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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

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(92¢ + tax included)

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

For the Community, by the Community.

Music On The Mountain

The Spiritual Motels

Wednesday

February 26, 2020

Volume 35 — Issue 30 ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Rain Can’t Dampen Spirits At Washington Mine. Supervisors Name February 22nd: Julian 150th Anniversary Day It may have been cold and wet, that did not keep the board members of the Julian Historical Society from Re-Dedicating the Washington Mine on Saturday. Showing the mine location, including the some equipment used throughout the area. Receiving the proclamation from the Board of Supervisors, and reading the speech given by Mr. John Geiger in 1970 (see page 3). Plans were also announced for the future of the site (see page 2). A small but enthusiastic group of the curious joined in the celebration, huddled around a small bucket of hot coals.

Spring Sports Schedules Eagles Track

Saturday, March 7 9am Mt Carmel Field & Distance at Mt Carmel HS Friday, March 13 3:00 Citrus League Meet #1 Home Saturday, March 21 8am 17th Annual Elmer Runge Invitational at Patrick Henry HS Saturday, March 28 10am Calvin Christian Small Schools Invitational at Escondido HS Saturday, April 11 8:30am 4th Annual Jim Cerveny Invitational at Mission Bay HS Thursday, April 16 3:00 Citrus League Meet #2 Home continued on page 4

San Diego-based indie folk/pop duo The Spiritual Motels to perform at the Julian Library on Tuesday, March 3 at 6:00 p.m. “Something magical often happens when complementary male and female voices come together in harmony,” writes Dustin Lothspeich, Senior Associate Editor at SoundDiego, of 2020 San Diego Music Awards "Best Pop" nominee The Spiritual Motels. “Angus and Julia Stone, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, the Civil Wars, She and Him, the Head and the Heart, the list goes on and on. Go ahead and add The Spiritual Motels, a local indie-folk/pop duo comprised of Amy Day and Omar Musisko, to it.” Switching instruments through their live set, the band utilizes guitar, piano, mandolin, accordion, harmonica, effects, and live loops/loop pedals to create a unique and memorable style that draws from singer-songwriter, indie folk, country, Americana, spoken word, and electronic influences. The band features two of San Diego’s veteran singer-songwriters: Day of The Local and Shepherd Canyon, and Musisko of The Peripherals (former SDMA nominee for Best Americana). Lothspeich describes Musisko’s voice as having “a certain whisper to it, like he’s afraid to wake the baby in the next room,” while Jay Allen Sanford of the San Diego Reader writes that Day’s “ethereal vocals bring to mind Lana Del Rey and Hope Sandoval.” Lothspeich writes, “individually, the two are both fully capable singers, but when they're singing together in unison? That's the ticket;” Sanford describes their dual-vocal sound as “surprisingly lush.” The band, which gigs frequently at a variety of venues throughout the region, had its first performances in Summer 2018, and launched its debut album, Super Tiny Disappearing Oceans, on November 23, 2019. For more info, visit www.thespiritualmotels. com or contact Julian Library Branch Manager Josh Mitchell at Joshua.Mitchell@sdcounty.ca.gov.

Girls Softball

Friday, February 21 3:30 @ Victory Christian Tuesday, March 10 3:30 @ Calvary Christian Thursday March 12 3:30 Home vs San Pasqual Academy Thursday, March 19 3:30 @ San Pasqual Academy Tuesday, March 24 3:30 @ Mountain Empire HS Thursday, March 36 3:30 Home vs Vincent Memorial Wednesday, April 10 W 32-6 @ Vincent Memorial Thursday, April 2 3:30 Home vs Calapatria Tuesday, April 7 3:30 Home vs Borrego Springs Thursday, April 9 3:30 @ West Shores Thursday, April 16 3:30 Home vs Mountain Empire continued on page 4

CPUC New Online Comment Portal Offers Opportunity To Provide Input Online And View Comments Of Others The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), in its commitment to increase transparency and accessibility, today announced that the public can now submit comments on CPUC matters electronically, as well as review the comments of others. Members of the public can already make their voices heard at the CPUC in a variety of ways, such as emailing or mailing comments to the CPUC, speaking at a CPUC Voting Meeting, or attending public hearings and workshops. With the release of the new online comment feature, members of the public can now read comments submitted to the CPUC through the new online portal, and can submit their comments directly through a proceeding’s docket card at www.cpuc.ca.gov/Docket. The docket card shows all documents related to a specific proceeding underway at the CPUC, such as a proceeding evaluating a utility’s request for a rate change. This additional way to provide comment to the CPUC increases transparency and accessibility by making it easier for the public to provide their comments and allowing others to see the comments. When submitting a comment electronically on the website, the public should keep a few guidelines in mind: • There is a 4,000 word/2-page limit for each comment. • When a comment is received, it will be made available to the public on the CPUC’s website. However, there is an option to make the comment private. • The commenter must include first name, last name, city, state, zip code, and email address. This information, excluding the email address, will be publicly displayed with the comment unless the commenter chooses to make the comment private. Public comments will still be accepted via email at public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov, via tollfree phone at 866-849-8390, or via written letter to CPUC Public Advisor, 505 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, CA 94102. To learn more about how to provide public comments to the CPUC, please visit www.cpuc.ca.gov/written_informal_comments. Get the fact sheet on providing comments to the CPUC here: http://bit.ly/2v0hw0w. The new format is only for public comments on proceedings. Parties to proceedings must still formally file comments. Information about becoming a party to a proceeding is available at www.cpuc.ca.gov/Party_to_a_Proceeding. The CPUC opens many proceedings on different issues that are of importance to Californians. As a regulatory agency, the CPUC uses hearings and meetings to gather information related to these proceedings. Comments from the public are important, as this input helps the CPUC reach an informed decision on proceedings. Please visit www.cpuc.ca.gov/documents to search for official CPUC-generated proceeding documents.

Boys Baseball

Some of the mining equipment on display at the Washington Mine.

Friday, February 28 3:00 @ Victory Christian Tuesday, March 5 3:30 @ St. Joseph Academy Friday, March 6 3:30 Home vs Victory Christian Tuesday, March 10 3:00 @ Coastal Academy Wednesday, March 18 3:00 @ St. Joseph Academy Tuesday, March 24 TBA Home vs Coastal Academy Friday, March 27 3:00 Home vs St Joseph Academy Tuesday, April 7 3:00 Home vs High Tech HS Wednesday, April 8 3:00 @ West Shores Friday, April 10 3:00 Home vs Warner Tuesday, April 14 3:30 Home vs Ocean View Christian Wednesday, April 15 3:00 Home vs Calapatria Wednesday, April 22 3:30 Home vs Vincent Memorial Friday, April 24 3:00 Home vs West Shores Wednesday, April 29 3:00 @ Warner Thursday, April 30 3:00 Home vs Bayfront Charter continued on page 4

Pick up your copy of the SD County Parks & Rec “Upside of Outside”

ESTABLISHED

1870

YEARS

Julian, CA.

Spring Program Guide at Town HallSpring Hall


February 26, 2020

2 The Julian News

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The The most most dangerous dangerous animals animals in in the the forest forest don’t don’t live live there. there.

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2020. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

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Julian, the little town that stole our hearts has come through again. I want to say thank you to you, and you know who you are, for the cards with expressions of sympathy on the passing of my husband Keith Merrick. Dr. Merrick truly enjoyed working in Julian and being able to help with your medical problems. You were not “just patients” to him, you were people that he truly cared about as I could read in your comments in the cards. His hobby of photography played a large part in his time in Julian, he was always dashing off to take pictures of one thing or another, something that touched his heart. So when you see a sunbeam, an apple blossom, a puddle with rain drops in it remember him, he is still watching out for you now that he has gone Home. God Bless You all. Thank you. Jean Marie A Celebration of Life for Barbee Skinner will be held at 1pm on Sunday March 1st - Julian Community United Church, 2898 Hughway 78/79 (just west of Pine Hills Road)

Plans To Recreate Entrance To The Washington Mine

It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare. Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-5 pm

760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management closed 12-1 for lunch

E TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Wildfire Prevention - Newspaper (2 1/16 x 2) B&W WFPA01-N-03259-C “Animals” 85 screen Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127801

Announced at the 150th Celebration on Saturday was a plan to recreate the entrance at the Washington Mine including the oar cart and its tracks, location of the two original shafts at the site and the oar bucket which removed the oar from the shaft (as seen above). The project which is being spearheaded by Jim Davis is on schedule to be inplace by the end of summer, possibly opening up the Historical Society’s property for tours. Combined with the Eagle and High Peak mines next door this will add another glimps into the way Julian evolved in the late 1800’s.

