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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

For the Community, by the Community.

Wednesday

April 29, 2020

Julian, CA.

Volume 35 — Issue 39 ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Is It All Fake News

ESTABLISHED

1870

perspective by Michael Hart

The problem is not the quarantine, the “stay at home” orders, or even the virus itself! The problem is us! We all believe what we want to believe! For some it is extreme fear of the unknown, others see a conspiracy to force them to give up their liberty. And there are those who want to believe that is a plot by foreign or domestic governments to take over the world. In this country our political leaders, from the local elected officials’ right up to the President feel their responsibility is to protect the people they serve. Their problem is how to best reassure “We the People” that the steps they are taking is in our best interest to keep us healthy and alive. Our problem is we get mixed messages – because everyone has an opinion – and opinion has taken the idea of presenting the facts into the twilight zone of reality. When you can turn the channel or pick up a newspaper, read an online source and there are contradicting opinions from “experts” in their field, who is to be trusted? Which one has the actual facts? What are the facts? We are awash with opinion masquerading as fact. So… what do you believe? How do you find sources that YOU can form your own opinion and make decisions to live your life, avoid the virus, and not just follow along with the rest of the masses, whatever they may think is true? In this time of virus pandemic, economic insecurity, and contradicting opinions. Is it even possible? The Centers for Disease Control has put out a “fact sheet” to counter some rumors: Stop the Spread of Rumors Fact 1 - Diseases can make anyone sick regardless of their race or ethnicity. Fear and anxiety about COVID-19 can cause people to avoid or reject others even though they are not at risk for spreading the virus. Fact 2 - For most people, the immediate risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to be low. Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19. Fact 3 - Someone who has completed quarantine or has been released from isolation does not pose a risk of infection to other people. For up-to-date information, visit CDC’s coronavirus disease situation summary page. Fact 4 - There are simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy. • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. • Stay home when you are sick. • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. Fact 5 - You can help stop COVID-19 by knowing the signs and symptoms: • Fever • Cough • Shortness of breath • Seek medical advice if you ESTABLISHED

1870

YEARS

• Develop symptoms • Have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 or live in or have recently traveled from an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19. Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms. Those are the facts that the scientific community believes you should know. I can hear the clamoring already, “I don’t know anyone with symptoms, why should it impact me?” That’s actually and easy answer – because this is a “New” virus that has never circulated in the population before – we don’t really know enough about it to say with certainty how or when it will begin to subside. Public health officials are just beginning to get a handle on how it transmits, and there are some advances in treatments, but it continues to spread and containment is still a challenge. The most recent reports now say that the virus may have been circulating as early as November, public health officials are reviewing suspect cases from the first of the year to determine if they missed potential Corona virus/Covid-19 infection. “The percentage of deaths is lower than seasonal flu.” – This is a yes and no, in some parts of the world it is much higher, in the U.S. it is about the same. Part of the problem in basing an opinion on this figure is science is just not sure how many people have actually contracted the virus, hence the percentage is not accurate. The other problem for health officials is diagnosis, because patients’ present symptoms over multiple days, a person may seem to have only a minor infection on day 2 and be sent home only to return on day 5 with severe respiratory issues and then require hospitalization. “The reason to ‘stay at home’ is bogus” – This is the worst, because it does not take into account the real issue, and that is the strain Covid-19 places on the entire medical system. Because most patients have appeared at the hospitals in severe distress the system has been stressed, which was the original reason that public health officials became concerned. Testing for the virus was inadequate in early February, it was not always accurate and took too long to get results. Often the results came back after hospitalization was required. Fortunately newer tests are becoming available, thereby allowing for more rapid intervention by medical personnel. Just this past week advances have been made in diagnosis – monitoring of oxygen levels of potentially infected people appears to offer a window into the progression of the virus and may be able to offer more rapid response for treatment. It appears that peoples oxygen levels drop over the first few days that the infection is attacking, (it should be at 90+%) many are getting to the hospital with oxygen levels below 85% yet still breathing normally. There are some physicians who believe that monitoring oxygen levels can be an early warning and give them a better opportunity to begin early treatment thereby improving outcomes. “Once I get infected and recover, I will be immune.” - The

jury is still out on immunity, there have been reports of people recovering from their original infection and relapsing with even a more severe infection. Studies are ongoing to determine exactly how the immune system responds and if “herd immunity” is the ultimate way the majority of the population will be protected. “Hydroxychloroquine or Chloroquine is effective in treating Covid-19/Coronavirus.” - A study on chloroquine, conducted in Brazil, found one-quarter of the patients taking the antimalaria medication developed potentially deadly changes in the electrical system regulating their heartbeats. While a small and imperfect study, it highlights the compelling need for more rigorous data. Doctors in the United States have seen such heart issues with chloroquine and a similar but less toxic drug, an anti-inflammatory called hydroxychloroquine. Some medical systems are no longer using either to treat COVID-19, even if they initially tried it. Others use them only with careful monitoring. Rajesh Gandhi, an infectious diseases physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor at Harvard Medical School, was on the IDSA guidelines panel that created the guidelines published a week ago. "The IDSA guidelines panel concluded that the data so far for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine is insufficient to be either for or against it," Gandhi said. "We don’t know that it doesn’t work or that it works." The National Institute of Heath has put out treatment guidelines: “Evolving Knowledge on Treatment for COVID-19” Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)approved drugs for COVID-19. However, an array of drugs approved for other indications, as well as multiple investigational agents, are being studied for the treatment of COVID-19 in several hundred clinical trials around the globe. These trials can be accessed at ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, providers can access and prescribe investigational drugs or agents approved or licensed for other indications through various mechanisms, including Emergency Use Authorizations (EUA), Emergency Investigational New Drug (EIND) applications, compassionate use or expanded access programs with drug manufacturers, and/or off-label use. For this reason, whenever possible, the Panel recommends that promising, unapproved or unlicensed treatments for COVID-19 be studied in welldesigned controlled clinical trials. This includes drugs that have been approved or licensed for other indications. The Panel recognizes the critical importance of clinical research in generating evidence to address unanswered questions regarding the safety and efficacy of potential treatments for COVID-19. However, the Panel also realizes that many patients and providers who cannot access such trials are still seeking guidance about whether to use these agents. Finally, it is important to stress that the rated treatment recommendations in these Guidelines should not be considered mandates. The choice of what to do or not to do for an individual patient is ultimately decided by the patient together with their provider.

“A vaccine is months away.” – More like a year away, first it would have to be tested, then get approval, then manufactured in mass quantities. We may even see a second wave of the virus before that happens. “More testing will make us safer” – In theory this is the most effective means to track the spread of the virus and establish the potential immunity with-in the population. The problem is again development, of faster and accurate tests. Currently there are over 100 tests for checking anti-bodies (serological tests) most of which are not FDA approved and have not been validated. The fear is that many are closer to snake oil and will not provide true results. Thereby giving people a false sense of security, believing they have immunity when in reality they don’t. From the beginning there have been tensions over the impact to business, and which businesses. With most retail, entertainment, lodging and service businesses shut down and restaurants having to resort to take-out only, our options for being out in public have been severely impacted. For the business community it has been nothing short of a nightmare. Even with the infusion of billions of dollars in programs from congress, the economy is predicted to contract by somewhere between 20% and 40% in the coming months. Some businesses will not return, because they couldn’t get any relief from the various programs. Or they suffered the cascade effect of loss of cash flow, bills piling up, and no chance to qualify for any of those government programs. Although more programs are on the horizon, it is still a crap shoot to get the applications in and enough money to carry one through. This is especially true for sole proprietors, many of whom have used creative financing to keep themselves afloat since the great recession. If your business was fortunate enough to get your application in

and get funded with a PPP loan or EIDL(Economic Impact Disaster Loan) – CONGRATULATIONS! If you applied and have not heard, phase next is on its way, keep your fingers crossed. You may get lucky yet. So… what can you as an individual do? How do you get the facts? First, stay away from the opinion shows and pages. Go to the sources – the County has been updating the health impacts every day, as has the state. Available on their respective websites. The economic side is much tougher to get a handle on. As long as businesses are not allowed to open the impact is evident. Don’t follow the stock market, if you have investments (IE. 401k or IRA, investment fund) it will only scare the pants off you. Remember that the stock market is not the economy. Unfortunately it is the most reported on aspect of the economy, but it is not the best indicator of what is actually going on with your daily life. Hurry up and wait – there are checks being sent out to everyone who has filed a tax return or is on Social Security, we have even heard of people who already have them. Once they arrive you will be able to start planning your strategy on how to move forward. Take advantage of food pantry programs like Feeding America and others, it can help reduce how much food you will need to buy and thereby stretch the budget out so you have more to work with. Stay local when you shop, we have three well stocked groceries and they are doing all they can to keep essential items on the shelves. Look for other opportunities and take advantage, don’t let your pride be your downfall. Be patient, we didn’t cause this, and we can’t predict when it will end. But as a community we can keep it under control by following the health guidelines. Do what you can to help a neighbor, check on shut-ins, and maintain your own health. Eventually we will come out on the other side – stronger for our efforts.

