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U M J LI A N

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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

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(46¢ + tax included)

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

For the Community, by the Community.

Historical Julian

Murder in Julian The Trial of Javen Bush

Wednesday

www.JulianNews.com

Holiday Happenings At The Library On Thursday, December 6 at 3 PM, Branch Librarian Colleen

from David Lewis Baker will lead adults (and interested teens) in a holiday decorations

Rarely does an historic event in Julian have ample documentation with which to understand the event in its entirety. The story you are about to read has documentation. It’s good documentation because it recounts testimony given by the town’s people of Julian over five days of a murder trial. What’s lacking is a good understanding of how it affected the town and its people. This is the criminal trial of Javen J. Bush, charged with the murder of John Ivey on June 22, 1882. The opening article in the San Diego Sun newspaper is titled, “TRIAL OF J. J. BUSH.” It names the attorneys for the defense and the prosecuting team. It also gives the names of the twelve jurors’ selected to weigh the evidence. Capital cases were not prosecuted in Julian. The trial, which commenced on August 9, 1882, takes place in the Superior Court of San Diego. The whole affray was bad from the very beginning, and was only going to get worse. A reporter from the Sun newspaper commented that “The affair has cast a gloom over the entire community where the tragedy occurred, as both parties were well known and respected.” Javen Bush had a wife and five children. John Ivey was a native of Texas. He was about twenty seven years old at the time of his death. He left behind a wife and a small son. A reporter from the Sun newspaper quoted a local doctor as saying that Mrs. Ivey was in poor health and would likely not recover from this loss. The first witness called to the stand was L. A. Nichols. Nichols was a civil engineer. He had been directed by the court to prepare a map of the crime scene. Witnesses would later be asked to reference this map when giving testimony. The second witness called was Charles Webber. Webber was a saloon keeper in Julian. He had aided Nichols in preparing the court’s map of the crime scene. Webber explained the points on the map to the jury. He testified that he had known the defendant Javen Bush for ten or eleven years. He had known the deceased, John Ivey, for six or seven years. That the witness had known both the defendant and the deceased for years, illustrates part of the dynamics of living in a small town. Everyone knows everybody in the community. A murder in Julian touched everyone. A witness in this trial would have had a relationship with all parties involved. That relationship would make testifying extremely stressful for many of the witnesses. Webber had heard about the shooting between four and half past four in the afternoon when an Indian named Valentine came into town and told of the shooting. Charles Webber contributed ten dollars toward the expense of prosecuting Javen Bush. The third witness called was Tom Bundy, a saloon keeper in Julian. Bundy had also aided Nichols in the creation of the evidence map. The map not only depicted the location of the shooting, but also the locations in town where Bush and Ivey had been prior to the shooting. It’s not a coincidence that saloons and saloon keepers would be central to the evidence presented in this case. Webber testified that Ivey had been in his saloon and that Ivey had proclaimed that he had “a dollar and a half and was going to spend four bits at each of the saloons.” Later testimony by most witnesses say they saw Ivey consume multiple “drinks,” but he was never referred to as drunk. Bundy also testified that both Bush and Ivey were known to carry side arms with them. He said that, “It is the habit in Julian for nearly everybody to carry a pistol.” Bundy contributed five dollars to the expenses of prosecuting Bush. With two of the first three witnesses having contributed to the expenses of prosecuting Bush, we begin to see that the road to justice might be fairly straight. Next on the stand was Z. C. Davee, Julian’s Justice of the Peace. The Justice of the Peace acted as the ex-officio coroner for the town. Usually the Justice of the Peace would round up several local men for a coroner’s inquest. This group would determine if the victim was actually deceased and determine the cause of death. In this case, Davee needed no other members to determine whether Ivey was dead, or how it happened. Bush was already in the custody of the local constable and had confessed to killing Ivey. Bush’s father had requested Constable George Dean to go to the Bush residence where his son was in hiding. When asked why his son had not turned himself in, Bushed replied that his son was afraid to go anywhere for fear of being lynched. When Bush was arrested at home he told Dean that he was glad to get legal protection. Dean also took possession of Bush’s Colt Navy six shooter that was used to kill Ivey. One chamber had been emptied. Next sworn to the stand was John Viberg. John was nine years and eight months old. He was one of several school aged children who were called upon to testify against their school mate’s father, Javen Bush. It was John who heard Javen Bush tell his son Albert to go home and get his pistol; he wanted to kill John Ivey. The next sworn witness was the Indian, Valentine. Valentine, who lived in Laguna, was not proficient in the English language so Captain R. K. Porter acted as interpreter. Valentine’s testimony was crucial as he was there with John Ivey when he was killed. Valentine had been in Julian all day with Ivey and had visited the race track east of town. The race track is now under the highway in front of the present day Julian High School. He then left Ivey for a short time and visited some Indian friends. At about four o’clock, Valentine and Ivey started for Ivey’s house. Earlier, Ivey had some of his tools repaired at John McCain’s blacksmith shop. He now had them laid across the saddle in front of him. Valentine was a short distance back from Ivey and leading a bronco horse behind him. Valentine saw Bush, who was on the road ahead of them, leave his horse and start back toward them. Valentine thought Bush intended to talk with Ivey, but Bush approached Ivey with pistol in hand. Seeing this, Ivey tossed his tools to the ground and dismounted his horse. Ivey had little time to react to what was coming. He still had one foot in the stirrup when Bush raised and fired his pistol at point blank range. John McCain took the stand and corroborated the previous testimonies. Next on the stand was R. L. Viberg. Viberg’s testimony recounted how on June third, there was an election held to chose trustees for the local school board. Balloting had taken place where many public events were held in Julian; a local saloon. Just as balloting was continued on page 10

www.visitjulian.com

workshop. There will be supplies to make and decorate wreaths, swags, and centerpieces. Materials are supplied and you may take home items made. This is generously sponsored by the Friends of the Julian Library. Please join us at the Julian Library, 1850 Highway 78 for this fun event. These items can even be used for presents if you are so inclined! Please join us at the Julian Branch library on Tuesday, December 11 at 6 PM as we host an Old-fashioned Sing-Along. It is a time to gather together and sing some familiar tunes being led and accompanied by local residents, Bruce Druliner and Ken Wright. There will be songbooks with both folk songs and holiday tunes to follow along. All are invited to participate in this gathering and afterwards join in for some refreshments with Hot Chocolate and Apple Cider. The Julian branch library is located at 1850 Highway 78. For more information, please call the branch at 760-765-0370 or check out our Facebook page – Julian Branch Library.

Santa Weekending At Town Hall

Santa poses with some visitors on Weekends at Town Hall from 12-4.

Flu Cases Tick Up, But Still Down Significantly From Last Year by Tom Christensen, County of San Diego Communications Office There was an uptick in the number of flu cases reported in San Diego County last week, but the number is within expected levels and total cases are still down significantly from last year at this time. Cases nearly doubled to 113 for the week, compared to 59 reported in the previous week. But that number isn’t significantly different than the 102 reported for this week last year, and the total of 361 cases to date is much lower than the 675 at this time last flu season. “We didn’t see a huge increase in the number of cases until later in the flu season last year,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County public health officer. “Flu activity typically increases during the holidays and can last until April or May. “Vaccination is the best protection against influenza. December 2-8 is National Influenza Vaccination Week and we encourage people to get a flu shot so they are protected during family, friend or work gatherings this holiday season.” Last season, 342 San Diegans died from complications from the flu, the highest total since the County began tracking flu deaths nearly 20 years ago. The majority of those who died last season were over the age of 65, had underlying medical conditions and had not been vaccinated. Two children also died from influenza last year. The County Health and Human Services Agency publishes the weekly Influenza Watch report, which tracks key flu indicators and summarizes influenza surveillance in the region. All other indicators are at expected levels for this time of year. For the week ending Nov. 24, 2018, the Influenza Watch report shows the following: Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness: 3 percent of all visits (compared to 3 percent the previous week) Lab-confirmed influenza cases for the week: 113 (compared to 59 the previous week) Total influenza deaths to date: 2 (compared 4 at this time last season) Total lab-confirmed cases to date: 361 (compared to 675 last season) How to Prevent the Flu The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot every year. The vaccine is safe and effective. It takes two weeks for immunity to develop. Vaccination is especially important for people who are at high risk of developing serious complications from influenza. They include: People with chronic medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and lung disease, even if symptoms are under control Pregnant women People 65 years and older People who live with or care for others who are at higher risk In addition to getting vaccinated, people should also do the following to avoid getting sick: Wash hands thoroughly and often Use hand sanitizers Stay away from sick people Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth Clean commonly touched surfaces If you are sick, stay home and avoid contact with others The flu vaccine is available at doctors’ offices, community clinics, and retail pharmacies. If you don’t have medical insurance, you can go to a County public health center to get vaccinated. For a list of locations, visit www.sdiz.org or call 2-1-1.

December 5, 2018

Volume 34 — Issue 18

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

How to Survive A Significant Earthquake

by Yvette Urrea Moe, County of San Diego Communications Office

The Anchorage, Alaska 7.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami warning, which was later canceled, reminds us all to be prepared for these kinds of unpredictable disasters. Having a disaster plan and supplies and practicing your response with your family could mean escaping serious harm. Residents who live in seismic zones like San Diego County should know what to do before, during and after a significant earthquake. Most people who are killed or injured during earthquakes are hurt by falling objects around them. The County of San Diego’s Office of Emergency Services recommends that everyone in a family, including children, know how to drop, cover and hold. Practicing what to do during an earthquakes takes less than two minutes. Watch what to do when an earthquake strikes. If you’re inside, drop down to avoid falling over during the shaking; you should seek cover under a sturdy table or desk to protect yourself from possible falling debris, and cover your head with one hand, while using the other hand to hold onto the table in case it slides away and leaves you exposed. Try to seek cover where there are no overhanging fixtures, windows or heavy furniture that could topple over. If you’re inside and there’s no table or desk to get under, it is recommended that you move toward an interior wall with nothing above it or affixed to the wall that could fall onto you. Make sure there is no window nearby or heavy furniture that could be knocked over onto you either. Cover your head with your hands. If you’re in bed when an earthquake occurs, you can cover your head with your hands and a pillow and make sure you are not under an overhead fixture or shelf. Be careful of broken glass or debris when getting out of bed afterward. If you’re outside when an earthquake happens, you need to be in a clear area away from buildings where the façade might crumble; make sure you’re not under any utility lines, trees or bridges. If you’re driving, pull over to the side of the road, stop, and set the parking brake. Avoid overpasses, bridges, power lines, signs and other hazards. Stay inside the vehicle until the shaking stops. If near a shoreline, drop to the ground in a clear area and cover your head. Then as soon as you can walk, move inland or to higher ground in case of a tsunami. Walking is recommended over driving to avoid congestion. For more specific situations, visit ShakeOut.org’s earthquake safety tips. You can also visit ReadySanDiego.org to learn more about earthquake safety or tsunamis. An emergency family plan template is available in English, Spanish, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Japanese and Chinese. The template includes a list of important items to assemble in your disaster emergency kit. In addition to making a plan for what to do during an earthquake, you can prepare by walking around your home and securing furniture and wall hangings to continued on page 7

Winter Sports Schedules Girls Soccer

Wed., November 28 W 1-0 Home vs Hamilton Monday, December 3 3:15 Home vs Maranatha Christian Wed., December 5 3:00 Home vs High Tech (NC) Friday, December 7 3:00 Home vs Calnin Christian Wed., December 12 3:30 @ High Tech (NC) Monday, December 17 3:00 Home vs Gompers Prep Friday, January 11 3:00 @ Borrego Springs Monday, January 14 3:00 @ Maranatha Christian Friday, January 18 3:00 Home vs West Shores Wed., January 23 3:00 @ West Shores

Boys Basketball

Tues, November 20 L 16-75 @ Del Lago Academy Thurs., November 27 L 27-69 @ Hamilton Monday, December 3 3:45 @Calvary Christian Thursday, December 6 5 :30 Home vs San Diego Jewish Academy Monday, December 10 6:30 @ Temecula Prep Tuesday, December 18 5:30 @ San Diego Jewish Academy Tuesday, January 8 5:30 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 11 5:30 @ Mountain Empire

Girls Basketball

Tuesday, November 13 @ Bonsall Friday,November 16 Home vs Bonsall Tuesday, November 27 L 42-17 @ Hamilton Tuesday, December 4 5:30 Home vs Horizon Prep Thursday, December 6 5:00 @ Guajome Park Academy Wed., December 12 5:00 Home vs Guajome Park Academy Thursday, December 13 4:30 Home vs Hamilton Saturday, December 15 4:00 Home vs Preuss UCSD Tuesday, January 8 4:00 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 11 4:00 @ Mountain Empire

Boys Soccer

Monday, November 26 L 1-4 Home vs Ocean View Christian Tuesday, November 27 3:15 Home vs Calvin Christian Tuesday, December 4 3:30 @ Ocean View Christian Friday, December 7 3:00 Home vs Calnin Christian Wed., December 12 3:15 @ Calvary Christian Wed., January 9 5:00 @ West Shores Wed., January 16 3:00 Home vs Calipatria Friday, January 18 3:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial

Julian Offers a Wide Variety of Unique Gifts! Shop Local this Holiday Season!

continued on page 4


2 The Julian News

December 5, 2018

Health & Personal Services

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

30352 Highway 78(at Hwy 79)

OPEN Thurs-Monday 11 am - 5pm

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services Now accepting: Covered • Monthly California, Medi-Cal, Flu OB/GYN shots available at the Julian Medicare, Community • Digital X-ray Lab Services Clinic every day from 9-11Health and Group,1-3. Molina, • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Appointment advised. Please call the Most PPO’s and Tricare. • Behavioral Health (Smart Care) Sliding Fee Scale and

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2019. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef.