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson EarthTalk

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Cindy Arnston GreatSchools.org

Jon Coupal David Lewis Friends of the Library

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2020 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News

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February 26, 2020

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The Julian News 3

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Presented By Mr. John Geiger For The Julian Historical Society At The Centennial Observance Of The Discovery Of The Washington Mine On February 22, 1970. JULIAN GOLD Julian has an alluring past--a story of Gold discovery that set off a stampede diminutive in comparison to that of 1849 in the "Mother Lode" country but still a rush for the precious metal. In late 1869 Fred Coleman who had lived for some time around the CALL BRUCE 619•972•0152 Northern California gold fields came to herd cattle in this area. He lived with an Indian family named Nejo at Spencer Valley now known as Wynola; while riding herd one day he paused to water his horse at a little creek. A yellow sparkle caught his eye and he unpacked a skillet and began panning. For the next 30 years after that day in 1869, the history of Julian was Gold. A mining camp called Emery City was established at the junction of the two creeks. As many as 150 men washed gold from the stream bed and a few put in sluice Residential • Industrial • Commercial boxes. No one made over two dollars a day. The creek was then Serving Southern California named Coleman Creek, and a Coleman Mining Camp was organized Ben Sulser, Branch Manager with Coleman as the Camp Recorder. No vein or ledge was found at Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 that time. Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 The Bailey boys and their cousins the Julians (5 men in all) came to emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com the area in November, 1869, and panned in the creek with no paying sucess. They then went to work for some settlers and did prospecting about the area; they also herded sheep. Drury Bailey loved the area so much that he filed a Homestead claim and built a log cabin in the upper valley where Julian is today. On February 15, 1870, a mining district was formed and it was named Julian Theater Company invites the public to attend our Playwrights the Julian Mining District after Mike Julian who had been elected Festival 2020 on March 7th free of charge in the ‘Little Theatre’ at recorder. The first quartz claim discovered in the Julian District was Julian High School, 1656 HWY 78, Julian. Starting at 1:00pm our the Warriors' Rost, filed by Drue Bailey and seven others on February Festival finalist, ‘The First Step’ by Kathleen Holen of Borrego Springs 20th, 1870. It was a small pocket and was soon abandoned. It was will be performed and our second Festival finalist, ‘A Day in August’ located back of the present old Wellington house southeast of town by Jonathan Retz of Julian will be performed at 3:00pm. This is a on Old Cuyamaca Road. judged event, the first place winner will be awarded $1,000, second A few days later on February 22nd, 1870 H.C. Bickers filed on the place winner will take home $500. The audience will be encouraged discovery of the George Washington mine. These are his words: "On to participate in a brief question and answer period following each February 20th, wishing to be alone I walked about 200 yards from performance. Food will be available for purchase from 2:00pm. Come camp. I turned and started toward camp when I noticed a track which meet local playwrights, voice your thoughts to the writers and help I took for a bear track and I followed it for some distance where I came inaugurate JTC’s Playwrights Festival. upon a group of quartz rocks, each weighing some four pounds. I For further information call 760-765-1688 continued on page 10 9SDG16289_Storm Safety English Ad__Julian News__RUN: 02_26_20__ 1/2 pg BW__TRIM: 13” x 11”

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Julian Community Townhall Meeting Alpine, CA - - - The Horvath Campaign, at the invitation of the Julian Community, will have a townhall meeting on February 28, 2020 from 6-8 pm. Topics will include: 1. Roads and Infrastructure 2. Quality of Life – Housing, childcare, equal pay, sick leave, human trafficking 3. Immigration – plans for change 4. Medicare – Program improvements and Prescription Medication 5. Social Security and Veterans Benefits – saving social security and improving access for veteran benefits. 6. Agriculture and business issues in the community and much more. 7. Your own unique concerns impacting the community! We want to get to know you and hear your concerns!!! We hope that your media organization will announce the event and provide coverage during/after the townhall meeting. The community has expressed excitement for this unique candidate forum. *** The greatest asset, even in this country, is not oil and gas. It's integrity. Everyone is searching for it, asking, 'Who can I do business with that I can trust?' — George Foreman ***

SDG&E® crews are always ready for the next storm. Are you? Here are some ways to prepare. Before a storm:

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During a storm:

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report them immediately to 911 or SDG&E.

• If using a portable generator, make sure you know how to operate it safely.

• Avoid making unnecessary trips and let others know where you are going.

After a storm:

• Contact SDG&E or a licensed professional to relight your appliances and pilot lights.

• Avoid using electrical equipment in wet areas. • Use flashlights instead of lanterns, matches or candles.

Get more tips at sdge.com/safety Follow us on: © 2020 San Diego Gas & Electric Company. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved. 20SDG16289_StormSafety Print_JulianNewsBW_13x11_V3.indd 1

2/19/20 11:59 AM


4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month, 6pm 4th Tuesday of the Month, 10am at the Fire Station, 3407 Hwy 79, Julian Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society The Witch Creek School House and the Julian Stageline Museum are open the first weekend of the month 11am to 4pm. Historical presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month - Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4:00pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15pm Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 2:30pm - After School STEM Flex your brain muscles with fun, educational activities for kids & teens. Second and Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Fourth Wednesday Julian Indivisible Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 2pm Julian Historical Society Witch Creek School - 7pm Every Thursday Beginning Spanish for Adults Learn basic Spanish at the library. - 2:30pm Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every Saturday Ebook Workshop Learn how to download Ebooks & audiobooks from the library for free! - 11am Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance.

and

February 26, 2020

Back Country Happenings

The Boys From Palomar Return To The Red Barn Friday Night

February

(Love Your Library Month)

Wednesday, February 26 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Friday, February 28 Town Hall Meeting with 50th Congressional District Candidate - Dr. Helen Horvath Julian Town Hall 6 - 8pm Saturday, February 29 Leep Day Saturday, February 29 Friends of the Library Annual Membership Meeting AFTER HOURS @ the LIBRARY is the theme with at least 6 merchants willing to help us celebrate. Keynote Speaker will be Sandra Dijkstra, Literary Agent. Her presentation will be “The Shortest Distance Between You and a Published Book” Julian Library 5-7pm

In 1975 Dutch and Bruce met and began playing music together on Palomar Mountain, formerly known as Smith Mountain, along with an ever changing group of like minded musicians known locally as the “Smith Mountain Band”. A lifelong friendship developed and eventually the pair evolved into the duo “Smith Mountain Boys”. They enjoy playing country, popular hits from the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s to current from artists like Jackson Browne, James Taylor, The Eagles etc. The pair strives to blend their acoustic guitars and mellow vocals into a sound both pleasing and enjoyable for their listeners. Friday night Dutch and Bruce bring thier sounds to the Red Barn at Wunola Pizza from six to nine. Come out and enjoy the sounds of the another back country community in the warm relaxing atmosphere with your friends.

Saturday Night Swinging Blues With Cadillac Wreckers

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

March

Sunday, March 1 Celebration Of Life for Barbee Skinner Community United Methodist Church of Julian - 1pm Tuesday, March 3 Comics Club. Kids of all ages are welcome to make your own comic strips and comic books Julian Library - 3pm Tuesday, March 3 Music on the Mountain The Spiritual Motels (indie-folk, duo) Julian Library - 6pm Saturday, March 7 Julian Dark Sky Presentation: Spectroscopy Vivek Vijayakumar presentation on spectroscopy, the primary way we gain knowledge of almost every object, from stars to asteroids Julian Library - 11am Saturday, March 7 Julian Theater Company Playwrights Festival 2020 Julian HS Little Theater 1pm - FREE

Julian Historical Society

Sultry and swinging Blues is what you get with Cadillac Wreckers. The swingingest Blues band in the County returns Saturday night for some harmonica infused, true to its roots, blues at Wynola Pizza. Dane Terry and Dana Duplan bring their Cadillac Wreckers band back to Wynola for an evening of swing, jazz and rhythm-and-blues. Dana’s signature guitar style is familiar yet unique in the same breath. He’s made a study of Blues guitar legends and applied that knowledge to craft a sound immediately recognizable and all his own. Dane’s harmonicas are also prominent in the band’s overall sound. Dane uses the familiar ‘short harp’ or ‘blues harp’ as it’s popularly known, and also plays the button chromatic harmonica - the type usually only played by Jazz or Classical musicians - or Stevie Wonder. Cadillac Wreckers returm to Wynola Pizza’s Patio, Saturday from 6 to 9.

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month Temporarily In The The Historical SocietyCommunity Building Library 2133Room 4th Street

7:00pm

Sunday, March 8 Daylight Saving Begins 2am Tuesday, March 10 Merchants Breakfast Julian Elementary School Multi-Purpose Room 8am-10am Tuesday, March 10 Author Visit. Patricia GeistMartin discusses her book Falling in Love with the Process: A Stroke Survivor’s Story, followed by a Q&A and book signing Julian Library - 6pm Wednesday, March 11 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, March 12 Julian High School Board Meeting - 6pm Friday, March 13 Non-Fiction Book Club This month’s book is Never Home Alone by Rob Dunn Julian Library - 11am

Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves and Desperados historic comedy skits at 2 pm – In front of the old Jail on C Street

Friday, March 13 Chamber of Commerce Installation Dinner Julian Station - 6pm reservations: 760 765-1857 or: membership.visitjulian.com

Every day during business hours – Vet Connect VA services available at Julian Library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment.

Saturday, March 14 BLOOD DRIVE Julian High School Parking Lot 9:00am to 2:00pm

*** If humanity does not opt for integrity we are through completely. It is absolutely touch and go. Each one of us could make the difference. — R.Buckminster Fuller ***

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents Upcoming Events at Wynola Pizza Monday’s - Triva Night - 6 to 8 Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite - 6 to 8 Monday, February 24 - Trivia Night Friday, March 6 - Donn Bree & Friends Saturday, March 7 - Blue Creek Band For more information call Wynola Pizza and Bistro 760-765-1004

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Our adjacent BLACK OAK CABIN provides another option for your getaway! www.butterfieldbandb.com

* On Feb. 26, 1564, poet and playwright Christopher Marlowe is baptized in Canterbury, England, two months before the birth of his fellow playwright William Shakespeare. Historians believe Marlowe served as a spy for Queen Elizabeth while at Cambridge. He was nearly denied his master's degree in 1587, until the queen's advisers intervened. * On Feb. 27, 1827, a group of masked and costumed students dance through the streets of New Orleans, marking the beginning of the city's famous Mardi Gras celebrations. Early French settlers brought the tradition of Mardi Gras to the U.S. Gulf Coast at the end of the 17th century. * On Feb 24, 1868, the U.S. House of Representatives votes 11 articles of impeachment against President Andrew Johnson, nine of which cite Johnson's removal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, a

violation of the Tenure of Office Act. He was the first president to be impeached in U.S. history. * On Feb. 25, 1873, Enrico Caruso, the greatest tenor who ever lived, is born. Caruso recorded scores of arias of three and four minutes in length -- the longest duration that could fit on a 78 rpm record. * On Feb. 29, 1940, "Gone with the Wind" is honored with eight Oscars, including one for Hattie McDaniel for her portrayal of "Mammy," a housemaid and former slave. She was the first African American actor ever to win an Oscar. * On March 1, 1961, President John Kennedy issues Executive Order No. 10924 to establish the Peace Corps, which would send trained American men and women to foreign nations to assist in development efforts. * On Feb. 28, 1983, the celebrated sitcom "M*A*S*H" bows out after 11 seasons, airing a special two-and-a-half hour episode watched by 77% of the viewing audience. It was the largest percentage at the time ever to watch a single TV show. © 2019 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