Latest County Health Order Changes Announced Starting Monday, April 27, the following will be allowed in the ocean and bays: swimming, surfing, paddelboarding and kayaking. Recreational boating is still banned. However, each city is responsible for deciding whether to open its beaches. Check before visiting. Beach parking lots need to remain closed. Monday, the County also opened two additional drive-through testing sites: one at the North Inland Live Well Center in Escondido and the other at the Public Health Center in Chula Vista. If you have symptoms and want to be tested, you must have a referral from your doctor. If you don’t have a doctor or insurance, call 2-1-1 and ask to speak to the nurse triage line to request a referral. Starting Friday, May 1, everyone must wear face coverings anywhere in public they come within 6 feet of another person. Also starting May 1, some restrictions will be relaxed for parks and golf courses if they can enforce social distancing. Operators of a park or golf course need to create and post a plan for how they will do that. Social distancing and safety templates for Parks & Beaches | Golf Courses If they maintain social distancing: Parks can reopen parking lots, with limitations. Park visitors can sit, lie down, picnic if they practice social distancing. Members of a family or household can play active sports, such as basketball.

YEARS

County Offers Loan Program To Help Small Businesses In Unincorporated Communities By Tracy DeFore, County of San Diego Communications Office The County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a $5 million loan program to help small businesses in the unincorporated area that have suffered losses because of COVID-19. The program will be overseen by the San Diego Foundation. The loans are intended to allow these businesses to stay afloat and recover quickly once the state’s stay-at-home health order is lifted. Unincorporated area businesses that employ fewer than 50 people (like most of Julian) may qualify for the noor low-interest loans. Applicants could request up to $50,000 and pay no more than 2% interest for a term of up to two years. Businesses that can retain and create jobs will have priority. The board action allows staff to set up an agreement with the San Diego Foundation to distribute the funds. The Foundation will ensure the loans are covered by the State of California Small Business Loan Guarantee Program or a comparable program. Loans paid off within 60 months are returned to the County as well as 95% of any defaulted loans. You can fill out a short questionaire to give them an idea of need on the County’s website: https://www.countynewscenter. com/loan-program-tohelp-small-businesses-inunincorporated-area/

WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER JULIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


April 29, 2020

2 The Julian News Featuring the Finest Local Artists

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Health and Personal Services

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile !

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

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Fraud And Coronavirus

(NAPSI)—The warning bells are ringing. From regulators, law enforcement agencies and consumer organizations around the globe, the message is clear: Fraudulent schemes related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic have arrived, and they are coming in many forms, from investment fraud to fake CDC emails to phishing scams. Job loss, financial strain, and social distancing are conditions that present fraudsters with an opportunity to pounce. A study by the FINRA Foundation, the BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust, Stanford, and the Federal Trade Commission found that social or physical isolation can increase anyone’s susceptibility to schemes.  In times like these, it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction. Now is the time to move slowly, pay attention to details and not make rash decisions. Dramatic news coverage of viral outbreaks and pandemics can be an opportunity for scammers to pump inaccurate information into the marketplace to try to manipulate markets and investors. Following these hints can help you keep your money and personal information safe:  Tips for Avoiding Coronavirus Scams 1.Ask and Check. Before you make any investment decision, ask and check to verify information about any individuals you are dealing with and any investment product you are considering. You can use FINRA BrokerCheck, a free online tool, to get information on brokers and investment advisers.  2.Be skeptical. If an unknown company becomes the subject of press releases, emails, and promotional materials hyping the company and its products to cure the latest pandemic, hit pause. Be wary if you are flooded with information over a short time, especially if the communications only focus on the upside with little or no mention of risk. 3.Read a company’s SEC filings.  Check the SEC’s EDGAR database to find out whether the company files with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Verify these reports against promotional information put out by the company or third-party promoters. Exercise caution if they don’t align. And be suspicious of solicitations to invest when products are still in the development stage, where no actual products are on the market, or if the company’s balance sheets only show losses. 4.Question companies new to the “cure” market. Changes to the name or business focus of a company to capitalize on pandemic fears may be a sign that a company is engaged in, or the subject of, a potential fraud. These changes can turn up in company press releases, Internet searches and, if the company files periodic reports, in the SEC’s EDGAR database. 5.Run it through the Scam Meter. Before you make any investment decision, the FINRA Scam Meter can help you tell if an investment you are thinking about might be a scam. Reliable Resources on Scams and Coronavirus Fortunately, there are a number of resources that provide accurate, unbiased information to help you spot and avoid coronavirus-related scams: •FINRA •Securities and Exchange Commission   •Federal Trade Commission  •Consumer Financial Protection Bureau  •Better Business Bureau. Learn More For further ideas on how to protect your money, or to file a complaint or a tip, visit www.FINRA.org/LearnMore.

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare. Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-5 pm

760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management closed 12-1 for lunch

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2020 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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April 29, 2020

Julian Mini Storage

Distance Learning And Caring On Earth Day 2020

GATED - SECURE STORAGE SITES

Mrs. Lindsey White and Mrs. Val Thompson are two Julian Elementary teachers. They are also sisters, local girls, teaching kindergarten and first grade in the same building! Last Wednesday was Earth Day, and they had prepared special “Earth Day Kits” for their students. Everything was sprayed with sanitizer before the kits were assembled days earlier. They coordinated with fifty families and personally delivered their gifts with protective gear and observed social distancing. Our district boundaries are unusually broad, and they traveled from Mesa Grande to Butterfield Ranch, all in that one day. Parents kept the drop-offs secret. Many preparatory phone calls, text messages, and emails were sent back and forth. Students were surprised when their masked and gloved teacher arrived in their driveway. Mrs. White reported, “They were so thankful! Happy to see familiar faces.” It was hard for these young and loving kiddos to stop themselves from running up to give their teacher a hug. Each gift included an Earth-related book, compostable pot with soil and seed packet, popsicle stick and cardboard to make a plant identifier, crayons, color sheets, an instructional poem, and even a lollipop treat.

Serving the CoMMunity of Julian Outside Storage - Trailers, Boats, Cars, RV’s Unit Sizes - 5x10, 10x10, 10x15, 10x20, 10x30

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email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

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Bruce Strachota Grading, Demolition, Underground Utilities, Dump Truck, Excavation, Loader, Bobcat Rental, Rock & Base

cell: 619-972-0152

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Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California

Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com Well Water Filtration

But the threat of a pandemic is different from that of a nerve agent, in that a disease can spread uncontrollably, long after the first carrier has succumbed. — Hannah Fry

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4 The Julian News

Julian

and

Back Country Happenings

Calendar

San Diego County Library Remind Us Of Their Online Presence

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4:00pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 2:30pm - After School STEM Flex your brain muscles with fun, educational activities for kids & teens. Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every Thursday Beginning Spanish for Adults Learn basic Spanish at the library. - 2:30pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Saturday Ebook Workshop Learn how to download Ebooks & audiobooks from the library for free! - 11am Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street Every day during business hours – Vet Connect VA services available at Julian Library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment.