We look forward to seeing you!

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Rick Hill Bill Fink

Jon Coupal David Lewis

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2018 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News In Person

1453 Hollow Glen Road Office Hours: 3pm — 5pm Monday 3pm — 5pm Tuesday 9am — 5pm Wednesday — Friday

By Mail

The Julian News PO Box 639

Phone / Fax email

After Hours Printed on Re-Cycled Paper

Julian, CA 92036

760 765 2231 submissions@juliannews.com The Julian News @JulianNews Information may be placed in our drop box located outside the office front door. The phone will accept succinct messages 24 hours a day. Member National Newspaper Association

clinic 760-765-1223 for information. Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-4 pm 760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management

Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

Michele Harvey Greg Courson

As a long-time resident and advocate of the rich cultural heritage of our backcountry mountain communities, I took considerable interest in the plan’s envisioned by the Julian Community Heritage Foundation for the old, corner “Cheveron site”(Julian News, November 28th). As a former park ranger and private sector fundraiser for the National Park Service in the Rocky Mountain region during the early 1980’s, development funds were often raised in simple and straight forward fashion and gave the public at large an easy way to participate in beloved community projects. I think that this strategy may have been used in Julian previously, but is worth repeating: sell “shares” or “mini-deeds” to locals, businesses and the visiting tourists at large… one square foot, one square inch, one square yard or meter - - maybe a combination. An inexpensive and attractive “ownership or “deed” certificate is suitable for framing and given to each donor as a memento - - maybe designed in a mining certificate motif or some such art unique to Julian. My discovery was that people (and corporations) love to have an affordable “piece of the action”, and a colorful memento to acknowledge their role, their generosity. We called these projects “Vest Pocket Parks”, but we also raised money in this fashion for such iconic sites as the “Custer Battlefield” in Montana. Printing the “deeds” is a contribution in and of itself. Can you imagine, for example, a beautiful Victorian-era gazebo on this “Cheveron” lot, with radiating walkways, Victorian benches (also paid for by sponsors), low maintenance foliage, and perhaps even interpretive signage which is now at the west side of the town hall on a humble bulletin board? A major donors’ plaque could also be in the offing (including from Cheveron) … It would become a true centerpiece of Julian and a great lasting venue for the arts! It can happen! CLNTS 1 127093 22:03 Best Wishes – G. Gage Skinner, Pine Valley

Member California News Publishers Association

WV

1/15/02

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B/W DOLEV

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21:50

*127093*

9/6/02

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IRIS

Five Tips For Safety (NAPS)—For many of us, this season is a time to celebrate the holidays with family and friends. Unfortunately, thieves take advantage of the hol-idays to steal packages containing gifts for loved ones or supplies needed for holiday celebrations. The Postal Service™ looks forward to delivering a great deal of holiday cheer along with more than 15 billion mail pieces. The United States Postal Inspection Service®, the federal law enforcement arm of the Postal Service, is working around-the-clock to keep your important shipments safe and prevent mail and parcel theft. What can you do to ensure your gifts and cards are safe? Postal Inspectors are offering FIVE tips to help ensure your important packages reach their destination, and brighten the lives of friends and loved ones this holiday season. 1. Don’t leave delivered mail and packages unattended. Just as you would not leave your wallets and purses on the front seat of an unlocked car overnight, mail and packages should not be left sitting in mailboxes or on front porches for any length of time. 2. Going out of town? Hold Mail at the local Post Office®. If you plan on going out of town or know you won’t be able to check your mail for a few days, consider using the Request Hold Mail service on USPS.com®. Letters and packages will be held securely at the local Post Office until you pick them up or request delivery. 3.  Plan ahead. Ship using Hold for Pickup. When shipping packages, you can choose the Hold for Pickup option and the recipients can collect the packages at their local Post Office. If you are expecting a package, you can redirect it to your local Post Office by selecting Hold for Pickup using USPS Package Intercept®. 4. Customize the delivery. If you know the package will not fit in your mailbox and you won’t be home to receive it, you can authorize the carrier to leave it in a specified location. Visit usps.com, enter the tracking number and select Delivery Instructions. 5. Secure the shipment using USPS Special Services. Signature Confirmation helps ensure the package ends up in the right hands by requiring a signature at the time of delivery. For your most valuable packages, you can opt for Registered Mail® service. Registered Mail receives special handling from the time it’s mailed until the time it’s delivered, with documentation every step of the way.

*** During the holiday season, it's easy to forget that sometimes the best gift of all is simply the gift of time. I can't think of anything a writer would appreciate more than being given time and space to work. — Kate Klise ***

AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS. WHAT A CHILD LEARNS ABOUT VIOLENCE A CHILD LEARNS FOR LIFE. Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or visit www.actagainstviolence.org.

Ignore them and they’ll go away.

WWW.AFTERSCHOOLNOW.ORG 1-866-KIDS-TODAY

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

Film at Horan Imaging 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127093

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Afterschool Alliance - Newspaper 2 1/16 x 2 B&W MFNYR2-N-06232-H “Ignore Them” 85 line screen Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127931


December 5, 2018

Ramona Food and Clothes Closet Showing Holiday Spirit The Ramona Food and Clothes Closet (RFCC) Foundation is pleased to present a $2000 grant to Capability Ranch founder/ president Nicola Bridges as the last foundation grant of 2018. Pictured to her left is Cammie Morgan, RFCC Board Secretary and on the right is RFCC Board President, Rosamund Breese. Capability Ranch is a Ramona nonprofit Activities Center for teens and young adults with developmental disabilities. Arts, craft, music, dancing, educational presentations and special outings are facilitated by volunteers. Additionally they have special events which include exotic animal presentations, magic shows and more. Activities are held monthly. Please check out their website for calendar of activities, events, the ability to donate and more information at www. capabilityranch.org or call/text 914-582-5901

YMCA Volleyball League Coming Soon

YMCA Camp Marston is announcing the 21st season of Adult CoEd Volleyball league in Julian. The league begins with match play on Sunday, January 6, 2019 and runs through April. All matches are held at the Julian High School gymnasium on Sunday nights. The league has an opening for one new team this year. Individuals can also register their names to be picked up by a team by emailing camp@ymca.org. A team roster can carry up to 12 players. Cost is $150 per team. Each match consists of three rally-scoring games to 25. Matches are held on the hour, Sunday evenings between 5:00 and 9:00 pm. Volunteer referees enforce volleyball game rules. The league maintains a good level of play; not picnic-style volleyball. Team records are kept, with season-ending play-offs and championship match. “The adult volleyball league is very popular, and this year we have an opening for a new team”, stated Tom Madeyski, the director of YMCA Camp Marston. “Each year, the level of competition has steadily risen. I hear from players how much they enjoy getting a workout on Sunday nights along with the competition and fellowship”. Thanks to the Julian Union High School District, this collaborative effort provides a wonderful service to the adults of the community. Camp Marston is operated by the YMCA of San Diego County. To sign up as a team or individual, email camp@ymca.org or call 760765-0642.

Simple Tips To Make Outdoor Chores And Activities Easier (StatePoint) Whether you’re doing chores in the yard or going on an outdoor adventure, activities that take place outside come with their own set of challenges, particularly in colder weather. You can make all your outdoor activities safer and more effective this winter with these suggestions. Keep Your Hands Warm Your extremities are the first to suffer from the chill, so keep your hands warm at all times to prevent frostbite. Keep in mind that, these days, a good pair of gloves means touchscreen functionality so you won’t have to remove them every time you use your devices. While there are a lot of stylish options on the market that work great for your day-to-day life, you’ll want to pick up an additional pair that’s designed specifically for sports performance and utility, so whether you’re pitching a tent or tinkering with the car, your hands will stay toasty. Eliminate Spills Gassing up the snow blower? Trail-bound and preparing the ATV? Using your chainsaw to cut wood for the fireplace? You can improve the experience of fueling your equipment with innovative storage tools. If you’re still using leaky metal cans to store gasoline, diesel or kerosene, consider upgrading to a fuel can system such as the new SmartControl system from Scepter. Crafted with a unique push spout that provides a clean, fast and hassle-free pour, and constructed of durable and safe high-density polyethylene, it makes fueling easier, faster, cleaner and safer. What’s more, you’ll end up saving fuel -- and money -- as its design, which is available in 1-, 2-, and 5-gallon sizes, eliminates messy spills. And, its user-controlled flow makes it easier to direct the amount of fuel being dispensed. Be Prepared When you’re hitting the road for an outdoor adventure, be sure your car is stocked with an emergency kit. Should you get lost or encounter car troubles along the way, you’ll be prepared. Include such essentials as jumper cables, road maps (yes paper ones -- should your GPS device lose power or you go

offline), a blanket, warm clothes, first aid supplies, a flashlight, extra batteries, bottled water, and nutrition, such as granola bars. This will help keep you safe in unforeseen circumstances, and offer you peace of mind the rest of the time. This winter, have the tools and information you need to do all your favorite outdoor activities safely and effectively.

The Julian News 3

TREE N C A O I M L U P J E HT Local Experience Since 1988ANY * Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

FREE ESTIMATES

Licensed and Bonded Fully Insured for Your Protection

ERIC DAUBER H: 760-765-2975 C: 760-271-9585 PO Box 254 JULIAN, CA. 92036

License #945348

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Want to help out the community for Christmas but don’t know how? Here’s what Cindie and Ed Iveson of ECI Transportation and Courier Services contributed! Look at all the wonderful toys and a VERY big check towards Ramona Food and Clothes Closets "Share Your Christmas" program. Last year RFCC gave out 435 new toys and 182 holiday food boxes to those in need.


4 The Julian News

Julian

and

December 5, 2018

Back Country Happenings

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Calendar CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month 10am at the Fire Station, 3407 Hwy 79, Julian Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society Presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7 pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 2:30pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00 ESL Class - Tuesday/Thursday Improve your English skills with a Palomar College Instructor Julian Library, 4-6pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15 Every Tuesday Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10am - Baby Story Time with Miss Colleen 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer Second & Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Every Thursday VET Connect - VA services available at Julian library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment. Thursdays, 9am-4pm. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every 1st & 3rd Thursday Lego Club, Lego building for kids grade K-5. All materials supplied. Julian Library - 2:30pm. Every Saturday Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves & Desperados historic comedy skits at 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm – stage area behind Julian Market & Deli.