&

www.blackoakcabin.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

LONG TERM CLASSIFIED’S

4 weeks = $30.00 13 weeks = $75.00 26 weeks = $150.00 52 weeks = $300.00

Julian News 760 765 2231 boxed ads + $5.00

Eagles Track (cont)

Friday April 24 3:00 Dennis Gilbert Small Schools Invitational at Mountain Empire HS Saturday, April 25 8am Dick Wilkins Frosh-Soph Invitational at Del Norte HS Thursday, April 30 3:00 Citrus League Meet #3 Home Saturday, May 8 3:00 Citrus League Finals at Julian HS Saturday, May 16 9am San Diego CIF - Girls Prelims at Mt Carmel HS Saturday, May 16 2:00 San Diego CIF - Boys Prelims at Mt Carmel HS Saturday, May 23 9am San Diego CIF - Finals at Mt. Carmel HS

Girls Softball (cont)

Friday, April 17 3:30 Home vs Calvary Christian Tuesday, April 21 3:30 @ Vincent Memorial Thursday, April 23 3:30 Home vs Warner Tuesday, April 28 3:30 @ Mountain Empire Thursday,April 30 L 2-22 @ Borrego Springs Tuesday, May 5 3:30 Home vs West Shores

Boys Baseball (cont) Friday, May 1 @ Calipatria Tuesday, May 7 @ High Tech HS Wednesday, May 8 @ Vincent Memorial

3:00

3:00 3:00


February 26, 2020

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts Our Future

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Opera - Reflecting Life Turandot, Puccini’s last and unfinished opera, was premiered in Bucharest last week with a Russian soprano in the starring role. It was a lavish production, wowing the eye with imaginative staging and sumptuous costumes. It was also about as politically incorrect as you can get. Turandot is supposedly, more or less, set in China and there was a bit of “chinky chinky” in the music. More to the point, there were references to China throughout the absurd story and three of the main characters were named Ping, Pang and Pong. The costumes were sort of Chinese or something like it, the sets were close enough to “Chinese” to evoke a feeling of, sort of that is, China, and culturally all wrong. The singing was glorious. The opera probably wouldn’t have been allowed in the U.S.

We, as a country, have become very politically correct—so much so that we’re tripping over references and past deeds to the point that we ignore present problems. It’s great that you can’t say, as a prospective employer once said to us, “You’re qualified but we don’t hire women for this position.” It’s entirely something else to rake up a kiss at an office party in another era, or to blame Georgetown University today for having sold slaves nearly two hundred years ago. We don’t expect tribal people in the Amazon to behave as we do. Different culture, right? Broadminded that we are, we ACCEPT these differences. But, somehow, we don’t accept that the culture in our own country two hundred years ago might need to be accepted as “other” in the same way. No—we judge our ancestors by today’s norms. Excuse me? Did we just say that? Well, yes, we did. We judge people who lived and worked one or two centuries ago, under very different conditions and with a different world view, as if they SHOULD have behaved in a way we find acceptable today. And we go further. We talk about “restitution” for these wrongs. That could be complicated. If we go down that road, perhaps they should restitute all women for being treated more like property than people until the last century. Or everyone who was descended from a serf, owned by his Lord, in the Middle Ages or, until much more recently, in Russia. Slavery, common throughout the world well into the 19th century, was wrong, difficult and repugnant but life wasn’t peaches and cream for anybody in the Age Before Aspirin. An ancestor wrote a letter from New Jersey to a cousin in Ohio in 1834 mentioning, among other things, that she had an eleven-year-old bound girl to help in the kitchen. No, the child wasn’t a slave; she was white and would be free in some years but imagine…eleven, given to a strange family as a servant. This system was common, widespread in the northern colonies, and often brutal. We hope our ancestor was a kind, loving woman who took good care of that little girl. *** To me, integrity means always doing what is right and good, regardless of the immediate consequences. It means being righteous from the very depth of our soul, not only in our actions but, more importantly, in our thoughts and in our hearts. — Joseph B. Wirthlin ***

by Michele Harvey

I saw an article that stated that we have lost nearly one third of our bird species here and in Canada since 1970. You may think that this is no big deal, but every bird we lose means we have lost an insect eater. We have also lost seed spreaders and fertilizer makers. We have lost birds because of deforestation, giving them fewer places to nest. We have also lost birds because of congestion. So many people live in areas that used to be open that birds and other wild life species get pushed out of their normal habitat, or people think they are pests, so they kill them. More people equals fewer birds. More construction and growth equals fewer birds. I don‘t care personally who believes in climate change. It is here. I’ve lived on the same property for close to twenty-five years and I’ve seen changes. I’ve seen trees thrive and I’ve seen trees die from years of drought. I’ve seen the ponds across our road fill beyond capacity because of more than ample rain and I’ve seen them stay dry for way to many months. Some years we have plenty of wild rabbits, squirrels, gophers and rodents for the coyotes to eat and other years we have lost outdoor cats to the coyotes, bob cats and mountain lions. We can plan on living through more drought years so now is a good time to plan for them. I’ve written some tips in the past and here I will repeat some and write newly discovered tips. Do not throw fruits and vegetables away. Create a compost pile with them or create a bin. Add dirt from time to time to keep the bugs at a minimum. You can add newsprint by getting old issues of The Julian News at the office across Hollow Glenn Road from Nickel Brewery. Rip the newspapers into strips so they break down sooner. Our printer uses vegetable dyes that are very popular with the worms that can help break down your compost. The newspaper itself is made from 35% recycled paper. Using newspaper for mulch is a good idea too. Place it around your plants and toss a little dirt on top of it so it won’t blow away and you will see fewer weeds. If you have very few food scraps, you can chop them into small pieces and using a hoe to dig ditches between your plants, drop the scraps into the ditches and then cover them up. They will break down and become one with the soil in time. Plant fruit trees. Go to a nursery to find out what fruits grow best in your area (Julian is a USDA Zone 8). A Sunset Garden Book will show you what plants grow in what areas. Plant vegetables. Learn to can food. This is one way of “putting food by”. Many foods can be dried. Be imaginative. Ask yourself what you can do to survive if need be. Listen to what successful gardeners have to say and don’t hesitate to ask questions. We all begin as neophytes. I’ve been listening to avid gardeners for about sixty years. I’ve known (sometimes without knowing at the time) Master Gardeners and they are all very helpful. Sally Snipes, our local Master Gardener, self-published a booklet of gardening information that I have owned for over twenty years. When I was able to work in my yard and do some gardening, I always kept that book close at hand. They may still be selling it at Julian Elementary School. I read that we should never paint the exterior of our houses dark colors. Dark colors attract heat. I know this is true because I grew up with a black swimming pool in our La Mesa yard. Without a heater, and with large trees overhanging both ends of the pool, it never got below 68 degrees and never got much above 72 degrees. On the other hand, does this explain how a darkly painted room feels cool and a shaded yard feels cooler than one that has no shade? Save water! The day may come when we have no choice but to save every drop of water that we possibly can, so it’s a good idea to get into the habit now. Washing and rinsing dishes in plastic or metal washtubs is a good idea. That way, when you have finished with the water you can pour it or throw it onto plants. Don’t throw dirty soapy water onto edible plants. Instead, pour soapy water on flowering plants. Roses love soapy water. The soap bubbles kill aphids. When you are warming water in your shower, let it go into buckets. Buckets of clean water can be used for pet water, for dish water or for plant water. Think of ways that you can prepare for the coming weather changes. They are already showing themselves and we need to prepare ourselves for our future. These are my thoughts *** No man can purchase his virtue too dear, for it is the only thing whose value must ever increase with the price it has cost us. Our integrity is never worth so much as when we have parted with our all to keep it. — Ovid ***

The Julian News 5

Rosemarie Danelian Kalemkiarian

April 14, 1927 – February 5, 2020

Rosemarie Danelian Kalemkiarian passed away on February 5 at her home in La Jolla. She was born in Evanston Illinois to Jack and Siranoush Danelian. Her parents were survivors of the Armenian Genocide. Settling in Hollywood, she graduated from Hollywood HS in 1945. A proud graduate of UCLA, she became an elementary school teacher and was a teacher all her life. She married Paul Kalemkiarian on February 22, 1952, moving to Palos Verdes Estates in 1965. Rosemarie loved politics and service. She was PTA District Council President, and served on the Inglewood Library Board. She used her gift of cooking to sell mail order cakes, and her love of antiques to start Hallmark Silver Ltd. She was appointed to the LA County Commission for Women in 1985. She was the first woman City Council Member in Palos Verde, elected in 1977. Paul and Rosemarie retired to San Diego County. In Julian, Escondido & La Jolla she continued to be a mover and shaker. She is survived by the love of her life for almost 68 years Paul Kalemkiarian; Son Brent & Lynn Kalemkiarian, Daughter Honorable Sharon Kalemkiarian & Rey Galindo, and son Paul & Sandra Kalemkiarian. She is cherished by 8 grandchildren Justin, Beth, Sam, Kay, Rebecca, Sara, Lisa & Lena; 2 Great Grand Children Micah & Ani. Also survived by brother Lawrence Danelian, predeceased by her brother Richard Danelian. Memorial Service will be held on March 21, 2020, 1:00 pm at UACC 3480 Cahuenga Blvd, LA. Reception to follow. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to St Garabed Armenian Church in San Diego or Women’s Support Center in Armenia.

