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November 14, 2018 Volume 34 — Issue 15 ISSN 1937-8416

Benefit Concert Saturday For Julian High With Country Star Coffey Anderson

QQ

Goes Down In Flames

by Michael Hart

The fate of the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District was dealt a severe blow in Tuesdays balloting. Proposition QQ - which supporters had hoped would fund the district into the future was defeated with nearly 60% of those voting saying NO thank you. (As of Sunday night no=744, Yes=579) - the Registrar of Voters has yet to finish counting mail-in and provisional ballots (356,000). The defeat means if the district is to continue it will have to operate on the $50 benefit fee currently in place. It does not mean the district will dissolve, yet! That will be determined early next year when the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) administers the vote of the community that was required by the “Protest” filed at their October meeting, the signatures have been verified and notice was given out on Tuesday that the “Protest” would move forward. When questioned LAFCO representative said “the vote on QQ would not keep the protest from moving forward, and no mechanism was available in the process to stop the community vote. In the mean time a new board will be seated as Mike Menghini and Eva Hatch garnered the top two vote totals. The new board will have to wait like the rest of us for the final decision on dissolving the district before it can actually effect any changes. If Dissolution goes through then they will have to serve as care-takers during the process. Then have to sign the district over to the County Fire Authority. A process that should be completed, depending on the community vote, by early summer. Borrego Springs Fire District also had a ballot measure to increase their “Parcel Tax” (Proposition PP) which required a 2/3 vote for approval. It was not approved with only a 55% yes vote. Duncan D. Hunter was returned to congress in the 50th district with 52% over Amar Campa-Najjar(47%). In the State Senate voters returned Brian Jones (55%) to his 38th district seat over Jeff Griffith(44%). In the 71st Assembly District Randy Voepel(62%) returns to Sacramento as challenger James Elia(37%) came up short. The Palomar Community College Board will be represented with Norma Miyamoto and Mark R. Evilsizer. The Julian High and Elementary boards will remain as all members ran without opposition. In Borrego Springs Unified the winners where Judy K. Coyle and Valeen Szabo. Warner Unified: Jeannean Rombal, PJ Stoneburner, Terry L. Cox. Palomar Health Board will have: Linda Carol Greer, Richard C. Engel, Laurie Edwards-Tate and John Clark. The County wide voting turnout was 45.2% of all registered voters, State wide the turnout was 42.6%. A final tally will not be certified with the Secretary of State until early December (7th).

This Saturday, the 17th, the Miss Julian Peagent is presenting a special fund raising Concert with Coffey Anderson. There will be two seatings: first one at 5:30 then a second show at 7:30 in the Julian High School Theater. Tickets for either show id $15.00 per person. (from Wikipedia) Coffey Anderson, an American country singer-songwriter and internet personality, originally from Bangs, Texas. He came to fame through his YouTube videos releasing Christian versions of mainstream music. In 2008 took part in Nashville Star. He has released nine albums so far. His self-titled album Coffey Anderson released on September 28, 2010 on Coffey Entertainment / Dream Records / Universal entered the Billboard 200 at No. 134. Five of his eleven albums are general albums: Southern Man (2008), Me and You (2008), Coffey Anderson (2010), Boots & Jeans (2012), This Is Me (2016) and Country Style (2018). The rest are faith-based Christian albums: Inspiration Vol. 1 (2008), three released in the series Worship Unplugged, Volumes 1 and 2 in 2008, and Vol. 3 in 2011, Redemption (2013) and God Is Enough (2015). He also released Kids Songs EP (2015). And Anderson's newest release Country Style (2018). Anderson founded his own indie label Coffey Global LLC and tours extensively. Coffey Anderson is a graduate of Howard Payne University (HPU) where he played college basketball with HPU's Yellow Jackets. Coffey walked away

from his first love, basketball, to focus on his music. After graduating in 2002, he moved to Los Angeles, California opting for a musical career and started composing his own material. Anderson became somewhat well known via his YouTube videos where he sings lively renditions of original and cover materials. Singing pop, country and Christian songs. He is also known for his interactive stage performances. Some of his more popular YouTube videos include his compositions "Memphis", "Southern Man" "Rock and Roll Sally", "Can I?" and "Better Today". He has also been involved in Direct-to-Fan networks in the music community, launching his "Direct-to-Fan Live Sessions". Anderson keeps a hectic touring program performing live. On April 30, 2010, Coffey signed a record deal with Los Angeles label Dream Records. His selftitled album Coffey Anderson released on September 28, 2010 is his first charting album on the