April 29, 2020

Library buildings remain closed; Virtual services become more important to customers. In concert with National Public Library Week, the San Diego County Library (SDCL) announced its new public information campaign “The Library Is Always Here.” The campaign reminds the public that even though our stay-athome orders from the state of California and San Diego County’s Public Health Officer have not changed, the library services continue online. “Your library staff remain active behind the scenes while the buildings remain closed to the public,” said County Library Director Migell Acosta. The new “normal” has increased the number of requests for SDCL’s virtual services and the library staff are drawing on their passion and expertise to rapidly expand the digital library. “This includes a new way for cardholders to increase their learning opportunities online with Lynda.com, a LinkedIn product and a broad range of new magazines titles available through Overdrive via the Libby app. Be sure to give these a try!” Acosta said. But all this work would not be remotely possible if it wasn’t for a group of people that give their all to the mission of the San Diego County Library. Acosta is very proud of the work of the SDCL staff. “From getting the virtual bookshelves ready, to curating the important information you need at this moment, or finding ways to provide programs to the public, they do it all,” said Acosta. And that is why he is asking all of us to help celebrate them during National Library Week. National Library Week is an annual celebration of libraries and the wonderful people that work in them to make it all possible. Join us in celebrating Library Week, April 19-25, and be sure to follow us on social media, @sdcountylibrary on all platforms, to find out more. This is a small sample of all the work your library is still doing. Things may be different now, but one thing you can be sure of — The Library Is Always Here!

May

Friday, May 1 International Workers’ Day Sunday, May 10 Mother’s Day Wednesday, May 13 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, May 21 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm (via Zoom) Saturday, May 23 Julian Fiddle & Pickin’ LED E C Contest AN Town Hall C Monday, May 25 Memorial Day Holiday Wednesday, May 27 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

*** If we can provide even a few months of early warning for just one pandemic, the benefits will outweigh all the time and energy we're devoting. Imagine preventing health crises, not just responding to them. — Nathan Wolfe ***

Saturday, May 30 Grad Nite at Disneyland ? JUHS Seniors

June

Wednesday, June 10 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, June 10 Julian High School Board Meeting (Wednesday, prior to graduation – LCAP, Budget Approval)- 6pm (via Zoom) Thursday, June 11 JUHS Graduation - 6pm? Sunday, June 14 - TBA Julian Historical Society Wine, Cheese & More Party plus silent auction Wynola Pizza 5-8pm

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Sunday, June 21 Fathers Day Wednesday, June 24 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

s ing til t e Me Un All nded ice ot pe Sus ther N Fur

July

Saturday, July 4 Independence Day Parade Noon - ? Wednesday, July 8 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, July 22 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

August

Wednesday, August 12 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Wednesday, August 20 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm Wednesday, August 24 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. - DRIVE THRU

*** Even the pandemic flu of 1918 only killed one to two percent of the people who were infected. — Dr. Anthony Fauci ***

• On May 3, 1469, the Italian philosopher and writer Niccolo Machiavelli is born. Machiavelli became one of the fathers of modern political theory. The term "Machiavellian" is used to describe an action undertaken for gain without regard for right or wrong. • On May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover officially dedicates New York City's Empire State Building. The building went up in just over a year, under budget and well ahead of schedule. • On April 30, 1948, the Land Rover, a British-made all-terrain vehicle, debuts at an auto show in Amsterdam. The first Land Rover was made from an old American-made Willys-Overland Jeep and had a boxy, utilitarian design, four-wheel drive and a canvas roof. • On April 28, 1967, boxing champion Muhammad Ali refuses to be inducted into the U.S. Army,

citing religious reasons, and is stripped of his heavyweight title. Ali was convicted of draft evasion, but never served any of his five-year prison sentence. • On May 2, 1972, after nearly five decades as director of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover dies. By 1969 the media, the public and Congress had grown suspicious that the FBI might be abusing its authority. Congress passed laws requiring Senate confirmation of future FBI directors and limiting their tenure to 10 years. • On April 29, 1992, a jury in the Los Angeles suburb of Simi Valley acquits four police officers who had been charged with using excessive force in arresting black motorist Rodney King. The verdict prompted the L.A. riots. The arson and looting finally ended three days later. • On April 27, 2009, the American auto giant General Motors announced plans to discontinue its 80-year-old Pontiac brand. Initially known for making sedans, Pontiac gained acclaim in the 1960s for its fast, sporty "muscle cars," including the GTO, Firebird and Trans Am. © 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month Temporarily In The The Historical Society Building Library Community 2133Room 4th Street

7:00pm

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Our adjacent BLACK OAK CABIN provides another option for your getaway! www.butterfieldbandb.com

&

www.blackoakcabin.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262


April 29, 2020

Russell Clarkson Weaver

March 23, 1921 - April 13, 2020

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

In Honor of My Father

Russell Clarkson Weaver was born March 23, 1921 in Armour, South Dakota. He died at age 99, shortly after Easter Day on April 13, 2020, surrounded by the love of the family that adored him. Russell is survived by his three daughters and their husbands: Cathy and Robert Monsibais, Nancy and Henry Younce, and Patty and Greg Layne, in addition to six granddaughters, three grandsons, and six great-grandchildren, brother, Charles Weaver, and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his beloved first wife, Lorraine, who died in 1994. A few years later, he married Laurel Sederberg, who died in 2017. He always said he was lucky to have been married to two such wonderful women. Russell lived for many years in Bakersfield before moving to Sacramento in 1969. He spent his career as an auditor for the California Franchise Tax Board, and his accounting skills carried over to other areas of his life. He was organized and meticulous with everything from his tools to his paperwork and he had a file for everything. He was a gifted woodworker and built many beautiful pieces of furniture. Throughout his life, Russell was active in his community. He was involved with the YMCA, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, and the Sacramento Railroad Museum where he served as a docent for many years. He loved playing golf with family and friends. Russell was the patriarch of our family and the center of our world. He loved his family and he was a genuinely good man, kind, funny, honest and sweet. He was proud of his service in the Navy during World War II and was scheduled to go on the next Honor Flight. We have lost another member of the Greatest Generation. Services will be held in Sacramento CA.

Food Options Julian Union School District School Lunch Options*

continued until June

(not available Saturday & Sunday)

Julian High School parking lot 11:30-12:00 noon Old Dairy bus stop 11:30-12:00 noon Shelter Valley Community Center 11:30-12:00 noon Butterfield Ranch bus stop 12:15-12:30 PM

*Locations and times may change based upon the variable nature of this situation

All FEEDING SAN DIEGO Mobile Pantries are still scheduled as planned, we will be transitioning to a drive-thru distribution model at all sites (excluding “drop sites”) to limit the spread of COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Please stay in your cars until the Feeding San Diego mobile pantry arrives, thereby avoiding unnecessary contact with others. Then IN AN ORDERLY LINE follow the directions from a representative. Everyone will be served. Since this is a new process please remember to be patient and courteous. The food will be placed in the TRUNK (only), by a volunteerbe sure there is easily accessible space. Thank you for your cooperation. Colts Burger Bar - inside the Julian station will be open on weekends for carryout orders from 11-6 pm. Please feel free to call or text your order to 619-654-5693. Thank you for your support and patronage. Quecho Elevated Mexican Eatery - still opened for take out! Hours for take-out will be daily 11-7 (except Wednesday’s when we are closed). We are changing things up a bit to keep our customers and staff as safe as possible! Take-out orders must be called in 760.765.1560, payment will be taken over the phone and delivery will be curbside! Heros Deli - NOW Open for Take Out, 12-6, Friday thru Monday Soups and Such - Take Out Only, Regular Hours Julian Beer Company - Open for Take Out Orders Wynola Flats Produce - We will be open regular hours for the foreseeable future. We have been cleared by the County to operate with the only restriction being that 6 feet of social distancing must be maintained. We are exploring food box delivery and may offer this ourselves or through partners in the near future. In the meantime if you learn of anyone who is homebound and cut off from food supplies please let us know ASAP. We are committed to making sure that all of us can access healthy food within our own community. We will also be continuing to work with the Santa Ysabel Farmers Market and we hope to offer an alternate sales point for their produce until the County has lifted the restrictions on Farmers Markets and normal operations have resumed. Any questions? Just ask. We are blessed to have each other and we will get through this together.

