRATING d) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INSTRUCTING e) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INTEGRATING f) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INSTRUCTING g) CCE&I h) CCI SOLUTIONS Located at: 4275 Executive Square, Suite 200, La Jolla, CA 92037 The following registrant(s) has abandoned use of the fictitious business name: Aaron Fiore, 10250 Prince Jed Ct., Santee, CA 92071. This fictitious business name referred to above was filed in San Diego County on April 21, 2020, and assigned File No. 2020-9007595. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO ON September 12, 2020. LEGAL: 08618 Publish: September 30 and October 7, 14, 21, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015814 MOONSHINE MAGIC 735 Kentwood Dr, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 401 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by An Individual Thomas Edward Barnes, 735 Kentwood Dr, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 22, 2020.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A workplace change doesn't seem to have turned out quite as you'd hoped. Never mind: Just treat yourself to a healthy dollop of that Aries self-confidence, and you'll soon view things differently. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Some of the support you might have hoped for in a difficult situation might not be there. But you have the strength to rely on your own capabilities if you must. Good luck. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A disagreement with a longtime friend can be painful, but it also can be a learning lesson. Insist on a full and complete airing of views. You'll both come away the better for it. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A stalled relationship can be restarted with some give and take on both sides. And while it could take more time than you expect, don't rush it. Be patient, and let it happen naturally. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An opportunity to move a longstalled project from concept to construction might be opening up for the Big Cat. Meanwhile, be prepared to spend more time dealing with family matters. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Use your Virgo organizational skills to line up support to help you deal with a sticky workplace problem. A personal matter also might be helped with friendly intervention. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Trying to resolve a workplace problem with a

longtime associate can be difficult. Consider bringing in an impartial third party to help you both reach a mutually acceptable solution. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) This is a good time to assess your current career situation. Consider whether you have a chance to move up where you are now, or if you should look elsewhere. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) With education being a dominant part of this week's aspect, one of the things you might want to think about is taking courses to enhance your career opportunities. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might have a problem trying to stay focused on a matter you'd rather not deal with. But the sooner you do, the sooner it will be resolved and out of the way. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) An unforeseen complication creates a difficult problem. But things get resolved once you use your ability to turn negative situations into positive experiences. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) The Pisces penchant for doing the right thing at the right time helps you deal with a particularly troublesome situation. Consider your best option, and act accordingly. BORN THIS WEEK: Although you might sometimes seem rigid in your views, your love of justice makes you a trusted friend everyone can rely on.

© 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

LEGAL

NOTICE

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00026335-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2020-00033711-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ALYSSA MARIE DOUGLAS FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MARIAH FELLOWS and MATTHEW LEIDE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: ALYSSA MARIE DOUGLAS HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ALYSSA MARIE DOUGLAS TO: ALYSSA MARIE VALIENTE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on NOVEMBER 9, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 10, 2020. LEGAL: 08625 Publish: October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020

PETITIONER: MARIAH FELLOWS and MATTHEW LEIDE and on behalf of: PAITYN RAYNE LEIDE, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: PAITYN RAYNE LEIDE, a minor TO: MAKYNNA RAYNE LEIDE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 23 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on NOVEMBER 17, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 28, 2020. LEGAL: 08628 Publish: October 14, 21, 28 and November 4, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00026435-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: SYDNEY NOELLE PRATHER FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: SYDNEY NOELLE PRATHER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: SYDNEY NOELLE PRATHER TO: SYDNEY NOELLE VALIENTE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on NOVEMBER 9, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 10, 2020. LEGAL: 08626 Publish: October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9016214 HANDSY 9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.,San Diego, CA 92131 The business is conducted by A Joint Venture Lated Wang, 9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.,San Diego, CA 92131 and Neil Tuason Pesarillo, 9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.,San Diego, CA 92131. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 26, 2020. LEGAL: 08629 Publish: October 14, 21, 28 and November 4, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015628 HI5VEGAN 9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.,San Diego, CA 92131 The business is conducted by An Individual - Wai Heung Cheung, 9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.,San Diego, CA 92131. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 19, 2020. LEGAL: 08630 Publish: October 14, 21, 28 and November 4, 2020

LEGAL: 08623 Publish: October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9015787 ALOHA KAI CONSULTING 11570 Windcrest Ln, Unit 1623 San Diego, CA 92128 The business is conducted by An Individual Yvette Kai Nolasco, 11570 Windcrest Ln, Unit 1623, San Diego, CA 92128. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 21, 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9016135 RUNONEARTH FITNESS 3139 Borrego Springs Road, Borrego Springs, CA 92004 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1877 Borrego Springs, CA 92004) The business is conducted by An Individual - Casey Derek McGuire, 3139 Borrego Springs Road, Borrego Springs, CA 92004. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 26, 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9016415 LIVING WATER CARLSBAD 2588 El Camino Real, Carldbad, CA 92008 The business is conducted by An Individual Elliot Lee, 6972 Sandpiper Pl, CA 92009. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 1, 2020.