DECEMBER

Thursday, December 6 Holiday Homecrafts Make wreaths, swags, and center-pieces with Ms. Colleen. Julian Library - 3pm

Thursday, December 6 FREE Flu Shots Julian Library - 2 to 5 Thursday, December 6 Live Poets Society Adults and teens are welcome to read their own poetry to the group, led by Steve Clugston. Julian Library - 6pm Thursday, December 6 Chamber of Commerce Holiday Mixer - Town Hall 5:30 pm to 8:00 Friday, December 7 Julian Womens Club Holiday Home Tour leave from Methodist Church 9am and 1pm

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents

Ezza Rose (Eireann Hutchinson) returns home to showcase her latest album “No Means No” this Friday nigh at Wynola Pizza in the Red Barn from six to nine. Currently based in Portland, Oregon Ezza has become a mainstay in the music scene. “The progression from folk to something more closely resembling rock has been organic and fluid like the rest of her history, but she is not without a significant amount of stubborn drive. This latest change is just another indicator that Rose is, above all, a consummate musician.” Anchorage Press. She and her band are in Julian for one night only, It will be a chance to catch up, and hear the latest from this child of Julian.

Thursday, December 13 Shooting Star Party in Santa Ysabel West Preserve 7:00 PM to 10:30 PM Friday, December 14 “A Christmas Carol” JHS Theater - 7pm tickets = $15 / under 10 = $8 Saturday, December 15 DIY Gift Wrapping Join us in the community room to wrap presents. All supplies provided by the library. Julian Library 10am - 2pm Saturday, December 15 “A Christmas Carol” JHS Theater - 7pm tickets = $15 / under 10 = $8 Sunday, December 16 “A Christmas Carol” JHS Theater - 2pm tickets = $15 / under 10 = $8 Sunday, December 16 Handel’s Messiah Julian Community Choir presents this traditional holiday oratorio, Sponsored by Community United Methodist Church of Julian. Julian Town Hall - 7pm Friday, December 21 Special Fund Raising for victims of the the “Camp Fire” (Paradise, CA) in memory of Joe Rabetoy Wynola Pizza - 6 to 9 Saturday, December 22 LAST CHANCE DIY Gift Wrapping. - Join us in the community room to wrap presents. All supplies provided by the library. Julian Library 10am - 2pm Saturday, December 22 Wine Discussion Join Lili Dierenfield for an informed discussion for our guests encompassing the properties, ordering, pairing and the merits one might pursue to find their favorite wine. Orchard Hill Country Inn from 2:30 to 4pm

www.butterfieldbandb.com

&

www.blackoakcabin.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

Sunday, December 9 Breakfast with Santa Pine Hills Lodge 9am to 2pm

Wednesday, December 12 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Our adjacent BLACK OAK CABIN provides another option for your getaway!

“The Mellow Downs” Debut In Wynola, Saturday

Friday, December 7 Triangle Club Community Christmas Santa, music, crafts, treats Julian Town Hall - upstairs 5-7pm

Tuesday, December 11 Community Sing-A-Long Christmas Carols with Bruce Druliner and Ken Wright Julian Library - 6pm

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

7:00pm

The Mellow Downs were created as a recording band. John Flynn and Mark Jackson who had worked on previous projects together wanted to write original blues songs and create an album as an art piece. Mark gathered together a heck of crew - The great “Bad Brad” Karow with a huge San Diego blues and American roots background going back 30+ years, on drums. Gary Hutcheson on bass. Gary has played tight and groovin bass in rock and blues bands in L.A. and San Diego for 40 years. The fantastic Tom Mann (a Southern California blues legend) playing many styles of blues and jazz piano as he has been doing for decades. Mark Jackson is the singer and harmonica player in this group and is a highly talented song writer, crooner, harmonica player and all around blues man. John Flynn, San Diego blues and roots guitar player who has been on the scene for 25+ years and for the first time has begun writing original songs. Together this band recorded over the last year at Camp Karow Studios. The album which was released in January of 2018, was recorded live with no overdubs or editing. The Camp Karow Studio captured a very natural and raw sound which we hope folks will like. The band is beginning to play shows now to support the album. The Mellow Downs name is an offshoot of a great Little Walter song called Mellow Down Easy. We hope the name conjures a mid-century style and feel, which as a band we prefer. Check these dudes out Saturday from 6 to 9 at Wynola Pizza’s Red Barn Upcoming Wynola Pizza & Bistro Shows:

Monday, November 19 - Trivia Night 6:30 to 8 in the Red Barn Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite 6 to 8 Friday December 14 - Haywire Saturday December 15 - Plow with Chris Clarke For more information call Wynola Pizza & Bistro 760-765-1004

• On Dec. 8, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln offers his conciliatory plan for reunification of the United States with his Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction. It allowed for a full pardon for and restoration of property to all engaged in the rebellion with the exception of the highest Confederate officials and military leaders. • On Dec. 6, 1933, a federal judge rules that "Ulysses" by James Joyce is not obscene. The book had been banned in both the United States and England when it came out in 1922. Three years earlier, its serialization in an American review had been cut short by the U.S. Post Office. • On Dec. 5, 1941, John Steinbeck's nonfiction book "The Sea of Cortez" is published. The book reflects SteinbeckÕs serious study of marine biology. He would later use his knowledge of the sea and its creatures in creating Doc, the marine biologist

in "Cannery Row" (1945). • On Dec. 4, 1952, heavy smog begins to hover over London. Smoke, soot and sulfur dioxide from the areaÕs industries and cars were trapped by a highpressure air mass, leading to the deaths of at least 4,000 people, many of whom died in their sleep. • On Dec. 3, 1967, Lewis Washkansky, 53, receives the first human heart transplant, in Cape Town, South Africa. He was given drugs to keep his body from rejecting the heart, but died 18 days later. • On Dec. 7, 1982, the first execution by lethal injection takes place in Texas, when Charles Brooks Jr. receives a fatal dose of a barbiturate by intravenous injection. • On Dec. 9, 1992, nearly 2,000 U.S. Marines arrive in Mogadishu, Somalia, to spearhead a multinational force aimed at restoring order in the conflict-ridden country. In October 1993, rebels shot down two U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters and killed 18 American soldiers. © 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Girls Soccer (continued)

Boys Basketball (continued)

Tuesday, January 29 3:30 Home vs TriCity Christian Wed., January 30 3:00 @ Borrego Springs Friday, February 1 3:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial Wed., February 6 3:15 @ West Shores Friday, February 8 3:00 Home vs Mountain Empire

Tuesday, January 15 5:30 Home vs Warner Friday, January 18 5:30 Home vs West Shores Friday, January 25 5:30 Home vs Borrego Springs Tuesday, January 29 5:30 Home vs Mountain Empire Friday, February 1 5:30 @ Warner Tuesday, February 5 5:30 @ West Shores Friday, February 8 5:30 Home vs Vincent Memorial

Girls Basketball (continued)

Tuesday, January 15 4:00 Home vs Warner Friday, January 18 4:00 Home vs West Shores Friday, January 25 4:00 Home vs Borrego Springs Tuesday, January 29 4:00 Home vs Mountain Empire Friday, February 1 4:00 @ Warner Friday, February 8 4:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial

Boys Soccer (continued)

Wed., January 23 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 25 Home vs West Shores Friday, February 1 @ Calipatria Friday, February 8 @ Borrego Springs

3:00 3:30 4:00 5:30

760 765 1020

JULIAN

YESTERYEARS

Home Crafted & Vintage Items • Home Sewn Kitchen Items • • Grape Tray Wall Art • • Soaps • Lotions • Books • Downtown Julian in the Cole Building

Open 11-5

2116 Main Street - Downstairs

7 Days A Week


December 5, 2018

January 26, 2016 4:47pm 1969... Booby trap class... I saw 3 living ghosts, transfers from another Division, the whispered, hallow eyed, slack lips, predead by all appearances, not a role model for survival in Viet Nam... H 50 Years ago the Journey began for a young man from Del Mar. Drafted and shipped off to the other side of the world. Local Resident Howard Fisher tells his story of war and survival and recovery. Exclusivly

EAST OF PINE HILLS

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Why Do I Keep Cats The cats are useless, a fact which has been pointed out to them in four languages, not including Cat. It probably should include Cat but they snicker at our pronunciation, “snicker” being a euphemism for rolling around the carpet and laughing their catly heads off. There are Gophers in the Garden, or more likely, A Gopher in the garden. When there were 21 feral cats draped around the deck this didn’t happen. It is easier and cheaper to buy veggies than to deal with 21 feral cats (all of whom were eaten by coyotes or driven away by Goldie, hard to tell without anyone around to ask and Goldie keeps his silence) but still…. It is actively UNPLEASANT to watch plants droop and move toward death, then find they have no roots. No roots at all. We have discussed this with the cats. Six cats, all of whom harvest birds far too regularly, should be able to deal with one gopher. It seems, however, that they don’t like to get their paws dirty. We point out their, um, bathroom habits which do involve dirt after all. They counter with their litter box which doesn’t have any dirt but is filled with (expensive) kitty litter which may be why they will frolic outside, run in the house to use said litter box, then return to the great outdoors with all its… dirt. It seems that their manicurist moved to the city and… We digress. So we went online to look up gopher traps. This seems complicated—find the gopher runs under the earth and do this and that and the other thing and we gave up. Poison isn’t a good option; the cats are probably too picky to snack on poisoned gopher but it’s not a chance we wish to take. Perhaps flooding the gopher holes… Some years ago The Husband, with respect to ground squirrels, came up with a system of putting some inflammable gaseous material in the holes, the lighting it. No thanks then, no thanks now. Then Cousin Bob suggested that we stop feeding the cats so they are hungry. At your peril, owner, at your peril. Maybe the cats would pay attention to Japanese…Ano ne, Neko san!…

Tips To Keep Kids’ Minds And Bodies Active (StatePoint) If you’re like many parents, you want to ensure that your little ones’ playtime gives them a chance to exercise both body and mind. Here are some fun ways to incorporate both into the equation. • Outdoor fun: Outdoor fun can be had nearly any time of year. Carve out time each week for trips to the local playground or park and for short walks and scooter rides. The change of scenery will activate young minds naturally to explore the world around them. continued on page 7