US Billboard 200 albums chart. The first single from the album is "You Are All I'm After" with an accompanying music video. He has followed it up with two new singles, "Seek Your Face" and "Sunshine". Presently, Anderson is living near in Los Angeles releasing new material . In February 2015, he moved with his family to Nashville to pursue bigger opportunities. However after only eleven months, Anderson felt his calling was back in California. He tours extensively giving on stage concerts as well as church and public events, performs in fairs, rodeos, and live concerts and shows. He has performed on Fox and Friends, Glenn Beck's The Blaze, CMT, TBN, NBC and many others. He is involved in charity, notably partnering with the Military Warriors Support Foundation based in San Antonio, Texas in order to help raise funds to award mortgage free homes to wounded war heroes.

Preparing An Emergency Plan For Your Unique Needs Perhaps a neighbor or family member can include you in their evacuation plans. Set this up beforehand and plan how to coordinate in the event of a disaster. * Plan for pets and service animals. Include food, medications and other supplies your pets may need in your emergency kit, too. * Pack the essentials. In addition to your medical information and needs, don't forget essentials such as nonperishable food, water, a weather

(Family Features) Disasters such as fires, hurricanes, floods and other emergency situations are all too common these days. In fact, about 4 out of 5 Americans live in counties hit by weather events since 2007, according to disaster declaration data from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). That illustrates how these events can impact nearly everyone and the importance of having a plan. This is particularly true for older people and people with disabilities. Health issues, mobility concerns and use of assistive devices can create additional challenges during emergencies. However, there are simple steps everyone can take to prepare now for what may come later. * Discuss your plan. Talk about preparedness with friends,

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neighbors and family members. Contact your city or county emergency management office as well as service providers, such as meals programs. Discussing the topic can help you create a support network, find local resources for preparation and identify contents for a custom emergency kit. * Create a contact list. Make a list of people and places you can turn to for support in an emergency, including people you may need to help or notify of your safety. Include phone numbers, email addresses and physical addresses. Also include insurance providers, health care professionals and medical supply companies. Keep one copy on hand and put another copy in a watertight container in your emergency kit. * Prep for power outages.

Ask your health care providers about how to prepare for power outages, especially if you depend on medical devices that use electricity, such as oxygen, dialysis or a power wheelchair. Write down your plan, along with information about your devices, and keep a copy in your emergency kit. * Make a list of all medications and medical supplies. Keep a list of your medicines, including dosages and allergies, along with other essential supplies like extra eyeglasses, hearing-aid batteries and at least a week's supply of all prescription medicines in your emergency kit. * Plan for transportation. Have a plan in place in case you need to evacuate or get to health care services during an emergency. Know what equipment you need and how you will transport it.

radio, a flashlight, extra batteries, blankets, cash, extra clothing and personal hygiene items. Keep your emergency kit in an easy-to-access location. Learn more about preparedness at acl.gov/programs/emergencypreparedness. To help educate older adults, people with disabilities, community-based organizations and others about emergency preparation, ACL created some materials with tips on readiness. These are free to download and available to the public for use.

Winter Sports Schedules Cross Country

Saturday, November 17 CIF Championsip @ Morley Field Saturday, November 24 CIF State Championships @ Fresno

Girls Soccer

Friday, November 30 3:45 @ TriCity Christian Monday, December 3 3:15 Home vs Maranatha Christian Wed., December 5 3:00 Home vs High Tech (NC) Friday, December 7 3:00 Home vs Calnin Christian Wed., December 12 3:30 @ High Tech (NC) Monday, December 17 3:00 Home vs Gompers Prep Friday, January 11 3:00 @ Borrego Springs Monday, January 14 3:00 @ Maranatha Christian

Boys Basketball

Tuesday, November 13 3:30 @ Bayfront Charter Monday, December 3 3:45 @Calvary Christian Thursday, December 6 5 :30 Home vs San Diego Jewish Academy Monday, December 10 6:30 @ Temecula Prep Tuesday, December 18 5:30 @ San Diego Jewish Academy Tuesday, January 8 5:30 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 11 5:30 @ Mountain Empire

