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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

DATED MATERIAL

Face Covering Required Everywhere You Go How well do cloth face coverings work to prevent spread of COVID-19? There is limited evidence to suggest that use of cloth face coverings by the public during a pandemic could help reduce disease transmission. Their primary role is to reduce the release of infectious particles into the air when someone speaks, coughs, or sneezes, including someone who has COVID-19 but feels well. Cloth face coverings are not a substitute for physical distancing and washing hands and staying home when ill, but they may be helpful when combined with these primary interventions. What is a cloth face covering? A cloth face covering is a material that covers the nose and mouth. It can be secured to the head with ties or straps or simply wrapped around the lower face. It can be made of a variety of materials, such as cotton, silk, or linen. A cloth face covering may be factory-made or sewn by hand, or can be improvised from household items such as scarfs, T-shirts, sweatshirts, or towels. When should I wear a cloth face covering? You may choose to wear a cloth face covering when you must be in public for essential activities, such as shopping at the grocery store. Wearing a cloth face covering does not eliminate the need to physically distance yourself from others. How should I care for a cloth face covering? It’s a good idea to wash your cloth face covering frequently, ideally after each use, or at least daily. Have a bag or bin to keep cloth face coverings in until they can be laundered with detergent and hot water and dried on a hot cycle. If you must re-wear your cloth face covering before washing, wash your hands immediately after putting it back on and avoid touching your face. Discard cloth face coverings that: - No longer cover the nose and mouth - Have stretched out or damaged ties or straps - Cannot stay on the face - Have holes or tears in the fabric Our best community and individual defense against COVID 19 is washing our hands frequently, avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, avoiding being around sick people and physical distancing, especially by staying at home. A strong health care delivery system and emergency response system is also an essential core defense to save lives when people do get ill. There may be a benefit to reducing asymptomatic transmission and reinforcing physical distancing from the use of face coverings. However, face coverings may increase risk if users reduce their use of strong defenses, such as physical distancing and frequent hand washing, when using face coverings. San Diego County has chosen a policy promoting face coverings for their residents, they are not requiring increased demand on medical grade respirators, such as N95 and surgical masks. The County is emphasizing the use of face coverings in conjunction with evidencebased interventions such as staying at home, physical distancing when completing essential activities and washing hands. Individuals outside of counties with recommendations on face coverings, should wear coverings if they feel comfortable doing so, and practice strict hand washing before and after touching and adjusting the mask. They are reminded that face coverings are not a replacement for other evidence-based measures such as physical distancing, frequent hand washing practices, and remaining at home when not doing essential activities.

Women’s Club Keeps Cranking Out The Face Coverings

Julian Women’s Club memberf Carol Galley has sewn over 300 face coverings and they have been passed out to local residents and workers. The Women’s Clubhas produced over 1,000 masks. Some going to healthcare workers in nursing homes.

1870

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For the Community, by the Community.

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

Wednesday

May 6, 2020

Julian, CA.

Volume 35 — Issue 40

www.JulianNews.com

ISSN 1937-8416

3T’s = Test - Track - Treat

"Testing, Tracing, and Treatment: This effort is a cornerstone of our efforts to move forward—robust testing, tracing and treatment. This system must be in place—not only a “gate” to open in order to come out, but more importantly, as the way we daily track and ultimately defeat this virus. - Supervisor Nathan Fletcher The County’s Health and Human Services Agency will hire or retrain more than 500 staff to conduct COVID-19 testing and tracing as part of its efforts to fight the virus. The testing focus will be on at-risk populations, including residents in senior living facilities and low-income communities. “Our commitment at the County is to keep a sharp focus on the priority populations, the vulnerable and underserved people that (Wilma Wooten, M.D., County public health officer) has identified in her recent testing guidance,” said HHSA Director Nick Macchione. “This will require us to get a little more creative in taking the testing to the places where it is needed most.” In an effort to meet the region’s testing goals, the County will deploy several mobile testing sites to at-risk communities. In addition to the new Live Well Bus, the County Library’s bookmobiles and other County vehicles will also be used as mobile testing sites soon. New Testing and Tracing

County Assessor Reminds Business, Aircraft & Vessel Owners May 7th Is Business Personal Property Tax Filing Deadline State Filing Deadline Approaching -File Now to Avoid Penalties–Tax Payment Due in August SAN DIEGO San Diego County Assessor/ Recorder/County Clerk, Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr. is reminding all business, aircraft and vessel owners that Tuesday, May 7th is the State of California mandated deadline for filing unsecured business personal property statements. Filings must be postmarked on or before May 7th to avoid a 10 percent late filing penalty. The unsecured property tax bills are issued based on the statements filed by May 7th and have to be paid prior to August 31, 2020. Assessor Dronenburg said, “During these difficult times my office is working proactively to help taxpayers avoid any penalties by filing their forms timely.” Dronenburg continued, “I requested the Governor to delay the State of California mandated May 7th business personal property tax filing deadline, but that relief has not been granted.” Dronenburg concluded, “While my office over the counter services are temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we remain open and committed to providing taxpayers excellent customer service online, over the phone and through e-mail to ensure everyone has the tools they need to avoid penalties by continued on page 11

Staff The County currently has a staff of more than 120 case and contact tracers who have conducted more than 4,000 COVID-19 investigations since the beginning of the public health crisis. Each confirmed positive case generates an average of three contact investigations. The County is proposing to expand the number of contact tracers to 450 or more in the coming months. This pool of tracers will be made up of current County employees and external applicants. The County today posted an opening for temporary contact tracers. The County also plans to hire an additional 200 public health nurses to help support the area’s testing efforts. The region’s Laboratory Task Force has set a goal of testing 5,200 people a day, with that figure based on Harvard research being used by the federal and state government to set COVID-19 testing numbers. Face Coverings Mandatory As of Friday(May 1), all San Diego County residents are required to wear cloth face coverings in public when within 6 feet of another person who is not a household member, or whenever entering a store or other business. The cloth facial coverings, which will be required until further notice, don’t have to be hospital grade, but should cover the nose and mouth. While local law enforcement agencies will focus on education

about the new public health orders about face coverings, the County is providing 10,000 face coverings to local law enforcement entities so officers can distribute them to the public when they contact individuals. As of May 1, more than 685,048 tests have been conducted in California and reported to the California Department of Public Health. These numbers include data from commercial, private and academic labs, including Quest, LabCorp, Kaiser, University of California and Stanford, and the 22 state and county health labs currently testing. The Department is now reporting all tests reported in California, rather than the total number of individuals tested. As new laboratories begin to test for COVID-19, some have had delays in reporting to the state. To resolve this issue, and to ensure this data is as complete as possible and reflects the state’s entire testing capacity, the Department is contacting laboratories directly to assess the completeness of reporting and to gather additional testing data if needed. In addition, laboratories have been working through their backlogs of tests awaiting processing, and the backlog has been reduced. This helps ensure we can meet the additional demand expected from broadening testing guidelines and opening 86 additional sample collection sites across California.

Regulars Wanted - Celebrates One Year Since Opening

Ways To Rethink The Insanity Of Schooling Our Kids At Home

by Darcy Gleisberg

May 1st 2020 marked the One Year Anniversary Regulars Wanted Beanery Co. After spending a year traveling around the United States and Canada collecting ideas, Christian and Jenifer Eggert found their home in Julian. The opportuinty to take over the former Granny’s Kitchen provided the perfect place to share those tastes with locals and tourists alike. Familiar faces from the former staff as well as some welcome new team members will be happy to prepare a variety of Organic Tea and Fair Trade coffee drinks with locally roasted beans from Café Virtuoso. Bootstrap Kombucha and Julian Hard Cider on tap, fresh squeezed orange juice, and a curated collection of local wines and craft beer are also available. Sophie Krabil is still at the helm of the bakery, turning out her signature favorites like scones, cookies, pies, muffins, and empanadas as well as an innovative mix of Gluten Free, Vegan, and Low Glycemic options. In additon to those sweet treats Lauren Schaefer is running the bread program which includes our house bread, bagels, buttermilk biscuits, and English muffins. A Community Supported Bread program will begin soon with a rotation of different breads in addition to other Community Supported programs. With the newly implemented online marketplace, baked goods and mechandise are now availible for shipping nationwide. Chef Christian, former founding Chef/Partner of SuperNatural Sandwiches spent last year refining old breakfast favorites like monkey bread french toast, buttermilk biscuits and maple sausage gravy, and breakfast sandwiches. The new Arizona BBQ Outfitters Santa Maria grill drives the developing lunch menu currently featuring dry rubbed Mary’s Organic Chickens, Black Angus Tri-Tip, and Mad Mike’s gourmet sausages all grilled over mesquite and local oak and applewood. Available as traditional BBQ plates or featured on a growing list of signature sandwiches, along with mouth watering sides and sauces. Heirloom beans are impetus of the Beanery and we currently feature a unique blend of Organic Anazasi and Kashmir thin skin Rio Del Rey beans prepared de la olla or pot style. We would like to sincerely thank our Employee Family, Regulars, and locals for your support and guidance through the last year. We look forward to serving the commiunity of Julian for many years to come. For more information, hours, menus, photos, webstore please visit: www.regularswanted.cafe