My father died in the Korean War. He commanded a B-29 bomber in the 19th bomb group in the 93rd bomb squadron. It was a training mission and out of eighteen men, only three survived. Two crew members survived and one trainee. One crew member, Chuck Rees is still alive today. That fateful night took place on October 31st, 1952. That was also the night my brother was born. The circumstances are written down in a book, “No Sweat”. After retiring from his civilian job, Bud Ferrell wrote a series of narratives about his Korean War experiences from the time he signed up until he left the air force. He put them into this book. My Dad was born on October 3rd, 1919. I know that he served in the Army-Air corps in the Pacific during WWII and he was a policeman possibly before and definitely after his service in that war. He went back to being a policeman after the war and was called back to service for the Korean War. He was drafted. He was the third of three children. I was told that soon after he was born, his mother and father broke up. Grandpa wanted to honky tonk and Grandma wanted to stay home with the children. So they divorced. At some point, Grandma remarried. She married Frank Weston who had two daughters of his own. Grandpa Weston was a construction contractor who lost his business during the depression and I never learned any more about that part of my Dad’s childhood. Mom and Dad met at a college party. They were both students at San Diego State. This is one of my favorite family stories. Mom was introduced to four young men named Bob standing side by side. As school progressed and she saw Bob Harvey on campus, she would say “Hello Bob.” Not knowing why she remembered his name, he was very impressed that she remembered him. One day he asked her out on a date and eventually they were engaged and then on July 4th, 1943 they were married on a 48 hour pass. At that time Dad was in the military. In 1947 my older sister was born in Dayton Ohio, I was born in San Diego in November of 1950 and my brother was born the night my Dad died, October 31st, 1952. I have the telegram that Mom received telling her that Dad was missing in action and I have the telegram telling her that he was presumed dead. When I look at them I get tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat, even after all of these years. I think my reactions are more for my Mom than they are for me. I know that Mom’s heart was broken when she finally came to understand that Dad was dead. When I was in my twenties, his sister, my aunt Ginny told me that mom didn’t want to believe that Dad was dead until she just deny it. Through the years she had other boyfriends and I know some proposed to her, but she just couldn’t bring herself to marry after her marriage with Dad. She once told me that their honeymoon lasted throughout their marriage and you just can’t follow that. I remember seeing a photo of Dad in a beekeeper’s outfit and my sister once found paperwork showing Dad’s intent to buy a chicken ranch in Victorville after he retired but I have no actual memories of my Dad. My Dad was a very honorable man. When he commanded the B-29 during the Korean War he was an old man of thirty-two with a crew of mostly eighteen year olds. San Diego State has erected an Obelisk outside the student center with the names of alumni who died fighting for our country. My Dad’s name is on that obelisk. The San Diego Police Department Museum on College Avenue has a wall of honor for officers who died serving their country. Dad is on that wall of honor. A flagpole with names of men who died serving their country was erected in the 1950s and has been in several locations at the San Diego Zoo and at the Armory north of the zoo. Dad is one of the men it is dedicated to. Near the old Navy Hospital in Balboa Park is a plaque dedicated to police officers who died serving their country, one in each war so far. My Dad is one of those officers. I found out that my Dad’s name is on the walls of The Court of The Missing in The Punch Bowl Military Cemetery of the Pacific... in Honolulu. I think my cousin also sent me a photo of his name on a memorial in Okinawa and he is on the Korean War Memorial in Washington D.C. These are all wonderful tributes. However, never knowing my father because he left when I was just eighteen months old, and knowing that my mother spent a life of the hardship of a single woman trying to earn a legal paycheck in the 1950s and 1960s with a broken heart, I can speak for myself and I’m sure I can speak for her in saying I would rather have had my father with us. These days of having to stay at home to protect ourselves from what may be a virulently killer virus is not a problem for me. People who are protesting because they want to go to the beach or to a park, not because they need to open their businesses back up, but only because they can’t stand to stay at home, worry me. I think they are spoiled brats who are used to having tantrums to get their way and I think they are people who think that following the laws of our country and mandates of our state aren’t important to them. If you are bored while staying at home then I think you are probably a boring person and you need to work on that. These are my thoughts

The Julian News 5

EAST OF PINE HILLS

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Bird Songs In Bucharest, Romania, the trees outside our apartment window are filled with birds and their songs fill the air. This is annoying before dawn but, en fin, annoyance is a small price to pay for such a serenade. Back here in Julian it was a bit of a mystery—there are birds. We know that because they eat the birdseed in the feeder with the speed of summer lightning. Ravens caw, jays jay but actual birdsong….well, it’s there but not up front and center like the Metropolitan Opera of Bucharest birds. Until now. Have you noticed? There are more birds singing. Or they are louder, perhaps. And the sky is really, really blue again. You thought it was blue before and the remembered blue skies of childhood were, probably, the imagination running….no, the sky is that remembered blue once more. At the risk of being ostracized from the modern world, we’ll say it: it’s a joy and relief to see and hear the world in bright sound and color. And staying quietly at home day after day isn’t bad either. There is music on the (okay, old-fashioned) CD, there are books. The summer garden is planted and we’re going through family photos, trying to sort and make sense and put in order. There is e-mail, ZOOM and the phone; we aren’t alone. There are also the cats, horses, chickens and occasional neighbors coming for eggs, standing more than six feet distant. We have the space. Projects are getting done, corners that haven’t been cleaned…scratch that one. Projects are getting done, new ones discovered. We’re exceptionally fortunate in Julian with our mountains, room to move around, the blue sky and birdsong. Especially now the blue, blue sky and the melodious birdsong. Appreciate them—it won’t last. Life will get back to normal.


6 The Julian News

Julian

and

Back Country Dining

Lake Cuyamaca

Julian

and

April 29, 2020

Brewery Guide

Julian

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

8am - 8pm

760•765•0700

r o F n Ope e Ountts• k Discou a T • cals

Take Out Only From Side Door - Call for Availability

Lo

15027 Highway 79 - at the Lake Julian

Julian and Wynola

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

Open For Take Out Only in Wynola 2119 Main St. Julian

4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

COLEMAN CREEK CENTER

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER VISA/ MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

(2 BLOCKS OFF MAIN ON WASHINGTON)

OPEN 7 DAYS

11:30AM - 8:30PM

760 765-1810

SENIORS & PIZZA dow n i W THURSDAYS ru h T e v ur Dri $ —

O e s U e Pleas

6

Beer on Tap

YOUR CHOICE + SOFT DRINK Drive Thru Service For To-Go Orders

760-765-2472 Wynola

Julian Casual, Relaxed

open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun Growlers Out offering The Door on - tasters Weekends - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road

1921 Main Street 760 765 2900 Serving Organic Take OutCoffee, Tea, Breakfast, Beer, Regular Hours Wine & MORE.

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

Julian and Santa Ysabel

CLOSED Until Further Notice

Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

Whole Pies Only Two locations to serve you:

Julian

2124 Third Street one block off Main Main Street

760 765 0832

www.juliantea.com

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

Breakfast served Thursday - Monday

MORE THAN JUST GREAT PIZZA!

— Take Out — Curb Side Pick Up

Family Special

Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

Julian

Family Friendly

Santa Ysabel

2- Peperoni Pizzas Julian 1- Cheese Pizza 1 Pasta Dinner 1- Caesar Salad 4- Wynola Fountain Drinks

$39.95 Take and Bake 5 Partially baked Pizzas

2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

Open 7 Days a Week

JULIAN GRILLE

r o F y l t l i Ca labil i a Av

Purchase 4 of your favorite pizzas get the 5th FREE

(760) 765-1004

3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR

Lunch and Dinner • Patio Dining 765-0173 2224 Main Street •

Chef’s Corner

Mid-Week Dinner Specials

Black Beans Packed With Antioxidants

onditioned Tea Room C r i A *** It's the advantage of the virus to spread, and you can only spread when you infect people and they infect other people without necessarily killing them. So if you had 100 percent mortality, the potential pandemic would almost self-eliminate itself. — Dr. Anthony Fauci *** 1. ACRONYMS: What does the ZIP postal code stand for? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the longest river in the United States? 3. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What was Walt Disney’s middle name? 4. BUSINESS: Which company owns the Lamborghini line of sports cars and SUVs? 5. FOOD & DRINK: What is the primary ingredient in the snack hummus? 6. MYTHOLOGY: Where was Achilles’ vulnerable spot? 7. MOVIES: In the thriller “Die Hard,” what was the name of the high-rise building where the action took place? 8. SCIENCE: Which part of the atom has no electrical charge? 9. ENTERTAINERS: Which actress/singer’s nickname was The Divine Miss M? 10. TELEVISION: Which 1970s comedy series spawned the spinoff series “Maude”? Answers on page 11