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

Rain, Hail, Welcome To November

The Julian News 5

HOME SERVICES Grading & Demolition

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Today I have been really enjoying the rain that is nourishing my yard and taking the dust and dirt off of my trees, bushes and buildings. I think that November is a great time for inches of rain. It doesn’t knock blossoms off of fruit trees and the fact that our property is at the top of a gentle hill, we don’t ever get flooded. Well, the roof over our laundry room leaks so the laundry room gets really wet, but that’s what large plastic bins are for. I already see the local ponds holding water from the rain and the CALL BRUCE 619•972•0152 pond on the way to Ramona, past the Christmas tree farm has some supplied v1 JC 85 Iris 127801 13:50 8/8/02 substantial pools of water in it, so life is looking a tiny bit better for the migrating birds. I hear that by Friday, Julian had about 3 inches of rain and Ramona had 1inch. Way better than none for sure. Not only was last year one of the driest years on record here in San Diego County, when a fire starts anywhere in the back country, not necessarily close to us, the helicopters with buckets scoop water out of our lakes and ponds making our area even drier. Some property Residential • Industrial • Commercial owners used to welcome the helicopters, before this horribly long Serving Southern California drought, saying that they take out the old water and make room for Ben Sulser, Branch Manager the new. Other property owners wanted to keep all of their water for Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 their orchards and livestock. Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 After having about 3 inches of rain in the past few days, I wish that emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com I had a tractor and had scooped out pond sized holes in my yard to hold the rain until it could trickle down to my well water. I’d probably get into trouble with the environmentalists though. The The most most dangerous dangerous Now it’s Saturday and I’m hoping for more rain or even for some animals animals in in the the forest forest snow. At noon the outside temperature here at the west end of don’t don’t live live there. there. Spencer Valley is below 50 degrees. With some moisture later, we may all be singing “It’s beginning to feel a lot like Christmas.” Rain isn’t always very welcome here. Our apple crops suffer when they get hit by a pounding rain, hail or snow when they are flowering or when the fruit is new and tiny. However, I can’t think of a single crop that will be majorly damaged by getting rain this time of year. The corn, potatoes and pumpkins have been harvested and there aren’t ONLY YOU CAN PR E VE N T W I L D FIRE S. w w w . s m o k e y b e a r. c o m many flowers blooming now. Wait until spring though. That’s when we could use another nourishing rain, just before the apple, peach, plum and pear blossoms set and early enough to give the lilacs, daffodils, irises and food crops the nourishment that they need that time of year. I think that one reason that I love rain is because I don’t have to drive long distances in heavy traffic full of people who drive like they TO PUB: are on a dry road. Have you ever heard of hydroplaning? NOTE Watch a DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Wildfire Prevention - Newspaper (2 1/16 x 2) B&W WFPA01-N-03259-C “Animals” 85 screen Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127801 & vehicle skim on top of water instead of holding tight to the road. That’s hydroplaning. It’s dangerous and it often happens when people drive Oak and Pine our Specialty CA. State License #704192 too fast on wet roads. They lose control of their vehicle because they Fully Insured for Your Protection aren’t actually on the pavement. They are driving on water where they Workers Comp. get no traction and can’t steer or maneuver their vehicle. This is not a dictionary definition. This is from my own experience of watching 760 other drivers drive too fast in dangerous conditions. Rainy days are good days to bake and to make chili, soup and stew. Over 20 Years in Julian Things that take a long time to cook are best cooked on cold days. ALL MAJOR We are fortunate enough to have an upright freezer where I can keep CREDIT CARDS • Trained Experts lots of winter meals. I’m making chili right now. It’s easy to rinse a • Difficult Removals pound or 2 of pinto beans, cover them in water in a large stove stop • Artistic Trimming pan, boil them for 3 minutes and then let them sit for several hours • Brush Clearing Chris Pope, Owner ACCEPTED or overnight. On the second day I cook up ground beef because I really like chili con carne, I find my chopped tomatoes in the freezer, add them and warm up my house a second day. We all have different ways that we like to spice up chili. I use chili powder and a bit of salt to make the chili powder a little less sweet. When it’s all cooled down and I’ve served some to husband and me, I put the rest in plastic containers which I label with the contents and date. I like to use cottage cheese, sour cream and other containers with lids about that same size. They are perfect for a meal for 2 of us and if I thaw out 2, they are just about enough for Mike and I to share with our grandchildren. Sometimes I serve chili on baked potatoes. Adding some grated cheese to the top makes a really substantial winter meal. My favorite rainy days are the ones when I don’t have to go to work. My kitchen has one wall that is almost entirely windows above my kitchen sink, so now you know why I like to cook and bake on the rainy days that I enjoy so much. These are my thoughts.

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3 Ways Military Families and Veterans Can Stretch Their Budget (StatePoint) “How can we make our money go further?” The eternal question being asked by families everywhere, every day. While military families are no strangers to the same budgeting dilemmas as everyone else, the good news is that there are plenty of ways that our servicemen and women, veterans and their families, can stretch their dollar and live more affordably. Bank Smart Think before you bank. Does your bank make it easy to conduct transactions overseas? Does it have specially trained staff familiar with military and veteran home lending continued on page 10


6 The Julian News

Julian

and

Lake Cuyamaca

Back Country Dining Julian

&

Winery Guide

Julian

24th Annual Victorian Christmas Teas

Winter Hours 8am - 8pm

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Daily Lunch Specials

Daily Dinner Specials

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er 3rd th b m e v No

Daily — Thurs. December 6th thru Mon .December 23rd 760 765 0832

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December 5, 2018

2124 Third Street

one block off Main Street

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

Julian 760

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Heather’s Tip ~ remove pens from pockets before you put them in laundry!

Sausage & Burgers Serving starting at Noon Friday’s & Saturday’s

Don’t forget Monday is Donuts Day OPEN: Monday 7:30 - 3:30 Wednesday-Friday 7 - 5 & Sat/Sun 7 - 6

Julian

Julian Gateway To All of The Back Country Corner of 78 & 79 in Santa Ysabel

open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun

Only a Short ride from downtown Julian

offering - tasters - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

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Drive Thru Service For To-Go Orders

Julian

Wynola

Julian & Wynola

ROMANO’S

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Julian’s First Producing Winery

COLEMAN CREEK CENTER

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

760 765 3495

MENGHINI WINERY

SENIORS THURSDAYS $6 -

YOUR CHOICE + DRINK

Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

Groups Please Call

Open:*Every Day

Established 1982

Tasting Room

Winter Hours and Picnic Area Monday - Friday 11 - 4 1150 Julian Orchards Drive Saturday & Sunday 10 - 5 2 miles North of Julian out Farmer Road *Except: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

760 765 2072 www.menghiniwinery.com

JULIAN GRILLE

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

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2718 B Street - Julian Reservations 760 765 1003 Dine In or Takeout • Wine and Beer See our menu at www.romanosrestaurantjulian.com

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WOOD-FIRED PIZZA • Every Sat & Sun afternoon BBQ/Grill Specials • “From Scratch” Salads, Soups, Desserts (760) 765-1004 3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

Dine Inside, Outside Take Out Conference Facilities

Over 35 varieties of beer, ale and hard cider

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR

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Chef’s Corner Presto Change-O! Turkey Leftovers Transformed *** The joke may be that no one likes fruitcake, but if that were the case, they wouldn't appear on store shelves every holiday season! — Harley Pasternak *** 1. MOVIES: Which 1990s movie featured the famous line, “I’m king of the world!”? 2. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What is the name of the song that is played sometimes when the president of the United States appears in public? 3. ORGANIZATIONS: Carrie Chapman Catt was a founder of which U.S. group formed in 1920? 4. MUSIC: Roger Daltrey was the lead singer of which famous rock band? 5. ANATOMY: How many pairs of ribs does a human being have? 6. HISTORY: In what city did Hitler commit suicide at the end of World War II? 7. LITERATURE: What 18th-century statesman and inventor once wrote under the pseudonym “Silence Dogood”? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone for January? 9. FOOD & DRINK: What cocktail is made from rye whiskey, absinthe, a sugar cube, a dash of bitters and a lemon twist? 10. U.S. STATES: Which state’s nickname is the Tar Heel State? Answers on page 12

Thanksgiving’s gone, but the memories linger on -- in the form of leftovers. After having all the traditional Thanksgiving fixings, I always crave spicy foods. I’ve come to enjoy thinking up ways I can transform the mountain of plastic containers full of a few scoops of this and a mound of that into a new recipe. Leftover turkey combined with Mexican spices makes a great meal. I love this enchilada recipe because the combination of cumin, chili powder and cayenne pepper completely changes the flavor of the leftover turkey, and it’s easy to prepare. If you don’t have time to make the enchilada sauce from scratch, use a good quality, commercially made sauce, and add the spices from the recipe to give it a homemade taste. Serve this dish with a side of

Spanish rice and a tossed salad, and you’ll have a great meal and a great way to finish off that leftover turkey! TURKEY ENCHILADAS 3 cups cooked turkey, shredded 2 cups sour cream 3 cups shredded cheddar cheese, one cup reserved for topping 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

12 (10-inch) tortillas, corn or flour Enchilada Chili Sauce: 2 cans (4 ounces each) chopped mild green chile peppers 2 cups chopped onion 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder 1 1/2 pounds stewed tomatoes 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar 1/2 cup water

continued on page 12


December 5, 2018

Ask Pastor Rick

Bud Fink

January 21, 1926 - November 6, 2018

Religion In The News “Farewell” This is the 261st Religion in the News/Ask Pastor Rick piece for the Julian News. It is also the final article as I will be retiring from the pastorate and moving out of the state in January. The 261 articles cover a period of just over ten years. I offer my sincere thanks to Michael Hart and Michele Harvey, publishers of the Julian News, for giving me this platform for extending my voice in the community. I stated at the conclusion of each article — “Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.” Both Michael and Michele have been gracious in their comments about the pieces. Another “thanks” is necessary to all of you who sent in questions for the Ask Pastor Rick portion. For some, my brief answers were sufficient. For others, we continued to dialogue via eMails to get the fullest response. My parting words to you come from the pen of the unknown author of Hebrews when he wrote: Now may the God of peace who brought up our Lord Jesus from the dead, that great Shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant, make you complete in every good work to do His will, working in you what is well pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen! [13.20-21 NKJV]

Publishers Note: We would like to thank Pastor Rick for his dedication to providing his column. Ten years ago when he origianily approached us with the idea, we had said yes with reservation, Religion can often be a wedge between people and create more division within a community. Rick was thoughtfull in his approach and summerized stories without bias. His questions and answers often provoked thoughtful reflection from our readers. Only once did his column cause any controversy, losing one subscriber in ten years is a small price to pay for stimulating the community. Thank You Pastor Rick! In January we will have a new column with a different perspective to replace “Religion in the News” - as yet untitled, it is our hope it will provide similar stimulation and discussion. MjH *** Overspending is as certain a part of the holiday season as overeating. But pushing away from both the table and the cash register at least a little bit sooner can make the postholiday hangover hurt a little bit less. — Jeffrey Kluger ***

Surviving An Earthquake

continued from page 1 prevent items from falling over during intense shaking and injuring someone. After a significant earthquake, you would want to be prepared for aftershocks, check yourself and others for injuries and check the structure for damage or gas leaks or fires. Residents are also encouraged to register their cellphones on AlertSanDiego, the County’s emergency notification system and download the SD Emergency App at no cost.

The Julian News 7

JULIAN THEATER COMPANY PRESENTS:

Bernard (Bud) H. Fink died at home late in the evening on November 6. While “he raged against the night” until it was his time, he went peacefully, surrounded by family. As was his wish he left on his own terms, leaving his home feet first. He was preceded in death by his wife Jeannette and is survived by his sons Bill, Josh and daughter Susan. He was a grandfather and great grandfather. Bud was born in 1926 and grew up in Brooklyn, NY. He joined the army at seventeen and served in the ETO during WWII. He was a member of the vaunted 3rd Division serving in the 756th Tank Battalion. He was an eighteen year old tank commander at the Battle of the Bulge. He was wounded near the end of the war and was awarded the Purple Heart. After the war he went back to high school, then Purdue University and graduated from Monmouth College attending school at night. He worked as a house painter after the war and got a break and became a construction superintendent on a large housing project in N.J. He quickly rose the corporate ladder and headed many construction and development firms across the country. In California he was president of Kaufman and Broad and Morrison Homes. Bud was an historian, a great observer of his time and a storyteller of his experiences. He differed from many of his fellow Vets in that he was able to talk about the war and relate it to the historical perspective. He got his start in public speaking at about 90 years old after appearing on the Mike Slater show four times. Plans are in the works to create a CD of his talks on the show. He spoke at Julian H.S., the Julian Historical Society and many other schools and Veterans Organizations. He will be sorely missed by many. He will have a military funeral at Fort Rosecrans on January 21 which would have been his 93rd birthday. The service will start promptly at 11:30 A.M. Guests should plan to arrive at the main building by 11:00

WHERE: JULIAN HIGH SCHOOL THEATER 1656 HWY 78 JULIAN 92036

FRIDAY DECEMBER 14TH - 7PM SATURDAY DECEMBER 15TH - 7PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 16TH - 2PM FRIDAY DECEMBER 21ST - 7PM SATURDAY DECEMBER 22ND - 7PM SUNDAY DECEMBER 23RD - 2PM

Sean Tomlinson

ADULTS: $15, CHILDREN 10 AND UNDER: $8

Sean Patric Tomlinson arrived on Planet Earth August 21, 1967. After several years of exploration on naval bases, young Sean established home base in Julian, California, graduating from Julian High School with the class of 1985. While living in Julian, Sean found the joy of computers and began hacking in a white hat and coding in service to humanity. Later, Sean established a new home base in Decatur, Illinois, where he made important friends and encountered all sides of the human experience. It is there that he died suddenly of natural causes on November 25, 2018. May the force be with him as he journeys to the final frontier. Sean was preceded in death by his cherished stepfather Charlie Garten, and is survived by his mother Jo (Hensley) Garten and sisters Brooke Deidrick (the smartipants) and Aimée Garten (the Romulan spy) in California, as well as half-brother Jeff Tomlinson and extended family in Illinois. SteelRat/Samizdata will also be greatly missed by his vast network of cyber colleagues, friends, and followers online. The family will have private services in California and Illinois. In lieu of flowers, please simply make the effort to be kind to those who are different. Honor Sean’s memory by seeing the goodness and value in everyone.