Girls Basketball

Tuesday, November 13 TBA @ Bonsall Friday,November 16 4:00 Home vs Bonsall Tuesday, November 27 4:00 @Hamilton Thursday, November 29 TBA @ Bonsall Tuesday, December 4 5:30 Home vs Horizon Prep Thursday, December 6 5:00 @ Guajome Park Academy Wed., December 12 5:00 Home vs Guajome Park Academy Thursday, December 13 4:30 Home vs Hamilton Saturday, December 15 4:00 Home vs Preuss UCSD Tuesday, January 8 4:00 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 11 4:00 @ Mountain Empire

Boys Soccer

Monday, November 26 3:00 Home vs Ocean View Christian Tuesday, November 27 3:15 Home vs Calvin Christian Tuesday, December 4 3:30 @ Ocean View Christian Friday, December 7 3:00 Home vs Calnin Christian Wed., December 12 3:15 @ Calvary Christian Wed., January 9 5:00 @ West Shores Wed., January 16 3:00 Home vs Calipatria continued on page 4

The Chamber Would like to Once Again Thank those who sponsor our events. All Proceeds from our Events Go Right Back into the Community. These Businesses contribute to us ALL and We thank Them!


2 The Julian News

November 14, 2018

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THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD COMMUNITY HEALING It is 3 o’clock in the morning. I feel compelled to get these words on ONLY YOU CAN PR E VE N T W I L D FIRE S. w w w . s m o k e y b e a r. c o m paper since sleep has eluded me and the sentences just keep swirling around, each time reorganized in increasingly more complicated ways, unique but likely incomprehensible in the morning. Not a method for inducing sleep or effective writing. The majority of voters in this community saw fit to reject the illconceived Proposition QQ for just cause, much due to more tax TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. money sucked from our pockets for a cause no longer NOTE meeting Wildfire Prevention - Newspaper (2 1/16 x 2) B&W WFPA01-N-03259-C “Animals” 85 screen Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127801 the requirements of the community, the response ability less than needed. The JCFPD Fire Board made the correct decision to join the Residential • Industrial • Commercial San Diego Fire Authority and the voters made the right decision. Serving Southern California We will have another opportunity to put behind our notions of Ben Sulser, Branch Manager nostalgia, of local control and tradition when the LASKO vote comes Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 before us in a few months. While fond heroic memories, and gracious Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 respect for our Volunteers over the past many years are appropriate, emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com the time in our lives dictated by forces beyond our control, both natural and human-fueled, tell us it is time to prepare, move away from smalltown thinking and join the rest of the world. We will not succeed in anything through division and hatred. We must join together, talk and make good decisions for effective long-term outcomes. Permit a writer’s indulgence for a moment to relate a relevant and poignant story. I suppose this could be labeled “what I did on my & summer vacation.” In May Ingrid and I went home to Sweden to Oak and Pine our Specialty visit friends and relatives and just play Swede again. While at the CA. State License #704192 Fully Insured for Your Protection apartment in Stockholm three arson-started fires were set, causing Workers Comp. some scary days. The fires in old forests and buildings stubbornly resisted suppression. They were finally knocked down and the fire crews praised for saving a part of a town older than our country. 760 Several days later another fire broke out, more North and West Over 20 Years in Julian of Stockholm, also arson-started. The winds were kicking up. While ALL MAJOR no unusual alarm at first it was strange. The fire quickly became a CREDIT CARDS • Trained Experts problem and they started to evacuate people and animals. Within • Difficult Removals days over 60 large forest fires were burning simultaneously in a • Artistic Trimming country the size of California, but only a fifth of the population. The • Brush Clearing Chris Pope, Owner ACCEPTED local volunteer and permanent fire crews were quickly overwhelmed. Resources from all over Europe had to be flown into the country to aid in the battle. We were there two months and the fires were still burning We must do the right thing Julian, show we are community minded and still breaking out in new areas. At the time the causes were but worldly. We know what we must do. Set aside the gossip, the unknown, but two major facts were known: The country’s fire crews rumors and get transparent. Talk to each other. We are all in this and five air-drop helicopters were inadequate to meet the challenge; together. The decisions are not ‘we vs them’. We are not the Hatfields the crews were unprepared for such conditions. Perhaps some of our and McCoys. The decision is: whether tradition and local control is volunteers looking for a purpose could teach their brethren in Sweden ours to defend in isolation; or shall we move from the delusion of a few things. isolation and become part of a greater community. Sweden has undergoing a severe drought not seen in over 100 The people have always had control. It is the American way. Let years. The lakes and rivers were so low that the country was water us join out sisters and brothers of the County and get modern. We rationing. Can you imagine? A country with hundreds of lakes and owe this to our children, our tourist-dependent economy, our infirm rivers and very well managed forests. Yards, farms, crops burnt brown needing better medical response. Property owners want reasonable and looking like ours, a total shock to those accustomed to lush green fire insurance rates. lawns, forests and an abundance of delicious summer crops to last C. Englund through winter. A threat to the food chain was discussed. The only smiles were those brought by the world soccer finals. While I write this, California has three holocaust-potential fires burning in Butte and Ventura Counties and fires yesterday in a canyon near SDSU and in Temecula areas had the potential. Those windspread fires in the North were moving at an estimate 80 football fields a minute, an image hard to wrap around, people fleeing for their lives through burning caldrons like reenactments of scenes from Dante’s inferno and conceptions of hell. Our SD Unified Fire authority quickly put out the local fire, but the north burns on, terrifying and deadly as it swallows up whole towns and communities just like ours as if mere matchsticks. Add that to the reports of more mass killings and horrific political rhetoric and it is no wonder sleep eludes me. My friends, this condition is a call to arms. Our little community has another challenge. In a few months we must vote (a LAFCO requirement) for the fate of the volunteer system of the Julian/Cuyamaca District. Considering the Tax proposition lost and the District’s extremely low level of preparedness and high debt seems a reasonable time to finally close this chapter on a system relying on charity, unreliable volunteerism, funding and equipment, and a broken system full of bitterness, old hatreds, family feuds and short on relevance. The reality of modern times screams unity, preparation, readiness and health and safety of the community. Go where the money and resources are. We dictate the terms, held intact by legal agreement, local control as much as in any democratic process and unincorporated township could have. Volunteers will always be necessary and are recruited all over California including San Diego County. The training and certification is free and brings with graduation a future.

