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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

The Newspaper of Record.

For the Community, by the Community.

Wednesday

1870

YEARS

Julian Branch Library Hosts Blood Drive With San Diego Blood Bank Julian Branch Library is hosting a blood drive in partnership with the San Diego Blood Bank. This Thursday, August 13, 2020 from 10:00 am ‑ 3:00 pm. At 1850 Highway 78, Julian in the parking lot. All donors will receive a FREE Comic Con Limited‑Edition t‑shirt (while supplies last, sizes subject to availability.) Anyone 17 and older, who weighs at least 114 pounds and is in good health may be eligible to donate blood. A good meal and plenty of fluids are recommended prior to donation. Appointment and photo identification required. Please call (800) 469-7322 or visit SanDiegoBloodBank.org for more information.

3 More Covid-19 Cases Identified The County’s latest figures on Covid-19 cases has brought the total in 92036 to seven, 3 more that identifird 2 weeks ago. Ramona has reached 200, Sata Ysabel 3, Warner Springs 6, and Ranchita 3. Borrego Spring is showing 17 cases, figures released through August 8. 20 reported COVID-19 Community Outbreaks, in a Preschool, business office, retail business, a religious orgaization and bar/restaurant. The 14 day average of new cases is 5.3%, with number of tests averaging 7,100 per day. Over 630,000 tests have been administered in the County since testing began in mid-March.

Census Deadline Your Input Needed

Have you done your Census? 68% of Julian residents have! If not, respond today and be counted. A counted community is a funded community. Federal dollars for the Julian community for the next 10 years are at stake. Respond today on-line at https:// my2020census.gov/1 or call 858-285-7539. Local Census employees are available to answer questions or to complete the questionnaire on your behalf over the phone. English and Spanish available. Let’s get counted Julian.

Julian, CA.

Volume 36 — Issue 02 ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Back To School With A Chromebook

ESTABLISHED

August 12, 2020

School started Tuesday at all three Julian schools. You would never know by the lack of noise or the empty parking lot at the high school. All schools are starting the year with distance learning, much to the disappointment of the administrations. On Friday elementary and Jr. High students began picking up their supplies for the semester, including “Chromebooks” and for some internet “hot-spots” The high school is scheduled to disperse their learning tools on Monday. All students are expected to sign in with their various classes everyday on their computers. Unlike the spring when evryone was feeling their way, this will be a full and immersive learning environment for all concerned. And much to the dismay of some - grades will be given at the end of the semester.

Night Sky Photography Basics Julian is a wonderful place to enjoy the dark night sky. Stars, meteors, planets, etc., are visible year-round on cloudless nights. There are several times each year when meteor showers appear, or a rare comet will provide an even better show for those who take the time to be patient and look up. You can see the International Space Station whiz by occasionally and the wondrous milky way is visible for much of the year. The Perseid meteor shower occurs between late July and mid-August and this year will peak Aug 10 through Aug 13 in the NE sky with up to 100 meteors an hour. Capturing night sky images with your camera is not as difficult as you might think if you follow some basic guidelines. When shooting night sky images - stars, meteors, comets, planets – the main limitation is that you never have enough light. So, you need to use every feature of your equipment to help you capture as much as you can. Here are some basic rules to follow which apply no matter what camera you have. To capture stars, you will want to choose a dark night with no clouds and with no visible moon if possible. Then you will want to find a location with a clear view of the sky and with little or no light from terrestrial sources – buildings, streetlights, security lights, etc. You will also need a sturdy tripod since you will be taking multi-second exposures. In a pinch you could rest your camera on a rock or a car but that is not very convenient. There will not be enough light to use the Auto features of your camera so you will be using the ‘manual’ mode of your DSLR or mirrorless camera as well as the ‘manual’ focus of your lens. Not to worry, here are some basic settings to get you started and once you have captured a few images you can then adjust any of these settings as necessary. Start with ISO 3200, shutter 20 seconds, and your lens aperture as open as you can; f/1.4 to f/2.8 if possible. Use a 14mm to 28mm lens to capture a wide view of the sky. Remember that you will need to set your camera to Manual if you normally use Auto. Now the tough part, you must manually focus on the stars. It is a good idea to practice during the day to see where your lens should be set and then mark or remember that for night shooting. Once you are all set up, take a shot, review it, and then adjust

the focus. You may need to do that multiple times before things become focused. And remember to keep checking it between subsequent shots. One fact that can surprise people is how quickly things in the sky move. Shooting stars streak across the sky in less than a second of course (we will talk about capturing those below) but all the other stars move too. In fact, they move so quickly that they become lines rather than points of light in your photograph even after only a few seconds of exposure. To avoid this, you will need to limit the exposure time. You can use a simple guideline called the ‘500 rule’. It says to divide 500 by the focal length of the lens you are using. For example, if you are using a 24mm lens you have 500/24 = 20 seconds before stars begin to be lines. For a crop frame – or APSC – camera you have less time with the same lens; only 333/24 = 14 seconds. (You can check your camera documentation to determine if it is full frame or crop frame). In either case, this is just a guideline; you can certainly use a longer exposure if you’d like and I’d recommend using all sorts of settings so you get the feel of how your equipment performs. It is OK if you come home with hundreds of shots that you end up deleting as long as you captured a few keepers. One more bit of technical advice; you can increase the ISO setting to more than 3200 if your camera allows that. That allows the sensor to capture more light; doubling that number doubles the amount of light sensitivity. Some cameras are quite capable of 6400, 12,800 or higher. Just be aware that as you increase ISO, more noise will be captured in the image and you will need

Cedar Creek Falls and Three Sisters Falls Trails Under New Restricted Guidelines Through The End Of The Year

by Kevin Wixom

to filter that out later. Again, play with your equipment and take images using lots of different settings. In short, you are constantly balancing things; more light sensitivity means more noise, more exposure time means stars become lines, smaller aperture means less light hitting the sensor, etc. You have three main levers to balance: aperture, shutter speed and ISO (called the Exposure Triangle). Focusing is the fourth challenge. Be patient and be as precise as you can. Taking pictures of the night sky can be frustrating and it takes hours of practice, but the rewards are tremendous. Did I mention patience? Now that you can capture images of the stars, how in the world (or rather, out of this world) do you capture shooting stars? Now we need to add another little variable… luck. You have no idea when a meteor will appear and it will be gone in a second, so you want your camera to be exposing when that random meteor flies across the sky. You can do this a couple of ways. First, you can keep manually starting each exposure. That works but can get boring. Plus, you do not want to keep touching things after you have them set properly; invariably you will bump the focus ring or some other setting. Second, you can use something called an intervalometer. This device connects to your camera and will continue to trigger the shutter using the exposure time you have set as long as the camera battery lasts. Did I mention you should have extra batteries with you? You should. Intervalometers are easy to find on Amazon or your local camera shop; just get one that works with your camera. By the way, shooting the moon

continued on page 8

Effective Saturday, August 1, 2020 the Cleveland National Forest will be moving into ELEVATED fire restrictions. These restrictions are put into effect to provide for emergency resource protection and public safety during hazardous fire conditions. The following are the ELEVATED fire restrictions as of August 1, 2020 through January 1, 2021: Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, or within a developed recreation sites. Welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with an open flame. Target shooting, discharging a firearm, air rifle, or gas gun. Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, or charcoal fire except within a developed recreation sites. General fire restrictions are in place year-round and remain in effect: Fireworks are never allowed on the Cleveland National Forest. No wood or charcoal fires are allowed except in identified developed campgrounds and developed picnic areas within designated fire rings. Discharging a firearm using the following ammunition is never allowed, this includes hunting seasons: steel core, armor piercing, and tracer ammunition. Visitors are asked to be aware of wildfire conditions in their area and take appropriate prevention measures where necessary. For more information visit: www.fs.usda.gov/cleveland To protect the health and safety of visitors, cooperators and employees, Three Sisters and Cedar Creek Trails closure will be extended from Tuesday, August 4 through Saturday, October 31. All permits for the Cedar Creek Falls Permit area will be cancelled for these dates.