Kim Beck

June 24, 1937 - November 17, 2019

Kim Allynn Beck was born on June 24, 1937 in Glendale, CA to Helen and Harry Beck. Helen, an artist and writer, was inspired to name her only son, "Kim" after a well-known character by the famous novelist, Rudyard Kipling. Harry's business was buying, fixing and selling pianos. As a boy, Kim helped refurbish, refinish, and tune the pianos. He also received classical piano training. At an early age, Kim taught himself to play guitar as well, in order to accompany Harry, who had a habit of playing WW1 tunes on his mandolin for hours. This early exposure to music set the tone for Kim's lifelong career as a musician. At the age of twelve, Kim impressed school audiences playing the music of Mozart, and by high school he and his sister, Nanci had already formed their own country music band. They played local venues for years. When Kim was still in grade school, the family moved from North Hollywood to Valley Center, where Kim enjoyed ranch life helping out with the care of animals, gardening and hiking. When his parents bought a motel in Clear Lake, CA, he recalled happy memories rowing around the lake and hiking in the area. The family eventually settled in Escondido, where Kim graduated from Escondido High in 1955 before joining the National Guard. Kim went on to play piano and guitar in various night clubs throughout San Diego County by night and to teach music lessons by day. While playing for a dance in Julian, Kim met his future wife, Jo Huntamer. They raised their two daughters, Kathleen and Jeannie in Escondido. Around this time Kim also got a job playing piano on the Cal Worthington Dodge shows on TV. When the girls were in Jr. High, the family moved to Julian where Kim played at the Pine Hills Lodge three nights a week and in La Mesa three nights a week. Kim's music could be heard on local live radio stations where he backed up many country music stars, including Glen Campbell, the Otwell Twins of the Lawrence Welk Show, Sammi Smith and Smokey Rogers. When Kim and Jo divorced, Kim moved on to Riverside County where he eventually met and married Elise Pettit. Between jobs in Hemet, Apple Valley, and Cambria, he and Elise paused long enough in San Luis Obispo for Kim's third daughter, Darby Ann to be born. After a stint in Elko, Nevada with Billy Mize, Kim and his new family returned to Riverside; moving in with a steel-guitar player and his family. Kim then landed a regular job playing five nights a week in Winchester. Kim and his family settled in Sun City where Elise worked in a medical office and Darby attended and finished high school. Later, when Darby had children, Kim became a stay-at-home Grandpa to chip in with child care so Darby could pursue a career. When Darby and her family moved out of state, their bond remained close and they visited as often as possible. Jeannie experienced the perils of a musician's life when Kim's band had a gig at the Stateline Casino in Wendover, Nevada. At the last minute the band's "girl singer" cancelled and on short notice Jeannie agreed to fill in. Near the end of the gig the band member who drove the band out, (because he was the one with a van) got drunk and left the whole band stranded in Nevada. Kim had to buy an old clunker just to haul the band home. Kim enjoyed playing music with his daughter, Kathleen, whenever the two got together and always looked forward to Kathleen's annual Spring music jam in Julian. This is when he got to play music with Kathleen, various family members, friends and a lot of other great musicians just for the fun of it. continued on page 11


6 The Julian News

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*** Public confidence in the integrity of the Government is indispensable to faith in democracy; and when we lose faith in the system, we have lost faith in everything we fight and spend for. — Adlai Stevenson I *** 1. GEOGRAPHY: Which is the least-populated continent? 2. GEOLOGY: What metal is produced by refining the ore bauxite? 3. EXPLORERS: Where was explorer Marco Polo born? 4. ART: Which popular American artist referred to himself as “Painter of Light”? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the pH value of pure water? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of leopards called? 7. LITERATURE: What was the birth name of author Toni Morrison (a pseudonym)? 8. MOVIES: In which James Bond movie is the character of Jaws introduced? 9. HISTORY: Which country was home to the Contras guerilla force in the 1980s? 10. LANGUAGE: What is a truel? Answers on page 11

February is a celebration of matters of the heart. Love is in the air this month, so remember to love yourself and take good care of your health. Avoid overeating or going hungry between meals by eating nutritious meals and snacks. Eating three small, wellbalanced meals and two or three nutritious snacks are good ways to protect your health and your heart. Research shows that people who eat a healthy breakfast, lunch and dinner along with two or three healthy snacks are less likely to overeat and gain weight. Avoid foods with lots of simple carbohydrates (sugars) like candy bars or soda. Healthy snacks contain complex carbohydrates like whole-grain breads and cereals. Combining complex carbohydrates with protein-rich foods such as low-fat yogurt, peanut butter or low-fat cheese creates a satisfying snack.

Read food labels and check the nutrition facts information on packaged snacks. Just because something is labeled as “low fat,” “all natural” or “pure” doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s nutritious. Many low-fat snacks contain unhealthy amounts of sugar and as many calories as full-fat snacks. Do

the math when reading the serving size information on the label, as most snack foods are meant to be two or more servings. You may need to double or triple the listed amount of fat, calories or sugar to get an accurate caloric count. The best way to avoid eating continued on page 11

T


February 26, 2020

Lincoln Carving This folk-art carving of President Abraham Lincoln was made from a tree stump in the late 1800s. It is 47 inches tall. The sculpture sold for $1,800 at a recent Garth’s auction. President Abraham Lincoln has been memorialized in many ways since his death in 1865, but there are things that few people remember today. 1. The president and his wife, Mary Todd, had four sons. Three died young. "Eddie" (Edward Baker) Lincoln, born in 1846, died at 3 years old in 1850. "Willie" (William Wallace) was born in 1850 and died in 1862 at the age of 11. Son Thomas, called "Tad," was born in 1853 and died at 18 in 1871. But their first-born son,

The Julian News 7

Robert Todd, was born in 1843 and lived until 1926, passing at the age of 82. 2. President Lincoln was the tallest president. He was 6 feet, 4 inches tall. 3. Lincoln's birthday is Feb. 12, 1809. 4. President Lincoln did not smoke and rarely drank alcohol. He drank water with meals. Try some of President Lincoln's favorite foods on President's Day. One of his favorites was apples. He held an apple with his thumb and forefinger, and ate it from the bottom. Some say he also liked chicken fricassee with biscuits, and most reports say he enjoyed oyster stew. Mary Todd Lincoln used "Miss Leslie's Complete Cookery" cookbook that is still available at bookstores today. *** Q: Is there an easy way to spot a reproduction Booz cabin bottle? I know a lot were made. A: Look at the raised word

"WHISKEY" on the side of the bottle. On original Booz bottles, the top fork of the letter K is wider than the bottom fork. On most repros, the bottom fork is wider. *** CURRENT PRICES Beer bottle, Kuntz Lager, labeled, 1920s, 9 1/4 inches, $85. Telephone, Northern Electric, oak, rotary dial, handset, 22 x 8 inches, $160. Blanket chest, oak, rectangular lift top, 4 panels, stylized flowers, geometric borders, 28 x 54 inches, $340. Chandelier, 6-light, roses, leaves, wrought metal, continental, c. 1925, 28 x 26 inches, $480. *** TIP: If you have a dusty, dirty book, try rubbing or blotting the pages with a piece of white bread. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com ® 2019 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Necessity may well be called the mother of invention but calamity is the test of integrity. — Samuel Richardson ***

1. Name either of the starting pitchers before Chris Sale and Jacob deGrom in 2018 to face each other with a sub-2.00 ERA and at least 100 innings pitched for that season. (Hint: The year was 1985.) 2. Washington Nationals rookie Juan Soto set a record in 2018 for

the youngest player (19) to steal three bases in a game. Who had been the youngest? 3. Minnesota’s Adam Thielen tied an NFL record in 2018 by having eight straight games of at least 100 receiving yards. Who else holds the mark? 4. When was the last time before 2019 that a first-time men’s basketball champion was crowned in the NCAA Tournament? 5. The Detroit Red Wings swept the Stanley Cup Finals two consecutive years (1997 and 1998). Name either team the Red Wings beat. 6. Name the only driver other than Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel to win the Formula One season championship between 2010 and 2019. 7. Entering 2020, how many of tennis star Serena Williams’ 23 grand slam titles were won in the decade of 2010-2019? Answers on page 11


February 26, 2020

8 The Julian News

Pastor Cindy Arntson

Much of the human tragedy in the world is rooted in anger. Many of us were taught that it is wrong to be angry and so we try to hide it. But when anger is suppressed, it becomes an explosion ready to go off with the slightest spark. We can pretend it doesn’t exits. We can try to avoid conflict and confrontation but sooner or later, if we get pushed too far or get too worn out, anger erupts. Even if our anger doesn’t explode, it often leaks out in sarcasm, snide remarks, looks that could kill, or the silent treatment. Though anger can be dangerous, we also know it is part of being human. Anger isn’t bad in-and-of itself. In fact, anger can be good. Anger has motivated and energized some important movements in history to bring significant positive change. The problem is feeding or indulging our anger. If we allow ourselves to be possessed by it, the consequences can be destructive. Anger will always exist but we have to consciously choose whether we will channel it for good or harm. When Leonardo da Vinci was painting The Last Supper, he was in the midst of an intense and bitter argument with another painter. To take revenge on this guy, he decided to use the face of his enemy for the face of Judas Iscariot. When people came to look at his work in progress, they recognized who "Judas" was. Da Vinci got great joy out of portraying this man as Judas Iscariot. When he finally came to the face he had saved for the very end, the face of Jesus, he drew a blank. He couldn’t paint a thing. Finally, he realized that his anger was getting in the way. So, da Vinci went back to the image of Judas and painted an anonymous face. He went to his enemy, asked forgiveness, and they were reconciled. Then, he was able to finish one of the world's greatest portraits. We are living in a time of great anger. There are people who are angry about the current direction of our nation and others who are angry about their anger. There seems to be fresh reasons for anger every day. I have felt some of that anger myself. I have seen its power for good and its potential danger. I believe that some of my anger is justified and I want to harness its energy to fight for what I believe is right and good. But I don’t want anger to control or change me. I want my anger to become something that builds rather than destroys. Courtney Martin wrote an article in which she suggested we must balance anger with love. This, at first, sounds sentimental and simplistic, not realistic or strong enough. We believe love is the answer in theory but usually, we doubt its effectiveness in our real world circumstance. In her article, Martin anticipated our skepticism and explained that we, too often, limit our understanding of love to maternal love, family love, romantic love. In trying to use the power of love, I find myself going back again and again to my love of our nation, which helps me tap into love for all its people, not just the ones who agree with me or who seem vulnerable or who are friendly or peaceful. Applying these lessons to the rising anger and deepening divisions within our nation, I find I must discipline myself to not deepen that division or stoke the fires of anger on either side. I use my actions and words to shine light and build up. Sarcasm and ridicule, exaggeration and snap judgements are easy but counterproductive. I’m trying to focus my anger more on the circumstances than on the people. I read a news story that exemplified a healthy balance of anger expressed with love. Constituents in Tennessee were asking their congressional representative to host a town hall meeting so they could speak

...snowy areas like the Arctic.