I resigned from a fifteen year teaching career this past February. I was hoping to spend more time with my two young sons as a stay at home mom. Little did I know just how much I’d be staying at home! As my oldest will be starting kindergarten next year, I’ve been following our local school district’s Facebook page; the combination of the comments left there and the feedback I hear from friends: moms, teachers, and teachermoms alike, sometimes making my skin crawl. Here are some thoughts and tips I would give to my parents and students if I were still teaching: • Think big picture. No skills should ever live and die within a single grade level or with a particular teacher. With any assignment or unit, help your student find the bigger “why” behind the work. It’s my understanding that currently, the academic world is running a lot like that old show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” where “everything’s made up and the points don’t matter anyway,” so instead of melting down over the particulars of an assignment, consider what the bigger take-away is intended to be and master that. • Look ahead. If you’re in California, it’s very easy to find subject-specific Common Core standards per grade level. If you’re concerned about your child being prepared for the next level of schooling, look at what’s on the menu. Identify the subjects or subsets in which your child is the weakest, and have him/her focus his or her energy

WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER JULIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

continued on page 8


May 6, 2020

2 The Julian News Featuring the Finest Local Artists

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JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

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Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

Thank you for your article, Is It All Fake News. It contains several important guidelines for acquiring accurate, up to date information regarding the current pandemic. However, I disagree with your statement that the president feels his responsibility to protect the people he serves. His response to the crisis has been self serving, incompetent and inhumane. While we are all hoping, as you wrote, “Eventually we will come out on the other side, stronger for our efforts”, history provides us with an appalling precedent: the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-19. The first wave, which occurred in about the same time frame as our current crisis, was devastating, costing many thousands of lives around the globe. The second wave wasn't a wave at all. It was an explosion. Estimates of the death toll world wide range as high as 100 million human beings. Dr Fauci says a second outbreak of the virus this fall is inevitable. To suggest that the Covid-19 virus will return in as deadly a form as the 1918 pandemic would be pure conjecture on my part. No current scientific evidence that I know of suggests that such grim fate awaits us. But history shows us that it is possible. And the only known effective means of control is isolation, strictly enforced. One thing we can be fairly certain of: If the virus does return the federal government will not be prepared for the worst. It will again be up to city, county and state leaders, as well as us as individuals, to have on hand supplies needed to survive and to adhere to stay-athome directives. Jan Payne Julian Dear Julian, Though the COVID-19 pandemic has brought extraordinary change to many aspects of our lives, San Diego Humane Society remains deeply committed to helping people and pets in need. We recognize that the crisis has impacted individuals and families in unprecedented ways across our community, and we have adapted to providing safety net services at a time when they are needed most to help people keep their pets. We’re seeing incredible stories every day and are buoyed by the outpouring of support we’ve received from our community and the smiles on the faces of those we’ve helped. Here’s one story that I hope will make you proud of partnering with us to help those in need. As you know, the impact of COVID-19 has been felt by everyone, but for those facing significant health challenges, it’s even harder. We recently worked to help someone keep her pets while battling cancer during this pandemic: “In October 2019 I was diagnosed with cancer and started chemo in November. There were a few days in which I wanted to give up. Knowing the kitties needed me ...that kept me going. They give me purpose, comfort and a lot of joy. Despite being unable to finish my last round of chemo due to the pandemic...I am happy to share that currently my cancer is inactive. “Of course the pandemic has been a great source of stress. I am grateful to have the love and comfort of these tiny living beings to carry me through. I know they are happy to be with me too.” We were happy to help her and so many others at this difficult time. Additionally, we’ve worked to increase our impact by expanding our partnerships during the pandemic. To reach seniors, military veterans and individuals living with disabilities, we’ve provided food to San Diego Food Bank, ElderHelp, AIM Independent Living Services and many more local organizations. We provided pet food and supplies for pet families housed at the Convention Center and for those temporarily living in quarantine at some hotels. And we teamed up with Councilmember Chris Cate's office to deliver 108 bags of pet food to people and pets in need and provide pet food distribution at 19 San Diego Unified School District sites. Recipients of this pet food are primarily seniors living in low-income housing. As a result of these efforts, since March, we’ve distributed nearly 65,000 pounds of pet food, which amounts to 288,000 meals, to help people care for their pets. Anyone who needs it can pick up pet food from our campus locations daily from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Things look a little different for all of us right now, but San Diego Humane Society's PAWS San Diego program will continue providing essential services to help keep pet families together. Take care of yourselves and each other, Geraldine D’Silva Director of PAWS San Diego, a program of San Diego Humane Society

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare. Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-5 pm

760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management closed 12-1 for lunch

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2020 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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May 6, 2020

Julian Mini Storage

Serving the CoMMunity of Julian

Jeff And Beverly Smith Celebrating 38 Years Together

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Jeff and Beverly Smith celebrated their 38th wedding anniversary last week. They honeymooned on a sailboat in Glorietta Bay off Coronado Island those many successful years ago. The current stay at home orders did not slow their anniversary sailing tradition this year. Mr. Smith rigged a 15-foot long sloop for a tight sail around their pond next to the house. Love the Julian spirit!

Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California

Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com Well Water Filtration

*** While money is used to finance speech, money is not speech. — John Paul Stevens ***

TREE N C A O I M L U P J E HT Local Experience Since 1988ANY * Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

Access 7 Days - 7a.m. to Dark • UNITS AVAILABLE NOW!

Handyman Services

The Julian News 3

County Parks Open For Hikes Volcan, Santa Ysabel East and West plus Wm. Heise open with six foot distancing requirement. Cars must also be parked with spaces between. Lots will be staffed and will be closed when capacity is reached. Hours: 8am to 5pm. Bathrooms sanitized every two hours. Santa Ysabel Nature Center and Jess Martin Park: Skate Park, exercise equipment will remain closed. TOU COVID__Julian News__RUN: 05_06_20 & 5_3_20__1/2 pg. B/W__TRIM: 13” x 11”

ERIC DAUBER H: 760-765-2975 C: 760-271-9585 PO Box 254 JULIAN, CA. 92036

(SACRAMENTO) The California Catastrophe Response Council, which oversees the Wildfire Fund, has formally named the California Earthquake Authority (CEA) the fund’s administrator. The Wildfire Fund was established by the California Legislature, under Assembly Bill 1054 and Assembly Bill 111, and was signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom on July 12, 2019. At that time, CEA was designated the fund’s interim administrator until the nine-member California Catastrophe Response Council could be formed and appoint an administrator. During the new council’s quarterly meeting on April 23—held via teleconference due to the COVID-19 pandemic—the council evaluated core competencies needed for an administrator, including qualifications set forth by statute, and the potential options available to the council. It also reviewed materials about CEA’s operating structure and more than 23 years of experience before making its decision in a unanimous vote. “CEA readily accepts the role of administrator. We’re proud of the work we’ve been doing since the Wildfire Fund was established last summer, and we’re pleased to have the confidence of the California Catastrophe Response Council,” said CEA CEO Glenn Pomeroy. continued on page 10

Nothing’s worse than a houseful of hot air when you’re trying to keep your cool. Call time-out and use these tips to save on energy between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. These simple savers can make a difference. Use portable fans to cool yourself with a nice breeze

Raise your thermostat by 7 to 10 degrees

Use your window shades to keep direct sunlight out

Consider doing laundry before 4 p.m. or after 9 p.m.

We’ve got lots of other ways to help you stay comfortable.

© 2020 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All trademarks belong to their respective owners. All rights reserved. Whendell is a trademark of San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E) and may be used only with permission of SDG&E.

WE-8690A

California Earthquake Authority Named Administrator Of Wildfire Fund

HERE’S HOW TO KEEP YOUR ENERGY COSTS DOWN.

Find more tips at sdge.com/whenmatters

License #945348

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4 The Julian News

Julian

and

Back Country Happenings

Calendar

The Yetti Is Ready

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4:00pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 2:30pm - After School STEM Flex your brain muscles with fun, educational activities for kids & teens. Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every Thursday Beginning Spanish for Adults Learn basic Spanish at the library. - 2:30pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Saturday Ebook Workshop Learn how to download Ebooks & audiobooks from the library for free! - 11am Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street Every day during business hours – Vet Connect VA services available at Julian Library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment.

May 6, 2020

May

Sunday, May 10 Mother’s Day Wednesday, May 13 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, May 21 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm (via Zoom) Saturday, May 23 Julian Fiddle & Pickin’ LED Contest E C Town Hall AN

C

Monday, May 25 Memorial Day Holiday Wednesday, May 27 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Saturday, May 30 Grad Nite at Disneyland ? JUHS Seniors

June

Being a highly endangers species - the Ranchita Yetti is showing its adhearance to the County’s health order to wear a face covering while out in a public space, setting a good example for all to follow.