Popular Forest Trails Require Higher Level Of Skill And Preparedness On Warm Days Cedar Creek Falls and Three Sisters Falls trails, near Ramona and Julian, located in San Diego County, are known for their beauty, but they are also extremely dangerous on warm days. Among the most popular destinations on the Cleveland National Forest, these trails require extra precautions during summer months. Every summer, often multiple times a week, hikers find themselves overwhelmed by the heat, dehydrated, and in need of help. Since June 27, 2020, emergency responders have performed 11 rescues in these areas, including one which tragically resulted in a fatality. “As more and more people come to the National Forest for fresh air and exercise, they may not be aware that hiking these trails can be extremely dangerous, even deadly,” says Amy L. Reid, the Palomar district ranger. “We encourage visitors to be responsible for their safety by being prepared, considering the conditions, and possibly choosing another location on warm days.” The waterfalls, generally shown flowing beautifully at full capacity in pictures on social media and the internet, dry up during the warm months and the pools turn stagnant. In general, the USDA Forest Service does not recommend hiking either the Cedar Creek Falls Trail or Three Sisters Falls trail between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on warm days, and does not recommend hiking the trails at all if the temperatures are over 90 degrees at the trailheads. When hiking in the Three Sisters or Cedar Creek Falls areas during the summer months, the Cleveland National Forest asks visitors to plan for an arduous hike in desert conditions with little to no shade, expect temperatures to be significantly hotter along the trail than at the trailhead, carry a minimum of one liter of water per person, per hour of planned hike (both trails take 4-5 hours on average to complete), and wear light-colored clothes, sturdy shoes, and a hat. On days that the National Weather Service issues a heat advisory or excessive heat watch, local officials will implement an emergency closure. With today's heat advisory announcement, temporary closures will be in place Saturday, July 11 and Sunday, July 12. However, even days without a heat advisory or excessive heat watch can still be dangerous. Hikers visiting Cedar Creek Falls need a visitor use permit, which can be acquired at www.recreation.gov. Cleveland National Forest officials encourage visitors to be aware of their surroundings and responsibilities when visiting the Forest. For more information, please visit the website at www.fs.usda.gov/ cleveland or call the nearest office.

NATIONAL RESURRECT ROMANCE WEEK * Enjoy it with your special someone.

ESTABLISHED

1870

YEARS


August 12, 2020

2 The Julian News

Health and Personal Services

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

30352 Highway 78(at Hwy 79)

OPEN Thurs-Monday 11 am - 5pm

What You May Not Know About Generic Prescription Drugs

Due to current circumstances, this year’s Summer Learning Program will be completely virtual. There will be no physical prizes but you can explore our new program and earn badges. June 22 through August 31, 2020.

Reminder All Letters submitted must be signed by the author. The publisher reserves the right to refuse publication of anonymous and third party submissions.

MjH

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

(BPT) - Many prescription medications on the market today are expensive, and may not be fully covered by health insurance plans. Because of the costs involved, people who take prescription medications often ask their doctor or pharmacist about less expensive options that might be available to them. In many cases, generic versions of prescription medications can provide savings. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about generic drugs: Are all generics the same? No. Most people don't realize that there are two types of generic drugs; authorized generics and regular generic medications1. Both regular generics and authorized generics are FDA approved, safe and effective. However there are some differences that consumers should keep in mind. Authorized generics are identical1 to their name-brand counterparts. They are made by the same manufacturer, most often in the same facility and on the same equipment as the brand-name drug. In addition, they have the exact same active and inactive ingredients, which means they will have the same size, shape, smell, taste and feel as the brand name drug. Regular generics, on the other hand, are copies of brand drugs made by a different company than the manufacturer of the brandname drug. They can be different in size, shape, smell, taste and feel - both compared to the brand and compared to other generic drugs. Like authorized generics, regular generics have the same active ingredients, dosage form and strength as the brand-name drug. However, regular generics often have different inactive ingredients, which make up 70% of an oral tablet, on average2. Inactive ingredients do not have a pharmacological effect and are added to generic medications as fillers or binders. What are some things to consider when taking generic drugs? In many cases, multiple manufacturers make a generic version of a particular brand-name drug, each using their own formulation of inactive ingredients. In fact, the 18 most prescribed oral medications have an average of 82 different available formulas2. Pharmacies and pharmaceutical distributors can shift purchases of a given generic from one manufacturer to another on a regular basis. As a result, patients may receive a round, pink tablet one month and an oblong, green tablet the next month for the same prescription from the same pharmacy. What are the key benefits of authorized generics? With authorized generics, consumers switching from brand-name drugs to generics can feel confident that the medication they are taking will be the exact same drug product as the brand name drug they're used to. As long as they are getting the authorized generic, they can be assured each and every refill will be the same product every time. This consistency in medication may be a factor in switchback rates. A switchback occurs when a patient switches back to the brandname product from a generic medication. A recently published study showed lower switchback rates in patients who switched from brandname to authorized generic medications than patients who switched from brand-name to regular medications3. Where can people find authorized generic drugs? If you are interested in exploring authorized generics as an option, more information is available at AuthorizedGenerics.com, including a Product Finder tool to find out whether an authorized generic version of your medication is available. Bottom line, knowing your treatment options is an important part of managing your health. This is why understanding your options in generic drugs and talking with your physician or pharmacist can help you make informed decisions and take control of your health. 1 U.S. Food & Drug Administration. FDA List of Authorized Generic Drugs. Accessed at https://www.fda.gov/drugs/abbreviated-new-drug-applicationanda/fda-list-authorized-generic-drugs. 2 Daniel Reker et al. "Inactive" ingredients in Oral Medications. Science Translational Magazine, March 2019. https://stm.sciencemag.org/ content/11/483/eaau6753. 3 Rishi J Desai et al. Differences in rates of switchbacks after switching from branded to authorized generic and branded to generic drug products: cohort study. BMJ, April 2018.

*** I have had dreams and I have had nightmares, but I have conquered my nightmares because of my dreams. — Jonas Salk ***

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare. Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-5 pm

760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management closed 12-1 for lunch

Fictitious Business Name Filings Published for only $30

We send a proof of publication to the County Clerk with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Name Change Orders Published for only $50 We send a proof of publication to the Court with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Call the Julian News Office 760 765 2231

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2020 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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August 12, 2020

Finding Volcan’s Rare Plant Treasures

HOME SERVICES

by Valérie Cournoyer

Did you know that San Diego is the most biodiverse county in the continental U.S.? As excited as that may make us about living in San Diego, it is also a fact that entrusts us with a great responsibility.

Residential • Industrial • Commercial Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com Grading & Demolition

Bruce Strachota

FREE ESTIMATES

Grading, Demolition, Underground Utilities, Dump Truck, Excavation, Loader, Bobcat Rental, Rock & Base

cell: 619-972-0152

TREE N C A O I M L U P J E HT Local Experience Since 1988ANY * Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

Serving Southern California Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

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ERIC DAUBER H: 760-765-2975 C: 760-271-9585

Hulsea californica by Sharyl Massey

Many of the plant species in San Diego are endemic to this county, meaning that they have evolved here and are found nowhere else. This special status makes them vulnerable to changes in their environment, as there might not be many, if any, other populations to replace damaged areas. Plants can often serve as an indicator species, revealing the impacts of a changing climate, land use, or a change in fire regime. Our native plants are also a critical resource for animal species, providing food and shelter essential to their survival. The Volcan Mountain Foundation has been documenting species occurrence and distribution on the mountain, not only to learn more about this incredibly rich ecosystem, but also to monitor changes in plant communities over time. Spurred by VMF’s recent Teofulio Summit acquisition, VMF partnered with the San Diego Chapter of the California Native Plant Society, led by Prickly poppy by Susan Meyer Chapter President, Justin Daniels, for the first botanical survey of the property, along with Fred Roberts (Rare Plant Botanist), Larry Hendrickson (California State Parks Botanist) and Sharyl Massey (Outdoor Education Specialist). The group spent hours in the hot San Felipe Valley sun, carefully identifying each plant species they encountered. A few surprises included a number of populations of Hulsea californica, which has a rare plant status and is endemic to San Diego County. A subsequent survey on a 50-acre property near the ridge of the mountain proved 20SDG16469_Whendell Level Pay Summer__Julian News__RUN: 06/17/2020__1/2 pg BW__Trim: 13” x 11”

PO Box 254 JULIAN, CA. 92036

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to be just as exciting, with more uncommon species thriving on the mountain. We continue our efforts to learn about, monitor, and conserve the amazing biodiversity of the Volcan mountains with our partner organizations in the county, and appreciate your support which makes this all possible! Valérie Cournoyer has served on the VMF Board of Directors since 2019, and Co-Chairs VMF’s Conservation-Stewardship Committee.

LEVEL PAY CAN MAKE SUMMER BILLS MORE CHILL.

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Learn more at sdge.com/summer

© 2020 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All trademarks belong to their respective owners. All rights reserved. Whendell is a trademark of San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E) and may be used only with permission of SDG&E.

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6/8/20 5:36 PM


4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian

Saturday, August 15 Virtual Star Party Curiosity Peak YouTube channel Perseid meteor shower, look at larger nebulae and complexes. Facebook group: Official Julian Dark Sky Network 9pm

Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm

Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 2:30pm - After School STEM Flex your brain muscles with fun, educational activities for kids & teens. Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every Thursday Beginning Spanish for Adults Learn basic Spanish at the library. - 2:30pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Saturday Ebook Workshop Learn how to download Ebooks & audiobooks from the library for free! - 11am Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street Every day during business hours – Vet Connect VA services available at Julian Library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment.