Animals live in parts of cold...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2020 V16-7

In Lands of Cold and Snow! Seals, hares, oxen, foxes and squirrels are some animals that can live in cold, snowy climates. Do you know other animals that live in lands of cold and snow? Many live where land and water meet. Will you read the clues below and fill in the crossword? I can "bearly" wait to see the answers.

1

bear

penguin 3

2

5

6 8 9

4

7

10

13 w 1. walk in single file; lead animal breaks trail in snow; known to travel great distances o lf 11 2. large sea animal hunted for its hide, ivory tusks, oil; moves in herds; sunbathes in groups 12 2 3 3. Dall __________ – horned animal; hooves have 1 rough pads to help traverse mountains owl 4 goose puffin 4. polar __________ has black skin, but “white” fur; hunts seals from sea ice 5 38 5. large, beaked bird; dives up to 60 meters to catch fish walrus 37 36 6 6. collared __________ – burrows under snow; eats stored seed, bark Who 7. snowshoe __________ – lives above ground unlike many 14 long-eared cousins; grows white coat of fur for camouflage Am I? 7 35 8. timber __________; moves up to 12 miles a day in a pack to hunt arctic fox 9. largest of northern deer; wide hooves help it walk in snow I live on the edge moose 15 10. Alaskan __________; oldest known sled dog; does not normally of snowy lands and in live in wild, cared for by people; has strength and endurance 8 the icy waters. I am a caribo 34 u lamute a m wonderful swimmer 11. snowy ___________; stays awake during day, unlike others; 33 and diver! Who am I? white feathers; travels to slightly warmer places in winter lemmin Follow 12. fluffy white animal; can hear prey as it moves under snow e g wolverin the dots 13. short legs, long nose and hair; finds things under snow using smell 32 19 to see 26 10 11 14. flightless bird glides on stomach along snow, ice; huddles with 31 24 12 me! 9 20 30 others for warmth; oil on feathers protects from cold water 14 13 21 28 27 25 15 15. bird; migrates to slightly warmer climates for cold winter months; 18 29 23 22 moves in large groups to protect young from predators like arctic fox 16 17

sheep

hare

How Do Penguins Keep Warm? Some live in warmer areas around the world. Layers of fat and feathers keep penguins warm. Penguins are one of my favorite animals. They are such fun to watch. They seem to know they’re putting on a show! Speaking of penguins and shows...can you fill in the blanks to answer my new joke below?

There are many animals and birds living in the lands of cold, snow and ice. My cousin, Pearly the Polar Bear, lives up north in the Arctic. Penguins do not live with the polar bears in the area near the North Pole. They live in areas farther south. Some live in deep cold, such as on the continent of Antarctica, near the South Pole.

What did the penguins sing after putting on their best hats and "tails”? __ __ __ __ __ 20 8 5 18 5 __ __ __ __ 12

DoubleTake DoubleTake Pick me!

9

11

5

'

__ 19

__ __ 14 15

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ 2 21 19 9 14 5 19 19

" __

__ __ __ "

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

19

14 15 23

A __ 1

B __ 2

C __ 3

D __ 4

__E 5

F __ 6

G __ 7

H __ 8

N __ 14

O __ 15

P __ 16

Q __ 17

R __ 18

S __ 19

T __ 20

U __ 21

2 I __ 9 V __ 22

21 19

9 14

5

J __ 10

K __ 11

L __ 12

M __ 13

W __ 23

X __ 24

Y __ 25

Z __ 26

19 19

! Hey! That sounds a lot like that hit song by the famous composer, Irving Berlin.

Study these penguins. Can you find and circle the 2 that are exactly alike? Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Pick me!

Solution page 11 to him directly. He refused and referred to them as kooks. In response, the group decided to hold a peaceful protest at his office and publicized it as a “kookfest.” On the day of the protest, the congressman wasn’t in his office because his brother-in-law had just died of ALS. In response to this news, the “kooks” raised money and donated it in the congressman’s name to an organization seeking treatment/ cure for ALS. For the sake of our country, we must value each other so much that we cannot tolerate being estranged; that we cannot view each other as enemies; that we control our anger instead of letting it control us. Cindy Arntson is ordained clergy serving Community United Methodist Church at 2898 Highway 78, Julian. Direct all questions and correspondence to: Faith and Living, c/o CUMCJ, PO Box 460, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2020

Faith and Living

Screen Time: What Research Says And What Parents Can Do (StatePoint) Screen time is a hot topic for parents and researchers alike. While digital devices are the norm, and children can certainly use them to their benefit, parents can also help children learn healthy digital habits. Research is still working out the long-term impact of devices on kids. Here’s what’s known so far, and what you as a parent can do about it. • Devices Before Bed = No Sleep: It’s undisputed: when it comes to bedtime, devices are a big no-no. According to Hoag Medical Group, devices are known to emit a specific light wavelength that messes with sleep patterns. Doctors recommend that kids don’t use devices for at least one hour before bed. The fix: At night, stick to the basics. Read to your children or

tell them a bedtime story. When they’re old enough to read to themselves, encourage them to stick with the habit of curling up with a good book before light’s out. • Screen Time Linked to Depression and Anxiety: According to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics, kids who spend a lot of time in front of screens are at a greater risk for emotional issues and low self-esteem. This is in part because the more time kids are spending in front of screens, the less time they’re spending doing healthy activities like socializing or being active. Additionally, certain content can increase anxiety, particularly social media. The fix: Distract kids with fun, thought-provoking alternatives. Whether it’s a trip to the playground, board games or fortbuilding, putting screens away

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gives children’s imaginations time to flourish. • Verbal ‘Warnings’ Do More Harm Than Good: Every parent knows the struggle of limiting device use. Handing a tablet over is easy enough, but getting it back? That’s when the struggle begins. According to research, giving kids a warning that screen time is coming to an end increases the chances that kids will fight back and defy their limitation. The fix: Setting clear limits on tech use is not just important, it’s essential. New technology

can help you do so much more seamlessly than an idle warning. Think apps that don’t lead kids into the next level of a game or give parents control over kids’ devices remotely. One such tool is a parental control app called OurPact. To start, parents sign up for a free account. After pairing their child’s devices, they’re able to manage them remotely through at-a-touch blocking or automated schedules. It’s great for setting bedtime schedules, ensuring devices don’t cause homework continued on page 11


February 26, 2020

The Julian News 9

California Commentary

The Many Flaws Of Prop. 13, The 2020 Impostor

by Jon Coupal

A couple of months ago, this column sounded the alarm concerning the big statewide school bond on the March 2020 ballot. Voters have already started casting their ballots on this measure, ironically identified as Proposition 13 (2020). Unlike the beneficial Prop. 13 from 1978, this Prop. 13 is a huge $15 billion statewide school bond that threatens taxpayers in several ways. And the more we learn about this proposal, the worse it gets. Although the amount of debt is “only” $15 billion — setting a new record for school bonds — the total cost will be $27 billion when interest costs are added. We also pointed out that Prop. 13 (2020) is a huge threat to California property owners. While it is true that the bond itsef, plus interest, will be repaid out of the state’s general fund, local school districts are usually required to provide matching funds. Those matching funds are generated by local bond measures, which are repaid exclusively by property owners. The threat to homeowners is that, if Prop. 13 (2020) passes, those debt limits are nearly doubled. After our original column ran back in November concerning the debt limit increase, several taxpayers inquired as to where that language could be found in the text of Prop. 13 in the ballot pamphlet, the state’s Official Voter Information Guide. And there’s the rub. Proposition 13 (2020) was placed on the ballot by the legislature through the passage of Assembly Bill 48. The language of the law relating to the debt limit, under the terms of the bill, takes effect if Prop. 13 passes. However, this language relating to the debt limit is nowhere to be found in the text of the ballot measure that is printed in the voter guide. The provisions of AB48 regarding the local debt caps aren’t the only provisions not appearing in the printed text of Prop. 13. The same is true with the language relating to the

preferences for construction projects that employ “project labor agreements.” These agreements, as noted previously, can result in 25-30% higher construction costs and freeze out non-union construction companies from competing for the business. That’s money that could actually be spent building and refurbishing more school projects that benefit our children. What’s the response to criticism that the voter guide is missing many of the important provisions of AB 48 that will take effect if Prop. 13 (2020) passes? First, it is argued that it’s a common practice in ballot measures to incorporate additional legal provisions by reference to them. To require that the full and complete text of the law be included in the ballot pamphlet could substantially increase the costs of printing ballot material. Second, other material in the voter guide summarizes the provisions of AB 48 that would take effect with Prop. 13’s passage. We don’t buy it, especially in the context of Prop. 13 (2020). The provision increasing the debt limits is short and could easily have been included in the text of the measure so that voters could actually read it. At a minimum the voter guide should include a statement at the start of the printed text of the law explaining that other provisions would also become law if the proposition passes, and there should be a link printed in the booklet that allows voters to find and read the text online. It is regrettable that there is a lack of transparency with respect to the impact the passage of Prop. 13 (2020) would have. Our political leaders have perfected to an art form the ability to keep things hidden from voters and taxpayers. They need to be held accountable at the ballot box and we can begin that process by voting no on the 2020 measure that’s labeled Prop. 13. *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA).