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Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

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The Julian News 3

November 14, 2018

Mobile Dairy Comes To Junior High

This year on October 22, 2018 the Julian Elementary and the Julian Junior High had a special assembly. This was no ordinary assembly on Monday, the farm was brought to the students. How? Have you heard of a Mobile Dairy Classroom, this is when instructors come and teach kids where the milk they get in the grocery stores come from. They travel with cows, this

time there was a beautiful jersey cow named Gloria with her calf; students were taught about how farmers milk the cow to the point where they sell it for our use. Questions were answered, the curiosity of wondering where your food comes from is endless and on the 22nd, kids got to learn in a fun way. All students were able to not only see the cows up close and personal, but they

Plastic Pollution: What to Know

(StatePoint) Plastics are an increasingly widespread pollutant, according to environmental experts, harming ecosystems and wildlife as well as endangering human health. One of the largest worldwide industries driving this crisis -- the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector which offers such things as soft drinks, toiletries, foods and other consumables -- is not taking significant action to put the brakes on the growing production and marketing of single-use plastics, suggests a new report. The report, “A Crisis of Convenience: The corporations behind the plastics pollution pandemic,” by Greenpeace, found that single-use packaging is the main delivery system used by all of the companies surveyed and there is no sign of that changing. What’s more, none of these companies have comprehensive strategies that include commitments to move away from single-use plastic, with some companies actually increasing the amount of single-use plastic packaging and waste they produce. “Unfortunately, across the board, the consumer goods industry has failed to take responsibility for the single-use plastics crisis they helped create,” said Greenpeace USA ocean plastics campaign director, John Hocevar. “The current commitments corporations have made around plastics actually allow for increased use in the future. We need more transparency and substantive action immediately.” Other study findings include the fact that most solutions being explored by businesses are primarily related to addressing recyclability or recycling, not reducing or creating new delivery systems. Unfortunately, most companies know or disclose little about the amount of their packaging that is recycled and even less about the destination of their plastic waste after consumption. Beyond personal choices, such as recycling single-use plastics and using reusable bags and bottles, Hocevar points out that individuals can make an impact by talking to their local grocery stores, restaurants and businesses about phasing out single-use plastics as well as by writing to some of the larger companies urging them to move in a