• On Aug. 13, 1899, Alfred Hitchcock is born in London. His innovative mastery of suspense made him one of the most popular and influential filmmakers of the 20th century. In 1925, he directed his first movie, "The Pleasure Garden," a silent film. • On Aug. 11, 1934, a group of federal prisoners classified as "most dangerous" arrives at Alcatraz Island, a 22-acre rocky outcrop situated 1 1/2 miles offshore in San Francisco Bay. The convicts were the first civilian prisoners to be housed in the new high-security penitentiary. • On Aug. 16, 1948, baseball legend George Herman "Babe" Ruth dies in New York City. For two days following, his body lay in state at the main entrance to Yankee Stadium, and tens of thousands of people stood in line to pay their respects. • On Aug. 15, 1969, the Woodstock music festival opens

Wednesday, August 12 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Wednesday, August 19 Spencer Valley School Returns

Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm

Women’s Club Holds A Yard Sale

Tuesday, August 11 Julian Schools Return*

Tuesday August 18 Julian High School - Back to School Night

Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212

Back Country Happenings

August

Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212

Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4:00pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00pm

and

Thursday, August 20 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm Monday, September 25 Native American Day Wednesday, August 26 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

August 12, 2020

on Max Yasgur's 600-acre farm in upstate New York, with folk singer and guitarist Richie Havens kicking off the event. Approximately 400,000 people attended, most of whom did not pay for the $24 tickets. • On Aug. 14, 1971, St. Louis Cardinals ace Bob Gibson throws his first career no-hitter in an 11-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1964 Gibson won his first World Series Most Valuable Player Award. • On Aug. 10, 1984, the action thriller "Red Dawn" opens in theaters as the first movie with a PG-13 rating. The Motion Picture Association of America created the PG-13 category to indicate film content with a "higher level of intensity" than PG. • On Aug. 12, 1990, fossil hunter Susan Hendrickson discovers three huge bones jutting out of a cliff near Faith, South Dakota, part of the largest Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found. The 65 million-year-old specimen dubbed Sue, after its discoverer, is 42 feet long with a 2,000-pound skull and 58 teeth. © 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

ACTIVITIES & LODGING The Julian Women’s Club held a yard sale at their cottage on Saturday, cleaning out the members closets and passing along bargins.

Hair Cuts For Patways

ESTABLISHED 1987

Proudly serving visitors for over 30 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents!

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

www.butterfieldbandb.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Wednesday, August 26 Back To School Night at Spencer Valley School Thursday, August 27 Julian Elementary - Back to School Night

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

September

Thursday, September 3 Julian Junior High - Back to School Night Monday, September 7 Labor Day Holiday Wednesday, September 9 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, September 10 Julian High School Board Meeting (2nd Thursday – Unaudited Actuals) - 6pm Wednesday, September 23 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

October

Friday, October 2 JHS - Homecoming* Wednesday, October 14 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, October 28 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Saturday, October 31 Halloween

November

Sunday, November 1 Daylight Saving Ends - 2am Wednesday, November 11 Veterans Day

The hair was flying off heads all day Saturday at Julian Pathways Op Shop as Rene the stylist donated proceeds from the day, raising over $250.

Combatting Cybersecurity Threats Of The COVID-19 Era (StatePoint) New data reveals that in uncertain times, consumers and businesses need even greater vigilance when it comes to their cybersecurity. The mid-year update to the 2020 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report highlights an opportunistic use of the COVID-19 pandemic by cybercriminals. “Cybercriminals can be resourceful, often setting traps to take advantage of people’s kindness and panic in uncertain times, as well as their trust in everyday systems,” says Bill Conner, SonicWall president and CEO. “With everyone more remote and mobile than ever before, the cybercriminal industry is very aware that businesses are highly exposed.” Shifting Threats During the first half of 2020, global malware attacks fell from 4.8 billion to 3.2 billion over 2019’s mid-year total, a continuation of a downward trend. However, less malware doesn’t necessarily mean a safer world; ransomware has seen a corresponding jump over the same time period and continues to be the preferred tool for cybercriminals. Increasing a staggering 20% globally in the first half of 2020, SonicWall logged 79.9 million ransomware attacks (+109%) in the U.S., a trend that continues to ebb and flow based on the behaviors of agile cybercriminal networks. COVID-19 Email Scams The global pandemic plus social-engineered cyberattacks has proven to be an effective mix for cybercriminals utilizing phishing and other email scams. Dating as far back as Feb. 4, SonicWall researchers detected a flurry of increased attacks, scams and exploits specifically based around COVID-19. This contrasts with phishing as a whole, which was down slightly by the time pandemic phishing attempts began picking up steam. Office Lures a Staple Microsoft Office is a necessity for millions working remotely. Cybercriminals were quick to leverage this shift. Leveraging SonicWall Capture Advanced Threat Protection with patent-pending Real-Time Deep Memory Inspection technology, SonicWall discovered that 22% of Microsoft Office files and 11% of PDF files made up about one-third of all newly identified malware in 2020. The technology identified a record 120,910 ‘never-before-seen’ malware variants during that time -- a 63% increase over the first six months of 2019. “Cybercriminals are too sophisticated to use known malware variants, so they’re re-imagining malware to defeat security controls, and it’s working,” said Conner. Non-Standard Ports By sending malware across non-standard ports, assailants can bypass traditional firewall technologies, ensuring increased success for payloads. A ‘non-standard’ port is leveraged by services running on a port other than its default assignment. An average of 23% of attacks took place over non-standard ports -- the highest mark since SonicWall began tracking the vector in 2018. IoT Serves Threats Remote workforces can introduce many new risks, including Internet of Things (IoT) devices like refrigerators, baby cameras and doorbells. A 50% increase in IoT malware attacks mirrors the continued on page 8

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

Back-to-School Season Essentials For College Students

With some preparation and the right tools, college students can look forward to a successful school year ahead. (StatePoint) The back-to-school season may look and feel different this year, but there are some essentials which can aid college students no matter how and where their learning takes place in the fall. • Caffeine fix: Late to bed, early to rise -- most college students rely on coffee to fuel this grueling schedule. Seek out an easy to use, low-maintenance coffee maker that doesn’t require a ton of space. When paired with an insulated to-go cup, quick caffeine fixes can help students not only when they’re burning the midnight oil or getting out of bed, but also when they’re heading out the door. • Musical tools: Studies suggest that learning to play music has the power to foster the personal growth needed for achieving selffulfillment later in adulthood, making a Casio keyboard one great addition to any students’ dorm room or bedroom. Portable and compact, they offer a range of features for musicians to learn, practice, record and perform. • Lighten the load: With so many electronic versions of textbooks available these days, an e-reader can be a useful tool for students looking to lighten their load, as well as organize all their reading material in one place. Not only that, e-versions of books tend to be less expensive than their traditional counterparts, which can over time, represent significant cost-savings. • Wearable tech: With multiple alarms that can help students keep track of class schedules, a Casio Pro Trek Watch is not only helpful on-campus or when learning remotely, but is also a great outdoor companion. With GPS, location memory, water resistance and triple sensor technology, those looking to get outdoors after sitting in front of a computer for hours on end will find its features useful on the trail or lake.


August 12, 2020

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

Theater in Julian

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Of Squirrels, Coyotes and Chickens Don’t die in a chicken pen if you’re a ground squirrel. In fact, it’s probably best not to die in a chicken pen if you’re a human either, because our dear, fluffy, clucky hens are carnivores. The egg-stealing ground squirrels can’t resist a trail of chicken scratch leading into a Have a Heart trap. Have-a-Hear HAH! We’re heartless and so is the sun. By the time afternoon egg gathering comes around, any trapped ground squirrels (we’re up to 37) are sunned into permanent sleep. In other words, dead. Then all that needs to be done (as opposed to using a lot of water to drown them should they still be alive) is haul them up to the Coyote Snack Bar. This is usually done the next morning when there is more energy in the old human bod and less heat in the summer air which further slows the old human bod. So the routine goes….at least it was the routine until the hens discovered that ground squirrels are good to eat. Now any part the is within pecking range of the outside of the cage is pecked into oblivion and we are left to deliver partial-ground squirrels to the coyotes. Yuck. Yuck, we say, but the coyotes go further. They are outraged and yesterday presented us with a petition. Some coyote wannabe lawyer must of have composed it because, in quite high flown language, the coyotes objected to the hens’ eating THEIR coyote snacks. There were three of them, large coyotes, who sat in a row in front of this lone human as the petition was read. “Look,” we said when the lawyer coyote finished, removed his reading glasses and glared at us, “one obvious solution is not to trap any ground squirrels at all. Then you can’t fight over the remains.” The coyotes looked at each other in dismay. The one in the middle spoke. “We appreciate what you do for us but if we don’t get the whole ground squirrels well, we like to eat hens, too…” The threat wasn’t exactly subtle but we held our ground. “How about eating each other after I shoot you?” we said, looking at our fingernails then pulling the thumb back, as if cocking a pistol. We don’t have a pistol but the coyotes don’t know that. The discussion went back and forth, quite amicably, mainly to allow the coyotes to save face. Saving face is very important to coyotes, but we had reached the end of the conversation. We will continue to trap ground squirrels. If the hens can reach them….well, the coyotes still get the rest. Just don’t die in a chicken pen.