DOORS OPEN 30 MIN PRIOR TO PERFORMANCE ADVANCE TICKET SALES: BROWN PAPER TICKETS,

August 21, 1967 - November 25, 2018

Sheila K. Dibos

April 15, 1939 – November 15, 2018 Sheila Kathleen Simpson Dibos went home to our Lord on Thursday, November 15, 2018. A beautiful San Diego native, Sheila was married for 55 years to Robert J. Dibos Jr. who preceded her in death in 2013. “Bob and Sheila” are reunited with the Savior they both adore, with each other, their parents and her two brothers. As Catholics, their faith In Christ was and is the bedrock of who they are. A 1957 graduate of Lincoln High School, Sheila spent one year in fashion design college before marrying the love of her life. They had 6 children, 21 grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren. They raised their family in Escondido and in 1991 followed their dream and moved to Julian where they spent many glorious years in the mountain home they built. Their five acres became a fun-filled sanctuary with tree houses, a horse arena and stables, and even a baseball diamond. Kids, grandkids, nieces and nephews, and kids who called her “Grandma” all loved visiting. A phenomenal cook and baker, Sheila’s meals were unsurpassed. She was an extraordinary seamstress and designer, a fearless and loving wife, mom and grandma. She generously shared her many gifts and love with all those who knew her. She was a dear friend to many. She was a teacher at heart and loved instilling her faith in her grandchildren, as well as in the students she taught at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Julian. She lived every one of her 79 years with an insatiable love for Jesus. Her greatest legacy is 3 generations following her example, flourishing with immovable faith and endless love. How blessed are we? Sheila leaves many friends and a big, close family brokenhearted & rejoicing at her passing. Included are her children and families, her dear sister Peggy, and her eleven brothers and sisters she inherited from Bob, who dearly loved her like a sister for 60 years. She will be more than missed, but her legacy lives on. Her Celebration of Life will take place on Monday, December 10, with a Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. at St. Michael’s Catholic Church, 15546 Pomerado Rd. Poway. Burial will take place at 2:00 pm the same day at Pioneer Cemetery in Julian. In lieu of flowers, donations would be very appreciated to Life Choices Poway at 13412 Pomerado Rd. Suite C, Poway, CA 92064

800-838-3006 on-line purchase: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3822021 INFORMATION: 760-765-1688 www.juliantheatercompany.com Keep Kids’ Minds And Bodies Active continued from page 5

• Movement through discovery: Seek out toys that inspire movement through the act of discovery. For example, Chase Me Casey, a monkey that skates, spins and wobbles across the floor, encourages children to dance and crawl after him. When your child gets close, Casey reacts with playful sounds and encouraging phrases. Five colorful shape buttons on the monkey’s shirt introduce letters, numbers, body parts, music and more. • Music class: For young children, music class is a great way to connect mind and body, as kids are introduced to simple rhythms, dancing, singing and percussion instruments. If music class doesn’t fit into your family’s schedule, you can always get the jams going at home, introducing your child to an array of musical styles. • Toys to grow with: From floor play to first steps, look for toys that will assist your child with this crucial transition. For example, the VTech Stroll & Discover Activity Walker, which grows with your child, is nicely suited for floor play as its removable activity panel is packed with features like light-up piano keys, spinning gears and shape sorter pieces to help develop fine motor skills. When kids are ready, you can attach the panel to an adjustable two-speed walker, so they can learn and discover while on-the-move. • Imaginative play: Let kids create their own adventures using their imagination as a guide. Toys such as Starshine the Bright Lights Unicorn can add whimsy and adventure to active playtime. Place the seven charms on any of the three magic hearts to see the horn light up and hear colors, objects and phrases in English or Spanish. Use the charms to answer quiz questions or add sound effects to create your own special song. Squeeze the unicorn’s tail to see her wings flap and hear phrases and sound effects. Starshine’s continued on page 8


December 5, 2018

8 The Julian News

We make gifts for the holidays...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

by Bic Montblanc

Waltzing Matilda

by Joachin de Bachs

Australia is a relatively new country on the world scene. It was first explored by the Dutch in 1606. It wasn’t until 1770 that Captain James Cook landed and charted its east coast for England, who quickly claimed it as a colony. Never mind the fact that Australia had been inhabited for 60,000 years by an aboriginal population but its socio, economic and political history began when Europeans began populating the land. In 1778 the first fleet of English settlers arrived in Botany Bay after a three month journey from England. The majority of those settlers though, were prisoners. Australia was originally intended as a penal colony. As more and more prisoners, disaffected English loyalists from America, Europeans and Asians began to arrive, Australia’s and New Zealand’s economies began to thrive. It was a continent rich in agricultural potential, mining, timber and wool. Britain began colonizing the rest of the continent and riches began to flow back to England. Key in the development of Australia was the “squatter.” It is a negative term but in Australia’s early history, freemen and emancipists (those that were freed after their incarceration) began to occupy large tracts of land for the purpose of herding cattle and sheep (jumbuck, a male sheep) or growing crops. While it wasn’t exactly legal, the economic benefit of settling the land and exporting products gave the squatters some legitimacy and wealth. By the mid nineteenth century, land grants were given and squatters were actually licensed and they paid minimal rents for the large tracts of land they developed. The squatter class also pushed for its place in society without the negative connotation. Like any new nation, Australia suffered economic strife at times. There were also great influxes of different nationalities, some causing great distrust such as the Irish who filled the prisons at times. The Irish were primarily Catholic and were at odds with the British population who were primarily Anglican or Presbyterian. Other conflicts in the mines or the sheep shearers strikes caused conflicts with the squatters. When released from prison and during economic hard times men would hit the road looking for work throughout the country. These “swagmen” (think of the American hobo) with little else than a blanket and a “billy” (a can used for boiling water or a meal), rolled it up and swagged their blanket and possessions around the shoulder and referred to it as Matilda. Off they went on their “waltz” through the countryside. Often on their waltz they would take refuge from the oppressive heat under a eucalyptus tree, what the aborigines called gulabaa and the new Australians called a “coolibah” tree. They sought water and comfort near a “billabong” which is a small body of water generally created by an oxbow from a river or stream. Of course a swagman wouldn’t be a swagman without his “tucker bag” where he could stuff food or any necessary items for his waltz around the country. He was always at the mercy for work or food and sometimes in conflict with the squatters who used “troopers” (law enforcement) to protect their rights and property. Now this little story will give you some background into the words and terms all our Aussie friends know but we Americans find a bit strange. It is one of the most charming and musical national

Annimills LLC © 2018 V15-47

The A rt of ‘Gifting’

The holidays are here! It's great fun to surprise family or friends with gifts. If you like to make gifts, it's time to start planning and working on them. Gifts that you make and give from your home, kitchen, garden or artistic skills are from your... We like to make gifts!

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Everyone likes a dash of color to brighten up the day! You can make a wonderful gift by painting something. How about building and painting a birdhouse or feeder? Maybe you can decorate or paint someone's name on an item.

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'Put Together' a Special Gift for Someone Thank YOU!

Have you ever "put together" a gift? It's easy. Just collect a few things that go well together and place them nicely in a container, such as a bag, box or basket. Use your imagination to decorate your gift: a bow, a flower or card would add a nice touch. If you want to be a little fancy, add a piece of tissue paper or make a nest of shredded paper in the bottom of your gift container. Very nice!

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Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2018

POST NOTES

...and donate them to different groups.

Solution on page 12 anthems (albeit unofficial) in the world. Of course the song is Waltzing Matilda from a poem written by Banjo Petersen and first sung and put to music around 1895. If you haven’t heard it, google it. It’s a great story and rousing tune and so indicative of the spirit of Australians. Once you know it you can’t help but sing it along with the crowd. Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong Under the shade of a coolibah tree, He sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me chorus: Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me He sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled, you'll come a-Waltzing Matilda,

with me Down came a jumbuck to drink at the billabong, Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee, he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag, you'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda you'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag, You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me Up rode the squatter, mounted on his thoroughbred, Up rode the troopers, one, two, three, With the jolly jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag? You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me. Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing

Matilda You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me With the jolly jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag? You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, you scoundrel with me. Up jumped the swagman and sprang into the billabong, You'll never catch me alive, said he, And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong, you'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me. Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong, You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me. Oh, you'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me.

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

For a great version of Waltzing Matilda, You Tube Slim Dusty. There are other versions of the history of Waltzing Matilda, one being that the large number of German migrants filled lonely times on the road dancing with their swag that they called Matilda.

Keep Kids’ Minds And Bodies Active

continued from page 7 majestic hooves feature wheels so kids can push her as they head off on their next adventure. • Simon Says: “Simon Says” is a fun game to get kids moving while reinforcing vocabulary, from learning the names of different body parts to distinguishing sounds, such as “Simon Says cluck like a chicken.” This is a game that can progress with your child’s development. Start with the basics like, “Simon Says touch your nose.” As kids get more coordinated, try stuff like “Simon Says hop on one leg.” Keeping kids active and engaged adds meaning to playtime and makes things more fun. With toys and activities, you can foster discovery and imagination while introducing movement to children.


December 5, 2018

The Julian News 9

Schuco Stuffed Bears Are the Schuco stuffed bears made by the famous German Schuco company that made the very collectible toy cars? The German company started making clockwork and other mechanical tin toys in 1912 as Schreyer & Co. in Nuremberg, Germany. The name was changed to Schuco in 1921. The company designed and made many clever toys that moved. Teddy bears were added during the 1920s, and some were miniature bears that held a bottle inside. The famous "Yes/ No" bear moved its head when you moved its tail up and down or sidewise. The business faced

This 1930s Schuco toy spaniel with brown ears, a white body and a stitched nose and mouth sold for $900, which was three times the estimate. many reorganizations, and new companies formed in Germany and the U.S. until 1972, when it declared bankruptcy. It was later acquired and is now part of Simba Dickie Group, a major toy company. The Schuco company in the U.S. made teddy bears in the 1920s with black button eyes. A

few years later, the bears had jointed arms, jointed legs and flat feet, and by 1925, some of them could walk. An early 1930s Schuco Yes/No stuffed spaniel in nice condition with cut-glass eyes recently sold at a Bertoia Auctions auction for $900, although many Schuco toys sell today for less than $300. *** Q: I inherited a carved wooden cane with a hidden sword in it. The cane is about 37 1/2 inches long and the blade is about 18 1/2 inches. The carved handle head looks Egyptian, and there are carved designs down the entire cane. It has a metal tip and a metal piece with a button to release the blade. I can't find any markings on it. Any information including approximate value would be helpful. A: Canes were popular accessories for the well-dressed man from the 1700s to the early 1900s. Gadget canes, which are canes that have special features or conceal items, are

popular with collectors. Canes have been made that conceal swords and other weapons, flasks, lighters, fans, perfume bottles, pool cues, tools and other items. The cane's value is determined by the material of the head, intricate hand carving and special features. A carved sword cane with overall leaf and vine carving sold for $360 recently, but several more common sword canes went for $25-$55. CURRENT PRICES Teddy bear, gray fur, black felt vest and hat, holding faux leather briefcase, faux pearls, jointed, Kent Collectibles, 1985, 12 inches, $15. Game, Uncle Wiggily, pin the hat, Milton Bradley, frame, original packaging, hats, 24 x 30 7/8 inches, $71. Spice rack, six Aunt Jemimas labeled with the spice names, red rack, shaped spices, 4 inches, 7 pieces, $145. Cufflinks, sterling silver, turquoise scarab, pharaoh and King Tut amulet, rope and bead

design, c. 1910, 1 1/4 x 3/4 inches, pair, $225. ***

TIP: 18th- and 19th-century Irish silver is more valuable than English, because it is rarer. Have a collector on your holiday shopping list? The 51st edition of "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2019" makes a great gift. The 528-page softcover book features 16,000 listings and more than 2,500 full-color photographs. © 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1. Who holds the major-league record for most consecutive games reaching base safely at least twice per game?