Share Your Christmas The Ramona Food and Clothes Closet will be holding its annual Share Your Christmas Program on Friday December 14 from 10-2. Our program has been serving low income families for many years. During this event hundreds of children ages 1 to 12 will receive a new unwrapped toy, food for their family, and a small stocking stuffer. Pre-qualified parents come into the store to choose age appropriate gifts for their children. Last year we gave out 438 toys and 182 food boxes to our local families from Ramona, Julian, Santa Isabel, Warner Springs, Borrego Springs and back country areas! We anticipate many more this year. Sign-ups for parents are: Sat Dec 1, 10am-noon and 5:00pm7:00pm. Mon Dec 3, Tues Dec 4 and Wed Dec 5, 10:00am-noon Thurs Dec 6, 10am-noon and 5:00pm-7:00pm. How you can help: Collect new unwrapped toys and canned/boxed food. Another way is to encourage businesses and individuals to hold a drive for us or when having a holiday party/lunch/dinner/golf tournament etc., ask for a donation of an item as the “entrance” fee. This year we will be collecting items and gift certificates from local businesses to make up a large basket that we will raffle off. Here are some of the specific items we will be looking for: New toys and gift certificates for children ages 0-12 years of age. Unexpired food items: Canned ham, cranberries, yams, chicken broth. Boxed mashed potatoes, stuffing, cereal or oatmeal, muffin/biscuit mix, can/ box milk and gravy. Of course any donations of food are welcome and will be used for distribution through our emergency services. For more info please contact Vesna Curry on facebook, messenger, 760-789-4458 or ramonafcc@att.net Remember ALL of our toys and food distribution stays local!

by Alison J. Hernandez 6th grade Julian Junior High

were all able to pet the cows and talk to them. This program was started about 80 years ago and is still going strong. It’s a non-profit organization. It was a wonderful way for all of the elementary and junior high students to see how milk is made up close. (You can request an assembly at HealthyEating.org/ MDC877.324.7901) better direction. More information about the study and plastic pollution can be found by visiting www. greenpeace.org. “The sector urgently needs to move away from throwaway plastics for the benefit of our oceans, wildlife and communities around the world,” says Hocevar. *** We have an epidemic of gun violence in America, and in trying to understand how that has happened, part of what we need to do is help equip our children to respond not with fear but with kindness. This has to be the way we go forward. — Elizabeth Esty ***

Get Your Reservation Soon For The Holiday Home Tour The Julian Woman’s Club is hosting their annual Holiday Home Tour on Friday, December 7, 2018. We will meet at the United Methodist Church on Hwy 78 where you will have the opportunity to purchase gifts from our wonderful crafters & quilters. Baked goods will be available for purchase and refreshments will be served before each tour begins. The cost of this tour is $20.00. There will be two tours on Dec. 7th. The first tour leaves promptly at 9 AM, so be at the church by 8:30 AM. The second tour leaves the church at 1 PM, so be there by 12:30 PM. Come early to shop at our fabulous craft and bake sale. Each guest will be assigned to a car with a driver that knows the route to each of the 5 home on the tour. Reservations: Submit form found at the Julian Woman’s Club website julianwomansclub.org. OR Send or deliver the following information to Edie Seger, P.O. Box 2062, Julian CA 92036. NAME________________ Which Tour (9am or 1pm) ___ Whose in your Group______ Check for $20 for each person. (made out to Julian Woman’s Club) When your check and form are received your reservation will be finalized. Printed forms are available at Julian Tea and Cottage Arts where you may pay and turn in your form in person. If you have any questions about the tour, please call Edie at 760-765-0832.

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6 Tips to Maintain Eye Health (Family Features) When considering making changes to positively impact your well-being, many aspects of health may jump to the forefront, from taking care of mental and emotional health to ensuring a well-maintained body from head to toes. However, one sometimes overlooked area is your eyes and the importance of vision care. Despite nearly 4.2 million Americans over the age of 40 suffering from impaired vision, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, it's an aspect of daily health that is sometimes neglected. To better care for your eyes, consider these tips that put the focus back on eye health: Schedule an exam While focusing on enhancing care for your eyes is a productive idea regardless, it's also

important to have your vision and eye health checked regularly by a professional. This can help detect diseases and conditions that cause vision loss and blindness, many of which show little or no symptoms in the early stages, and a doctor can help create a care plan that preserves your eye health. Use proper lighting While there are many everyday ways to maintain eye health and function, there is one simple yet overlooked way to take care of your sight: reducing eyestrain. While three out of four Americans suffer daily from eyestrain, according to an online survey conducted by Russell Research, some people may not realize the lighting they use at work and home may be contributing to the problem. continued on page 5


4 The Julian News

Julian

and

November 14, 2018

Back Country Happenings Vulcan Mountain Boys Friday Night

Girls Soccer (continued)

Calendar CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month 10am at the Fire Station, 3407 Hwy 79, Julian Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian

Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves & Desperados historic comedy skits at 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm – stage area behind Julian Market & Deli. Sundays - FREE MOVIES JHS Little Theater - 2pm For updated movie titles, please call 760-765-0606 extension 300

NOVEMBER

Wednesday, November 14 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am

Saturday, November 17 Electronic and Hazardous Waste Collection Event Julian Library, 9-2

Julian Historical Society Presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7 pm

Saturday, November 17 Coffey Anderson In Concert Julian High School Theater 2 shows 5:30 & 7:30 Tickets = $15

ESL Class - Tuesday/Thursday Improve your English skills with a Palomar College Instructor Julian Library, 4-6pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 5pm, info: 619 540-7212

Thursday, November 22 Thanksgiving Thursday November 22 Old Fashioned Thanksgiving at the Pine Hills Lodge Seatings at 11 am, 1:30 pm, and, at 4:30 pm. $45 for Adults, $24.95 Children 10 & under. Reservations Required: Please call 760.765.1100 Thursday, Friday November 22, 23 Julian Library Closed

Every Tuesday Tai Chi with Rich. Julian Library - 9 AM Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am

Friday, Saturday November 23, 24 Holiday Tea with Christmas Classics on Harp and Piano from Dr. Marsha Long Julian Gold Rush Hotel - 5pm

Second & Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Every Thursday VET Connect - VA services available at Julian library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment. Thursdays, 9am-4pm. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall Every 1st & 3rd Thursday Lego Club, Lego building for kids grade K-5. All materials supplied. Julian Library - 2:30pm. Every Friday FREE Feature Film Screening JHS Little Theater For updated movie titles, please call 760-765-0606 extension 300 6pm Every Saturday Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance.

Friday, January 18 3:00 Home vs West Shores Wed., January 23 3:00 @ West Shores Tuesday, January 29 3:30 Home vs TriCity Christian Wed., January 30 3:00 @ Borrego Springs Friday, February 1 3:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial Wed., February 6 3:15 @ West Shores Friday, February 8 3:00 Home vs Mountain Empire

Tuesday, January 15 5:30 Home vs Warner Friday, January 18 5:30 Home vs West Shores Friday, January 25 5:30 Home vs Borrego Springs Tuesday, January 29 5:30 Home vs Mountain Empire Friday, February 1 5:30 @ Warner Tuesday, February 5 5:30 @ West Shores Friday, February 8 5:30 Home vs Vincent Memorial

Girls Basketball (continued)

Boys Soccer (continued)

Tuesday, January 15 4:00 Home vs Warner Friday, January 18 4:00 Home vs West Shores Friday, January 25 4:00 Home vs Borrego Springs Tuesday, January 29 4:00 Home vs Mountain Empire Friday, February 1 4:00 @ Warner Friday, February 8 4:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial

Friday, January 18 3:00 Home vs Vincent Memorial Wed., January 23 3:00 @ Borrego Springs Friday, January 25 3:30 Home vs West Shores Friday, February 1 4:00 @ Calipatria Friday, February 8 5:30 @ Borrego Springs

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Monday, November 19 Triva Night at Wynola Pizza 6:30 - 8pm

Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15

Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10am - Baby Story Time with Miss Colleen 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts with Miss Linda 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 4:30 - Qi Gong - An ancient Chinese healing system using physical postures and breathing to guide and replenish energy, with Vika Golovanova.

Haywire For A Saturday Night Ho-Down

Thursday, November 15 Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting Town Hall - 6pm

Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212

Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 2:30pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00

Friday Night in the Red Barn at Wynola Pizza and Bistro the Vulcan Mountain Boys bring Bluegrass from the Olympic heights of Leucadia. The best of High Energy Bill Monroe, Stanleys, Flatt&Scruggs and the most tasteful contemporary artists. Vulcan Mountain Boys are a piece Bluegrass band with roots in San Diego jamming and stage performance venues. Maintaining high fidelity to “Birth of Bluegrass” through “Modern Roots” eras, you will get high-energy tempos, driving rhythms, and soaring traditional harmonies. Hold on, Vulcan Mountain Boys will give you a wildly satisfying traditional Bluegrass listening experience journey! Eric Bentley – bass; Bill Frisbie – guitar, vocals; Lou Shrinkle – mandolin, vocals; Jim Henderson – banjo, vocals. The fun and tunes start at six and they’ll serve it up until nine. Good food, good libations and good music.