Wednesday, June 10 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, June 10 Julian High School Board Meeting (Wednesday, prior to graduation – LCAP, Budget Approval)- 6pm (via Zoom) Thursday, June 11 JUHS Graduation - 6pm? Sunday, June 14 - TBA Julian Historical Society Wine, Cheese & More Party plus silent auction Wynola Pizza 5-8pm Sunday, June 21 Fathers Day

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Wednesday, June 24 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

July

s ing til t e Me Un All nded ice ot pe Sus ther N Fur

Saturday, July 4 Independence Day Parade Noon - ? Wednesday, July 8 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Julian Historical Society

Wednesday, July 22 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

August

Wednesday, August 12 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, August 20 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm Wednesday, August 24 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

• On May 9, 1671, in London, Thomas Blood, an Irish adventurer better known as "Captain Blood," is captured attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. King Charles II was so impressed with Blood's audacity that he made him a member of his court. • On May 10, 1749, the 10th and final volume of Henry Fielding's novel "Tom Jones" is printed. The serialized novel told the humorous story of the attempts of the illegitimate but charming Tom Jones to win his neighbor's daughter. • On May 7, 1902, Martinique's Mount Pele begins the deadliest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. The city of Saint Pierre was buried and virtually everyone died instantly when a cloud of superheated gas sent an avalanche of boiling ash down the mountain. • On May 6, 1937, the airship

Hindenburg, the largest dirigible ever built and the pride of Nazi Germany, bursts into flames upon touching its mooring mast in Lakehurst, New Jersey, killing 36 passengers and crewmembers. • On May 4, 1965, San Francisco Giants outfielder Willie Mays hits his 512th career home run to break Mel Ott's National League record. Mays would finish with 660 career home runs, good for third on the all-time list at the time. • May 8, 1988, Stella Nickell is convicted of murder by a Seattle jury. She was the first person to be found guilty of violating the Federal Anti-Tampering Act after putting cyanide in Excedrin capsules in an effort to kill her husband. She began planning his death after their 1976 honeymoon. • On May 5, 2002, the comic book adaptation of "Spider-Man" becomes the fastest movie ever to earn more than $100 million at the box office. Its $39 million opening day bested the previous record of $32 million, set by "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" in 2001. © 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month Temporarily In The The Historical SocietyCommunity Building Library 2133Room 4th Street

7:00pm

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262


May 6, 2020

U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo Appointed For A Second Term

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has appointed Joy Harjo to serve a second term as the nation’s 23rd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry for 20202021. During her second term, Harjo will launch a new Library of Congress collection and online map featuring Native poets and poetry. “Joy Harjo is such an inspiring and engaging poet laureate,” Hayden said. “I’m thrilled she said yes to a second term to help the Library showcase Native poets from coast-to-coast. Her profound musical and literary talents are a gift to the nation.” Harjo’s second term will begin Sept. 1 and will focus on her signature laureate project, “Living Nations, Living Words: A Map of First Peoples Poetry.” This digital project, developed in conjunction with the Library’s Geography and Map Division, will be created using ARCGIS StoryMaps, a web mapping application geared toward storytelling, to showcase contemporary Native American poets from across the country. The project will include Native poets’ biographies and recordings of them reading and discussing one of their poems. It will also help build a new collection in the Library’s American Folklife Center featuring the recordings of the Native poets. “It is an honor to serve a second term as poet laureate, especially during these times of earth transformation and cultural change,” Harjo, who is the first Native poet to serve in the position, said. “Poetry reminds us that we are connected beyond words, and to communicate through poetry has the potential to expand the conversation into wordless depths, to help us move collectively into fresh cultural vision. To get there in understanding, we begin with the roots. In this country, the roots are found in the poetry of the more than 500 living indigenous nations.” During the coronavirus pandemic, Harjo’s work was recently featured in The Poetry of Home, a new video series from The Washington Post and the Library featuring four U.S. poets laureate on the theme of “home” at a time when so many people are sheltering in place. About Joy Harjo Harjo was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on May 9, 1951, and is the author of nine books of poetry — including most recently “An American Sunrise,” (W.W. Norton, 2019). Harjo has also written a memoir, “Crazy Brave” (W.W. Norton, 2012), which won the 2013 PEN Center USA literary prize for creative nonfiction, as well as a children’s book and a young adult book. She is the editor of “When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry,” to be published by W.W. Norton in August 2020. Harjo’s many literary awards include the PEN Open Book Award, the American Indian Distinguished Achievement in the Arts Award, the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts and the Arrell Gibson Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oklahoma Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Library of Congress. Harjo continued on page 10

My Thoughts

The Julian News 5

by Michele Harvey

We Are Trying To Be Self-Sustaining

A few weeks ago my grandchildren planted small potatoes, sweet peppers, serrano peppers, tomatoes, beans and daffodils. More recently their uncle, my other son, planted tomatoes and strawberries. We already are growing onions and chives. We have a peach tree, an apple tree and a pear tree. We used to have more fruit trees, but after so many years of drought they became firewood. One of our fences is lined with blackberries. Our chickens provide us with a few eggs and some fertilizer. This is the beginning of our sustainability. I’m going to plant more potatoes and onions because I have some that have sprouted and they will do just fine in the ground. We have three acres, mostly clay, but lots of it is usable land, other than the clay. We have four compost bins set up that have been maturing for as many as ten years, so we have created some good soil. I’m a lazy composter. I throw plant matter into the bins, weeds that have dirt attached, spoiled fruit and vegetables, strips of newspapers with just black ink on them and fireplace ashes. I don‘t turn anything over to make it break down faster. With as much land as we have, if my compost bins are all full, I just build another one. I made my compost bins with wood pallets lined on the inside with cardboard, thank you Celia Lawley for telling me how to do this, and I let everything sit there year after year. When I need soil, I shovel it out of the bottom of a compost bin. This system works just fine for me. As I said, I’m a lazy composter. I truly think that we all need to be more self-sufficient. We need to grow more of our own food because the farmers in this country are very short on labor. This will cause a major food shortage. Maybe it already has. Farmers are already plowing crops under and I read about a chicken rancher who had to destroy two million chickens because of a lack of labor. This is just crazy. Do you think the Mexicans and Hondurans are here to take your jobs? How many of you twenty-two million unemployed people have gone to farms asking to pick lettuce and cabbages or to pick strawberries? I think that work is available to people who are willing to swallow their pride and take menial jobs. I’ve done it when I had to do it. Both of my sons work as groundskeepers. It’s hard work and it pays bills. Julian is full of people who are willing to work hard. I remember a time when I worked four jobs in one month. I painted a fence, I worked full time at a retail job, I worked full time in a restaurant and I did a weekly housekeeping job. Working enough to pay bills is one method of self-sufficiency and self-sustainability. I’m not a person to sit still and complain about not having work. I make phone calls and I follow up leads. The garden that my grandchildren put in is in a section that their Uncle Robert created years ago. It’s a rectangular plot that is lined with corrugated metal that goes down into the ground for about a foot. Robert recently created the garden at my house in pots sitting on adobe tiles. We have moles, gophers, ground squirrels and rabbits that would just love to dig up our tasty plants. Right now we have wonderfully soft green grass and other edible plants for these critters along with the mice and rats that I know exist on our property. But that won’t always be true, so now is the time to prepare for battling with the wild critters. Though I’ve planted tomatoes, and chives in the past, we haven’t planted this much food on this property since we moved onto it in 1996. We could plant a lot more if we could figure out how to keep the deer away. Raccoons could be a problem too. And we have a lot of weeds. More than I could have ever imagined. We live west of a large horse ranch. Every time the east wind blows through our valley, it brings more weed seeds from across the road. The weeds love growing in our yard. Most of our property burned in the Cedar Fire in 2003 leaving ash behind which was a

natural fertilizer. Wild mustard that grew about a foot tall and less than a foot wide before the fire really grew after the fire. Since 2003 our wild mustard has grown to nearly four feet tall and three feet wide. Though lack of good health has prevented me this year, I love to go outside in the early spring and whack those wild mustard plants down. Convincing most men to whack the weeds down before the seed heads form is difficult at best. They often wait until the weeds have dried before whacking them down, and then it’s too late. By then weed seeds have already planted themselves in the ground and they are just waiting for rain. We have had such a wonderful amount of rain this year that I even have weeds growing in my potted plants. I sure don’t understand how anyone living in a rural area can get cabin fever. Around here is so much to do. On a different subject, If you are feeling lonely, consider getting a pet. The San Diego Humane Society takes in about 50,000 animals each year and they look for homes for these needy critters. Getting a cat or a dog may help you get through this period of isolation and then when it’s over you will have made a new friend. Guinea pigs are very sociable too. You can call the Humane Society at 619-299-7012. These are my thoughts.