2. Which of the following majorleague players known for their longevity pitched in the fewest major-league seasons: Tommy John, Jim Kaat, Jesse Orosco or Nolan Ryan? 3. Name the last player before Cleveland’s Terrelle Pryor in 2016 to have three rushes, three receptions and three passes attempted in the same NFL game. 4. Name the last NCAA men’s college basketball team to reach three consecutive NCAA championship games. 5. Who was the last NHL player before Washington’s Evgeny Kuznetsov in 2018 to have a fourassist game in the Stanley Cup Final? 6. When was the last time before 2018 that the U.S. women’s hockey team won Olympic gold? 7. In 2018, Brooks Koepka became the fifth golfer to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same year. Answers on page 12


10 The Julian News

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multimedia presentation detailing the science behind climate change, how it’s affecting snow levels and what we can each do to become part of the solution, has been an especially effective way to get young people fired up about solving the climate crisis. The program has reached some 60,000 students since its inception in 2011.

®

Dear EarthTalk: With the onset of global warming, how likely is it that ski resorts and skiing itself might soon become a thing of the past? -- Mandy Billings, Provo, UT Last winter’s low snow year and unseasonably warm temperatures across much of the American West meant a bad year for business for ski resorts, and also left many of us wondering whether skiing would even be possible in the warmer world we’re getting as we continue to pump out greenhouse gases. “Our recent modeling suggests that under a high emissions scenario, skiing could be very limited to non-existent in parts of the country by the end of this century, particularly in lower elevations—such as the northeast, Midwest and lower mountains around the West,” says Cameron Wobus, lead author on a 2017 study projecting climate change impacts on skiing across the U.S. “Things look better midcentury, so this dire future for skiing isn’t imminent—and things also look much better under a more aggressive greenhouse gas mitigation scenario, so this future also isn't inevitable.” According to Wobus’ research, ski resorts in the Pacific Northwest have the most to fear, with predicted losses of 80 percent or more of the ski season. Ski resorts in the Northeast also won’t fare well as we warm. The relatively good news is that the ski resorts in the intermountain west should face “less severe losses” due to their higher elevations. The ski resorts themselves are doing what they can to try to reduce and offset their own emissions. To wit, Vail Resorts will power its 15 U.S.-based ski resorts with 100 percent wind energy beginning in 2020, and is well on its way to achieving its ambitious 2030 goal of “zero net emissions, zero waste to

This map from a 2017 study shows projected climate change impacts on natural snow accumulations and potential snowmaking conditions across the U.S., with pink colors representing losses of 80%+ of the ski season and bluer colors representing less severe losses. Credit: “Projected climate change impacts on skiing and snowmobiling" landfill and zero operating impact on forests and habitat.” Nearby, Aspen Skiing Company is big on solar, donates six figures annually to local non-profits working on climate mitigation and related issues, and lately has focused on firing up its customer base to encourage climate-friendly voting in Congress. Meanwhile, the list of ski resorts now deriving all of their power from on-site renewables (e.g., Berkshire East, Jiminy Peak, Squaw Valley, Wolf Peak, Arapahoe Basin, Breckenridge) is growing every year. Coordinating and facilitating much of this activity is the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA), a trade group representing over 300 U.S-based ski area owners and operators. NSAA’s Sustainable Slopes initiative, launched in 2000, provides an overarching framework for ski areas on sustainability and enhanced environmental performance. Its Environmental Charter serves as a blueprint and inspiration for ski resorts looking to green their operations. Another influential player is Protect Our Winters (POW), a non-profit founded in 2007 by professional snowboarder Jeremy Jones to mobilize the outdoor sports community against climate change. Its “Hot Planet/Cool Athletes” program, in which a professional skier or snowboarder leads an all-school assembly through a 45-minute

CONTACTS: “Projected climate

change impacts on skiing and snowmobiling: A case study of the United States,” www.sciencedirect. com/science/article/pii/ S0959378016305556; Protect Our Winters, www.protectourwinters. org; NSAA Sustainable Slopes, w w w.nsaa.or g /envir onment / sustainable-slopes. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. To donate, visit www.earthtalk. org. Send questions to: question@ earthtalk.org.

Military Families/ Veterans Stretch Their Budget continued from page 5

opportunities? Does it provide financial education to those who have served? Your money will go further when you select a bank that understands the needs of active duty service members, veterans and their families. What’s more, when you need a loan, shop around and thoroughly research special military discounts and repayment plans that are flexible and personalized for your needs. Connect for Less Military families know better than anyone else the importance of staying connected. But all that video calling and photo sharing can be pricey if you’re paying for hefty data bundles and cell phone plans. Instead, opt for a wireless

December 5, 2018

Murder in Julian continued from page 1

coming to a conclusion, Ivey and Bush had a confrontation. This confrontation may have been the start of trouble between Bush and Ivey. Viberg testified that Ivey said to Bush, “Jay I think that beats you.” Bush became very angry and made “blasphemous” remarks against all who have voted against him. Viberg tried to quell the situation by asking the crowd to step up to the bar and have a drink. Bush refused to participate. He later rushed up to Ivey and thrust a piece of paper near his face and exclaimed that it contained names he had “spotted,” apparently in reprisal for being denied election to the board. Near the end of his testimony, Viberg remarked that he was in favor of hanging Bush by mob law. Another child sworn to the stand was Maud Parsons. She was nearly twelve years old when called to testify. Her mother was the sister of Mrs. Javen Bush. No mention has ever been made of how these children were affected by the strain of their testimony. All members of the Bush family testified that Ivey shot first, there allegedly being two shots fired. Albert Bush, who had retrieved his father’s pistol for him, said that Ivey had fired a shot which hit the ground and kicked up dust. When asked why his dad did not go to the Bush house and retrieve his own pistol, Albert supplied one of the few humorous moments of the trial. He said, “I can beat my father running from Julian to home when he has his shoes on. I don’t know if I could beat him if he was bare-footed.” There was laughter in the court room. The Bush family and the

Indian Valentine had enormous pressure on their testimony. On the fourth day of the trial, it was alleged that after the trial the Indian Valentine would not live for twenty four hours. Things were getting nasty. It was not an impersonal nasty. Everyone involved knew each other. They would have to face each other on the street for as long as they lived in Julian. It was rough. It is not clear if the election confrontation was the first issue Bush and Ivey had with one another or just a continuation of differences. John Ivey had been appointed overseer of the road to town which passed through the Bush property. There was a disagreement over what route the road would take through the Bush property. Bush claimed Ivey had never been given permission for the route he planned to take. During one confrontation Ivey proclaimed out loud to Bush, “You’re a God damned liar.” Regardless of the issues, it is clear that Bush and Ivey held no liking for each other. Three separate trials were held. Two resulted in guilty verdicts, one for acquittal. Appeals of the case would last until 1886 when the last legal avenues were exhausted. Javen Bush was eventually declared guilty of murder and sentenced to life in prison. He was assigned two different prison numbers. The first number was from an institution where he was interned for physiological problems. The second number was assigned to him at San Quentin State prison. In early 1906, Bush applied for parole.

Newspaper accounts relate that the parole application opened many old wounds in Julian. It is ironic that Bush’s trials and appeals lasted for years. The day of the murder, many Julian residents were content to lynch the murderer. Javen Bush died in prison of Pernicious Anemia on June 10, 1906. The cause and treatment of this affliction was just becoming known in 1906, too late for Javen Bush. John Ivey is buried near the top of Julian’s pioneer cemetery. As stated earlier, the effect of this murder and subsequent trials would likely have taken a heavy toll on the lives touched by this event. There is nothing small about small town feelings. That fact is no different today than it was over a century ago. Today social media has taken small town nastiness and elevated it to new heights. At least back then you had to ride all the way to town to share your opinions, and, you had to have guts enough to face the person you were smearing. One thing has not changed. Whether online or in person, conflict can devastate a small town. Treat your neighbors respectfully. *** I like to compare the holiday season with the way a child listens to a favorite story. The pleasure is in the familiar way the story begins, the anticipation of familiar turns it takes, the familiar moments of suspense, and the familiar climax and ending. — Fred (mister)Rogers ***

provider that offers great deals for veterans, service members and their families. T-Mobile ONE Military offers all the benefits of T-Mobile ONE -- unlimited talk, text and data, texting and data (including texting and data abroad in over 210 countries) and complimentary Netflix at a discounted rate on up to 12 phone lines. And if you’re in the market for a fancy new phone – now really is the time to switch. T-Mobile recently announced a trade-in deal on all the 2018 smartphones from LG, Samsung and even the new iPhones. Available for a limited time, you can currently get the latest iPhone XR for just $10 per month when you trade in your old phone. And when you combine the trade-in deal with T-Mobile ONE Military, you can get four lines of unlimited and continued on page 12

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The Julian News 11

December 5, 2018

California Commentary

California Taxpayers Give Thanks But Worry About The Future In this season of Thanksgiving, taxpayers in California have reason to pause when asked for what they are thankful. Considering the costly plans of the newly elected Legislature and governor, taxpayers may be most grateful for the fact that the state hasn’t yet built a wall encircling the state to keep them from leaving. After 2017, when lawmakers enacted new taxes including a $5.2 billion annual tax hike on gasoline, diesel and vehicle registration, as well as a new tax on recorded documents, 2018 saw every effort by the Legislature to increase taxes defeated by advocates for taxpayers. We are grateful that the firstever tax on drinking water was defeated. We are grateful that the tax on fireworks was defeated, and that the effort to revive the “snack tax” was not successful. We are grateful that the proposal to put a sales tax on services was shelved. We are grateful that nearly a million voters signed petitions to repeal the gas and car tax. Of course, the bad news is that the gas tax repeal was given a new title by Attorney General Xavier Becerra that removed the words “gas tax repeal” from the ballot, deceiving voters. Further disappointments for taxpayers in November’s election results include progressives winning supermajorities in both the Assembly and the state Senate. California’s one-party government can now pass tax increases without the need of even a single vote from the opposition party. This surely increases the probability that taxpayers will be steamrolled by all the tax increases that were defeated in 2018 being resurrected in 2019. An even bigger threat may appear in the form of proposed constitutional amendments emanating from the Legislature.

by Jon Coupal

Supermajorities in both houses allow the party in power to place these on the ballot, again without the need of a single Republican vote. Once on the ballot, the measures need only a simple majority to pass. While Proposition 13 remains very popular, taxpayers advocates could be stretched to the limit if confronted with multiple anti-taxpayer constitutional amendment proposals. In the last decade, these have been stopped before clearing both houses of the Legislature. But now, the following proposals are likely to make an unwelcome encore in the Capitol: Lowering the vote threshold at the local level for passing bonds and parcel taxes from two-thirds, as required by Prop. 13, to 55 percent or even less; imposing higher property taxes on businesses; bringing back the estate and gift tax; restricting the ability of homeowners to transfer their Proposition 13 base-year value to a new residence; and weakening Proposition 218, the Right to Vote on Taxes Act, which limits the extent to which local governments can impose various fees, charges and assessments on property. Given the list of costly promises made during the election campaign, on top of the massive unfunded pension liability that already burdened the state, higher taxes are a near certainty in the next two years. Californians currently pay some of the highest state and local taxes in the nation, but it isn’t nearly enough to keep up with the spending of the politicians who have been elected to run the government. Still, California taxpayers can be grateful this Thanksgiving that they still have the power of the initiative and the recall. If they can keep it.