• It was American cartoonist, humorist and journalist Kin Hubbard who made the following sage observation: "There's no secret about success. Did you ever know a successful man who didn't tell you about it?" • Next time you're in Iowa, you might want to stop by the rural town of Riverside, which touts itself as the future birthplace of Captain James T. Kirk. Yep, the future birthplace. It seems that "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry asserted that the character of James Tiberius Kirk was born in Iowa, but he didn't specify exactly where. In 1985, the Riverside City Council voted to declare their town the future birthplace of the character, later writing to Roddenberry and receiving his approval. In honor of its newfound claim to fame, the city began hosting an annual Trek Fest, complete with a Spockapalooza battle of the bands. • If you enjoy cooking, you might have heard of some of the following cookbooks: "Kill It and Grill It," "The Joy of Pickling," "Full of Beans," "The Stinking Cookbook" and "I Can't Believe It's Not Meat!" Then again, maybe not. • The term "bric-a-brac," usually used to refer to a collection of tawdry trinkets, comes from the French, where its original meaning was "at random." • Most parents of small children know that trampolines can be dangerous, and they are. Every year, nearly 100,000 people receive emergency-room treatment for injuries sustained while using trampolines. Those injuries are hardly ever fatal, though. Pools, on the other hand, are far more deadly; more than 1,000 people in the United States die in swimming pools annually. *** Thought for the Day: If living conditions don't stop improving in this country, we're going to run out of humble beginnings for our great men. -- Russell P. Askue ® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** For me, integrity is the consistency of words and actions. Part of the way that you do that is to ask people questions on some of the most difficult issues that you confront. 'Take me through where you felt you had to compromise your values.' — Kenneth Chenault ***

® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** The integrity of men is to be measured by their conduct, not by their professions. — Junius ***


February 26, 2020

10 The Julian News

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

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• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G •

Electric

Gus Garcia’s

Home and Business Electrical Service

Water Treatment Services

GOT WATER PROBLEMS?

General Contractor

Excavation / Site Work

LARRY NOBLE CONSTRUCTION INC. General Contractor

New Construction Room Additions Decks Remodels

 New Meters  New Panels  Fans & Lighting  Additional Circuits  Water Well Electrical

Over 35 Years Experience

cell (760) 271 0166

Lawrence Noble, Owner Julian Resident for 27 years

License # 678670

State Lic.602654

760 • 765 • 2363 PO Box 1342 JULIAN, CA 92036

Heating / Air Conditioning Service

Carpet / Flooring / Window Treatment

SALES • SERVICE

Residential & Commercial Water Treatment Systems Water Testing

License No. 415453

WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS www.haguewatersandiego.com

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS and WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

CONTRACTORS

• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G •

50 Years Ago continued from page 3

® Dear EarthTalk: How is it that fungi can help clean up contaminated soils? – M. Sharpe, Canton, CT Like animals, fungi derive energy by breaking down large molecules into smaller compounds. They do so by secreting enzymes and acids onto whatever it is they intend to consume, and then absorbing the byproducts of this digestion process. While fungi primarily consume biological matter (like dead wood), their enzymes can also break down a wide array of man-made compounds. In fact, fungi are so good at this, we’re now employing them to clean up contaminated soils via a technique known as mycoremediation. Of course, these fungi are just doing what they evolved to do eons ago. Underneath our feet, massive fungal networks run through the soil, with many fungal species developing a symbiotic relationship with plants whereby a part of the fungus (the mycelium) grows adjacent to—and sometimes inside of—the roots of the plant. The mycelium is capable of breaking down and transporting nutrients and minerals essential for the plant’s survival. After detecting and digesting these compounds, the mycelium ferries them to the plant’s roots, where they’re absorbed. In exchange, the plant releases compounds that are vital for the fungi’s survival.

Underground mycelium networks can absorb and break down a wide range of natural and man-made compounds, and that’s why we’re using them to clean up contaminated sites naturally. Credit: Kirill Ignatyev, FlickrCC It’s the fungi’s ability to break down and/or transport compounds that make them useful for restoring damaged soils. Often, these soils have been saturated with compounds made up of dangerous—and relatively large—molecules. By breaking these molecules into smaller pieces, fungi help to reduce their toxicity. In other instances, soils are contaminated with fundamental elements such as cadmium, arsenic, and mercury, which can’t be broken down. However, fungi still have the ability to uptake and transport these substances, and to eventually concentrate them in their fruiting bodies (mushrooms). We can then remove the fruiting bodies, and the contaminated ecosystem will be one step closer to regaining health. Fungi can break down and/or absorb a wide range of compounds, including oil and other petroleum products, PAHs, PCBs, PCPs, neurotoxins, airborne pollutants, synthetic dyes, cadmium, lead, arsenic, mercury, copper, dioxins and organophosphates. If fungi are so effective at cleaning up our environment, why isn’t this technique more widespread? For starters, it’s a slow process. As with any biological strategy for environmental clean-up, mycoremediation is limited by the speed of metabolism. If a polluted area needs to be cleaned quickly, other options may be better. Another issue with mycoremediation is that it often fails to completely rid soil of a given toxic compound, instead simply reducing the concentration. It can also be hard to justify economically, as no one wants to eat a mushroom full of heavy metals. However, the biggest reason for mycoremediation’s relative lack of fame and use might simply be a lack of data from field tests. It’s a relatively new technique, without many case studies to support its use (despite a good amount of lab testing). Thankfully, this situation is changing. In 2017, for example, a large batch of oyster mushrooms was used to remediate soil damaged by California wildfires. The same variety of fungus has also been used to clean up oil spills and other toxic messes. CONTACTS: Fantastic Fungi Film, fantasticfungi.com; “Mushroom as a product and their role in mycoremediation,” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC4052754/; “Untapped potential: exploiting fungi in bioremediation of hazardous chemicals,” nature.com/articles/nrmicro2519. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https://earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk.org.

picked one up and noticed free gold in it." Hr. Bickers was an experienced prospector who had been in the northern gold fields. He showed the specimen to George Gower and to Dr. Wells, a minister from San Diego. Wells would not look at the rocks because it was Sunday, so it was set aside until the next day. Bickers continued: "the next day I took tocls starting from the spot, inviting Gower to accompany me. Upon careful prospecting we found the outcrop of the ledge. By Tuesday news got around and men began to show themselves looking for an extension of the ledge. In a highly excited state of mind Gower wrote a discovery notice commencing 'my name, then his, then Wells. then my son, his son and relatives, and other until there were 20 people in all." Each person was entitled to 200 feet, making 1,000 feet in all. This Claim was filed in the Coleman Mining Camp records. The day being Washington's birthday, Bickers, Wells, Gower and Company named it the George Washington Mine. The claim was later transferred to the Julian Mining District records. A camp was laid out by Gower, it was called Mount Vernon and was later abandoned. The partners worked with a will and by the first of March they took 1200 pounds of ore to San Diego where 400 pounds were put in the window of Dunham's store on 5th street for an exhibit. Crowds gathered, some seventy pounds were stolen. Excitement increased hourly. A stampede ensued, roads were blocked and choked with men on the way to the GOLD MOUNTAINS behind San Diego. With Gold behind Emery City, "Let's go, partner," was the cry, "Let's go." Dr. Wells stayed to look after the George Washington Mine. He was besieged by prospectors all wanting a sample of the ore. He was reluctant to give away gold ore worth hundreds of dollars a ton, so he filled up the pit and dug another some distance away. Every prospector who came expected to find a bonanza. Discoveries of other outcrops a short distance away inflamed the camp with news and the excitement continued. There were many versions of the discovery of the Washington Nine but Bickers was official. By August, 1870, over 54 claims were recorded in the New Julian Mining District. Drue Bailey had lain out a Townsite on his homestead and had named it after his cousin Mike Julian. The lots were 25 feet by 100 feet and Drue gave them free to anyone who would build on it. It is seldom realized that the town is "catty-wampus", cut on a bias to Cardinal directions; to see the town-site on a map and to tramp around on its streets are two different things. Drue Bailey looked at the terrain, saw a fairly level stretch

Northwest by Southeast, that offered a space of four long blocks, and called it Main Street. Then as the trail to the Washington Mine was being rapidly worn up the hill the principal cross street was named Washington Street. A miner was quoted in the San Diego Union of March 15, 1870, "One scarcely knows whether he is on his head or on his heels here in Julian. Imagine 800 men turned loose in the Mountains like Wild horses. A sober thought was unknown; people don't sleep at all." Julian had become a wild boom town, with tents and brush shanties everywhere. Log cabins were built and many others were under construction. Four, grocery stores and twelve saloons sprang up. Prices on food and material skyrocketed. Law and order were unknown. Five months after Bickers made the discovery he sold his interest in the Washington Mine to Gower for $5500.00. Most of the first ore mined was specimen ore that had a ready market with jewelers because it was very rich. The entire production over the years was two hundred thousand dollars. ($200,000.00) In the late 1870's an arrastra was built on the claim, which still stands as it was recently restored by the Julian Historical Society. Development of the Julian mines due to the uncertain arrival of machinery, tools and supplies, the pinching out of some of the promising veins and by distraction caused by new discoveries at Banner to the east. Other problems arose between miners and Land Grant Claims if the 1870's, the most threatening of which was the Cuyamaca Grant Claim. All of this led capital to hesitate to install expensive improvements. Money lenders were concerned about clouded titles. Then came the National Depression of 1873 and the lean years of the middle 1870's, even though transportation had improved, and milling equipment was abundant. After the court settlement in favor of the miners in July, 1875, things took a turn for the better and by 1380 minas were restored which had been idle. Activity increased and Julian was agin a'boom town. The decade of the 1870's had become a reality of experiences. Very rich ore had been found on the surface at most mines. Two stamp mills were erected in the late 70's; Wells Fargo had an office hero. They shipped $10,341.00 worth of gold in September, 1871; $5580.00 went through other sources. The price averaged $18.00. The town population in 1871 was 500 and one hundred houses were occupied, and many small camps were also at the mines. The spot of the original Washington discovery was on the right side of the canyon looking north. A tunnel was driven for 100 feet where another vein was encountered; both of these veins averaged one and three quarters