How To Make Mother’s Day From Anywhere (NAPSI)—For many Americans, this May 10 will be a Mother’s day like no other. Some families have been home together for weeks and developed a new appreciation for all their mother does. Others are unable to see their mothers person due to social distancing or just because of time, finances and distance. Fortunately, in all cases, there are ways to show Mom how much you care. If You’re Together - If the lady in your life has been working from home, on the front lines as an essential worker, home schooling and housekeeping, while keeping everyone healthy and happy, you can show you know all the effort that takes with a great gift. For example, Dads, kids and others can offer to take on her chores for a week. Give her a home spa day: do her nails, style her hair. Make dinner. Bake cookies. Create a handmade card full of heartfelt sentiments, popsicle stick jewlery box or clay bowl. One such lets her learn flower arranging through a live-streamed workshop from 1-800-Flowers. com and Alice’s Table. If You’re Apart - Keep in mind this advice: “At its core, gift-giving is the practice of turning feelings such as love, warmth, appreciation and pride into physical keepsakes,” writes Mara Leighton on BusinessInsider.com. “It’s one of the too few opportunities to convey to loved ones just how much we really love them.” One way to do that is to send flowers. You can quickly and easily order her favorite blooms at any time, though earlier is better to ensure ontime delivery. Consider a lush, healthy plant and give mom an opportunity to flex her green thumb. What’s more, scientists say plants add oxygen to the room and having greenery around may reduce stress. You can also give her a gift that keeps on giving to children everywhere. This Mother’s Day, 1-800-Flowers.com, Inc. will contribute $1 (up to $50,000) to the nonprofit No Kid Hungry for everyone who shares a Mother’s Day note of thanks and a photo. No Kid Hungry ensures kids nationwide get the meals they need during school closures—and beyond. Share your #ThankfulforMom story at 1800Flowers.com/thankful-for-mom.


6 The Julian News

Julian

and

Back Country Dining

Lake Cuyamaca

Julian

and

May 6, 2020

Brewery Guide

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8am - 8pm

760•765•0700

r o F n Ope e Ountts• k Discou a T • cals

Take Out Only From Side Door - Call for Availability

Lo

15027 Highway 79 - at the Lake Julian

Julian and Wynola

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4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

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open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun Growlers Out offering The Door on - tasters Weekends - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road

1921 Main Street 760 765 2900 Serving Organic Take OutCoffee, Tea, Breakfast, Beer, Regular Hours Wine & MORE.

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

Julian and Santa Ysabel

CLOSED Until Further Notice

Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

Whole Pies Only Two locations to serve you:

Julian

2124 Third Street one block off Main Main Street

760 765 0832

www.juliantea.com

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

Breakfast served Thursday - Monday

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2- Peperoni Pizzas Julian 1- Cheese Pizza 1 Pasta Dinner 1- Caesar Salad 4- Wynola Fountain Drinks

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2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

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Chef’s Corner Spend Less While Still Eating Well

Mid-Week Dinner Specials

though things may look bleak, have faith that this too shall pass, that you’re not alone, and that help is available to you... just ask! Learning how to spend less but still eat well takes skill, determination and know-how, but it can be done! There are simple ways to stretch your resources when you must cut expenses. Here’s a list of ideas designed to help you and your family eat well even after your income has been reduced. Most of the ideas are

onditioned Tea Room C r i A During these uncertain times when so many are ill, have lost their jobs and are frightened about what the future may hold, it’s easy to feel hopeless or become depressed. Remember, even

*** Well, I think that there's a very thin dividing line between success and failure. And I think if you start a business without financial backing, you're likely to go the wrong side of that dividing line. — Richard Branson *** 1. EXPLORERS: Which Western explorer discovered the Grand Canyon? 2. TELEVISION: In the “M*A*S*H” series, which U.S. state did Radar O’Reilly hail from? 3. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin phrase “acta non verba” mean? 4. GAMES: What are the names of the utilities in the Monopoly board game? 5. COMICS: Who is Garfield’s girlfriend in the comic? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone for April? 7. MUSIC: What does the musical notation “allegro” mean? 8. MOVIES: In which 1970s movie does the Cahulawassee River play a major role? 9. LITERATURE: What do the abbreviations stand for in the poet e.e. cummings’ name? 10. ROYALS: What was Princess Diana’s maiden name? Answers on page 11

practical, everyday things you can do to cut food costs. * Plan your meals one week at a time. Take advantage of specials and seasonal foods. Plan meals around featured sale items to cut food costs. * Make a shopping list. When you get to the store, stick to your list to cut down on impulse buying. * Find out when supermarkets discount meat, produce and bakery goods as day-old goods, and check items in the “discount” bins for additional savings. * Buy generic store brands and products on the lower shelves of the grocery store. The price difference can be considerable. * Shop for food once each week to save gas, time and money. * Make a pound of hamburger go further by adding breadcrumbs, oatmeal or tomato sauce. You are stretching a high-cost food item with low-cost products. * Look for coupons before you go, but only for what you would buy anyway. Some stores double coupon amounts for additional savings. * Use economy cuts of meat, like chicken thighs and chuck roast. continued on page 11


May 6, 2020

The Julian News 7

their radio parts inside a metal base with a glazed pottery top. One that was auctioned recently looked like a bright red, blue and yellow 14-inch-tall parrot. It

Rare Bird

Collectibles were sometimes made to fool people. A tiny teddy bear could hide a perfume bottle. Pincushions hide beneath the fabric skirts of half-dolls, ceramic figures stitched to the skirt. Some collectible canes hid thin flasks that held forbidden whiskey to drink secretly while on a walk. And bronze statues sometimes could open to reveal a naughty scene. In the early days of television, a ceramic black panther was really a lamp lighting the room and the TV set. But almost forgotten are the loudspeakers made for early radios that looked like statues of birds or kings, instead of the large horns usually used. Most famous were the Andia loudspeakers,

This rare bird, a ceramic parrot, conceals the working parts of a radio loudspeaker made in 1927. It substituted for the large horn used to amplify the sound of the radio and sold for about $900.

was made by Royal Doulton & Co. of England for Artandia Ltd. in 1927. Other designs include Miss Muffet, a Persian king, a Chinese scribe and other figures that would attract buyers. It sold at Auction Team Breker, a German auction of radios, music machines and other technical collectibles, for $906. *** Q: My mother gave me the metal dentist chair from my father's office. It is not like today's dentist chairs; it's more like a lightweight skeleton chair with a round enameled metal seat, rectangular slotted metal back and spindles for the headrest, legs and mechanical parts. There are no arms. It looks small and very uncomfortable. Is it worth anything? How was it used? How old is it? A: The 17th-century dentist held the patient on the floor to pull a tooth. By the early 18th century, a Windsor chair with a piece of wood added as a head

rest was used. Then inventors made improvements to metal, mechanical and upholstered chairs. Your chair was made in about 1910, a time when enameled metal furniture was very popular due to worries about bacteria. Large, padded dentist chairs are bought today for a family room or home bar as a conversation piece. They are hard to sell. A collector of dental antiques might pay a few hundred dollars, or a dental museum might give you a tax deduction if you donate it. *** CURRENT PRICES Blown glass flask, amethyst, swirled pattern, spiral ribs, Stiegel type, sheared mouth, 5 inches, $190. Sterling silver stuffing spoon, Hester Bateman, Elk monogram, England, 11 3/4 inches, $355. Wooden box, pine, sliding lid, painted stylized tulips on all sides, 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 7 inches, $585. Coffee mill, Landers, Frary &

Clark, No. 20, Crown, double wheel, cast iron, black paint, hinged lid, wooden handle, 12 1/4 inches, $1,045. *** TIP: When packing a piece of pottery for shipping, look at the shape. If it has a hollow space larger than 1 inch across, fill the space with sponge, foam or bubble wrap. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. “Sometimes I underestimate the magnitude of me” is a quote from what 1993 inductee into the National Baseball Hall of Fame?

2. In March, what NFL star announced the establishment of media company 199 Productions, named after his selection number in the 2000 NFL Draft? 3. What martial art was introduced as an official medal event at the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia? 4. The Indianapolis Colts selected Tennessee quarterback Peyton Manning with the No. 1 overall pick in the 1998 NFL Draft. What player was drafted at No. 2 by the San Diego Chargers? 5. True or false: On April 20, 1986, the Chicago Bulls’ Michael Jordan scored an NBA record 63 points in a first-round playoff win over the Boston Celtics. 6. At what track did motorsports pioneer Danica Patrick win her first and only IndyCar race? 7. NHL great Wayne Gretzky concluded his playing career on April 18, 1999, as a member of what team? Answers on page 11


May 6, 2020

8 The Julian News

watching a watercolor course on my phone while painting outside when my boys scrambled onto the table and demanded their own paper and water. My lesson got a lot less relaxing, but they were hearing art vocabulary like foreground, background, and value in an authentic setting. We always wish we had more time or that the world would just slow down; well it did. So let’s enjoy it. Maya Angelou’s quotation

We’re taking the time to plant...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

““I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel” is true from every vantage point in this situation. I, for one, am hoping that my list helped you to look at your child’s education is a calmer, more holistic way as we all navigate an unprecedented time together.

...flower boxes or pots for our Moms. Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2020 V16-18

Happy Mother’s Day!