*** Jon Coupal is the president of Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

• It was way back in the 19th century that American author and philosopher Henry David Thoreau made the following sage observation: "Men have become the tools of their tools." • If you were asked to name the U.S. state that is geographically closest to the continent of Africa, you might be tempted to say Florida. You'd be wrong, though; the closest state is actually Maine. • In 1938, Time magazine featured Adolph Hitler on the cover as its Man of the Year. • If you're like most parents, at some point you've been shocked by how quickly your kids outgrow things -- especially shoes. What may be an annoyance in a developed country is a major problem in undeveloped areas of the world; Kenton Lee is working on changing that. As a volunteer in an orphanage in Kenya, he noticed that many children had the toes cut out of their shoes just so they could fit in their growing feet. After returning home, Lee developed an adjustable sandal that can grow with a child, increasing up to five sizes using a system of snaps. Although the shoe is only available to nonprofits that send them to organizations in need, domestic demand is increasing. If you're a parent sick of buying seemingly endless pairs of new shoes, you'll be glad to hear that Lee and his team are working on a commercial version. • It was beloved British author (and, of course, creator of Sherlock Holmes), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who introduced the sport of skiing to Switzerland, thereby transforming that snowy country into a premier tourist destination. *** Thought for the Day: "The reason that adulation is not displeasing is that, though untrue, it shows one to be of consequence enough, in one way or other, to induce people to lie." -- Lord Byron ® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness. — George Sand ***

® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

For me, I think everybody with half a heart tries to do their best to do their part of good during the holiday season. — Darren Criss


The Julian News 12

December 5, 2018

San Diego County Libraries are participating in the children’s book drive, Reach Out and Read San Diego. Until Dec. 24, residents may donate new children’s books to help children create their own love of reading. Founded by the American Association of Pediatrics, the program serves 86,000 children each year. Through Reach Out and Read, doctors and nurses are able to promote childhood literacy and school readiness to young children and their families in 97 offices throughout San

books available for downloading, but the news has not reached everyone. To use the service, individuals need a library card and a PIN, which gives them access to the Overdrive or Libby systems. The free e-books and e-audiobooks include a collection of children’s titles that are compatible with such readers as Nook, Kindle, tablets, mobile phones and other devices. E-books and e-audiobooks may be checked out for seven, 14 or 21 days, depending on how you set your preferences. When you are finished reading or listening to the book, you may return it, or they are automatically "returned” to the library with no late fees! Whenever possible, SDCL purchases titles from publishers that permit unlimited downloads (that is, always available for download). However, most publishers only sell their digital titles by the copy, the way

Diego and Imperial County. Library staff members invite the community to help support early childhood literacy by donating a new children’s book in the designated box at the Julian Branch Library. Are you using the library to its full potential? While some readers savor the feel of a book in their hands, others have transitioned to downloading books to read and listen to. But they are still paying for downloads. For more than five years, the library has provided a free service that offers

The A rt of ‘Gifting’

Chitter and I are teaming up to make gifts for the holidays.

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'Put Together' Gifts

P T O T E B A G S Y Y T F U O G

N H G H I G G U G R T W R H O R

D G S F H D F T A D R R G Y L E

F T F T R S E D B E F A T G B S

E E S N O R P A H S G P H T O C

Thank YOU!

O K

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa & Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

PUBLIC NOTICE

All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in the Julian News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served notice that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

S D H K Y N N N C A H G S F X M

A S F O E U E D N C N H K R E O

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I O T P G G K U L T P J A D M E

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1. rubber stamps, ink pads, paper 2. cheese, crackers, jelly 3. soaps, bubble bath, small towels 4. dried flowers 5. candies, cookies 6. coffee, tea, muffin mix 7. fruit, nuts 8. pens, envelopes, stationery 9. pet toy, pet snacks and shampoo

own poetry to the group, led by Steve Clugston. - Thursday, November at 6pm. Tuesday, December 11 - The library will host a Community Sing-A-Long of Christmas Carols and holiday songs with Bruce Druliner and Ken Wright at 6pm. Non-Fiction Book Club 2nd Friday of the month at 11 a.m. Next, meeting: Dec. 14. Book title: “The End of Night” by Paul Bogard. Call the branch to request a copy. Saturday, December 15 and 22 - Do It Yourself Gift Wrapping. Join us in the community room to wrap presents. All supplies provided by the library. 10 to 2pm. For information, contact FOJL President Melanie Klika at Quail1805@aol.com, or Branch Manager Colleen Baker at colleen.baker@ sdcounty.ca.gov or 760-7650370.

Military Families/ Veterans Stretch Their Budget continued from page 10

four iPhone XRs for just $35 per month a line – all on America’s fastest 4G LTE network. Leverage Tax Breaks One of the largest financial benefits of military service are the tax breaks Make sure you leverage all the tax breaks available to you and your family -- from exclusions offered to those serving in combat zones to moving expense deductions to job search cost deductions when you re-enter civilian life. Then, take the money saved from these deductions and invest it into your family’s financial wellness. Great places to divert your tax savings include a rainyday fund or a retirement account. When working out your family’s finances, it’s important to keep in mind these special discounts and opportunities available exclusively to military families. Simple choices will help you stretch your budget and get on the path towards greater financial wellness.

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

RENTALS

physical books are sold. SDCL monitors the number of customer requests for digital titles, so additional copies of titles may be purchased as needed. To find your favorite books, visit www.sdcl.org/ebooks.html. The Julian branch staff members are happy to help anyone who needs assistance getting started. According to branch manager Colleen Baker, her mother is one of the most prolific Julian branch downloader of books on her Kindle, and she knows that anyone can do it, too! Other SDCL branches also provide hands-on workshops for a variety of e-readers and mobile devices. Contact any branch for information. Baker reminds library users that there is an abundance of great materials, databases and programs offered at sthe library. Upcoming Events: Live Poets Society - Adults and teens are welcome to read their

CUSTODIAN I

Pay Range: $11.50 - $13.06/Hour Job Type: Full Time with Benefits Location:YMCA Camp Marston/Raintree Ranch in Julian, CA Application Deadline: 12/17/18 DESCRIPTION: This position will be responsible for maintaining and providing routine scheduled cleaning. The Custodian I must be able to work as a team and provide quality cleaning indoors as well as outdoors. Availability for this role includes flexible weekday and weekend hours in Julian, CA. Apply online: www.ymca.org/jobs or call (760)765-0642 with questions 12/12

LAKE CUYAMACA RECREATION AND PARK DISTRICT Is looking for individuals to fill the following Part Time Seasonal Positions. * DOCKHAND * RANGER * PROPERTY MAINTENANCE * SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC * BAIT AND TACKLE SHOP If interested call (760)765-0515 or just stop by the Bait And Tackle Shop and pick up an application. Thank you 12/26

Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

Community United Methodist Church

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Phone: 760-765-0114 E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com

continued from page 6

TO MAKE THE TURKEY ENCHILADAS: 1. Using a large bowl, combine the cooked turkey with the sour cream, 2 cups of the cheese, the salt, cumin, chili powder and the cayenne pepper. 2. Wrap the tortillas in a clean dishcloth or food-safe paper towels and sprinkle both sides with a little water. Microwave the tortillas for 10-15 seconds to warm and soften. 3. Lightly oil a shallow 13 by 9-inch baking pan so that the enchiladas won’t stick to it. 4. Place a tortilla on a flat surface. Spoon 2 to 3 tablespoons of the turkey mixture on the end of the tortilla closest to you. Roll up the tortilla. Arrange it, seam side down in the baking pan. Repeat, placing each stuffed tortilla side by side until the pan is full. 5. Pour the chili sauce over the enchiladas and bake, uncovered at 350 F for about 25 minutes, or until hot and bubbly. Sprinkle with the remaining cup of cheese. Bake for another 5 minutes. Remove pan from the oven and let it set for 5-10 minutes before serving. Serves 4 to 6. TO PREPARE THE ENCHILADA SAUCE: 1. Using a medium-sized pan, saute the chili peppers and the onions in the oil until the onions are soft, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic, salt, cumin and chili powder, and saute for another minute. 2. Add the stewed tomatoes and the brown sugar, and saute for 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the water. Turn heat to high and bring the mixture to a rolling boil. Then turn the heat to low and simmer uncovered until thick, about 15 to 20 minutes.

*** To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. © 2018 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the publisher prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. Publisher accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall Publisher’s Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Publisher is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. Publisher accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place. Julian Camp Housekeeping & Foodservice - jobs available, full-time and part-time. Contact us at 760-765-1600 or jobs@whisperingwinds.org. 12/5

Chef’s Corner

WORSHIP SERVICES

MEETINGS

AA Meetings Monday - 8am

Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Childcare – Birth Through 5th Grade

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Monday - 11am

Connecting People With God And Each Other . . . Changing Lives

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

MISC. FOR SALE

PERSONAL SUPPORT

RAIL ROAD TIES - perfect for landscaping, etc. call Bruce, 619 972- 0152 12/31

The Spencer Valley School District is seeking applicants to establish a hiring pool for a part-time GROUNDSKEEPING & MAINTENANCE position. Interested applicants are requested to call (760-765-0336) or come by the school office (4414 Highway 78/79, Santa Ysabel, CA) and request a job description and application. Completed applications will be accepted November 30th through noon December 14th, 2018. 12/12

ESTATE SALES ESTATE SALE!!

Friday 12/7 and Saturday 12/8 8AM please no early birds! 25350 Mesa Grande Road, Santa Ysabel For sale will be Tools, Machinist tools, drill press, vehicles, Sooner Horse Trailer, Assorted Horse tack and ranch items, Housewares, furniture and too much more to list! 12/5

*** Instead of waiting until the holiday season - when mail solicitations flood in from worthy organizations and making a flurry of gifts because this is the time of year to give, sit down and take stock. Identify your passion, learn about it, and direct your time, mind, and dollars to aligned causes and organizations. — Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen ***

Julian-Cuyamaca Fire — Activity Log

Time Date Incident Location Details 1400 11/25 Medical Hwy 78 1600 11/25 Medical Hwy 78 1000 11/28 Traffic Collision Engineers Rd/ Broken Oak Ln MC vs Truck; Moderate injuries 1000 11/28 Medical Washington St 1500 11/29 Medical Washington St 0000 12/2 Public Assist Iron Springs RdTree in road

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. “Titanic” 2. “Hail to the Chief” 3. League of Women Voters 4. The Who 5. 12 (24 ribs) 6. Berlin 7. Benjamin Franklin 8. Garnet 9. A Sazerac 10. North Carolina

Tuesday - 6:00pm Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Tuesday - 7pm

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Open Discussion

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm

San Jose Valley Continuation School (Across street from Warner Unified School)

Wednesday - 7pm

® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

continued from page 9 Name two of the four others to do it. 1. Boston’s Ted Williams, with 21 games. 2. Orosco pitched in 24 seasons, trailing Ryan (27), John (26) and Kaat (25). 3. San Francisco’s Billy Kilmer, in 1964. 4. Kentucky (1996-98). 5. Colorado’s Joe Sakic, in 1996. 6. It was 1998. 7. Ben Hogan (1948), Jack Nicklaus (1980), Gene Sarazen (1922) and Tiger Woods (2000). ® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911 www.sandiegoga.org

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

1•888•724•7240

Friday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 7pm

“Friday Night Survivors” 3407 Highway 79 (across from Fire Station)

Saturday - 7pm “Open Step Study” 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. — Aesop


November 2018 December 5,7,2018

The TheJulian JulianNews News 13 13

RANCHES ◆ HOMES ◆ LAND ◆ LOANS

Donn Bree, Owner/Broker & Meriah Druliner, Operations Manager/Realtor

Red Hawk Realty Team – Your Friendly, Local Real Estate Office

Contact Info: Phone –(800) 371-6669 • Email – Marketing@Donn.com • Website – www.DONN.com

Contact us for a FREE Property Valuation! – We Know The Backcountry!

G N I T S I WL

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Listing Agents Donn and Diane Old West Ranch

Located in the heart of one of San Diego County’s most coveted equestrian communities. Four separate Heritage Ranch offerings or one large offering.

Old West Ranch - 333.54 acres - $2,900,000 Trails End - 101.19 acres - $895,000 Buckskin - 108.29 acres - $849,000 Palomino - 68.78 acres - $749,000 Wrangler - 55.28 acres - $595,000 Diane (760)213-1155 CA DRE#01891996

ED R U T FEA ING LIST

Listing Agents Donn and Meriah EXCEPTIONAL MESA GRANDE ESTATE

ED R U T FEA ING LIST

Co-listing with

Tammy Tammy Tidmore Tidmore & & Kelly Kelly Pottorff Pottorff from from Willis Willis Allen Allen

EXCLUSIVE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ESTATE

L A N O TI P E C EX E VALU

Listing Agents Donn and Meriah

RANCHO JAMUL ESTATES Nearly $1 MILLION under market value!

Elegance, functionality and serenity define this exceptional 126 acre estate. Extraordinary views, 4729 esf, 4 bd, 4.5 bath, open floor plan, attached 3-car garage, expansive, 1830esf deck and solar are just a few of the incredible amenities this home has to offer. Two seasonal ponds, water well, and MORE!