How Internet From Space Brings Faster Internet To Rural Areas

(NAPSI)—For many in the American countryside, signals from space have been most welcome for some time. That’s because, in many places, that’s the best way to get Internet service: via satellite. Then and Now While early systems may have been only a little better than dial-up, enormous improvements in high-capacity satellites mean they can deliver faster speeds and more data at a more affordable price. How It Works Satellite Internet doesn’t rely on terrestrial connections. That’s why it can keep people connected every day and even during disasters when other systems may be down. Instead, the Internet signal is delivered to a connection, which then sends the signal via radio waves up to the satellite over 20,000 miles in the sky. The signal comes back down to your home or office and is captured by a dishshaped antenna, outside your home, which is connected to the Wi-Fi modem. The Benefits • Closing the digital gap: Even though the technology is complex, Viasat’s goal is simple: to make high-speed internet accessible just about anywhere, even the most hard to reach places. Many people are seeking the joys of rural living, but remote communities may not have the infrastructure needed to access traditional Internet service at home. Viasat is available where traditional internet service providers don’t go.  • Keeping people connected: This is more important than ever these days with so many working and attending school from home, accessing telemedicine, watching videos, playing games continued on page 8

The Julian Theater Company is alive and well, I’m happy to say. When I moved to Julian my mother asked me if the Pine Hills Lodge still had live theater performances. I don’t know if they did in 1984, however in the years after that I was able to go to many live plays and I enjoyed every one of them. The actors were talented experienced amateurs who worked for no wages. My daughter was a character in OLIVER! and my son Robert played a Russian soldier in Fiddler on the Roof. I helped make costumes for OLIVER! So the theater became a family project for us and other families who just couldn’t help getting involved. Once Dave Goodman sold the Pine Hills Lodge with its theater and its cottages, things changed. The new owners took away the desserts that went with the barbecue dinner theater and then they took away seconds on dinner, finally taking away dinner all together and closing down the theater. That was such a huge loss to the entire community of Julian. Without the weekly dinner theater at Pine Hills lodge Debra and Scott Kinney did their best to keep live stage plays going in Julian. They also brought movies to the little theater in Julian High School. They moved A Christmas Carol from Pine Hills Lodge to The Julian Town Hall with their son Ian being an integral part of the production until the year he was killed by a drunk driver in a traffic accident. They lost heart for a few years and finally were able to bring themselves back together. One year they brought back A Christmas Carol and then they have brought us more stage plays that have been very entertaining. Friday evening Scott and Debbie presented all of us with a ZOOM selection of local singers, 15 in all who sang tunes from Broadway plays. You can still see these selections on their Facebook page Julian Theater Company and you can see information for upcoming events when they are scheduled. What’s great about The Julian Theater Company is that they use local talent for their plays whenever possible. Experience isn’t necessary. However, stage fright isn’t a good thing at all. My granddaughter was in A Christmas Carol last winter and before that in October, she worked behind the curtain while her brothers were on stage for the annual Triangle Club’s Melodrama and Olio. My grandchildren were eight, nine and ten at that time, so you can see that when putting plays together, local producers are open minded about age categories. It didn’t take place this past spring, however, every other spring for many years Spencer Valley Elementary School in Wynola has put on a Shakespearean play. Spenser Valley School is an elementary school for grades from kindergarten through eighth grade. Every student has a part in the play. Originally local author Don Winslow suggested having the students perform the play. He was told that children couldn’t perform Shakespeare. He told those adults to do him a favor and not mention it to the children until they were done. The children performed remarkably well and they have been performing a different Shakespeare play every year for many years and I love watching their enthusiasm. It also amazes me how some of the young students can memorize long speeches. Shakespeare was big on long speeches. Teachers at Julian Elementary have taught students to perform plays some years and high school students perform plays each year too. Theater is a good way to teach people, young and old people how to perform teamwork. Theater can be a way for people of all ages to learn what it’s like to be older or younger, much older or much younger. They can watch how people of all ages move and talk. This gives us all a perspective on others that we may never have had a chance to have had otherwise. Working with others is important for so many reasons. Now, during our current lockdown it’s good to know that we have people who we can call or chat with on our computers. When I was in high school, I was an almost tom boy. I had lots of friends who were boys who I would pal around with. They asked me to help them work on their cars and trucks and I guess I was like a little sister to them. We worked as teams. I still keep in touch with some of them and I’m glad that I have a few friends that go back to the 1960s. Theater does that for people too. Sharing in a performance makes you feel like a family for a while. Some people keep that feeling and don’t experience loneliness as bad as others might. This is a good time to think about people that you have enjoyed having in your life. Give them a telephone call and tell them so. These are my thoughts.

The Julian News 5

Ruth Rabenberg

October 26, 1924 - July 30, 2020

Ruth Rabenberg, 95, formally of Julian CA, passed away peacefully on July 30, 2020 in Poway, CA. She was the second of six children born to the late Russell and Clara Harwood on October 26, 1924 in Minnesota. Ruth received her BA from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN and started her 38 year career in education as an English teacher. Ruth then earned her Master’s Degree in Education at the University of Southern California and was a high school counselor and vice principal in Cerritos, CA for most of her career. Ruth moved to California in 1948 to marry Berle Rabenberg, and they lived together in Los Angeles County for 36 years before moving to Julian. Ruth was predeceased by her loving husband of 53 years in 2001. Ruth is survived by her three daughters, Jill Allen, of Huntington Beach; Jan Dyer, of Julian; and Jordis Abbott, of San Diego. She is also survived by her brother, Charles Harwood, her sister, Mary Newman and five grandchildren. Prior to moving to Poway in 2018, Ruth was involved in many Julian community organizations, notably the Julian Women’s Club and Friends of the Julian Library. Ruth was an avid bridge player and played with her friends from Julian and Ramona until shortly before her passing. Ruth cherished her family and her many good friends in this community, leaving behind nothing but good memories. The family will scatter her ashes in a private ceremony. Anyone wishing to pass on Ruth’s love of literature may make a donation to the Friends of the Julian Library.

Lynda “Colleen” Marcy June 20, 1938 - July 22, 2020

*** Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out. — Carl Sagan ***

On Wednesday, July 22, 2020, Lynda “Colleen” Marcy, loving mother and grandmother, passed away at the age of 82, at her daughter’s home in Mesa Grande. Colleen was born on June 20, 1938. She was a 3rd generation Marcy in Wynola. She was the oldest of four children born to Edward Albin (Joe) and Alberta (Betty) Marcy of Wynola. Her siblings are Edward Alvin Marcy (Sharyon) of Evergreen, Colorado, Donna Duggan (Patrick) of Arizona, and Laura Lee Aquino (Faustino) of Julian. Like her father and her uncle, Colleen attended Spencer Valley and graduated from Julian High School. Her three younger siblings followed the same academic path. Colleen was raised and lived most of her life in the Julian area. She cherished her teddy bear collection and time with her family. Colleen was preceded in death by her son, Joe Michel. She is survived by her four children, Theresa Waggoner of Julian, Joanie Napier (Kevin) of Spring Valley, Tina Martin (Andrew) of Mesa Grande, and Andy Michel (Cynthia) of Oregon. Colleen had 10 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. She will be laid to rest in the Julian Cemetery near her parents and next to her son. Due to COVID-19, a celebration of life will take place in 2021. For more information, please contact her granddaughter, Donna, at 760-520-3850.


6 The Julian News

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August 12, 2020

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Chef’s Corner We All Scream For Ice Cream

We know that Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice flavored with honey and nectar. Biblical references also show that King Solomon was fond of iced

*** All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value. — Carl Sagan *** 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the birthstone traditionally associated with the month of July? 2. MOVIES: What was the name of the artificial intelligence system in “The Terminator” movie series? 3. CHEMISTRY: Which element has the chemical symbol Pt? 4. HISTORY: Which two boxers were matched in 1974’s “The Rumble in the Jungle” contest in Zaire? 5. ANATOMY: What is the common name for the hallux? 6. AD SLOGANS: Which product is featured in the advertising slogan “Obey your thirst”? 7. GEOGRAPHY: Which four U.S. states start with the letter “I”? 8. TELEVISION: What city was the setting for the 1990s sitcom “Home Improvement”? 9. MUSIC: Which female singer had a No. 1 hit in the 1970s with the song “You’re No Good”? 10. MEASUREMENTS: How many tablespoons are in 1/4 cup? Answers on page 11

It’s hot, and like many of you, one of my favorite ways to cool off is with a bowl of ice cream. Vanilla ice cream continues to be America’s flavor of choice. Ice cream’s origins are known to reach back as far as the second century B.C., although no specific date of origin or inventor has been indisputably credited with its discovery.

drinks during harvesting. During the Roman Empire, Emperor Nero (A.D. 54-86) frequently sent runners into the mountains for snow, which was then flavored with fruits and juices. More than a thousand years later, Marco Polo returned to Italy from the Far East with a recipe that closely resembled what is now called sherbet. Historians estimate that this recipe evolved into ice

cream sometime in the 16th century. England seems to have discovered ice cream at the same time, or perhaps even earlier, than the Italians. “Cream Ice,” as it was called, appeared regularly at the table of Charles I during the 17th century. It wasn’t until 1660 that ice cream was made available to the general public. The Sicilian Procopio introduced a recipe blending milk, cream, butter and eggs at Le Procope, the first and oldest cafe in Paris. The first official account of ice cream in the New World comes from a letter written in 1744 by a guest of Maryland Governor William Bladen. Records kept by a Chatham Street, New York, merchant show that President George Washington spent approximately $200 for ice cream during the summer of 1790. President Thomas Jefferson’s slave chef, James Hemings, is said to have a favorite 18-step recipe for an ice-cream delicacy that resembled a modern-day Baked Alaska. Around 1800, insulated ice houses were invented. Manufacturing ice cream soon continued on page 11