I made ard yc a funn m! Mo for my

motherhood

I love Mother’s Day! I was wondering how this lovely holiday for moms began, so I went to the library to do research to find out. I searched web sites on the computer. I found beautiful books full of stories and pictures. To find out what I learned about Mother’s Day read my clues below, then fill in the crossword puzzle.

Oh my gosh! If I listed all the things our moms do for us I’d have to list a billion bajillion things. When we are tiny newborns our Moms feed us, comfort us, diaper us, rock us to sleep, burp us, walk us, sing to us and keep an eye on us all day long. Gee, how tiring must that be? Now we are older and go to school, but moms still do so much for us. Here is a list my friends and I put together.

A Precious Gift!

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time

Y

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Y Y P P P P P Moms give us many gifts: love, care, energy, P P P P P P money. They also give us a gift of something they P Y Y can never get back for themselves. It is one of the most precious P P P P Y gifts they can ever give us: we watch it every day, P P P P P P we use it, P Y P P Y P it flies by, Y P P Color Key: P P PP once we spend it, we can P P P never get it back... P = Pink P P P P Y Y = Yellow P Mothers spend their _______ on us. P P

make

buying contrib ution s

Do You Know...? Sometimes we wear a white carnation to honor a mother who has died and a red or pink carnation for a mother who is still living.

A. bake tudio $18.00 S e c n a rs a D ll o B. buy ons ighteen D C. drive E st Dance Less Fir D. take E. remind N C H E C K X I H A I M T W F. make G. listen M J G E P X P H. shop D E K J U Z S I. coach F R N S Q V P J. mend D H E D H G F K. watch R V C A F O Y L. mop P P L Q B O P M. save W A T C H O N N. cheer V G Y N B J F O. check Y O L U J T K P. fold N T D U T A W Q. plant D H W T T V M R. pay N Z Y T N V M S. teach P L I S T E N T. wash

P

5

al nation 10 state

1. Match each chore with the word that makes sense.

1. ______ the beds 2. ______ for groceries 3. ______ us to the dentist 4. ______ to our fears 5. ______ us to practices and lessons 6. ______ our sports team 7. ______ for the school sale 8. ______ holes in our favorite clothes 9. ______ us to feed the dog 10. ______ supplies for school 11. ______ money for a rainy day 12. ______ our homework 13. ______ for us at our games 14. ______ us how to cook 15. ______ our favorite T.V. show 16. ______ vegetables or flowers 17. ______ the floors 18. ______ the windows 19. ______ the bills 20. ______ the laundry

11 12 1 2 10 3 9 8 4 7 6 5

12

11

holiday

9

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flower 3 1. Mother’s Day is a time to honor a mother, ______ or even a special aunt. 2. Soon after the death of her mother (in May 1905), a woman named Anna Jarvis 4 urged people to support the idea of a national ______ for moms. 3. Anna wanted people to show respect for ______ and to give thanks for all the work that mothers do for us. 2 4. She gave out her mother’s favorite ______, the white carnation, a custom that spread to many states. 5. Her home ______ of West Virginia was the first 1 (in 1912) to have an official Mother’s Day celebration. y? 6. On May 9, 1914, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson declared the first omm M ______ Mother’s Day to honor mothers whose sons had died in war. 7. Mother’s Day is celebrated on the second _____ in May (U.S., Canada). 8. A beautiful, historic building in West Virginia was named 7 The International Mother’s Day Shrine and Museum. Sunday They hold teas and programs to promote the ______ other grandm of mothers (and other women) to our country. 9. Businesses promote the ______ of cards, flowers, jewelry and other gifts for Mother’s Day. 10. Although it is nice when children give a gift, it is even more special when they take the ______ to write a letter or to do something special with their moms. 11. Often families attend religious services, have picnics or do ______ get-togethers or calls. 12. Can you ______ a breakfast, write and decorate a card or plan an activity for your mom’s special day?

Things Moms Do For Us!

family

P P

2. Then find and circle the word in the puzzle.

G X Z F R E E H C E W H N L E

P P

T E A C H N P Y N M H A B T R

P E G W C P T A W C O V E H J

S A A R I A U U Y D N P U P C

C S Z O S A V E G T F K R C I

H M N I F Y U A D N L T C O M

M U Q R E M I N D A C O U A B

DOG FOOD

B G C O B A K Y V L I P P C J

V A F O L D J H I P F A U H C

E Y E D B A K E M V D R I V E

W U O H L A G M A K E M Z J A

O B Q F W B V B B H K Z X U V

P P PP P P Y P Y P P P P P P Y P P P Y P Y P P P P P P P P P Y P Y P P Y Y P P P P P Y Y Y P Y P P Y P P Y P P P Y P P Y P P P P Y P Y PP P Y Y Y Y P P P PY Y Y Y P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P Y P P P P P P Y P P P P Y Y P P PP P

P

Solution page 11

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2020

clergy serving Community United Methodist Church at 2898 Highway 78, Julian. Direct all questions and correspondence to: Faith and Living, c/o CUMCJ, PO Box 460, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

have been turned upside down; throw the teacher’s toddlers or tweens in the background and you have a recipe for insanity for an educator/parent. Instead of hate mail, send the teacher some virtual flowers and politely address the problem instead of attacking the person. • Savor teachable moments. Some of your child’s best learning will happen even when she isn’t Zooming her teacher. I was

Y

I recently watched the TED Talk, Embrace the Shake. I found it to be very inspiring and relevant to our current circumstances. The speaker was Phil Hansen, an artist who developed permanent nerve damage while in art school using extreme pointillism to create his works of art. The nerve damage caused a tremor that made his primary artistic technique impossible. He was so devastated by his diagnosis, that he dropped out of art school and gave up on his plans for a career in art. For a long while he completely gave up creating any type of art but he continued to feel a longing to express his artistic impluses. Things changed for him when a neurologist told him to “embrace the shake” and let his limitation teach him fresh ways to create. That’s exactly what he did. Today, Phil Hansen is creating art in totally unique ways that are inspiring artists and non-artists alike. He went from having a single approach to art to finding seemingly endless creative possibilities. His limitation paradoxically led to greater creativity. Most of us have a very strong sense of what normal is based on how things were before the Coronavirus outbreak. Much of our grief and frustration in this current situation is that we can’t continue patterns of living and ways of expressing ourselves that feel familiar and comfortable to us. We could remain stuck in our original vision of how life should be and be angry about our inability to realize that vision, or we can be like Phil and embrace the opportunity to undertake new ventures and discover new opportunities for meaningful relationships, work and creative expression. It has been exciting to see how many people in our country and around the world are “embracing the shake.” People are finding new ways to achieve their overarching goals. They are developing new products based on new needs. We are seeing generosity being expressed in unique ways with wonderful results. People are rising above their own suffering to show compassion to others. Within the life and work of churches, pastors and Christian communities, we are being forced to find new ways to stay connected, be inspired and serve our neighbors. Experts in church vitality and evangelism are speculating that this crisis has forced pastors to learn new skills and make use of technology in ways that are necessary to remain relevant in the coming generations. It has forced congregations to try and to accept new things that they maybe never would have imagined just months ago. I think these same trends are true for other aspects of our culture and daily activities. All this is not to say that Phil Hansen’s nerve damage was desirable. Nor is the coronavirus pandemic a good thing. With all the suffering and hardship it has caused in all aspects of life, we would not ever choose this situation. However, now that this crisis affecting our entire world is a given, we may need to accept that our future may look very different from our past. By embracing the shake, we might create a future much better than the one we originally envisioned. Various research groups and polling agencies are finding that the majority of Americans are more united in their outlook today than any time since 9/11 and that this unity crosses political party affiliations. This shared perspective might become the basis for greater respect, compassion and cooperation. The things we are frustrated by or discouraged about today may be opportunities to try new things that might open up positive possibilities and outcomes we never imagined. Cindy Arntson is ordained

there. • Supplement. Kahn Academy, YouTube, Pinterest--there are infinite resources out there that address the same topics your child is tackling in school. If the technology is failing, the teacher is struggling, or your child is disengaged, find something that works better--or let him/her do the work of finding additional resources. • Adapt. It’s easy as both a parent and a teacher to think there is a single correct approach to any given skill or subject. However, ask yourself if there is a way that your child can approach his or her hardest subjects in a fresh way. For me, history was dry until I wrote it into a story. I still remember so many details about ancient Islam because I wrote a historical fiction short story using information from my text book.