Boys Basketball (continued)

Friday - Sunday, November 23-25 Pomegranate Days Oasis Camel Dairy, 12-5 daily Tickets = $10-$15

Saturday it’s locals; Jim Lydick and Kathleen Beck, Drummer Paul Gordon, plus multi-instramentalist Meril Parker - “Haywire” come on out to see what's brewing at the Wynola Pizza place and share a musical good time with the entertaining band. Haywire is an eclectic folk band infl uenced by Joni Mitchell and Neil Young, venturing from the pop sounds of the Beatles to the beautiful ballads of Tom Waits. They feature well known tunes and some originals. Haywire is a four piece band including guitars, fiddle, accordian, and drums; mixing in a little base from time to time. Jim Lydick and Kathleen Beck have been playing together for more than two decades and have written scores of songs. Drummer Paul Gordon performs in numerous bands through out San Diego and is a seasoned veteran having played with Mick Taylor, David Chester and Ralph Landis, and we feel happy to have him. He is versed in many styles of music. Maril has played music since she was five and plays many instruments. She grew up playing piano, and took up the fiddle a few years back. Guitars, accordion, fiddle, flute and original tunes is what Haywire will be serving up this Saturday night from six to nine in the Red Barn, home of Backcountry Spirits, Julian’s newest watering hole

Saturday, November 24 Living Nativity (after tree lighting) Cider Mill on Main Street 6-8 Tuesday, November 27 Julian Art Guild Demonstration Live drawing hosted by the Julian Arts Guild. Julian Library - 6pm Wednesday, November 28 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 9:30am Shelter Valley CC - 11:30am Thursday, November 29 Chamber of Commerce Holiday Mixer - Town Hall 5:30 pm to 8:00

DECEMBER

Tuesday, December 4 Music On The Mountain Adrienne Nims/Spirit Wind

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Our adjacent BLACK OAK CABIN provides another option for your getaway! www.butterfieldbandb.com

&

www.blackoakcabin.com

For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Upcoming Wynola Pizza & Bistro Shows:

Monday, November 19 - Trivia Night 6:30 to 8 in the Red Barn Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite 6 to 8 Friday, November 23 - The Garners Saturday, November 24 - Blue Creek Band For more information call Wynola Pizza & Bistro 760-765-1004

Saturday, November 24 Holiday Hay Ride Fort Cross Old Timey Adventures $5 to $20 Saturday, November 24 Community Christmas Tree Lighting. Pioneer Park

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents

• On Nov. 12, 1799, Andrew Ellicott Douglass, an early American astronomer, witnesses the Leonids meteor shower from a ship off the Florida Keys. Douglass wrote in his journal that he "was in constant expectation of some of them falling on the vessel." It is the first known record of a meteor shower in North America. • On Nov. 16, 1901, on New York's Coney Island, a low-slung car called the "Torpedo Racer" breaks the world speed record for electric cars. Its builder and pilot, Andrew Riker, managed a speed of 57 mph. • On Nov. 14, 1941, "Suspicion," a thriller starring Cary Grant and directed by Alfred Hitchcock, makes its debut. They would later collaborate on "To Catch a Thief." • On Nov. 18, 1966, Sandy Koufax, 30, the ace pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers, retires from baseball due to

chronic arthritis in his pitching arm. "In those days there was no surgery," he said much later. In 1971, Koufax became the youngest person ever elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. • On Nov. 13, 1974, Karen Silkwood is killed in a car accident in Oklahoma. She had complained to the Atomic Energy Commission about unsafe conditions at the KerrMcGee plutonium plant where she worked was and was on her way to meet with a union representative and a reporter. The folder of information she had with her was never found. • On Nov. 15, 1984, "Baby Fae," a month-old infant who had received a baboon-heart transplant 20 days earlier, dies in California. Three other humans had received animal-heart transplants, but none survived longer than 3 1/2 days. • On Nov. 17, 1993, Annie Proulx wins the National Book Award for "The Shipping News," her novel about an out-of-luck journalist and father. It later won the Pulitzer Prize. © 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Julian Historical Society

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

760 765 1020

JULIAN

YESTERYEARS

Home Crafted & Vintage Items • Home Sewn Kitchen Items • • Grape Tray Wall Art • • Soaps • Lotions • Books • Downtown Julian in the Cole Building

Open 11-5

2116 Main Street - Downstairs

7 Days A Week


November 14, 2018

50 Years ago the Journey began for a young man from Del Mar. Drafted and shipped off to the other side of the world. Local Resident Howard Fisher tells his story of war and survival and recovery.