I’ve always been a firm believer in the power of a well-stocked pantry, and one of the main staples in my pantry has always been a variety of canned beans. Although researchers haven’t come up with a foolproof way to avoid the more “musical” and indelicate side effect of beans, they have found yet another reason why you should eat more of them. In addition to their high protein and fiber content, a new study finds that beans, particularly black beans, are a rich but overlooked source of antioxidants and may provide health benefits similar to some common fruits, including grapes, apples and cranberries. In a study that appeared in The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers tested the antioxidant activity of flavonoids -- plant pigments -- found in the skin of 12 common varieties of dry beans. Antioxidants destroy free

radicals, which are highly active chemicals whose excess has been linked to heart disease, cancer and aging. Black beans came out on top, having more antioxidant activity, gram for gram, than other beans, followed by red, brown, yellow and white beans, in that order. In general, darker-colored seed coats were associated with higher

levels of flavonoids, and therefore higher antioxidant activity, says Dr. Clifford W. Beninger, who has done research for the USDA’s Sugarbeet and Bean Research Unit. “Black beans are really loaded with antioxidant compounds. We didn’t know they were that potent until now,” says Beninger. Beninger acknowledges that some of the healthy antioxidants in continued on page 11


April 29, 2020

Antique Bed

This unusual bed with decorative bright paint sold recently for $12,500. It was made about 1830. There are pegs to use for “sacking” to hold the mattress, not side holes for roping the bed. It can be converted to hold a modern mattress. Can an antique bed be used in a modern home without difficulties? Yes and no. The beds used before about 1900

The Julian News 7

are shorter and narrower than the standard sizes used today. That means that to use the beds, the fitted sheets, blankets, box springs and mattresses may have to be custom made. It might be possible to use toppers or foam rubber instead of springs. But then the top of the bed will be lower than normal. Until the late 1800s, the mattress was held in the bed frame with wooden slats or rope. An old rope bed will have holes in the side rails to "rope the bed." Some old beds have pegs in the side rails. These hold a mattress with "sacking," a piece of sailcloth with eyelets that match the positions of the pegs. It is strung into place in the center of the frame to hold the mattress. Ask a local antique dealer, historical house curator or search online for "roping a bed" for instructions. An antique bed is shorter than a new one. Sometimes it is best to use just the head- and footboards and buy a modern

metal frame. A colorfully painted antique Empire bed made in New England was auctioned by Nye & Co. recently for $12,500. *** Q: I'd like to know a reasonable value of an old portable record player, a Califone Model 1430K. I'd like to buy one and this model reminds me of the one I used in school when I was younger. Can you help? A: The Califone Model 1430K phonograph was made in the 1970s and '80s and popular with schools, libraries and churches. It was a solid-state phonograph with a built-in speaker and a 4-speed turntable that played 45, 33, 16 and 78 RPM records. It had some useful features, including a built-in 45 adaptor and an on/off knob with a Pause position. Older models were blue or gray and had a metal turntable platter. Newer ones were made in gray with a plastic platter. But while considered "portable" in a case with a removable lid,

it weighs almost 20 pounds. A working Califone Model 1430K sells for $50 to $75. *** CURRENT PRICES Oil lamp, glass, emerald green font, beaded heart pattern, clear tapered base, 11 inches, $70. Advertising poster, Drink Orange Crush, woman floating on lake in inner tube, paper, frame, 19 1/2 x 15 1/2 inches, $150. Folk art cane, Eagle's head handle, black paint remnants, shaft with carved feathers, metal ferrule, American, 1800s, 35 1/2 inches, $210. Fraktur picture, house blessing inside heart, flowers & vines, watercolor details, grain painted frame, 1800s, 7 x 6 inches, $370. *** TIP: Felt-tip markers in shades of brown and black can be used to camouflage a small nick in furniture. You can use several markers and blend the color.

For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. What 1987 inductee into the Pro Football Hall of Fame served as executive director of the National Football League Players’ Association from 19832008? 2. A bronze statue of what Kentucky Derby - winning

racehorse was unveiled in front of a Churchill Downs entrance in April 2009? 3. What 1990 book by author/ journalist Buzz Bissinger documented a high-school football team in Odessa, Texas, and was the inspiration for two TV series and a feature film? 4. Kyle Orton, who played quarterback for five NFL teams from 2005-14, played football at what Big Ten university? 5. Born in Vienna in 1913, what pioneering athletic coach and trainer helped Roger Bannister run the first recorded sub-4minute mile in May 1954? 6. What former Major League Baseball pitcher inspired the nickname for ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction surgery? 7. The city of Beaumont, Texas, is home to a museum and visitor center dedicated to what legendary female multisport athlete? Answers on page 11


April 29, 2020

8 The Julian News

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

We use words when we speak or write. We use them in songs, stories, poems, letters and speeches! We use words to tell others what we are thinking, how we are feeling or how things work. We use words for fun too! We love to “play” on words in jokes and riddles, and in other ways.

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2020 V16-17

Don’t be chicken! Some of the words are long, but I sprinkled in letters to help you fit them into the crossword!

personification

12 9

3

opoeia

6

t onoma

Play On Words

spoonerism Read the clues to fill in the crossword puzzle with different kinds of word play that we have fun with: palindrome 3 4 n o ti ra te alli 1. a ______________ word shrinks a word making it easier to say; airplane = plane 5 1 2 2. word that is spelled the same backwards and forwards; kayak L O 3. series of words with the same starting sound; big bad boy L rhyme 7 4. words with the same letters, but moved around; cat - act eponym twister 5. words that resemble the sound they are talking about; whiz, bang 6 joke 6. set of “opposite” words; jumbo shrimp, small crowd T 8 clipped 7. swapping of letters or syllables in words; I have a bill 9 bunny rabbit = runny babbit in my bill to Y T 11 10 8. a tongue __________ puts together pay my words that are hard to say in a row; portmanteau bill. riddle anagram Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers n o r oxymo 9. an exaggerated statement; I died laughing R 13 10. putting two words together to make a new 12 word; squeeze + crunch = scrunch 15 N I 11. words that have the same ending sound; very cherry 14 hyperbole 12. a humor-filled story or trick; knock, knock! A. receive the message 13. giving human-like abilities to something non-human; B. to use words with more 1. man of few words the wind howled, time marches on Match each 2. man of his word than one meaning in a joke 14. a word named after a real person; teddy bear (Theodore Roosevelt) expression 3. get the word C. to keep quiet, secret 15. a clever question that needs thought to be answered; What loses to its D. keeps his promise 4. play on words its head each morning, and gets it back in the evening? A pillow! meaning: E. doesn’t talk very much 5. mum is the word

DR I P

A

UK

u

B

zz

Buzz

SN

AP

Word Ex-Change!

Dear Forest,

At the picnic today, a fast pitch from the baseball pitcher broke a pitcher, and the pieces flew into a warm pitch patch that sealed a hole in the walkway! A bowl of squash skidded off the table and squashed tomatoes in a basket. After I clean the mess and the rest I will need a rest! 3 4 And so I seal my letter with a seal to send to you! 2 5 P.S. Follow the numbers 1 to see it. 6 44 42 Your Pal, 7 43 41 Squeak 8 10 11 40 12 9 39 13 38 14 37 15 28 36 16 29 26 25 17 35 19 24 18 30 27 34 20 31 21 23 33 32 22

Too Hot to Hoot! mom dad pop did eve dud nun eye bob tot

noon deed peep toot

level racecar madam

snail

1. Change the “sn” to “tr” and see the “goo”.

__ __ __ __ __ moo

2. Add an “n” to this word and you’ll know what the cow said and what she jumped over.

fender

3. Change the first letter to “b” and you’ll know what happened to my car.

Potato Chips

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ bike

4. Change the “k” to “t” and you’ll see what a dog gave me as I was riding by.

__ __ __ __

5. Change the “ch” to “cl” and it will close your snack bag.

chip __ __ __ __

A ‘palindrome’ is a word that can be read forward and backward. Sometimes a person thinks up a sentence that can be read forward and backward too! Read these words and sentences, then find them in the puzzle!

sees kayak radar

Step on no pets. Was it a rat I saw? No lemon, no melon. Too hot to hoot!