P

Pastor Cindy Arntson

continued from page 1

Digging for facts to include in my story made me want to do the work. Think learning fractions to half or double a recipe, studying the details of a cellular model to create a sculpture or art, etc. Be forgiving. After day one of preschool, my oldest told us he didn’t like it and wasn’t making any friends. My husband went from normal human being to papa bear under attack by bees in six seconds: “We need to find another place right now!” However, after fifteen years in the classroom, I know the importance of grace on both sides. We want our children’s lives to be happy and easy; we want our lives to be happy and easy. However, neither of those things is going to be any closer to true if we beat up the very people we are trusting to be second in command in our children’s lives. Many educators are in completely murky and foreign waters as their educational practices

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Faith and Living

Rethink the Insanity


May 6, 2020

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

The Dark Side Of Stimulus

by Jon Coupal

The COVID-19 pandemic has turned the world upside down with massive disruptions in virtually every aspect of human life. With some notable exceptions, humanity has pulled together to vanquish this silent killer. It’s amazing how quickly both the private sector and public health experts have moved to confront this serious threat. For this, we can all be thankful. But politics is politics and the controversies over government’s response to the crisis are legion and will continue long after the virus disappears. At the international level, China must be held accountable to the rest of the world for both its actions and omissions that led to the spread of the virus. In the United States, debates swell over whether our response was too slow. Many of the same critics of President Trump’s handling of the crisis by underestimating the severity of the pandemic are the same people who criticized his barring of international flights into the country. In hindsight, both the administration as well as America’s health-care experts failed to respond in a timely manner. When our political leaders reacted, they did so with a sledge hammer, essentially shutting down the economy with strict shelter-in-place orders. Whether this was an overreaction will only become clear in the future when we know more about this particular virus, but the government-imposed shutdown was based on the best information we had at the time. Nonetheless, the nationwide shutdown has come with its own huge negative impacts on the economy and employment. And because it was government that ordered society and the economy to come to a screeching halt, it had the obligation to make individuals, businesses and institutions whole — or as close to whole as possible. And here is where it gets sticky. So far, Congress has passed more than $2.68 trillion in rescue assistance, including the most recent agreement to spend another $484 billion. This is a staggering amount of money. Almost from the outset, the battle over who was going to get this money lined up along the deep political divides in our nation. The first phase of the federal stimulus response was a relatively non-controversial $8.3 billion for coronavirus vaccine research and development.

Phase 2, about $192 billion, focused on providing paid emergency sick leave for some workers, as well as boosting aid for state unemployment insurance and food assistance. Phase 3 is where the fireworks started. At $2 trillion, 10 times what Phases 1 and 2 cost, all semblance of bipartisanship evaporated, with recriminations hurled in both directions. The fight was over whether the stimulus bill would be used to advance a list of progressive policies having little, if anything, to do with responding to the virus and the economic havoc it was wreaking. Fortunately, the effort to use the stimulus to impose elements of the Green New Deal, restructure corporate boards of directors and implement new voting procedures were quickly dropped in the face of public outrage. With the stimulus providing direct cash payments to most Americans, some complain that individuals with an AGI of $99,000 or more are denied any relief. That amount of money is a lot in many parts of the country but in some urban areas, a total household income of $90,000 meets HUD’s definition of low income for a family of give. Another brewing controversy is whether banks were allocating the funds intended to assist small businesses to large businesses that were their important clients, leaving small businesses with nothing as the initial payouts were quickly exhausted. Shake Shack was shamed into returning federal dollars. Harvard University, with an endowment of over $40 billion, was excoriated for taking $8.7 million in rescue funds. Small local government entities are likewise crying foul. In California, federal dollars are being distributed to local jurisdictions under the CARES Act only to those with populations of more than 500,000. We can also look forward to huge fights between red states and blue states over whether the latter should receive even more federal dollars to bail out failing public employee pension funds. Fiscally prudent states will argue that profligate states should not be rewarded for mismanagement. Call this “stimulus envy.” Whenever government starts handing out vast amounts of money there will always be inequities — either real or imagined. But unfairness in the distribution of federal funds isn’t the only problem with a stimulus that exceeds $2.6 trillion. America had a huge debt problem even before the virus came to our continued on page 11

• The first real shampoo dates back to the 1500s. In India, "sapindus," aka soapberries or soapnuts, were boiled with dried Indian gooseberry and other herbs. The extract created a lather and resulted in soft, shiny hair. • A single human hair can hold up to 100 grams in weight, while an entire head of hair could bear up to 12 tons -- the equivalent of two African elephants. • On April 1, 1974, black smoke was seen rising from Mount Edgecumbe, a volcano in Alaska. When a Coast Guard pilot came closer to investigate, he found 70 tires burning and the words "APRIL FOOL" spray painted into the snow. • While it's hard to imagine that anyone would dare to steal an infant Jesus, especially during the most wonderful time of the year, BrickHouse Security's "Saving Jesus" program offers a free GPS tracker for the star of your nativity scene. • U.S. park ranger Roy C. Sullivan had the flabbergasting distinction of being struck by lightning the most times and surviving: seven times between 1942 and 1977. • Speaking of distinctions, Buzz Aldrin holds the curious title of being the first man to urinate on the moon, shortly after stepping onto its surface. • At the end of the 19th century, American con artist, gangster and crime boss Jefferson Randolph Smith earned the nickname "Soapy" for his scheme of wrapping soap bars in notes of varying denominations and covering them with plain paper, then pretending to mix them in with bars devoid of money and selling the latter at an inflated price while maintaining the pretense that some of the packages contained cash. • Ben & Jerry learned how to make ice cream by taking a $5 correspondence course (which they split between them) offered by Penn State. *** Thought for the Day: "Sometimes you put walls up not to keep people out, but to see who cares enough to break them down." -- Anonymous ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants. — Epictetus


May 6, 2020

10 The Julian News

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® Dear EarthTalk: Cargo shipping creates huge amounts of air and marine pollution. What’s being done to change this given the large number of everyday goods that travel this way? —JJ, Newark, NJ

Some 80 percent of goods for sale around the world make their way from point A to B on a cargo ship, so cleaning up this industry is key to greening the overall economy. The vast majority of goods we use and enjoy have spent at least some time traveling on cargo ships. In fact, such ships facilitate more than 80 percent of global trade. Unfortunately, these huge ships that ply the world’s oceans and waterways burn lots of fossil fuels—some individual ships burn upwards of 100 tons of oil a day. If the global cargo shipping industry were a country, it would rank sixth overall in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (higher than South Korea, Iran and Canada). Cargo ships have several other negative environmental effects as well. They also emit large amounts of fine particles, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide—all bad for us and our environment. As if the emissions weren’t bad enough, cargo ships also run into marine life at an alarming rate: Ship strikes are one of the leading causes of death for many of the world’s whale species. But as bad as all this sounds, cargo shipping is one of the most efficient and eco-friendly ways to get items from point A to B. Big ships emit only about half as much CO2 as trains, one-fifth as much as trucks and only one-fiftieth of what airplanes would emit to transport the same load. Nonetheless, environmental concerns continue to dog cargo shipping. In response, shipping companies have started to employ innovative strategies to save fuel and reduce pollution, such as socalled “slow steaming” whereby ships can burn less fuel and reduce emissions by traveling more slowly than usual. Transitioning to cleaner fuels—such as liquified natural gas (LNG)—is another obvious short-term solution, but it can only get us so far. Another band-aid fix is the installation of exhaust scrubbers, which spray a fine mist of water to remove pollutants from ships’ exhaust before they can make their way up into the atmosphere. But scrubbers require energy, which leads to more fuel being burned. Also, the waste water they generate is sometimes dumped into the ocean, which negatively affect marine organisms. Longer term, environmental advocates are hoping for the wholesale decarbonization of the shipping industry. Plans are on the table for clean-burning hydrogen-powered cargo ships. Meanwhile, the first electrically-propelled cargo ship, Norway’s Yara Birkeland, is nearing completion. This 260-foot long vessel will carry chemicals and fertilizer on a relatively short 30-mile route. Despite these advances, cargo shipping will continue releasing large amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere for the foreseeable future. Though battery-powered ships are finally moving off the drawing board and into the water, their range is simply too limited to allow for mass replacement of existing cargo fleets. The energy density of batteries will need to increase by a factor of ~30 before such replacements can begin taking place en masse. Given the likely slow pace of change, buying local is probably the average citizen’s best option for reducing shipping-based emissions in the short term. CONTACTS: “The environmental cost of shipping stuff is huge…” vox. com/2015/12/23/10647768/ shipping-environmental-cost; “CO2 emissions for shipping of goods,” timeforchange.org/co2-emissions-for-shipping-ofgoods/; “Shipping and climate change,” transportenvironment.org/what-wedo/shipping-and-environment/shipping-and-climate-change; The uncounted cost of shipping's environmental impact, greenbiz.com/article/uncountedcost-shippings-environmental-impact. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https://earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