August 12, 2020

The Julian News 7

Miss Liberty This large figure is made of molded zinc, then painted to resemble the carved wooden figures used in the 19th century. It is the Goddess of Liberty, a familiar patriotic figure of the day. She was estimated at $15,000 to $20,000, but despite some damage and missing paint, sold for $25,200. Patriotic symbols like the Statue of Liberty, the American flag, the bald eagle and Uncle Sam are easily recognized today, but our first symbol, Miss Liberty, is almost forgotten. Before the Revolutionary War, the word "liberty" was the battle cry. Perhaps because a female figure was used to represent liberty in ancient Greece and an

Indian Princess for the colonies, the early representation for America's symbol was a woman. The figure was known as

Columbia, Goddess of Liberty, Liberty or Miss Liberty. She usually held a sword, wreath, shield decorated with stars and stripes, and wore the Phrygian liberty cap. By 1875, cast zinc figures of Lady Liberty were being made in New York by the William Demuth Company. Demuth was an artist who made many statues for use as lawn decorations, ships' decorations and decorations for buildings and parks. He later made figures for cigar stores and beer parlors that were a little less than 4 feet and sometimes as tall as 6-1/2 feet. Once the Statue of Liberty was in place in 1886, the Goddess of Liberty was almost entirely forgotten. She appeared again in posters and folk art during World War I. A large zinc Goddess of Liberty was auctioned at Garth's in Delaware, Ohio, for $25,200. *** Q: I was cleaning a field behind my house and found a lot of very

old barbed wire. I just want to find out when it was made and who made it. I'm probably going to keep it for decor. A: The first barbed wire was invented by Lucien B. Smith of Kent, Ohio, in 1867. Several patents for improving wire fencing were issued in the next few years. In 1874, Joseph F. Glidden of DeKalb, Illinois, was granted a patent for a doublestrand wire fence with wire barbs. Barbed wire began to be mass produced. Farmers and ranchers also made their own barbed wire. More than 2,000 variations of barbed wire have been made. Collectors want 18-inch samples. A collection of samples of approximately 125 different varieties of antique barbed wire sold at auction recently for $960. There are books, museums and websites that help identify and date barbed wire. The Antique Barbed Wire Society (www. antiquebarbedwiresociety.com) has a magazine for collectors.

*** TIP: It isn't always smart to remove engraving from silver. A coat of arms or quality engraving can add to the value of antique pieces. We never remove engraving. If anyone asks, we always say the initial belonged to a distant cousin. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. The annual award presented to the most outstanding wide receiver in NCAA Division I football is named after what Pro Football Hall of Famer?

2. What former major-leaguer, who retired from playing in 2001, is paid an annual salary of $1,193,248.20 from the New York Mets through the year 2035? 3. “We’re talking about practice! We ain’t talking about the game! We’re talking about practice, man!” is a 2002 press conference quote from what four-time NBA scoring champion? 4. What 1990 sports drama film starred Tom Cruise as NASCAR driver Cole Trickle? 5. The Kansas City Chiefs retired jersey No. 3 in honor of what placekicker? 6. How did former North Carolina Tar Heels basketball star Joel Berry II break his hand just before the start of the 201718 season? 7. Hughie Jennings holds the Major League Baseball career record for most times hit by a pitch with how many? Answers on page 11


August 12, 2020

8 The Julian News

Our next virtual star party is on August 15th at 9:00PM, hosted by Doug Sollosy and Vivek Vijayakumar. on the Curiosity Peak YouTube channel. We will be exploring the Milky Way again, but with a smaller more widefield telescope to look at larger nebulae and complexes. Additionally, since the Perseid meteor shower will peak on August 12-13, close to the new moon, we will discuss meteors and try to view some with an allsky camera. We're also planning other virtual star parties separate from the regular new moon star parties. On September 12th, we'll be looking at the effects of light pollution by comparing views of galaxies and nebula from the dark skies of Julian and a light polluted suburb in San Marcos. We will discuss the impacts light pollution has on astronomy, the environment, and our health. Any addiitonal ideas for this star party would be greatly appreciated. On

October 1st, we're planning a star party examining the spectra of bright stars and nebulae. Please check out and join our new Facebook group: Official Julian Dark Sky Network. it will be a reliable source of information about our activities, as well as what's up in the night sky and breakthroughs in astronomy and space exploration!

Nighttime Photogreaphy continued from page 1

requires completely different settings since it is typically so much brighter than stars. Your camera’s auto focus and Auto mode may even work fine. You can use fast shutter speeds of 1/1,000th of a second or faster and ISO at 400. Just remember that the moon moves very quickly so if you are set on a tripod, you will be moving the camera every few shots to keep the moon in the viewfinder. Oh, and you will want to use a much narrower lens; 100mm, 300mm or even narrower. A word on some practical things as you brave the cold night. Be aware of your surrounds, especially since you will be in dark places. Snakes, spiders, skunks do not appreciate being

For more examples of night sky photographs in and around Julian please visit my photo site: www.kevinwixomphotography.smugmug.com Facebook: Kevin Wixom Photography Instagram: @kevinwixomphotography

...project this week and next week too.

My family is working on a 4-H online...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Internet From Space continued from page 5

Enjoying a rural lifestyle no longer has to mean you have to give up the kind of Internet connectivity urban dwellers have, thanks to today’s outof-this-world satellite systems. and connecting remotely with family and friends. You can use Viasat Internet to email, chat, collaborate on documents, pay bills, do research, and much more. • Continuous improvements: More satellites are under construction, Viasat will add even more capacity throughout the U.S. in the next few years. That means faster speeds and the ability to handle more and more data from applications such as video streaming. • Availability: In many places where cable and fiber don’t go, satellite is there. For example, Viasat reaching some of the most remote parts of the country. Learn More For further facts about the only satellite ISP to make U.S. News & World Report’s Best ISP of 2020, visit viasat.com/internet.

Combatting Cybersecurity Threats continued from page 4

1

number of additional devices connected online, as individuals and enterprise alike function from home. Unchecked IoT devices can provide cybercriminals an open door into what may otherwise be a well-secured organization. As organizations mobilize for their new business normal, they 22:03 1/15/02 can adapt to new WV threats inB/W realtime by leveraging the services of security experts such as SonicWall. For more information, visit sonicwall.com. “This new business normal is no longer new,” says Conner. “As everything goes more remote, mobile and unsecure, organizations must move away from makeshift or traditional security strategies.”

WHAT A CHILD LEARNS ABOUT VIOLENCE A CHILD LEARNS FOR LIFE. Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or visit www.actagainstviolence.org.

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

Film at Horan Imaging 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127093

startled. Be courteous to other photographers nearby; no one wants your flashlight shining into their camera. Tripping over your tripod is easy to do in the dark (put some glow tape on the legs) and you’ll want a flashlight to find the stuff you drop or see what you just stepped on. Having a cell phone is a good idea; you can call for help, use it as a flashlight, access a compass or a number of good night sky applications to show you exactly where stars and planets are. Bring coffee, warm clothes and maybe even a chair to sit in. And remember to be nice to whoever is with you since they will probably want to go home before you do. Mostly, have fun! In subsequent articles we will cover more topics such as light painting, focusing techniques, post processing of images, noise reduction, stacking, and more.

I’d make cheese!

! Wow

Annimills LLC © 2020 V16-32

4-H Fun For Kids Everywhere!

What do you know about the world-famous 4-H organization? Do you know that about 7 million young people from more than 50 countries belong to the 4-H groups, clubs and programs? Members are 6 to 25 years old and have a range of backgrounds and beliefs. They think about their interests and then set out to complete their own hands-on projects: experiments, cooking, robotics, etc. 4-H members “learn by doing.” Right now, during a time when a lot of kids are staying closer to home, the 4-H has created a great online Home Activity Guide that offers families lots of ideas for learning, hands-on activities and experiments. Check out this FREE guide – and try out 11 some cool new stuff – by visiting https://4-H.org.

The 4-H:

1. has more than 6.5 ______ kids and young people as members in the U.S. and Canada. 2. encourages kids to get ______ and plan interesting projects. 3. teaches that we keep learning all our lives – and we can work to make the best even ______! 4. was started by a few people living in different areas; one was a superintendent of schools named A. B. Graham who began a club where kids could learn about ______ – the science of caring for animals and the land, and raising crops. 5. has a symbol that started as a 3-leaf ______ with an H on each leaf: head, heart, hands; later, the 4th leaf and “H” was added for health. 6. Head is for thinking and knowledge, the ______ is for spiritual strength, the Hands are for doing and Health is for “better living.” 7. members who live on farms may work with ______; enter competitions. 8. members in clubs near or in large ______ may work on areas such as: photography, cooking, neighborhood projects.