You can make a play on words just by exchanging letters in words. After you finish the activity below, try to write one of your own and share it with a friend.

!

ew Wh

It really

is.

T T K U P U N V O

G O S K R S E S U

R O T B E C E Y P

M H A A O E C O E

A O E B S B P D V

D T R T F A U N E

A T W S W D E O S

M O X I P U W L T

Y H K K H N A E E

X O R A Y D S M P

U O P Y E I I O O

C T O A R D T N N

X V P K A L A N N

W L F O C C R O O

D J O N E O A M P

E S B O C C T E E

E W R B A H I L T

D K F W R T S O S

F W V A J Y A N P

I F J A N F W M O

G H Y D A D Z J N

F R A D A R A M G

P L L E V E L O Z

N O O N N E M M Y

T O O T D U T I B

S P E E P B N W M

Solution page 11

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2020

Initiative will build on California Volunteers’ efforts to establish a volunteer corps to help with the state’s response during COVID-19 Interested volunteers can visit CaliforniansForAll.ca.gov With COVID-19 creating a critical need for community support and volunteers across the state, Governor Gavin Newsom today announced California Volunteers’ #CaliforniansForAll service initiative to connect Californians with safe volunteer opportunities and encourage those unable to physically volunteer to think creatively about ways to make a difference in their communities. “Across the state, Californians are asking how they can help their neighbors during this crisis and we want to channel that energy into our Californians For All service initiative,” said Governor Newsom. “Whether it’s volunteering at a food bank to feed older Californians, blood drives or supporting local nonprofits, there’s no shortage of opportunities for Californians to step up and meet the moment.” #CaliforniansForAll unites organizations in desperate need of volunteers with Californians looking to serve and share their commitment to their neighbors, while ensuring stay-at-home and physical distancing protocols are met. The initiative will focus on recruiting younger Californians to help the most vulnerable throughout the state, including the elderly who are at higher risk of infection. Californians are encouraged to join #CaliforniansForAll by signing up at californiansforall. ca.gov. Participants will receive an email from California Volunteers with information on what they can do in real time to help out, and those who opt in to volunteer will be contacted by local nonprofit partners when opportunities open up in their area. “Californians are united and there are no limits to our incredible creativity to help and support each other in this moment,” said California Chief Service Officer Josh Fryday. “California businesses, nonprofits and community organizations all play a vital role in the #CaliforniansForAll effort, and the residents of this state are stepping up when they are needed most.” "Californians across the state have been rising up to meet this moment and create a culture of me to WE,” said First Partner and honorary chair of California Volunteers Commission Jennifer Siebel Newsom. “I am proud that #CaliforniansForAll will enable even more Californians to engage in volunteerism, and help our communities get through this crisis together." The initiative by California Volunteers will partner with a coalition of nonprofit organizations – including the California Association of Food Banks, United Ways of California, the American Red Cross, media platforms, businesses such as LinkedIn, and leading entertainment companies like United Talent Agency (UTA), Westbrook Media and Creative Artists Agency (CAA) – to offer a variety of volunteer opportunities. From donating to food banks, checking on neighbors, reinforcing the need for physical distancing, assembling hygiene kits, providing online tutoring, and creating neighborhood chalk art competitions, Californians are uniting to help support each other like never before. Using #CaliforniansForAll, volunteeers will be able to share their efforts and stories on social media, amplifying our collective impactful efforts and uniting the sense of community that ties all of us together. For more information on the state’s response to COVID-19, please visit: covid19.ca.gov.

...jokes, puns, riddles and rhymes.

We enjoy playing with words...

C

Governor Newsom Launches Californians For All Service Initiative

How And Why To Keep Kids On A Schedule During School Closures (StatePoint) School closures have forced families nationwide to readjust to the current reality. However, a sense of structure is important for children’s developmental growth. To create a routine for your kids that sticks, consider the following tips: • Just because there is no formal school day doesn’t mean kids should sleep in or stay up late at night. Keep the same bedtimes, wake-up routines and mealtimes you always maintained during a regular school week. Doing so will bookend the mornings and evenings with a sense of normalcy. • Mimic a school day to the best of your ability. Use the distance-learning tools your child’s teachers offer as well as other educational apps and resources to have kids focus on different school subjects. This will help break up the day into little chunks just as would happen in

the classroom. Be sure to build in time for art projects, exercise and music. Most importantly, don’t forget “recess.” If possible, allow children to play in the backyard where they can socially distance from neighbors, or set up an area of your home for playtime. • Evenings are a good time to relax and unwind together. Play board games, watch your children’s favorite movies or even use the many resources available online to enjoy a virtual walking tour of a museum, botanical garden or zoo. This is also a good time to allow children to connect with their friends using video chat or with family members they are not currently able to see in-person. • For many children, screens are their greatest distraction. For this reason, one of the best ways to ensure your children stay focused on the schedule you create for them is by managing

their screen time. One easy way to do so with less direct intervention from you (since you are likely busy yourself!) is by using a screen time monitoring and scheduling tool like the OurPact app. Get started by signing up for a free account and pairing your children’s devices. From there, you will be able to manage

devices remotely to create a schedule that keeps kids offline when they need to be focused on other things. It can also be customized to allow children to visit and use only certain learning sites or apps during particular hours of the day. Because this schedule lives on the children’s devices as well, you’ll be giving them the comfort of a routine.

To learn more or download, visit OurPact.com. During these challenging times, it can be tempting to let your family routine fly out the window. By using new tools such as distance-learning programming and schedule management apps, you can keep kids to a schedule that makes them ultimately happier and healthier.


April 29, 2020

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

Prop. 13 Opponents Turn In Their Signatures

by Jon Coupal

With great fanfare, the proponents of an initiative to raise property taxes in California by $12 billion a year announced they had turned in over 1.7 million signatures to qualify the measure. Their press release was headlined “Schools and Communities First make history with most ever signatures submitted. ”It’s a wonder they didn’t break their arms trying to pat themselves on the back. For those who have forgotten, the measure, entitled the California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act of 2020, would remove one of Proposition 13’s most important protections – the limitation on annual increases in taxable value – from business and commercial properties. The increased tax burden would be passed along to consumers and taxpayers who are already struggling with California’s high cost of living. Multiple efforts to “split” the property tax roll have failed over the last 40 years. Most never made it to the ballot and the one that did, voters rejected. Prop. 13’s continued popularity remains remarkably strong to this day as evidenced by a recent Public Policy Institute of California poll showing that a strong majority of Californians believe that the initiative is “mostly a good thing.” One recent effort by the proponents of split roll was targeted for the 2018 ballot. Although they collected sufficient signatures, they missed the 2018 ballot, so that measure was then kicked over to the November 2020 ballot. Knowing that the proposal had numerous drafting errors, the proponents chose to start the process all over again. According to documents from the California Secretary of State, for the two qualification efforts combined, proponents raised about $17 million. It’s a cautionary tale for their wouldbe donors. Just because some political interests have massive stockpiles of cash, doesn’t mean they spend it wisely. As is true with most initiatives, proponents had to pay professional signature gatherers, the hired guns who stand outside of big-box stores and grocery

retailers trying to convince people to sign. It is a cutthroat business and some initiative proponents have, in the past, paid as much as $10 per valid signature. Even at inflated prices, proponents had to engage in deceptive practices to get the number of signatures they needed. Paid signature gatherers frequently had signs on their tables that read, “Protect Proposition 13, Sign Here.” How many signatories mistakenly signed an anti-Prop. 13 initiative thinking that they were doing the opposite? Not to burst their bubble, but voters need to be reminded that what split roll supporters did pales in comparison to the historic signature gathering effort of Proposition 13 in 1978. Unlike the modern day attack on Prop 13, 100 percent of the signature gathering for Proposition 13 was done by volunteers, with only $28,500 spent in qualifying the measure (covering costs for printing and mailing the petitions). More than 1.2 million signatures were submitted, which represented more than 12 percent of the 9.58 million registered voters at that time. The number of valid signatures in Los Angeles County alone was sufficient to qualify the initiative statewide. By comparison, while split roll proponents submitted 1.7 million raw signatures, this represents only 8 percent of the state’s 20.66 million registered voters. Between now and November, this column will deal with all the substantive problems presented by this horrible tax proposal. For example, when even notable Democrats like Willie Brown come out against it, and county assessors say that it would be virtually impossible to implement, that’s a clue that voters need to scrutinize the proposal carefully. At the moment, proponents might boast about the number of signatures they have gathered, but that is no measure of how it will fare at the polls. They should also heed the wisdom of Proverbs 16, which reminds us that pride goeth before the fall. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA).

*** Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all. — Emily Dickinson ***

• Humans are the only primates without pigment in the palms of their hands. • American alligator blood contains a serum that is so effective at combating bacteria and viruses, even alligators that lose limbs in mucky swamps often avoid infection. • Irish author James Joyce was a great fan of Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen's plays. How great? He learned basic Norwegian just to send Ibsen a fan letter. • There's a Facebook group called "Best Day of My Life: When I Realized the Old Brewers Logo Was a Ball & Glove AND the Letters M & B." • China has the largest population of smokers in the world -- 316 million people -accounting for nearly one-third of the world's smokers and 40% of tobacco consumption worldwide. But just more than 2% of Chinese women smoke, compared with more than half of all Chinese men. • The term "deadline" dates to the American Civil War. Lines in the dirt would be drawn around prisoners. If they crossed one, they would be executed by their guards. Not surprisingly, both prisoners and guards soon took to calling such a line the "deadline." • Philematology is the scientific study of kissing. • Research has shown that men who kiss their wives goodbye live about five years longer, make up to 30% more money and are involved in fewer car accidents than those who don't. • As if that weren't enough, kissing even helps keep your teeth healthy, by causing an increase in saliva, which helps wash away plaque. *** Thought for the Day: "Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within." -- James Arthur Baldwin ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** There is no governing structure for a pandemic, and little more than vague political pressure to ensure limited access to life-sparing tools and medicines for more than half the world population. — Laurie Garrett ***


April 29, 2020

10 The Julian News

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Dear EarthTalk: Now that Earth Day is 50 years old, I’m wondering how it originally started and whether the Coronavirus put a damper on the celebration this year? – Mary W. Seattle, WA Indeed, on April 22, Earth Day celebrated its 50th anniversary. Back in 1970, some 20 million Americans took to the streets, parks and auditoriums to demonstrate against pollution and other environmental ills stemming from 150 years of industrial development. The idea for that first Earth Day sprung from Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, who was troubled by the environmental deterioration he witnessed around the country and thought he could borrow some of the organizing tactics from the student-led anti-Vietnam War movement to infuse youth energy into raising public consciousness about air and water pollution. Nelson brought on a young lawyer/ activist named Denis Hayes to make it happen. At first the idea was to hold a nationwide “teach-in” on college campuses but it soon morphed into a nationwide celebration that all Americans could join, with thousands of rallies happening simultaneously within communities and on college campuses coast-to-coast. Earth Day continued to be celebrated across the country throughout the 1970s and 1980s and in 1990 went global. Hayes and company mobilized leaders on every continent, with some 200 million people in 141 countries taking part in the festivities. Environmentalists credit the 1990 celebration with giving a huge boost to recycling efforts worldwide and helping pave the way for 1992’s Earth Summit in Brazil. While organizers of this year’s 50th anniversary of Earth Day had big plans for mass global events focusing on reducing waste, fighting climate change and transitioning to clean energy, the global Coronavirus lockdown led them down a different path. Instead of getting together and locking hands in person to show popular support for strong environmental protections, activists and sympathizers gathered virtually all week, tuning into live talks and other streaming and interactive online programming curated by Earth Day Network and its partner Exponential Roadmap. Although it’s too early to tell, just because green-minded people all over the world couldn’t get together physically to celebrate doesn’t mean this year’s Earth Day will be less impactful. For one, we’ve all now gotten a taste of how clean our environment could be if we kept up just some of the restraint on resource use that the lockdown has caused. Covid-19 may also be helping more of us to contemplate other aspects of our human relationship with our environment, especially since the virus was brought on in part by human-induced climate change and by dangerous forms of animal agribusiness. As we enjoy cleaner air, more birdsong and parades of wildlife in our own backyards, not to mention the huge uptick in multi-generational residential gardening efforts. Earth Day has provided all of us with at least one day to focus our daily activities—even in quarantine— through the lens of the planet and what we can do to leave it better than we found it. Quarantine or not, the annual celebration of Earth Day serves as a reminder that Earth Day is every day. So if you didn’t plant a tree, re-think your household waste stream, or resolve to start biking to work once the office opens back up, maybe now is the time? CONTACTS: Earth Day Week, wedonthavetime.org/event/ earthdayweek; Earth Day Network, earthday.org; Exponential Roadmap, exponentialroadmap.org. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https://earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

Our friend JP Torres form the Poway Home Depot dropped off Masks, Gloves, Hand Sanitizer, Bottled Water and other supplies to our back country fire fighters mat station 56. Home Depot does so much to support to our communities and this is a really great show of support. Thank yous also have to go out to Anthony and Mike from the Carmel Mountain Home Depot. Michelle Dutro from Inner Norths Star Retreat Center coordinated the donation and although none of this could have been done without Zip the Service Dog, in typical fashion he could not be bothered to do more than receive some love. Thank You Home Depot for supporting our back country communities! PS - JP and Home Depot were the inspiration behind the Blood, Sweat and Orange IPA earlier this year from Nickle Beer.

How to Stay Healthy While Social Distancing (StatePoint) COVID-19 has the public rethinking how they stay healthy -- both physically and mentally. Even those in good health can start to feel anxious and fearful when the words ‘pandemic’ and ‘social distancing’ are mentioned. But can you stay active and mentally healthy while social distancing? The answer is a resounding yes. While routines have changed, it’s critical that people keep exercising and eating nutritious meals, since the body is often able to better fight off illnesses when it’s healthy and strong. Taking these steps helps fight off stress, which most people are experiencing right now in one way or another. Here is some advice from Cigna chief nursing officer, Mary Picerno to help stay healthy, both physically and mentally, during this time. • Get Outside: While it’s important to limit physical continued on page 11


Stay Healthy

continued from page 10 interactions, getting outside for a run, walk or bicycle ride is a great way to boost endorphins and enjoy fresh air. Just make sure to maintain six feet between yourself and others. If weather or other reasons limit your ability to go outside, many companies and gyms are offering free online exercises right now. Endorphins have been found to reduce stress, increase feelings of happiness and help fight against depression. • Get Proper Nutrition: Add fruits and vegetables to your plate for colorful, nutrient-rich meals. Vegetables also are a good source of fiber. Eating well will help you feel better and give you energy to keep moving. Now is a great time to try that new recipe or food subscription box! • Stay Hydrated: Drinking plenty of water can help prevent dehydration. According to the Centers for Disease Control

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because you can’t be with friends and family in person doesn’t mean you can’t stay in touch. Set up time to connect with video chats, phone calls and emails. Staying connected doesn’t have to be high-tech. Have kids or just a kid at heart? Write encouraging

and Prevention, dehydration can cause unclear thinking and mood swings. Not sure how much to drink? Many medical professionals suggest following the 8x8 rule, eight ounces of water eight times a day. • Stay Connected: Just