CPUC Issues Proposal For The Deployment Of Microgrids And Resiliency Strategies To Support Communities And Infrastructure Threatened By Power Outages SAN FRANCISCO, April 29, 2020 – The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) today issued for public comment a proposal that would require large electric investor-owned utilities to accelerate deployment of microgrids and resiliency projects to minimize the impacts of wildfire-caused power outages and Public Safety Power Shut-off (PSPS) events. The proposal will be on the CPUC’s June 11, 2020 Voting Meeting agenda. The proposal, officially termed a Proposed Decision, orders utilities to prioritize, streamline, and expedite microgrids and resiliency projects that could be put in place by September 1, 2020, and requires collaboration with local and tribal governments. The proposal is intended to rapidly develop and deploy projects that could keep electricity on for critical facilities and other customers during power outages. “Wildfire season will begin soon and, if like last year, it will surge this fall, bringing Public Safety Power Shut-offs and other outages” said CPUC Commissioner Genevieve Shiroma. “Microgrids using independent energy supply can provide essential backup and resiliency for communities affected. This proposed microgrid decision would appropriately require utilities to expedite deployment, all towards assuring essential services such as clean water, emergency services, and medical support can continue, especially in disadvantaged

communities and among the access and functional needs populations.” The proposal specifically requires utilities to: • Further standardize application processes for project approvals; • Expedite utility sign-off on installed projects; • Accelerate interconnection of projects for key locations, customers, and facilities; • Adjust tariffs to better value resiliency; and, • Enhance collaboration and coordination with local and tribal governments. The proposal intends to give communities with a strong interest in microgrids and resiliency projects better access to the technical resources and support from utilities. Additionally, the proposal conditionally approves several resiliency proposals from two utilities: • Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) would implement programs that would: o Upgrade substations that can be quickly and safely energized with local sources of power; o Procure temporary, portable generators for use at substations and other key locations of public benefit for the 2020 wildfire season; and, o Provide utility technical and financial support for communityproposed microgrids to enhance resiliency of critical facilities and vulnerable customers. • San Diego Gas & Electric

(SDG&E) would implement software and hardware technology to enhance microgrid operation, as well as augment and interoperate with SDG&E’s existing advanced distribution management system and microgrid projects proposed in other proceedings. “The CPUC is pursuing every path available to make our communities more resilient to wildfire-caused power outages,” said CPUC President Marybel Batjer. “Part of that approach is driving utilities to improve their wildfire mitigation work, another part is encompassed in today’s proposal, which helps ensure utilities expedite deployment of much-needed backup power for their customers in advance of the 2020 wildfire season.” This proposal is the latest in a series of actions that the CPUC has taken to improve preparation for the upcoming wildfire season. Other actions are described at www.cpuc. ca.gov/deenergization. In response to Senate Bill (SB) 1339, the CPUC initiated Rulemaking 19-09-009 to facilitate the commercialization and deployment of microgrids while prioritizing system, public, and worker safety and avoiding shifting costs between ratepayers. The proceeding is organized into three tracks and this proposal is focused on track one issues. The proposal is available at http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/ P u b l i s h e d D o c s / Ef i l e /G 0 0 0 / M335/K511/335511328.PDF.

Documents related to the proceeding are available at ht tps://apps.cpuc.c a.gov/ apex/ f?p=401:56:0::NO:RP,57, RIR:P5_PROCEEDING_ S E L E C T : R1909009. By clicking the “Public Comments” tab, members of the public can submit comments on the proposal. The CPUC regulates services and utilities, protects consumers, safeguards the environment, and assures Californians’ access to safe and reliable utility infrastructure and services. For more information on the CPUC, please visit www.cpuc.ca.gov.

Earthquake Authority Named Administrator

continued from page 3 CEA has experience managing funds of this size and will be working with the council to develop a claims administration process that is specific to the Wildfire Fund. Assets in the CEA fund for residential earthquake insurance policyholders are segregated and separately managed and maintained from assets in the Wildfire Fund, which was established to provide a source of money to pay or reimburse eligible claims arising from a covered wildfire caused by a participating utility company. All costs and expenses incurred by CEA to administer the Wildfire Fund are allocated to and paid from the Wildfire Fund.

Poet Laureate continued from page 5

has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Witter Bynner Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her collection “How We Become Human: New and Selected Poems 19752001” (W.W. Norton, 2002) was selected by the National Endowment for the Arts for its Big Read program. Her recent honors include the Jackson Prize from Poets & Writers (2019), the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize from the Poetry Foundation (2017) and the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets (2015). In 2019, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Harjo has taught at UCLA and was until recently a professor and chair of excellence at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She has returned to her hometown, where she holds a Tulsa Artist Fellowship. During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. In recent years, Laureates have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.

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May 6, 2020

California Commentary

continued from page 9 shores. Now it is much, much worse and few are raising it as a concern. We fully understand that our house is on fire and that we have to hose it down with cash. But as Milton Friedman was fond of saying, there’s no such thing as a free lunch, and young Americans and their children will be paying for all this for generations to come. Moreover, what if the next crisis isn’t as severe as what we are facing now? Will there be an automatic default position of “Well, let’s just spend more money?” Recall that when he was running for president, Barack Obama called George W. Bush’s $12 trillion national debt “unpatriotic.” But then he himself took the national debt close to $20 trillion. And President Trump has shown no inclination to take

the national debt seriously. This is a recurring character flaw that infects elected officials in both parties. It is my hope, but not my expectation, that once the virus is substantially contained and the

economy can begin to recover, we can start a national conversation about moving toward a balanced budget. It won’t happen overnight, but unless it is taken seriously, there is a real threat of worldwide economic collapse.

And that would make our current problems with COVID-19 seem puny by comparison. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA).

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A. bake B. buy C. drive D. take E. remind F. make G. listen H. shop I. coach J. mend K. watch L. mop 7 M. save N. cheer O. check P. fold Q. plant R. pay S. teach T. wash

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Chef’s Corner continued from page 6

They provide good-quality protein at a lower cost. * Use your oven efficiently and bake more than one dish at a time. The energy savings can be used to supplement other parts of your budget. * Mix one part of reconstituted instant milk with one part of skim milk, 1% or 2% milk. Again, you are stretching a high-cost product with a low-cost one in a way that likely will not be noticed by your family. * Compare prices per unit: pound, ounce, dozen or package. Most stores provide the information on the shelf label. * Wrap, store and plan how to use leftovers. Millions of dollars’ worth of food goes to waste each year. * Make your own convenience foods. The more convenience built into a food product, the higher its price. * Plan a meatless day each week. Meat is one of the more expensive foods in our diet. Use recipes that feature beans, cheese or vegetables instead of meat. Here’s an easy recipe for veggie-stuffed pasta shells that makes a great one-pot, meatless meal that saves time and money! SLOW-COOKED VEGGIE-STUFFED PASTA SHELLS 1 cup small-curd cottage cheese 1/4 cup grated Romano cheese or Parmesan cheese or a combination of both 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest or 1 teaspoon lemon juice 4 ounce package (about 1 1/4 cup) pepper jack cheese, coarsely grated 2 tablespoons Italian seasoning or poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNTIES LOCAL JULIAN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Local resident looking to borrow 550k secured by developed Julian commercial property. 5-10 year term, 6% interest only, low loan to value (LTV), first trust deed. Please send inquiries to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 1/31

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continued from page 1

*** When you have a great and difficult task, something perhaps almost impossible, if you only work a little at a time, every day a little, suddenly the work will finish itself. — Isak Dinesen ***

filing their business, aircraft and vessel statements before the state-mandated May 7th filing deadline.” In January, the County Assessor Business Personal Property Division mailed approximately 64,000 statements and notices to business, aircraft, and vessel owners, with 51,000 business accounts deemed eligible to file electronically. Eligible business owners are strongly encouraged to e-file their statements online by May 7th through our simple, accurate, and secure e-file system. Eligible taxpayers, who did not already receive a Pin Number, can secure their Pin Number to e-file by calling (85505-6100 or via e-mail at ARCCBusinessE-file. FGG@sdcounty.ca.gov. Taxpayers that received a request to file from the Assessor’s office or that own Business Personal Property (examples include: office equipment, machinery, computers) whose aggregate cost is over $100,000 must file a statement annually. Anyone receiving a request to file who was not the owner as of January 1, 2020, should return the statement with supporting information before the deadline so we can update records to avoid future assessment notices. Please visit www.sdarcc.com for more information or contact the Business Personal Property Division directly at (858) 5056100; E-mail ARCCBusinessEfile.FGG@sdcounty.ca.gov.

*** Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www. divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

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The Julian News 11

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg or ground cloves 1 (10-ounce) package chopped, frozen broccoli, thawed, squeezed of excess moisture 1 cup baby spinach, roughly chopped 16 large pasta shells, uncooked 3 cups marinara sauce, preferably one containing garlic and onions or mushrooms 1/2 cup water 1. In a large bowl, combine the cottage cheese, Romano or Parmesan cheese, lemon zest or juice, and 1/2 cup of the pepper jack cheese, the Italian seasoning or poultry seasoning, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes or cayenne, and the ground nutmeg or ground cloves until well-combined. Fold in the broccoli and spinach. 2. Gently fill the shells with the cottage cheese mixture (about 3 tablespoons per shell), using the side of the spoon to push and pack in the filling. 3. In a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker, combine 2 cups marinara and the water. Place the filled shells in the slow cooker, then spoon the remaining cup of sauce on top. Sprinkle with another 1/2 cup of the pepper jack cheese and cook, covered, on low until the shells are tender when tested with a fork, about 2 to 2 1/2 hours. 4. Spoon the stuffed shells and sauce onto serving plates and sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 cup pepper jack cheese. Serve with garlic bread, toast or rolls, if desired. Makes 4 servings.