feet wide. This vein was driven 100 feet north and 50 feet south; very rich ore was taken out of beautiful blue quartz. On the west side of the canyon a tunnel was 100 feet and ore sloped to the surface. This tunnel is now being restored by the Julian Historical Society. Further up the hill opening were made. Two shafts were sunk and a tunnel driven from the south side of the hill into these shafts; both were over 100 feet deep. In all the tunnels and drifts considerable stoning was done, indicating large production. Every thing was done by hand as no large equipment. was installed. The abaft where the windlass is Was sunk to 200 feet; because of water coming in they backed to 135 feet and drove a drift west for some 500 feet. This accounts for the large dump that is under our feet. This was the main working shaft of the 1890's. Mr. L.A. Smith operated the hoist on it for many years and as the years passed the quality of the ore was of milling grade and was milled in stamp mills in the area. No records are available for the operation of the Washington Mine in the 1880's and early 1890's. In 1892 S.A. McDonald owned the Mine, then Issac Marks and Tom Strick. It was passed on to Henry Williams who also operated several other mines in the area. Then A.A.Sutton and A.D.Daniels took a lease from

Williams in 1895. In 1914 Williams sold his interest to Joseph Harriot for $1,000.00; Harriot had filed location notice, so Williams quit claimed. At Harriet's passing A.B. Daniels %gain bought the mine in 1915. Daniels had-a mineral survey of the mine made. Upon Daniels death Mr. Smith bought a one-third interest from Mrs. Daniels; another one-third interest was sold to Mr. Louis. Mr. Smith operated the mine on a share basis intermittently between other mining activities into the 1920's. He took care of all of the assessment work and performed all necessary duties. When Mrs. Daniels died her daughter Mrs. Baker received her interest. In 1945 the three partners petitioned for a Patent on the Washington Mine and one was issued. Mr. Louise Smith, son of Mr. L.A. Smith, bought the other intersts and became the sole ow or. The mine has been idle since 1930. The Julian Historical Society purchased the Washington Mine from Mr. Louis Smith in 1969. There is no doubt that the old Arrastra could tell many interesting tales of the rich ore that it ground; I was told that the floor rocks were pulled loose about 1922 and some six ounces of gold was panned out of the mud liners of the rocks. This is not unusual for so large an arrastra.

Members of the Julian Historical Society, February 1970


February 26, 2020

Kim Beck — A Musician’s Musician

continued from page 5 When Kim and Elise got divorced, Kim eventually met his final partner, Donna Dewey. They spent nine years sharing a love of music and dancing together. Donna was not only Kim's number one fan, accompanying him to gigs, but also something of a roadie, helping to pack up and load instruments. They also enjoyed traveling and visiting with family and friends. For the last several years of his life, Kim played with Ray Poe's band, "Pickin Time," in Lemon Grove. He enjoyed playing with this band so much that he regretted having to cancel a gig with them, just weeks before he passed. Kim was inducted into the Western Swing Hall of Fame in Sacramento in 2014. He was also inducted into the Northwest Hall of Fame in Washington in

2016. Kim played and sang right up to his last days on earth, surrounded by his daughters and family. He passed away at home on November 17, 2019 of leukemia, with Donna at his side. Kim left behind his sister Nanci Beck, three daughters- Kathleen Beck (Jim), Jeannie Beck (Merlei) and Darby Amezcua (Manuel), seven grandchildrenSuntii and Autumn Osuna, Felicia Hill, Dylan Dacus, Sarah Holt, Baylee and Liberty Amezcua, ten great grand childrenJonathan Hernandez, Livia and Zen Limon, Asia, Dakota and Cyrus Dacus, Kai and Kaden Lewis, and Ashaa and August Osuna. Kim also left behind some great songs, two pianos, numerous guitars, two mandolins and a fiddle. Kim was widely regarded as a musician's musician. He will be missed but his memory plays on. Kim's celebration of life will be held at the Veterans- Foreign

Wars post in Lemon Grove off of Federal Blvd and College Ave. at 2:00 pm on March 22. All are welcome for refreshments and the music of Pickin Time, short one fantastic piano player, as fate would have it.

Screen Time

continued from page 8 distractions and for enjoying ping-free family dinners. It works on Wi-Fi and all cellular connections, meaning you can manage access whether you’re at the grocery store or at home. To learn more or download, visit OurPact.com. And of course, open the lines of communication about device use with your kids early on, and keep the dialogue going. Explain why screen time rules are important and set a good example. If you don’t want your kid to look at their device in the middle of a conversation, hold yourself to the same rule.

In Lands of Cold and Snow! Seals, hares, oxen, foxes and squirrels are some animals that can live in cold, snowy climates. Do you know other animals that live in lands of cold and snow? Many live where land and water meet.

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I live on the edge of snowy lands and in the icy waters. I am a wonderful swimmer and diver! Who am I? Answer: A Seal

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junk food and save money is to make your own snacks at home. Keep plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables refrigerated in small, sealed plastic bags, ready to grab and go. Whole-wheat pretzels, baked tortilla chips and rice cakes are delicious with lowfat toppings like spicy mustard or salsa. Spice up air-popped popcorn with a little cayenne pepper or garlic powder. Dried fruit like raisins or cranberries mixed with walnuts and wholegrain cereal are easy to pack in small plastic bags for a quick and healthy homemade trail mix. If you love chocolate like I do, 2 ounces of dark chocolate or an 8-ounce mug of hot chocolate are healthier snacks than a milk chocolate candy bar. Nonfat frozen yogurt or sorbet contain half the calories and are a better substitute for ice cream.

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! by Annimills LLC © 2020

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These heart-healthy recipes will ensure that you’ll avoid fattening junk food while enjoying a satisfying and nutritious midmeal snack. SPICY ROASTED CHICKPEAS This high protein snack is low in fat and high in flavor! 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas or garbanzo beans 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1. Heat oven to 400 F. 2. Using a colander, rinse and drain the chickpeas, shaking the colander to remove as much liquid as possible. Place the chickpeas on a rimmed baking pan. 3. Sprinkle the chickpeas with the olive oil and shake the pan to coat the chickpeas with oil. Season the chickpeas with the cumin, chili powder, salt and cayenne pepper. Shake the pan to coat the chickpeas with the spices. 4. Bake for 10 minutes. Shake the pan and return the chickpeas to the oven for another 10 minutes or until crispy. FRUITY CHEESE BREAD 2 slices dense, multigrain bread 1 tablespoon low-fat cream cheese 8 blueberries or 6 peach, apple, banana or strawberry slices or a mixture of all 2 tablespoons peanut butter or nut butter 1 teaspoon honey 1. Place the slices of bread on a plate. Spread with a thin layer of the cream cheese. Top evenly with the fruit. 2. Place the peanut butter or nut butter and the honey in a small, microwave-safe bowl and mix well. Heat on high for 15 seconds or until the peanut butter melts. 3. Drizzle the nut butter mixture over the fruit. Cut the fruity cheese bread in half and then into quarters. Serve immediately. Serves 2. CINNAMON APPLE CHIPS

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNTIES LOCAL JULIAN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Local resident looking to borrow 550k secured by developed Julian commercial property. 5-10 year term, 6% interest only, low loan to value (LTV), first trust deed. Please send inquiries to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 1/31

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MEETINGS

AA Meetings www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514

Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center

ARE YOU TIRED OF MAKING MINIMUM WAGE? Join our team! Miner’s diner is looking for dependable, honest, friendly and hard working cooks. Must be able to work in a fast-paced environment and available to work on weekends and holidays. No Experience Necessary, we will Train. Apply in Person at 2134 Main Street, Julian, CA - Do not send resumes. 2/26

Monday - 7pm

CEDAR GLEN UNITED METHODIST CHILDREN’S CAMP AND RETREAT CENTER is seeking Cooks and Site Support staff for cooking, food prep, dishwashing, housekeeping and light maintenance. Parttime, mostly weekends, some midweek. Must pass background check. Please email mpeters@calpacumc.org. 3/18

Every person has a different view of another person's image. That's all perception. The character of a man, the integrity, that's who you are. — Steve Alford

LEGAL NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00006386-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: BRIAN MICHAEL EGERER FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: BRIAN MICHAEL EGERER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: BRIAN MICHAEL EGERER TO: FINN MICHAEL EGERER IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 2, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 1, 2020. LEGAL: 08511 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” Her website is www. divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. © 2019 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

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TIRE SALES and Service writer, Brake and Alignment Technician - allpy at Ron's Tires and Brake 760 789 3600 tfn

HELP WANTED - “Small Engine Mechanic”, outside help and truck driver needed at Lake Cuyamaca. Come out and pick up an application at 15027 Highway 79, Julian. Phone is 760-765-0515 2/26

The Julian News 11

4 Granny Smith or other tart apples 2 tablespoons stevia or sugar substitute 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon Nonstick, butter-flavored cooking spray 1. Heat oven to 250 F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or aluminum foil. 2. Slice the apple into four sections. Cut out the core and the seeds. Slice the apples as thinly as possible. The slices don’t have to be uniform. 3. Place the sugar and cinnamon in a large bowl and mix well. Add the apple slices and toss until most of both sides of the apples are well coated. Place the apples, in a single layer, onto the baking sheets. Spray the apples with the cooking spray. 4. Bake for 1 hour, stir and spray the apples with more of the cooking spray. Continue baking until the apples are lightly browned and crisp, about 1 hour. 5. Set aside to cool and then transfer the apple crisps into an airtight jar or a sealable plastic bag. ***

(Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery

WORSHIP SERVICES Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Phone: 760-765-0114 E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com

(open to all females - 12 step members)

PERSONAL SUPPORT

Tuesday - 7pm

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm

*** To give real service you must add something which cannot be bought or measured with money, and that is sincerity and integrity. — Douglas Adams ***

Julian Men’s Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to

Thursday - 7pm

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Thursday - 7pm Julian Prospectors AA Open Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting

Friday - 5pm

Ramona Sobriety Party

Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St

Saturday - 5pm

Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

1•888•724•7240

continued from page 7 1. Dwight Gooden and John Tudor. 2. Rickey Henderson was 20 years, 241 days old when he did it for Oakland in 1979. 3. Detroit’s Calvin Johnson, who did it in 2012. 4. It was 2006 (the University of Florida). 5. The Philadelphia Flyers in 1997 and the Washington Capitals in 1998. 6. Nico Rosberg, in 2016. 7. She won 12, with four of them at Wimbledon.