4-H Clubs

The 4-H started in rural areas, but now its members are everywhere! Often, clubs meet right after the school day is over. Find and circle some exciting projects that kids can choose to do: A B Y L H O G U D A I R Y B

M B E D C N E C J K W J G N

P B T J A U O V N X V S S T

bicycle clowning dairy horses

DOLEV

H G A H K A S J Z R I M C L

I B I A N W B J H C E N E R G L Q K H C E B J U O F A C E J P A T I A O J W E V V G N B R B Q U T P D E O G A A L L E N R A P B O C A K E D geospatial photography small engine computers

*127093*

S B Y O E R L Q N E M G O E

A N D Y D K C E L M P U Z P H R X S S N G Y E F D V S N F B E D E I N E K I N C O R energy robotics theater small pet

G B G B One of the goals of the G B 4-H clubs and their online activities is to help members G B have hands-on experiences G B – so they can go ahead and G G “try it themselves.” G G Follow the color key to G G fill in the squares to read G G what the 4-H believes in: G G G = Green B = Brown G G

Try It Yourself!

Kids: color stuff in!

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Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2020

Virtual Star Party This Saturday Night


August 12, 2020

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

AG Becerra Can’t Be Trusted When Naming Props

by Jon Coupal

Last week, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association filed a lawsuit against California Attorney General Xavier Becerra for his abject failure to produce impartial ballot material related to Proposition 15, the “split roll” attack that seeks the partial repeal of Proposition 13. What Proposition 15 does can be described simply: It raises property taxes on commercial and industrial real estate. And yet, how does Becerra describe it in the ballot title? Like this: “Increases funding sources for public schools, community colleges, and local governments by changing assessment of commercial and industrial property.” What is missing, of course, are the words “tax increase” or “increases property taxes” or any other word or phrase that fairly characterizes what the measure does. Even the description of how the money will be spent is misleading. In fact, most of the money goes to local governments, not education. But, of course, “education” polls better than “local governments” so Becerra, in his never-ending quest to serve the interests of public-sector labor groups, dutifully gave them the title they wanted for their effort to pass a huge tax increase. Past criticism of Becerra’s bias has been vocal but there has been little recourse. In 2018, taxpayers won a case in the trial court over the description of the gas tax repeal, only to have that victory reversed by the appeals court. However, things may be different now because Becerra’s irresponsible behavior has even caught the attention of mainstream media. Within the last few weeks, editorial boards and columnists have lambasted Becerra. John Diaz of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote, “The ballot title on Prop. 15 begins by stating that it ‘increases funding sources for public schools, community colleges and local government services.’ It would do so, it states, by ‘changing tax assessment’—not raising taxes—on commercial and industrial property.” That column was headlined, “California attorney general loads language on 2 November measures.” The editorial boards of this

news organization, the Southern California News Group and the Bay Area News Group, wrote, “The title and summary of Proposition 15 are not only tilted toward one side, they are less than fully accurate. Property in California is not taxed on ‘purchase price.’ It’s taxed on fair market value at the time of purchase, adjusted annually for inflation with increases capped at 2 percent per year…It’s also misleading, if not completely false, to state that Proposition 15 ‘increases funding sources.’ It doesn’t add new sources, it increases taxes on existing sources: businesses in California.” CalMatters columnist Dan Walters wrote, “Rather than simply describe Proposition 15 for what it does, Becerra’s official title summarizes it this way: ‘Increases funding for public schools, community colleges, and local government services by changing tax assessment of commercial and industrial property.’” The headline on that column accurately summarized the situation as, “Becerra slants two ballot measure titles.” controversy of Becerra’s wrongfully picking sides when he has the fiduciary responsibility to be neutral is nothing new. Becerra did the same thing with Proposition 6 in 2018, an initiative measure that sought to reverse the legislature’s imposition of the infamous gas tax hike, which gave California the highest gas tax in the nation. Becerra gave the repeal measure a title that omitted any mention of repealing the gas tax hike. California voters are entitled by law to “a true and impartial statement of the purpose of the measure in such language that the ballot title and summary shall neither be an argument, nor be likely to create prejudice, for or against the proposed measure.” Instead, Attorney General Becerra has bowed to the political power of special interests who seek to hide from the voters that the measure they have put on the ballot is the biggest property tax increase in California history. We’ve had enough. California taxpayers will see him in court. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

*** We've arranged a civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technology. — Carl Sagan ***

• There is symbolism in Disney's Cinderella mosaic. The company says that "guests can see that each of Cinderella's stepsisters appears with her own special facial tint. One sister displays a red tint to show that she is 'red with rage,' while the other sister displays a green tint to show that she is 'green with envy,' as they watch Cinderella try on the glass slipper to reveal a perfect fit." • Eating more candy in one sitting causes fewer cavities than spacing it out through the day. • "The Hound of Heaven" poet Francis Thompson is listed as a Jack the Ripper suspect. Although there is no physical evidence to back up this bizarre claim, independent researchers say the imagery in Thompson's poetry, plus his background as a medical student, are valid grounds for suspicion! • Sorry, but that cream filling in Twinkies isn't cream at all -- it's vegetable shortening. • Due to heat expansion of its iron, the Eiffel Tower can "grow" by up to 6 inches in the summertime. • Need one more reason to hate Mondays? Scientists have found that even if you maintain a steady weight, you'll weigh the most on that day of the week. • Only a quarter of the Sahara Desert is sandy. • High heels came into circulation in roughly 10 B.C. They were worn by men of the Persian Cavalry not as a fashion statement, but to help their boots stay in their stirrups while riding horses. • In the 18th century, King George I of England declared pigeon poop to be the property of the Crown because it could be used to make gunpowder. *** Thought for the Day: "I slept and I dreamed that life is all joy. I woke and I saw that life is all service. I served and I saw that service is joy." -- Kahlil Gibran ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces. — Carl Sagan ***

® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Intuition will tell the thinking mind where to look next. — Jonas Salk ***


August 12, 2020

10 The Julian News

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

CONTRACTORS

• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G •

Water Treatment Services

GOT WATER PROBLEMS?

Excavation / Site Work

Carpet / Flooring / Window Treatment

General Contractor

LARRY NOBLE CONSTRUCTION INC. General Contractor

New Construction Room Additions Decks Remodels

Over 35 Years Experience Lawrence Noble, Owner Julian Resident for 27 years State Lic.602654

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760 • 765 • 2363 PO Box 1342 JULIAN, CA 92036

Heating / Air Conditioning Service

Julian Mini Storage

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Home and Business Electrical Service

SALES • SERVICE

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License No. 415453

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• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G • at dinner time while I am just • FISHING REPORT • ® Dear EarthTalk: Is it true that being around a waterfall makes you feel good? – S.B., Lewiston, ME The notion of waterfalls making you happy is often viewed as an “old wives’ tale,” but there may be some truth to it given the socalled “negative ions” pervasive in such environments. The collision of water molecules with each other causes water to be positively charged and surrounding air to be negatively charged. According to Pierce Howard, Ph.D., author of The Owner's Manual for the Brain: Everyday Applications from Mind-Brain Research, it makes sense that waterfalls can make you feel good, given that negative ions hitting our bloodstream can produce biochemical reactions linked to alleviating depression, relieving stress and boosting energy.

Being around waterfalls — like this 88-foot doozy along the North Fork of the Nooksack River in Washington State — could help us with a little mental uplift courtesy of the "negative ions" floating around crashing water molecules. Credit: Roddy Scheer. “High concentrations of negative ions are essential for high energy and positive mood,” he reports. “Negative ions suppress serotonin levels in much the same way that natural sunlight suppresses melatonin. Hence the invigorating effect of fresh air and sunshine and the correspondingly depressed feelings associated with being closed in and dark.” “The atmosphere we breathe normally is full of positive and negative ions,” he adds. “Air-conditioning, lack of ventilation, and long dry spells remove negative ions...the best ratios of negative to positive ions are associated with waterfalls and the time before, during and after storms,” says Howard. “The worst are found in windowless rooms and closed, moving vehicles.” Our love of waterfalls only underscores that people thrive when they are exposed to nature on a regular basis. A 2013 study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology definitively linked exposure to nature directly with improved mental health, comparing the mental health of those who moved from city landscapes to greener, more natural settings with those who relocated in the reverse direction. Researchers found that those who relocated to settings with a higher exposure to nature were noticeably happier during the three-year study period. “[E]nvironmental policies to increase urban green space may have sustainable public health benefits," they concluded. In another recent study, researchers sampled the effects of nature on 537 University of Rochester students in both real and imagined situations, and found that individuals who spent time outdoors—or even just imagined themselves in nature—consistently experienced higher energy levels and increased feelings of happiness. Study participants who spent just 20 minutes outdoors a day experienced significant increases in energy levels as well as noticeable mood boosts. Even indoor plants played a role in helping study participants feel more energized. Another way to look at it would be to consider our sedentary, indoor lifestyle as a drain on our energy reserves and taxing to our mood and general sense of well-being. In the landmark 2005 book Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv coined the term “nature deficit disorder” to explain how our lack of time outdoors has led to behavioral problems in kids and adults alike. Louv’s prescription? Spend more time outdoors (away from screens) interacting with nature and each other. In case you needed another reason to get off the couch and out into the woods on a waterfall hike, now you have it. You’ll be sharper. You’ll be more productive. You’ll be invigorated. And you’ll be happier. CONTACTS: The Owner's Manual for the Brain, amzn.to/3gAlLTm; Last Child in the Woods, amzn.to/3kcRb4b; “Green spaces deliver lasting mental health benefits,” medicalxpress.com/news/2014-01-green-spaces-mentalhealth-benefits.html. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https://earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