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April 29, 2020

Chef’s Corner continued from page 6

beans will be lost in water upon cooking, but says antioxidant levels will still remain high. Although dry beans were used in this study, frozen or canned beans may have similar antioxidant activity, he adds. The study adds antioxidants to a growing list of healthy chemicals found in beans, which also are rich in protein, carbohydrates, folate, calcium and fiber. Researchers hope to use information gleaned from this study to help develop new varieties of beans that pack even more disease-fighting power. Meanwhile, U.S. consumers gobble up an estimated 8 pounds of beans per person each year, with pinto beans and navy beans being the most popular. Red beans also enjoy immense popularity, particularly during colder months, as a staple of chili. Although not as popular in the U.S. as other varieties, black beans are a main ingredient in many international dishes. Try using canned black beans for dinner to create this easy recipe for Tex-Mex Chicken, Black Bean and Corn Soup. It’s a bowl full of comfort during this stressful time. Stay safe! TEX-MEX CHICKEN, BLACK BEAN AND CORN SOUP You can use leftover cooked chicken or purchase a rotisserie chicken (skin and bones removed, and the white and/ or dark meat cut into 1-inch cubes) in this recipe. Just skip the instructions for seasoning and searing the raw chicken for 1 minute. Instead, add 1 tablespoon of oil to the pot. Add the cooked chicken and spices to the oil over medium heat, stirring for 1 minute to allow the spices to bloom. Then, proceed with the rest of the recipe as directed. 3 to 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts or thighs, cubed into 1-inch pieces 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNTIES LOCAL JULIAN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Local resident looking to borrow 550k secured by developed Julian commercial property. 5-10 year term, 6% interest only, low loan to value (LTV), first trust deed. Please send inquiries to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 1/31

Stay Healthy continued from above

The Julian News 11

MEETINGS

AA Meetings www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - 7pm (across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

© 2020 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

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WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 s contemporary elements Blending of traditional d viceand r d e n e 16music S and e Warm welcome uplifting p ay Susru M Relevant, thoughtful message

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Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Phone: 760-765-0114 E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com

(open to all females - 12 step members)

PERSONAL SUPPORT

Tuesday - 7pm

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Men’s Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm

*** If a severe pandemic materializes, all of society could pay a heavy price for decades of failing to create a rational system of health care that works for all of us. — Irwin Redlener ***

*** Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www. divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the Julian News prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. The Julian News accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall The Julian News Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Julian News is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

3407 Highway 79

other health insurers are now waiving the costs of doctor visits related to a COVID-19 diagnosis as well as the cost of COVID-19 FDA-approved testing. To minimize your exposure, call or email your doctor or a local health system about a telehealth visit to be screened for COVID-19. The provider will then identify what steps you should take next. • Get Support: Talking through concerns and fears can help put them in perspective and make you feel calmer. You may want to reach out for professional support if you’re struggling. Cigna offers many resources and tools, including a 24-hour toll-free help line (1-855-2878400) to speak with qualified behavior health clinicians, a webinar focused on managing anxiety, fears and concerns, and mindfulness podcasts (available in English and Spanish) focused on improving resiliency and stress management. During this challenging time, taking care of your health should be a priority.

1 tablespoon chili powder 1/2 tablespoon cumin 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 can (14-1/2 ounces) chicken broth 1 3/4 cups water 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 cup frozen corn 2 cups salsa, mild, medium or hot 1/2 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese or Pepper Jack cheese, optional Garnish -- tortilla chips, avocado slices or sour cream, optional 1. Coat the chicken with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Season the chicken with the poultry seasoning, chili powder, cumin, salt and pepper. 2. Place the remaining tablespoon of the oil in a large pot. Turn the heat to medium high. Sear the chicken for 1 minute, and then turn the pieces over to sear for 1 minute on the other side. 3. Stir in the broth and water. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the beans, corn and salsa; return heat to high and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 3-5 minutes or until the chicken is no longer pink on the inside and the corn is tender. 4. Stir in the fresh lime juice. Garnish with the cheese, tortilla chips, avocado slices and sour cream, if desired. Serves 6.

Warner Community Resourse Center

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Thursday - 7pm

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(Across street from Warner Unified School)

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

1•888•724•7240

*** Without equity, pandemic battles will fail. Viruses will simply recirculate, and perhaps undergo mutations or changes that render vaccines useless, passing through the unprotected populations of the planet. — Laurie Garrett ***

continued from page 7 1. Gene Upshaw. 2. Barbaro. After winning the 2006 Derby, he suffered a fractured leg at the Preakness Stakes and was euthanized in January 2007. 3. “Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream.” 4. Purdue. 5. Franz Stampfl. 6. Tommy John, who played with seven MLB teams from 1963-89. 7. Babe Didrikson Zaharias.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Zone Improvement Plan 2. Missouri River 3. Elias 4. Volkswagen 5. Chickpeas 6. His heel 7. Nakatomi Plaza 8. The neutron 9. Bette Midler 10. “All in the Family” ® 2019 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Volume 35 - Issue 39

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to April 1, 2015; 2015; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007203 CHASING DAYLIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY 1606 Country Vistas Ln, Bonita, CA 91902 The business is conducted by An Individual Katharine Lee Mills, 1606 Country Vistas Ln, Bonita, CA 91902 . THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 3, 2020. LEGAL: 08538 Publish: April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007269 CONCIERGE PROCESSING SERVICES 503 Rosemont St., La Jolla, CA 92130 The business is conducted by An Individual - Gina M. McLeod, 503 Rosemont St., La Jolla, CA 92130. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 8, 2020. LEGAL: 08541 Publish: April 22, 29 and May 6, 13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007525 a) JULIAN YESTERYEARS b) JULIANS YESTERYEARS c) YESTERYEARS GIFTS AND JEWELRY d) YESTERYEARS OF JULIAN 1310 Orchard Lane, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1447 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Michael Jon Hart and Michele Louise Harvey, 1310 Orchard Lane, Julian, CA 92026. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 16, 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9007595 a) CC&I b) CRYPTOCURRENCY CONSULTING & INTEGRATING c) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INTEGRATING d) CRYPTO CONSULTING & INSTRUCTING e) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INTEGRATING f) CRYPTO CONSULTING ENGINEERING & INSTRUCTING g) CCE&I h) CCI SOLUTIONS 4275 Executive Square, Suite 200 La Jolla, CA 92037 The business is conducted by An Individual - Aaron Fiore, 10250 Prince Jed Ct., Santee, CA 92071. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON April 21, 2020.

LEGAL: 08542 Publish: April 29 and May 6, 13, 20, 2020

LEGAL: 08543 Publish: April 29 and May 6, 13, 20, 2020

Wednesday - April 29, 2020

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don't be put off by a seemingly too-tangled situation. Sometimes a simple procedure will unsnarl all the knots and get you in the clear fast and easy, just the way the Lamb likes it. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) It's a good time to go through your work space -- wherever it is -- and see what needs to be replaced and what can be tossed (or at least given away) without a second thought. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Someone who disagrees with your position might try to intimidate you. But continue to present a fair argument, regardless of how petty someone else might be while trying to make a point. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might find yourself exceptionally sensitive to family matters this week. An issue could come to light that you had overlooked. Ask other kinfolk to discuss it with you. LEO (July 23 to August 22) You might have more questions about a project (or perhaps someone you're dealing with on some level) than you feel comfortable with. If so, see which can be answered, which cannot, and why. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) It's a good time to clean up and clear out what you don't need before your tidy self is overwhelmed by "stuff." Then go celebrate the Virgo victory over clutter with someone special. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might feel a mite confused about why something you were sure couldn't go wrong didn't go all right either. Be patient. Things soon move into

balance, exactly as you like it. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) At this decision point, you could be moving from side to side, just to say you're in motion. Or you could be considering making a move straight up. What you choose is up to you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Although your finances should be in an improved situation at this time, thrift is still the savvy Sagittarian's smart move. Advice from a spouse or partner could be worth heeding. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Taking on a new challenge brings out the Goat's skills in maneuvering over and around difficult spots. Best of all, the Goat does it one careful step after another. (Got the idea, Kid?) AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Your well-known patience might be wearing thin because of a disturbing (and seemingly unending) problem with someone close to you. This could be a time to ask for help. Good luck. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Be careful about a new venture that lures you into a "just look and see" mode. Be sure that what you're being given to see isn't hiding what you should be seeing instead. BORN THIS WEEK: Aries and Taurus give you the gift of leadership and the blessings of care and concern for all creatures. © 2019 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

More than 50 million people around the world died during the 1918-1919 flu pandemic. That's why we have epidemiologists all over the world tracking whether new strains of flu emerge. — Tom Frieden

*** Most Americans think that public health is services for poor people, and since most Americans hate poor people and want all poor people's services destroyed, they hate public health. — Laurie Garrett ***

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday, April 29, 2020  

Wednesday, April 29, 2020