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Antarctica 2. Aluminum 3. Venice, Italy 4. Thomas Kinkade 5. 7 6. A leap 7. Chloe Ardelia Wofford 8. “The Spy Who Loved Me” 9. Nicaragua 10. A fight between three people ® 2019 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


12 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

Your Weekly Horoscope

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to February 1, 2015; 2015; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9001538 BURGER BENCH 16451 Bernardo Center Drive San Diego, CA 92128 The business is conducted by A Corporation Burger Bench RB, Inc., 16451 Bernardo Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92128. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 17, 2020. LEGAL: 08488 Publish: February 5, 12,19, 26, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00004017-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JENNIE ELISE ESTES FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JENNIE ELISE ESTES HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JENNIE ELISE ESTES TO: JENNIE ELISE POWELL IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 11, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 24, 2020. LEGAL: 08489 Publish: February 5, 12, 19, 26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9001949 a) INTEGRITY STABLES b) INTEGRITY STABLES RIDING AND TRAINING CENTER 4851 Belvedere Dr, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1841 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by An Individual Jennifer Elizabeth Smith, 4851 Belvedere Dr, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 23, 2020. LEGAL: 08492 Publish: February 5, 12,19, 26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9002709 a) GPS SAN DIEGO b) GPS CARLSBAD 765 Avacado Lane, Carlsbad, CA 92008 The business is conducted by A Corporation Caribbean Connection Foundation, 765 Avacado Lane, Carlsbad, CA 92008. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 30, 2020. LEGAL: 08493 Publish: February 5, 12,19, 26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9002704 a) ARCANASD HEALING b) ARCANA_SD 5465 Vincetta Ct Apt 6, La Mesa, CA 91942 The business is conducted by An Individual Stephanie Danyle Sanchez, 5465 Vincetta Ct Apt 6, La Mesa, CA 91942. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 30, 2020. LEGAL: 08494 Publish: February 5, 12,19, 26, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9002809 a) SANTA YSABEL ART GALLERY b) SANTA YSABEL GALLERY c) SANTA YSABEL ART FESTIVAL 30352 Hwy 78, Santa Ysabel, CA 92070 (Mailing Address: PO Box 480 Santa Ysabel, CA 92070) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Santa Ysabel Art Gallery, LLC, 30352 Hwy 78, Santa Ysabel, CA 92070. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 31, 2020. LEGAL: 08496 Publish: February 5, 12,19, 26, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00003539-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: KING VINCENT CHAVEZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: KING VINCENT CHAVEZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: KING VINCENT CHAVEZ TO: KING VINCENT VALERIUS HERACLIDES IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 23 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MARCH 10, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 22, 2020. LEGAL: 08498 Publish: February 12, 19, 26 and March 4, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00006224-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: CARLEY JANE GOLDSTEIN SCHU and JAKE RICHARD GOLDSTEIN SCHU FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: CARLEY JANE GOLDSTEIN SCHU and JAKE RICHARD GOLDSTEIN SCHU HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) CARLEY JANE GOLDSTEIN SCHU b) JAKE RICHARD GOLDSTEIN SCHU TO: a) CARLEY JANE GOLDSTEIN-SCHU b) JAKE RICHARD GOLDSTEIN-SCHU IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 25, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 4, 2020. LEGAL: 08499 Publish: February12, 19, 26 and March 4, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00005119-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: HALLETT FRANCIS MADRUGA FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: HALLETT FRANCIS MADRUGA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: HALLETT FRANCIS MADRUGA TO: ROBERT HALLETT MACHADO IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 17, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 29, 2020. LEGAL: 08501 Publish: February12, 19, 26 and March 4, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00004090-CU-PT-CTL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9002413 CROSSHATCH PUBLISHING 8039 Lemon Ave, La Mesa, CA 91941 The business is conducted by An Individual - Sarai Phegley, 8039 Lemon Ave, La Mesa, CA 91941. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 28, 2020. LEGAL: 08497 Publish: February 12,19, 26 and March 4, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9002338 THE BAD APPLE TATTOO 2724 B St., Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 2075 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A General Partnership - Concetta Laren Armijo, 3606 Royal Dr., Julian, CA 92036 and Rachel Alane Beardsley, 3606 Royal Dr., Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON January 28, 2020. LEGAL: 08504 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: VICTORIA ALEXIS DE ANDA FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: VICTORIA ALEXIS DE ANDA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: VICTORIA ALEXIS DE ANDA TO: VICTORIA NAYELI GARCIA IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on MARCH 11, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON January 24, 2020. LEGAL: 08502 Publish: February 19, 26 and March 4, 11, 2020

Wednesday - February 26, 2020

Volume 35 - Issue 30

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) All that flattery and fawning shouldn't affect any decision you have to make. Keep your focus on the facts and ignore all the hyperbole, especially if it gets uncomfortably personal. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your Bovine instincts are on the mark about that "favor" you're being asked to do. Agree to nothing unless you get a full explanation -- which you would check out first, of course. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A somewhat unsettled recent period should give way to a smoother time going through the week. Use this quieter time to catch up on matters you might have had to let slide. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Feeling a little confused is understandable with all those mixed messages. Take time to list the questions you have. Then present them and insist on answers that make sense. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Cupid can be very helpful for Lions seeking a love connection. The chubby cherub also brings warm and fuzzy feelings to paired Leos and Leonas who already share a special love line. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Travel is favored this week, whether you'll be globe-trotting or taking a trip to a nearby getaway. You might be surprised (or maybe not) by who wants to be your traveling companion. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Getting advice on your next business-related move is a good idea, but only if your advisers are trustworthy. Get references that you can check out before you make any decisions.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Getting a boost in your self-esteem is one benefit that comes with a job well done. There are other plusses as well, including being noticed by all the right people. Good luck. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Make time to deal with family matters, especially where they concern your elderly kinfolk. Being there for them from the start can help resolve problems sooner rather than later. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Getting a project started can often be difficult. But the good news is that you won't want for lack of assistance from colleagues who would like to work with you. So, let them! AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A lot of workrelated issues might be raised this week, and you need to be prepared for whatever comes along. Things should be easier when it comes to matters in your private life. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) What might appear to be a much unwanted change in your life right now could turn out to be a very welcome event after all. Give yourself a chance to see where it might take you. BORN THIS WEEK: You exercise your strong leadership qualities well, which is why people believe in you and feel reassured by you. © 2019 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office. — Dwight D. Eisenhower ***

Automotive Marketplace

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00008019-CU-PT-CTL

RON’S

PETITIONER: ACACIA JERICO FRIEDMAN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ACACIA JERICO FRIEDMAN TO: ACACIA JERICO CLARKE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 1, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 13, 2020. LEGAL: 08503 Publish: February 19, 26 and March 4, 11, 2020

AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00000575-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) IRIS ANNE MUNRO b) IRIS ANNE ERICKSON c) ANNA HEDLICKA d) ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER TO: a) ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER b) ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER c) ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER d) ANNA HEDLICKA KEPPLER IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 23 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 14, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 13, 2020.

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*** We learned about honesty and integrity - that the truth matters... that you don't take shortcuts or play by your own set of rules... and success doesn't count unless you earn it fair and square. — Michelle Obama ***

LE G A L N O TI C E S

LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2020-00005631-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2020-00008914-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2020-00004297-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MICHELLE LYNETTE BIXLER FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: DANIELLE MARIE ZURCHER FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MAHMOUD LADANI JANNESARI FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: MICHELLE LYNETTE BIXLER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MICHELLE LYNETTE BIXLER TO: MICHELLE LYNETTE JAMES

PETITIONER: DANIELLE MARIE ZURCHER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: DANIELLE MARIE ZURCHER TO: DANIELLE MARIE UPSON

PETITIONER: MAHMOUD LADANI JANNESARI HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MAHMOUD LADANI JANNESARI TO: MICHAEL LADANI JANNESARI

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 2, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 11, 2020.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 23 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on APRIL 7, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 19, 2020.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 61 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 9, 2020 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 19, 2020.

LEGAL: 08505 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

LEGAL: 08506 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

LEGAL: 08508 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

LEGAL: 08509 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

Name Change Orders Published for only $50

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9004297 MAK’S BOOKS 10466 Rancho Carmel Dr., San Diego, CA 92128 The business is conducted by An Individual Makenzie Schylar Young, 10466 Rancho Carmel Dr., San Diego, CA 92128. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 19, 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2020-9003162 MO’S CANDLES & MORE 4470 Julian Road, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1194 Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by An Individual - Reyna Cruz Vega, 853 Mnzanita Drive, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 5, 2020.

LEGAL: 08510 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

LEGAL: 08507 Publish: February 26 and March 4, 11, 18, 2020

We send a proof of publication to the Court with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Fictitious Business Name Filings Published for only $30

We send a proof of publication to the County Clerk with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Call the Julian News Office

760 765 2231

Profile for Julian News

Wednesday - February 26, 2020  

Wednesday - February 26, 2020