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

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WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 s Blending of traditional elements iceandecontemporary v d r Warm welcome Seandpeuplifting nd emusic r s Relevant, thoughtful message urth Su

F ntil otice U Community UnitedN Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

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PERSONAL SUPPORT

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St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Men’s Meeting

*** The high prize of life, the crowning fortune of man, is to be born with a bias to some pursuit which finds him in employment and happiness. —Ralph Waldo Emerson ***

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Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to

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Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

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Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

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continued from page 7 1. Reggie Jackson. 2. Tom Brady. 3. Taekwondo. 4. Ryan Leaf, Washington State quarterback. 5. False. Despite Jordan’s playoff record 63 points, the Celtics defeated the Bulls 135131 in Game 2 and went on to sweep the series 3-0. 6. Twin Ring Motegi. Patrick won the Indy Japan 300 in 2008. 7. The New York Rangers.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Francisco Vasquez de Coronado 2. Iowa 3. Deeds, not words 4. Water Works and Electric Company 5. Arlene 6. Diamond 7. Lively and brisk 8. “Deliverance” 9. Edward Estlin 10. Spencer ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Volume 35 - Issue 40

Your Weekly Horoscope

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types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

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Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to May 1, 2015; 2015; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO JULIAN COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP P. 0. BOX 249 JULIAN, CALIFORNIA 92036 REGULAR MEETING MONDAY • May 11, 2020 • 7 P.M. JULIAN TOWN HALL, Washington and Main Street, Julian, CA * * * PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA * * *

6 FEET SOCIAL DISTANCING WILL BE OBSERVED A. ROLL CALL OF MEMBERS B. REVIEW & APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF March 9, 2020 (No Meeting was held in April) C. APPROVAL OF AGENDA D. PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS: Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the group on subject matter within the Group’s jurisdiction that is not on the posted agenda. E. ACTION ITEMS 1. Mark & Priscilla Town Residence; APN 291-083-14-00; PDS2020-STP-85010W1; 2008 2nd Street, Julian 2. PLDO Funds 3. Second Street –Non-maintained portion 4. Maintenance Priority List F. GROUP BUSINESS 1. Announcements and correspondence received 2. Discussion items a. Julian Septic Plant b. Agricultural Clearing 3. Subcommittee reports 4. Meeting updates a. BOS and PC Hearings b. Future Group Meeting Dates (June 8th, 2020) G. ADJOURNMENT ALL ITEMS ON THE AGENDA ARE FOR DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE DECISION BY THE GROUP, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

*** A FINAL AGENDA WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD ON THE PORCH OF THE TOWN HALL 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE REGULAR PLANNING GROUP MEETING. *** The Julian Community Planning Group (JCPG) is a voluntary organization representing the community. The function for the JCPG is advisory to the County Planning Department, Planning Commission, and the Board of Supervisors with regard to land use matters. Members: Pat Brown, Chair; Bob Redding, Vice Chair; Kiki Skagen Munshi, Secretary; Woody Barnes, Herb Dackermann, Eric Jones, Keith Krawiec, Rebecca Morales, Katherine Moretti, Kenny Mushet, Rudy Rikansrud LEGAL: 08545 Publish: May 6, 2020

Julian Union High School District NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED 2020-21 BUDGET In accordance with the provisions of the Education Code Section 42103, you are hereby notified of the preparation of the proposed Annual Financial and Budget Report of the Julian Union High School District, for school year 2020-21. The proposed budget, computed district tax requirement, and any recommendations made by the Superintendent of Schools, San Diego County, shall be available for public inspection on June 6th to June 10th, The proposed budget is available on the district’s website: www. juhsd.org YOU WILL THEREFORE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Governing Board of the Julian Union High School District will conduct a public hearing of the proposed budget on June 9th, 2020, 6:00 PM, Due to the COVID-19 crisis, this public hearing will be held electronically via teleconference. If you would like to participate, visit the districts board agenda webpage at www.juhsd.org. If the COVID-19 crisis stay at home order is lifted the board meeting will be held in room 4 at the Julian Union High School Distrcit., 1656 HWY 78, Julian, CA, 92036. Dr. Paul Gothold County Superintendent of Schools San Diego County May 2020 Legal: 08547 Publish: May 6, 2020

Julian Union Elementary School District NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED 2020-21 BUDGET In accordance with the provisions of the Education Code Section 42103, you are hereby notified of the preparation of the proposed Annual Financial and Budget Report of the Julian Union Elementary School District, for school year 2020-21. The proposed budget, computed district tax requirement, and any recommendations made by the Superintendent of Schools, San Diego County, shall be available for public inspection on June 5, 2020 to June 10, 2020, The proposed budget is available on the district’s website at: https://sites.google.com/a/juesd.net/districtreporting/ YOU WILL THEREFORE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Governing Board of the Julian Union Elementary School District will conduct a public hearing of the proposed budget on June 10, 2020, 5:00 PM, Due to the COVID-19 crisis, this public hearing will be held electronically via teleconference. If you would like to participate via Zoom please visit the district website at: www.juesd.net for link/call information. Dr. Paul Gothold County Superintendent of Schools San Diego County May 2020 Legal: 08548 Publish: May 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007525 a) JULIAN YESTERYEARS b) JULIANS YESTERYEARS c) YESTERYEARS GIFTS AND JEWELRY d) YESTERYEARS OF JULIAN 1310 Orchard Lane, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1447 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Michael Jon Hart and Michele Louise Harvey, 1310 Orchard Lane, Julian, CA 92026. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 16, 2020. LEGAL: 08542 Publish: April 29 and May 6, 13, 20, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007595 a) CC&I b) CRYPTOCURRENCY CONSULTING & INTEGRATING c) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INTEGRATING d) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INSTRUCTING e) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INTEGRATING f) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INSTRUCTING g) CCE&I h) CCI SOLUTIONS 4275 Executive Square, Suite 200 La Jolla, CA 92037 The business is conducted by An Individual - Aaron Fiore, 10250 Prince Jed Ct., Santee, CA 92071. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 21, 2020. LEGAL: 08543 Publish: April 29 and May 6, 13, 20, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007269 CONCIERGE PROCESSING SERVICES 503 Rosemont St., La Jolla, CA 92130 The business is conducted by An Individual - Gina M. McLeod, 503 Rosemont St., La Jolla, CA 92130. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 8, 2020. LEGAL: 08541 Publish: April 22, 29 and May 6, 13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007318 KILOWATT BREWING 7576 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., San Diego, CA 92111 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Illumination Brewing LLC, 7576 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., San Diego, CA 92111. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 9, 2020. LEGAL: 08544 Publish: May 6, 13, 20, 27, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007343 TRIMMINGS COMPANY 1342 Morning View Drive #351., Escondido, CA 92026 The business is conducted by An Individual - Amy Josephine Klauber, 1342 Morning View Drive #351., Escondido, CA 92026. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 10, 2020. LEGAL: 08546 Publish: May 6, 13, 20, 27, 2020

Wednesday - May 6, 2020

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You still might have to deal with some lingering confusion that marked a recent workplace situation. But for the most part, you should now be well on your way to your next project. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A new commitment might demand more time than you'd expected to have to give it. But rely on that special Bovine gift for patience, and stick with it. You'll be glad you did. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You're earning the admiration of a lot of people who like the way you handle yourself when your views are on the line. Even one or two of your detractors are being won over. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Taking your responsibilities seriously is what you do. But ease up on the pressure gauge, and make time for much needed R & R. Start by making this weekend a "just for fun" time zone. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Some recently uncovered information might make a change of plans inevitable. If so, deal with it as quickly as possible, and then find out what went wrong and why. What you learn might surprise you. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Aspects favor moving carefully and deliberately when making any significant changes. Could be there are more facts you need to know, which you might overlook if you rush things. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A problem neighbor might be looking to goad you into an action you don't want to take. Ask

someone you both respect if he or she would act as an impartial arbitrator for both of you. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A recent workplace accomplishment hasn't been overlooked by those who watch these things. Meanwhile, start making travel plans for that much-too-long-deferred trip with someone special. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Those money matters continue to move in your favor. Now would be a good time to start putting some money back into the house, both for esthetic as well as economic reasons. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A changing workplace environment can create job pressures. But, once again, follow the example of your birth sign and take things a step at a time, like the sure-footed Goat you are. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Cheer up. You could soon have the funds you need for your worthy project. Your generous gifts of time and effort are well known, and someone might decide it's time to join with you. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your inner scamcatcher is right on target, and you're absolutely right to reject that "too good to be true" offer. Meanwhile, something positive should be making its way to you. BORN THIS WEEK: You are generous, and also sympathetic to people who find they need the help of others. © 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

I finally know what distinguishes man from the other beasts: financial worries. — Jules Renard

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - May 6, 2020  

Wednesday - May 6, 2020