Remarkable opportunity for discovery awaits at this exclusive 376+ acre estate! Stunning views from the 6100 sq ft main lodge, 4 bd, 4.5 ba, 4 fireplaces, chef grade kitchen, wine celler, library/ office, heli-pad and so MUCH MORE! A truly unmatched country experience awaits you. A rare must see!

Gorgeous, partially fenced, custom estate featuring French Normandy architecture, situated on 2 legal lots, totaling 5.14 acres. Equipped with an ideal equestrian facility, 2 wells, and so much more! Exclusive gated community. Must see to appreciate!

Meriah (760)420-5131 CA DRE#01997162

Meriah (760)420-5131 CA DRE#01997162

Meriah (760)420-5131 CA DRE#01997162

$2,500,000

$12,900,000

$1,595,000

E L A S FOR

E L A S OR

F

Listing Agents Star and Meriah

Listing Agent Donn and Kamisha

SCENIC JULIAN HOME

26905 DEER CANYON DR., RAMONA

CUSTOM HOME nestled in the hills of Julian. This beautiful mountain home is situated on a .6acre corner lot. 4+1 Bedroom/3.5 Bath, 2,493 esf. Owned solar system with off-grid capability, LED lighting, energy efficient! Magnificent views of the area. Must see to appreciate all that awaits!

3100+esf, 4+bed, 3 bath, custom ranchstyle home. Built in 2010 with highest quality craftmanship. Situated on 16+ beautiful acres with the “O” animal designator! Along with the superior custom home, this property offers a pool, tennis court, animal Facilities and VIEWS!

$628,000

$748,000

Star (760)908-2546 CA DRE#01730188 Meriah (760)420-5131 CA DRE#01997162

Kamisha (760)419-3101 CA DRE#01962367

E

E L A S FOR

AL S R O F

Listing Agent Star

159 ACRES GRAPEVINE CANYON, RANCHITA

Listing Agent Kent

3+ acres minutes from Downtown Julian CA. County approved septic layout for 3-bedroom home, perc test, paved access, power and water available. Views to the coast on a clear day, inspirational sunsets. Come build your dream home!

Tucked away down historic Grapevine Canyon Road, via a serene dirt road with beautiful views in all directions, lies this private, serene and undisturbed property. Take in incredible views of the Anza Borrego desert and surrounding areas from several vantage points. Create your own weekend getaway or full-time residence on this blank canvass, rich with opportunity.

Kent (415)205-8742 CA DRE#02047735

Star (760)908-2546 CA DRE#01730188

Payson Rd., Julian

$195,000

$79,000

PRICECED REDU Listing Agents Donn and Meriah

MESA GRANDE LAKE VIEW HOME

Discover stunning views of Lake Henshaw from this unique and exquisite 1bd, 1ba, 960 esf home with detached, 2-car garage, and complete guest studio. Den and office are optional bedrooms. View decks, exquisite gardens, a producing vineyard and wine production area and just a few of the wonderful features. A definite must see!

$499,000

Meriah (760)420-5131 CA DRE#01997162

Preeminent Million-Dollar Backcountry Brokerage

Red Hawk Realty Donn Bree (800)371-6669 CA DRE#01109566, NMLS#243741

E L A S FOR Listing Agent Nathalie OAK LAND ROAD, JULIAN

Come build the country home of your DREams on this 4.23 usable, mostly flat, vacant land parcel on the outskirts of downtown Julian, near Jess Martin Park. Functional well, electric utility, gorgeous views of Volcan Mountain and the surrounding hillsides.

$229,000

Nathalie (619)708-7987 CA DRE#02028997


14 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

JULIAN YESTERYEARS Vintage, Collectible & Handmade Items 2116 MAIN STREET

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to December 1, 2013; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO JULIAN COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP P. 0. BOX 249 JULIAN, CALIFORNIA 92036 REGULAR MEETING MONDAY • December 10, 2018 • 7 P.M. JULIAN TOWN HALL, Washington and Main Street, Julian, CA

Members: Pat Brown, Chair; Bob Redding, Vice Chair; Kiki Skagen Munshi, Secretary; Woody Barnes, Betty Birdsell, Herb Dackermann, Eric Jones, Keith Krawiec, Katherine Moretti, Kenny Mushet, Rudy Rikansrud LEGAL: 08150 Publish: DECEMBER 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027727 ITS FITZ 1846 E. Westinghouse St., San Diego, CA 92111 The business is conducted by An Individual Duane Martin Fitzpatrick, 1846 E. Westinghouse St., San Diego, CA 92111. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 5, 2018. LEGAL: 08138 Publish: November 14, 21, 28 and December 5, 2018

AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00047520-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON TO: DUSTIN GARRETT LEBSOCK IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 10, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 7, 2018. LEGAL: 08139 Publish: November 14, 21, 28 and December 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027755 HOIPOLLOI EXCHANGE 3442-1 Harris St., Lemon Grove, CA 91945 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Hoipolloi Exchange, LLC, 34421 Harris St., Lemon Grove, CA 91945. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 6, 2018. LEGAL: 08140 Publish: November 21, 28 and December 5, 12, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00058091-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: TIFFANY ANN NATION and SHEYENNE TORRI NATION FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: TIFFANY ANN NATION and SHEYENNE TORRI NATION HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) TIFFANY ANN NATION b) SHEYENNE TORRI NATION TO: a) SAKURA NAKAMURA b) YUI NAKAMURA IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 17, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 19, 2018. LEGAL: 08142 Publish: November 28and December 5, 12, 19, 2018

LEGAL: 08141 Publish: November 21, 28 and December 5, 12, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026737 POPE TREE SERVICE 330 Woodmeadow Ln. Ramona, CA 92065 The business is conducted by A Corporation - Pope Envcironmental Solutions, Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 23, 2018. LEGAL: 08143 Publish: November 21, 28 and December 5, 12, 2018

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00058977-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JAMILA YUSUF PATANWALA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Automotive Marketplace

PETITIONER: JAMILA YUSUF PATANWALA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JAMILA YUSUF PATANWALA TO: JAMEELA HUSSEIN JIWAJI

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IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on JANUARY 22, 2018 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 21, 2018.

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LEGAL: 08146 Publish: November 28 and December 5, 12, 19, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9028239 SHE SHED 4470 HWY 79, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: 15364 Yaqui Dr. Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Ronald J. Brown, 15364 Yaqui Dr., Julian, CA 92036 and Gay J. Brown, 15364 Yaqui Dr., Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 13, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9028211 OCOTILLO WELLS MOTORSPORTS 100 Banning Rd, Warner Springs, CA 92086 (Mailing Address: PO Box 6 Warner Springs, CA 92086) The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Kanoi Geoffrey Albino, 100 Banning Rd, Warner Springs, CA 92086 and Amanda Mae Albino, 100 Banning Rd, Warner Springs, CA 92086. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 9, 2018.

LEGAL: 08144 Publish: November 28 and December 5, 12, 19, 2018

LEGAL: 08147 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00058264-CU-PT-NC

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027444 RADIANT DEVINE FREQUENCIES 16767 Bernardo Center Dr. #270534, San Diego, CA 92198 The business is conducted by An Individual Martha Judith Guitierroz, 2609 Summit Dr., Escondido, CA 92025. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 1, 2018.

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The Julian Community Planning Group (JCPG) is a voluntary organization representing the community. The function for the JCPG is advisory to the County Planning Department, Planning Commission, and the Board of Supervisors with regard to land use matters.

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*** A FINAL AGENDA WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD ON THE PORCH OF THE TOWN HALL 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE REGULAR PLANNING GROUP MEETING. ***

1811 Main Street [K-Mart Parking Lot]

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You usually have no problem rushing to the defense of someone you perceive as being treated unjustly. But perceptions could be deceiving this week. Check the facts before you act. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Before you point fingers at who might be to blame for the unexpected change in your plans, take a few moments to reflect on how this turn of events might be a blessing in disguise. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You seek out advice in the first part of the week. But be careful not to let counsel from others overshadow your own sense of perception. Things become clearer by the week's end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) The trusted colleagues you relied on earlier continue to offer support with your project. But you take more control, and by the week's end, you should be in full command. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Rely on your practical side while exploring investment possibilities. Caution is still your watchword in these matters. Your social life takes a gratifying turn by the week's end. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) An already confusing situation appears to grow murkier during the first part of the week. But it all starts to clear by the week's end. Plan to spend the weekend with someone special. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a passion for life that inspires others to follow your example. You could be a motivational speaker.

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ALL ITEMS ON THE AGENDA ARE FOR DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE DECISION BY THE GROUP, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Keep your feelings to yourself as you work through an awkward circumstance. Complaining is useless, and also unwise since your words could come back to haunt you. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A sudden flash of Bovine practicality shows you how you might be able to turn your artistic pursuits into a profitable venture. A spouse or partner offers some sage advice. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be prepared with several "Plan Bs" that you might have to use as backups just in case you encounter some troublesome complications with your carefully constructed schedule. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might think you'll never have a free moment again with the demands of the workplace piling on. Cheer up. The pressure eases as holiday time nears. An old friend brings good news. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your Leonine pride might make it difficult to offer an apology to a co-worker you unintentionally offended. But a quick and sincere "I'm sorry" could prevent problems down the line. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a good time to tackle those backed-up chores that have kept you from moving into other and potentially more worthwhile projects. A personal matter needs your attention.

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* * * PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA * * * A. ROLL CALL OF MEMBERS B. REVIEW & APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF October 8, 2018 (November meeting canceled) C. APPROVAL OF AGENDA D. PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS: Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the group on subject matter within the Group’s jurisdiction that is not on the posted agenda. E. ACTION ITEMS 1. PLDO Funds – Advertise ? 2. Advertise Vacant Seat(s) 3. Post Office Box (retain?) 4. Forest Management F. GROUP BUSINESS 1. Announcements and correspondence received 2. Discussion items a. Bike Trails in Julian Planning Area b. Election of Officers c. Annual Training for Planning Group Members 3. Subcommittee reports a. San Dieguito River Valley Park Citizens Advisory Committee (Herb Dackermann) 4. Meeting updates a. BOS and PC Hearings b. Future Group Meeting Dates (January 14th, 2018) G. ADJOURNMENT

Wednesday - December 5, 2018

Volume 34 - Issue 18

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MARY ANN HOLDEN FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: MARY ANN HOLDEN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MARY ANN HOLDEN TO: SUMMER DEE LIGHT IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on JANUARY 22, 2018 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 19, 2018. LEGAL: 08145 Publish: November 28 and December 5, 12, 19, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9029133 a) INTEGRATED FUTURE INSTALLATIONS & CONSULTING SERVICES b) FUTURE INTAGRATED INSTALLATIONS & CONSULTING SERVICES 1408 Hermes Ave - Unit D, Encinitas, CA 92024 (Mailing Address: 300 Carlsbad Village Drive 108A-256, Carlsbad, CA 92008) The business is conducted by An Individual William Reid Britt, 1408 Hermes Ave - Unit D, Encinitas, CA 92024. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 26, 2018. LEGAL: 08148 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9028692 a) NOMA b) NOMA DESIGN & BUILD 4225 Executive Square #600, La Jolla, CA 92037 The business is conducted by A Corporation - YD Design, 3435 Mercer Ln., San Diego, CA 92122. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 16, 2018. LEGAL: 08152 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

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LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00059515-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2018-00056712-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: YING HAUN ZHUANG FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: VALERIE ROA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: YING HAUN ZHUANG HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: YING HAUN ZHUANG TO: RICHARD ZHUANG

PETITIONER:

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 24, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 26, 2018.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 17, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 9, 2018.

LEGAL: 08149 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

VALERIE ROA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: VALERIE ROA TO: VALERIE ROA BAEZ

LEGAL: 08151 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027690 TB TRANSPORT 17156 Mile High Rd., Julian, CA 92036 The business is conducted by An Individual Cynthia Dulcé Howell, 17156 Mile High Rd., Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 5, 2018. LEGAL: 08153 Publish: December 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018

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All Legal Advertising is subject to restrictions of the court, or agency requiring publication. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for deadlines which are missed because of late filings or other requirements beyond our control.

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Wednesday - December 5, 2018  

Wednesday - December 5, 2018