Howdy From Lake Cuyamaca

“Dusty Britches” here along with “Mrs. Britches”, “Dirty Britches”, “Wet Britches” and “Saggy” Britches. We are looking at warmer days ahead after a cooling trend. The moon is waning and can still be seen in the early morning sky. Our fishing has slowed down considerably… only pan fish are coming out now during this warmer part of the year. It seems to be a more protective time of the year as the ducks and their ducklings along with the geese and their goslings are staying very close together. I spied a kestrel working the open areas along the north shore just east of Lone Pine. The “American Kestrel” is the smallest and most abundant in the Falcon family. It’s size ranges from that of a blue jay to that of a mourning dove. They are very light with a small weight range measured in grams and a high metabolism. Because of their activity they have to eat frequently during the course of a day to keep their energy up. I thought I saw Abbot and Costello doing their “who’s on first, what’s on second” while listening to an older couple talking while having lunch on the deck of the restaurant. He couldn’t hear, and she didn’t listen. Human nature is sometimes funnier than a slapstick routine with Buster Keaton. Another tickler was down by the boat launch in the evening watching the local raccoons frolic in the cool water of the lake. It doesn’t happen too frequently, but when it does, it’s a 3 ring circus. I wanted to let folks know that we don’t have annual fishing permits here, but we do sell annual access permits. It’s normally $10.00 per car per day to access the lake, but the annual access pass is only $25.00 per car for the entire year and it is good for an entire year from the date that you got it, so if you visit the lake 3 times during the course of an entire year you have saved money… more frequent visits compound the savings exponentially… averaging one visit a month means your visitor access is only $2.08 average cost per visit, and if you visit once a week it averages around 48 cents per visit for the entire year… and so on… you see what I mean. It’s the biggest bang for the buck in San Diego! Hiking, Pic-nic ing, Bar-B-Q, birding, and some fun animals and birds to watch… My Labrador has learned how to drool as of late… and he can do it at the drop of a hat… usually

slicing in to a piece of seasoned tri-tip from “Don’s Market”. Not a pretty sight. Then, putting him outside so I can eat in peace, he acts as though I beat him. So, cut a piece off the tri tip and give it to him because I feel sorry… guess he won again, huh. Well “Happy Trails”. Lenny needs help, I’m off to unplug a toilet at “Chambers Park”… Best of luck to those casting their lines off the “Mission Belle”. “... good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: now this is the ideal life.” Mark Twain (Samuel Langhome Clemens) “tight lines and bent rods”… Dusty Britches

20+ years of Real Experience at your Service!

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*** It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It's my partner. — Jonas Salk ***

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New Rules For The Library


August 12, 2020

Happy 80th Birthday Parade

Chef’s Corner continued from page 6

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Joe Connolly got a surprise birthday parade on Sunday for his 80th!

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$30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

became an industry in America, pioneered in 1851 by a Baltimore milk dealer named Jacob Fussell. Due to ongoing technological advances, today’s frozen dairy production in the United States is more than 1.6 billion gallons annually. Wide availability of ice cream in the late 19th century led to new creations. In 1874, the American soda-fountain shop and the profession of the “soda jerk” emerged with the invention of the ice-cream soda. In response to religious criticism for eating “sinfully” rich ice-cream sodas on Sundays, ice-cream merchants left out the carbonated water and invented the ice-cream “Sunday” in the late 1890s. The name was eventually changed to “sundae” to remove any connection with the Sabbath. Today, ice-cream machines make it easy for home cooks to prepare their favorite flavor of this delicious, frozen dessert. Try this wonderful ice-cream recipe, and beat the heat with a frozen treat! FROZEN CUSTARD ICE CREAM Don’t let a favorite homemade ice cream using with raw eggs cramp your style with a possible food-borne illness. Substitute the traditional method with this cooked custard ice-cream recipe and variations from the American Egg Board. 6 eggs 2 cups milk 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 cups whipping cream 1 tablespoon vanilla 1. In medium saucepan, beat together eggs, milk, sugar and salt. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture is thick enough to coat a metal spoon with a thin film and reaches at least 160 F. Cool quickly by setting pan in ice or cold water and stirring for a few minutes. Cover and refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, at least one

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

The Julian News 11

hour. 2. When ready to freeze, pour chilled custard, whipping cream and vanilla into 1-gallon icecream freezer container. Freeze, according to manufacturer’s directions, until firm. Makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts. VARIATIONS Banana Nut: Reduce vanilla to 1 1/2 teaspoons. Cook and cool as above. Stir three large ripe bananas, mashed, and 1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans into custard mixture. Freeze as above. Chocolate: Add three squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate to egg mixture. Cook, cool and freeze as above. Strawberry: Omit vanilla. Cook and cool as above. Partially freeze. Add 2 cups sweetened, crushed fresh strawberries. Complete freezing. ***

Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning children’s author, culinary historian, and the author of seven cookbooks. Please join The Kitchen Diva in supporting Mattress Firms’ efforts to assist foster children through the Ticket to Dream Foundation, to make a positive impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of foster children in need. They understand that not everyone can be a foster parent, but anyone can help a foster child. http://www. tickettodream.org © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

*** The worst tragedy that could have befallen me was my success. I knew right away that I was through - cast out. — Jonas Salk ***

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In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

AA Meetings

Local business looking for experienced bookkeeper for periodic bookkeeping Please submit inquiries c/o Julian News PO Box 639, Julian, CA 92036 8/12 Local business looking for creative and engaging wordsmith" Please submit inquiries c/o Julian News PO Box 639, Julian, CA 92036 8/12 LAKE CUYAMACA is looking for a maintenance worker and a dockhand. If you are interested, please give us a call at (760)765-0515 or come by the bait and tackle shop and pick up an application. 8/19 T: 11.5 in

www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - Saturday 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 No (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Services Phone: 760-765-0114 This E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com Sunday PERSONAL SUPPORT

information: 760-765-2331

Tuesday - 7pm

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Men’s Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Thursday - 7pm T: 21 in

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

www.smallstep.gov

Saturday - 5pm

*** I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students. — Carl Sagan ***

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Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

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continued from page 7 Answers 1. Fred Biletnikoff. 2. Bobby Bonilla. 3. Allen Iverson. 4. “Days of Thunder.” 5. Jan Stenerud. 6. He punched a door after losing at a video game. 7. 287.

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1. Ruby 2. Skynet 3. Platinum 4. Muhammad Ali (winner) and George Foreman 5. Big toe 6. Sprite 7. Idaho, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa 8. Detroit 9. Linda Ronstadt 10. Four ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Volume 36 - Issue 02

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to August 1, 2015; 2015; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

PUBLIC NOTICE OPENING ON BOARD OF DIRECTORS Cuyamaca Water District - 15240 Highway 79, Julian CA 92036 This is to announce the vacancy that has occurred on the CUYAMACA WATER DISTRICT Board of Directors. Those persons wishing to serve on the Board may contact the District Office. Some qualifications necessary are: Applicants must own property within Cuyamaca Water District, be over 18 years of age and registered to vote. This is a non-paid, volunteer position. Application and/or additional information regarding this position can be obtained by contacting the District office at 760-315-1070 OR by emailing cwd@ cuyamacawaterdistrict.org. Our website is cuyamacawaterdistrict.org. Applications/Resumes should be received for submission to the Board by: August 20, 2020 Publish: August 12, 19, 2019 Legal: 08594

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9011733 ROAD KINGS ENGINEERING 8837 Cherry Rd., Lakeside, CA 92040 The business is conducted by An Individual - Steven Edward Whitlock, 8837 Cherry Rd., Lakeside, CA 92040. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 9, 2020. LEGAL: 08571 Publish: July 22, 29 and August 5, 12, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9011809 a) DE WITT LTD. b) DE WITT LTD 500 La Terraza Blvd., Suite 150, Escondido, CA 92025 The business is conducted by A Corporation - Jump Rails and More, Inc., 500 La Terraza Blvd., Suite 150, Escondido, CA 92025. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 13, 2020. LEGAL: 08573 Publish: July 22, 29 and August 5, 12, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9011570 SIMON PABLO DESIGN 13112 Tawny Way, Poway, CA 92064 The business is conducted by An Individual - Kelly Kinoshita, 13112 Tawny Way, Poway, CA 92064. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 7, 2020. LEGAL: 08574 Publish: July 22, 29 and August 5, 12, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00025589-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: KIMBERLY ARAGON FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: KIMBERLY ARAGON and on behalf of: ZACHARY TREVOR ARAGON, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ZACHARY TREVOR ARAGON, a minor TO: ZACHARY ANDREW ARAGON, a minor IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on SEPTEMBER 8, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON July 22, 2020.