LEGAL: 08624 Publish: October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2020

LEGAL: 08627 Publish: October 14, 21, 28 and Nvember 4, 2020

LEGAL: 08631 Publish: October 14, 21, 28 and November 4, 2020

Tom Gilhool

Wednesday - October 14, 2020

continued from page 5

took on entrenched forms of discrimination and made a profound difference.” Mr. Gilhool was lead counsel in two landmark federal cases that changed opportunities for the nation’s disabled people. He believed and established that they had civil rights under the Constitution that could be enforced through litigation. In Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (1971), he argued the state must guarantee a free public school education to children with intellectual disabilities. Previously, they had been barred from public school. The case resulted in similar suits in 37 states and in1975 the enactment by Congress of The Education for All Handicapped Children Act, now the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It mandates provision of public education following an individualized education program (IEP) created for each student. In the second case, Halderman v. Pennhurst State School and Hospital, twice before the U.S. Supreme Court, Mr. Gilhool argued that the segregation of Pennhurst residents and the harsh conditions to which they were exposed violated their constitutional right to equal treatment under the law. In 1977, U.S. District Court Judge Raymond J. Broderick ruled that isolation at the institution for the mentally and physically disabled was “clearly separate and not equal.” He ordered the state to place residents in the community with appropriate social services. After appeals were exhausted, Pennhurst closed in 1987. Mr. Gilhool’s work sparked a national movement of the developmentally disabled from distant congregate asylums, but it also resonated personally with Mr. Gilhool whose brother, Bob, was developmentally disabled and had been a resident for some years at Pennhurst. In addition to his brother Bob, sister Beth Connally (John) and wife Gillian, Mr. Gilhool is survived by Bridget, her husband Don Bonsteel, and their children Max 16 and Erika 14 of Catonsville, MD and Nicholas, his wife Marian Bell, Milo 13 and Benno 9 of Los Angeles. Other tributes to Tom and information about the many cases he litigated and won for clients he empowered can be found through www.pubintlaw.com and the Facebook group Remembering Tom Gilhool. An online memorial will be held for him at 1 pm ET, 10 am PT Saturday, October 24. More information will be posted on these sites.

Family Caregivers Of Veterans Eligible For Free Professional Help continued from page 10

Even as states re-open, some of the most critically wounded or ill veterans and their caregivers will have a long journey back to the pre-pandemic world. These veterans often have vulnerable immune systems that require their caregivers to take every precaution against exposure. By asking family and friends to keep their distance, they are losing a vital source of daily support. “We are grateful to CareLinx and Wounded Warrior Project for helping us respond to this urgent need,” Schwab continued. “We hope other organizations also step up, so we can ensure every veteran caregiver suffering during COVID-19 receives the help they need.”  The program is rolling out in select regions and will expand nationwide over time. Eligible caregivers can request services that include companionship, grocery shopping, cooking, mobility assistance, transportation, bathing, and other activities of daily living. AARP and Bob Woodruff Foundation have also joined as key collaborators for this effort to help spread the word to military and veteran caregivers.   To learn more and apply, visit www.hiddenheroes.org/respite. 

NASA Expert IDs Mystery Object continued from page 4

was circumstantial, given the object’s chaotic one-year orbit around Earth. It never was designated as an asteroid, and left Earth’s orbit in 2003. The latest object’s route is direct and much more stable, bolstering his theory. “I could be wrong on this. I don’t want to appear overly confident,” Chodas said. “But it’s the first time, in my view, that all the pieces fit together with an actual known launch.” And he’s happy to note that it’s a mission that he followed in 1966, as a teenager in Canada. Asteroid hunter Carrie Nugent of Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Massachusetts, said Chodas' conclusion is “a good one” based on solid evidence. She’s the author of the 2017 book “Asteroid Hunters.” “Some more data would be useful so we can know for sure,” she said in an email. “Asteroid hunters from around the world will continue to watch this object to get that data. I’m excited to see how this develops!” The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics' Jonathan McDowell noted there have been “many, many embarrassing incidents of objects in deep orbit ... getting provisional asteroid designations for a few days before it was realized they were artificial.” It’s seldom clear-cut. Last year, a British amateur astronomer, Nick Howes, announced that an asteroid in solar orbit was likely the abandoned lunar module from NASA’s Apollo 10, a rehearsal for the Apollo 11 moon landing. While this object is likely artificial, Chodas and others are skeptical of the connection. Skepticism is good, Howes wrote in an email. “It hopefully will lead to more observations when it’s next in our neck of the woods” in the late 2030s. Chodas' latest target of interest was passed by Earth in their respective laps around the sun in 1984 and 2002. But it was too dim to see from 5 million miles (8 million kilometers) away, he said. He predicts the object will spend about four months circling Earth once it’s captured in mid-November, before shooting back out into its own orbit around the sun next March. Chodas doubts the object will slam into Earth — “at least not this time around.”

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - October 14, 2020  

Wednesday - October 14, 2020  

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