Case Number: 37-2020-00024468-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: SUZANNE GRACE GLASNAPP FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: SUZANNE GRACE GLASNAPP HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: SUZANNE GRACE GLASNAPP TO: SUZANNE GRACE DEL FIORENTINO IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 23 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on SEPTEMBER 1, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON JuLY 13, 2020.

LEGAL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JONATHAN FRAIMAN FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JONATHAN FRAIMAN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JONATHAN FRAIMAN TO: JONATHAN PARNELL IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on SEPTEMBER 2, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON July 21, 2020. LEGAL: 08579 Publish: August 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9011691 SIERRA ROBLE WINERY & VINEYARD LLC 34810 Hwy 79, Warner Springs, CA 92086 (Mailing Address: PO Box 21, Warner Springs, CA 92086) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Sierra Roble Winery & Vineyard LLC, 34810 Hwy 79, Warner Springs, CA 92086. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 8, 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9012432 C W ENTERPRISES 2303 Nicklaus Drive, Oceanside, CA 92056 The business is conducted by An Individual - Charles A Griffin Jr., 2303 Nicklaus Drive, Oceanside, CA 92056. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 24, 2020.

LEGAL: 08576 Publish: July 29 and August 5, 12, 19, 2020

LEGAL: 08580 Publish: August 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00019614-CU-PT-CTL

PETITIONER: ANTHONY AARON SALCEDO and KADEE ELLEN SALCEDO HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) ANTHONY MICHAEL BECKER (a minor) b) ABIGAIL IRENE BECKER (a minor) TO: a) ANTHONY MICHAEL SALCEDO (a minor) b) ABIGAIL IRENE SALCEDO (a minor) IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on SEPTEMBER 14, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON July 23, 2020. LEGAL: 08577 Publish: July 29 and August 5, 12, 19, 2020

help resolve even long-standing problems. A shift in policy might catch you by surprise. Be alert to signs of change. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your kindness and compassion are exactly what are needed in dealing with an awkward situation in the early part of the week. Share the weekend fun with family. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Keeping your focus straight and true is a good way of getting your points across. Save any variations for a later time. The musical arts are important this weekend. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Reject advice to cut corners in reaching your goal. Better to take a little more time to do the job as you promised. You'll gain new respect for your honesty and integrity. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Don't allow a troublesome situation to grow so big that it will be increasingly difficult to deal with. The sooner you speak up, the sooner everyone will be able to benefit. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Confronting someone who is making a lot of mistakes could be the kindest thing you can do both for that person and for anyone who could be adversely affected by the errors. BORN THIS WEEK: You absolutely glow when you see beautiful things, and everyone around you is warmed by your light.

RECYCLING JUNK MAIL IS GOOD, STOPPING JUNK MAIL IS BETTER Learn how to unsubscribe from catalogs, credit card offers, phone books and coupons Recycling and Household Hazardous Waste Hotline and Redesigned Database

1-877-R-1-EARTH WasteFreeSD.org

© 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE

LEGAL: 08575 Publish: July 29, and August 2, 12, 19, 2020

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ANTHONY AARON SALCEDO and KADEE ELLEN SALCEDO FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don't gnash those pearly whites because you might have to delay your plans. This could give the Lucky Lamb a better perspective of what's been done, and what still needs doing. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Scoring financial bull'seyes is easy for the focused Bovine who knows the ins and outs of the marketplace. But even with your success record, caution is still the watchword. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Watch that tendency to overromanticize a situation that should be given closer scrutiny. Better to be suspicious now and ask for an explanation, rather than face a sad surprise later. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Bruised self-confidence can make things difficult unless you accept the fact that you have what it takes. Ignore the critics and concentrate on believing in yourself. Good luck. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Congratulations on what you've accomplished. But this is no time to curl up for some serious catnapping. Your rivals are probably already working on plans to overtake your lead. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your adventurous side wants to play a more dominant role this week, and you might want to oblige. Try to arrange for some getaway time with that special person. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Taking logical approaches to pesky workplace issues can

LEGAL: 08578 Publish: August 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020

Case Number: 37-2020-00025106-CU-PT-CTL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Wednesday - August 12, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00023070-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ABDUL KARIM MANSOUR FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ABDUL KARIM MANSOUR HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ABDUL KARIM MANSOUR TO: KARIM MANSOUR IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on AUGUST 20, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON July 6, 2020. LEGAL: 08581 Publish: July 29 and August 5, 12, 19, 2020

ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court's facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other non-signing parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. Julian News Publisherd: Until Further Notice

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9012904 STANDING AT THE DOOR 10584 Ponder Way, San Diego, CA 92126 (Mailing Address: PO Box 80055, San Diego, CA 92138) The business is conducted by An Individual Monty Brewer, 10584 Ponder Way, San Diego, CA 92126. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON August 1, 2020. LEGAL: 08582 Publish: August 12, 19, 26 and September 2, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9012278 OINK PIGMENTS 1494 Hedionda Ave., Vista, CA 92081 The business is conducted by A General Partnership - a) Alexa Jade Wilson, 1494 Hedionda Ave., Vista, CA 92081, b) Sarah Helena Bristow, 10585 Washington Blvd., Indianapolis, IN 46208, c) Julie Gillespie, 2029 Cerrissa Ct Unit D, San Diego, CA 92154. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON July 22, 2020. LEGAL: 08583 Publish: August 12, 19, 26 and September 2, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00027312-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JOANN BASUINO KELLY FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JOANN BASUINO KELLY HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JOANN BASUINO KELLY TO: JOANN MARIE BASUINO IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on SEPTEMBER 17, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON August 5, 2020. LEGAL: 08584 Publish: August 12, 19, 26 and September 2, 2020

How Does Telehealth Really Compare To In-Person Health Care? (BPT) - Following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, the adoption of telehealth services has been on the rise and people are turning to digital technology more than ever to address their personal health care needs without having to leave their homes. But while many have begun to embrace telehealth offerings as a new way to connect to care and address their personal health needs, myths surrounding what telehealth services are intended for and how they compare to in-office visits continue to prevail. To help determine how digital care can best meet health care needs during quarantine and beyond, here are the facts behind four common misconceptions about telehealth:

MYTH #1: Telehealth is only for basic or urgent care needs. FACT: Telehealth can often be the first stop for preventive, primary care and other health and wellness needs. Patients can connect with a doctor or nurse practitioner to receive care for a range of acute, preventive and chronic care needs, including illness and injury, mental health services, and management of conditions like asthma, diabetes and more. Whether patients live in a rural area or simply want an easier way to manage their health, telehealth can adapt to their needs. MYTH #2: There aren't any telehealth providers in the area. FACT: Many trusted local and national health care systems provide telehealth services across the nation. Today, more than half of providers in the United States offer some form of telehealth service, according to an April 22, 2020, Merritt Hawkins survey, "Physician Practice Patterns Changing as a Result of COVID-19." Additionally, recent government, health system and reimbursement policy changes have improved patient access to telehealth services and are encouraging use as a safe way to access care during the pandemic. In fact, locating telehealth providers is easier than ever before with platforms like Walgreens.com/FindCareServices, which helps patients access care when and how they need it. Patients can choose from more than 30 telehealth providers treating over 100 conditions, while searching from the comfort of their own home. Available through an app and online, the platform makes it easy to find and compare available providers by location, preference, insurance coverage, services and price. MYTH #3: Virtual care isn't as good as in-person care. FACT: Telehealth services can offer high-quality, convenient access to care. Much like face-to-face office visits, telehealth visits can facilitate a trusting, open dialogue with a doctor or nurse practitioner. Most providers have a web-based interface or mobile app, making it easy to log onto and use secure, quality video for consultations and to visually help communicate about injuries or conditions. Telehealth also reduces time spent in waiting rooms and commuting to appointments, putting more power in the hands of patients. It can be particularly valuable for enabling remote monitoring and regular check-ins for patients with chronic conditions. While telehealth can be a convenient alternative to in-person care, there are still instances where in-person appointments are recommended, such as in the case of a medical emergency. To consider the best option for care needs, check with a doctor. MYTH #4: Telehealth is too expensive. FACT: Telehealth and other services can help save money while expanding access to care. When looking for a telehealth provider, it can prove cost-effective to compare options based on pricing, insurance coverage, preferences and services provided. Look for telehealth options that list transparent pricing information to help guide the search. If a consultation requires a prescription, Walgreens also has 24/7 pharmacy chat capabilities through its app and Walgreens.com/ SaveOnRX with discounted pricing on a range of medications. Telehealth is more accessible than ever as more providers evolve and adapt technologies to meet patient needs at a safe distance. But even as social distancing constrictions lift, digital wellness offerings will present greater flexibility and convenience in meeting individual health care needs.

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Wednesday - August 12, 2020  

Wednesday - August 12, 2020  

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