Exclusivly

June 05, 2016 2:50pm All soldiers fight, suffer and die alone surrounded by friends... Pure allure... obscure to procure... and when achieved a voice asks, “Have you lived long enough? Do you want to go back” ... Happy 4th H

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts More Fires

by Michele Harvey

The Julian News 5

Health & Personal Services

By Michele Harvey As I wrote this column I was listening to reports of fires throughout General Dentistry & Orthodontics California. The Woolsey fire doubled in size from Friday afternoon, November 9th to 70,000 acres on Saturday. It has burned homes in Malibu, Westlake Village and Thousand Oaks. It is also threatening Specializing in fixing broken teeth parts of Simi Valley, West Hills and possibly Pepperdine University and beautifying your smile ! where many students and staff members are being sheltered in It’s time you had the smile you’ve place. After 6 years of drought, firefighters are fighting a fire that always dreamed of ! Call today ! is consuming exceptionally dry areas that contain more extreme fire conditions than they have seen in their entire lives. As of Saturday Most Insurance Plans Accepted morning, 2 people had died because of this fire. Visa and Master Card I’m also worried about the Paradise fire in the Sierra Nevada 2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675 foothills, because we know people who live there. I hear that the town of Paradise which supports 25,000 people is gone. Just plain gone. When we experienced the Cedar Fire, firefighters saved our town. That meant that we had places to work when we returned. We had A Division of places to buy gas and groceries. Our doctor and dentist offices were intact. • Complete Family Practice Services Now accepting: Covered People of Paradise California have no town to return to, so I expect • Monthly California, Medi-Cal, Flu OB/GYN shots available at the Julian that employment is at a minimum for anyone who doesn’t work for clean Medicare, Community • Digital X-ray Lab Services up or construction crews. As of early Sunday morning, 6 thousand Clinic every day from 9-11Health and Group,1-3. Molina, • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery homes were destroyed and 23 people had died. 110 people were Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Appointment advised. callandthe Most PPO’s Tricare. • Behavioral Health (Smart Care) Please still missing. It’s one of the biggest death tolls from fires in California Sliding Fee Scale and clinic 760-765-1223 for information. history. The biggest number of people who died in a California fire Financial Assistance Available. were in the Griffith Park fire of 1933. That year, 29 people died and at least 100 were injured. These were all untrained firefighters who were clearing brush when the fire started. President Trump blames these newest fires on gross forest mismanagement. He needs to study a problem before he has an opinion on it. I haven’t heard anything from any of the firefighting commanders to agree with Mr. Trump and in fact, apparently the opposite is true with the exception of Federal lands. More money for better management might help. Now he is threatening to hold back CLNTS 1 127093 1/15/02 WV B/W DOLEV FEMA funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency22:03 because California, in his mind, isn’t doing what we can to prevent wildfires. We know that our biggest problems are drought caused by climate change, the pine beetle and the Oak Borer Beetle, but we don’t have enough money to cut these trees down on our federal lands and 4 85 IRIS 127931 21:50 9/6/02 AB now we are being threatened with further cuts in funds. I apologize to those of you who are Trump believers. I just don’t think that anyone has given him facts enough for him to understand what’s happening in California this week. A few facts; nearly 60% of California’s forest land, 33 million acres, is owned by the federal government. This information comes from a 2018 report by the California Legislative Analyst’s Office. I read in Sunday’s San Diego Union that 25% of California’s forests are privately owned and approximately 14% are owned by industrial owners like timber companies. State and local AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS. governments only own 3% of California’s forests. So, doing the math, I Ignore them and they’ll go away. say that the federal government should be giving us more assistance, WHAT A CHILD LEARNS not less assistance. ABOUT VIOLENCE A CHILD LEARNS FOR LIFE. In case of the probability of a local wildfire, a few things to remember are: Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or Fire requires oxygen. If you wait too long to evacuate, the fire that is visit www.actagainstviolence.org. approaching you may suck up all of the oxygen that your vehicle will WWW.AFTERSCHOOLNOW.ORG need to start and to run. 1-866-KIDS-TODAY One man who was interviewed about this week’s fires said that the only things he had time to save were his family photos. Do you know where your family photos are? NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY If you have small pets, please NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. make certain that you have Afterschool Alliance - Newspaper 2 1/16 x 2 B&W enough carriers for them and MFNYR2-N-06232-H “Ignore Them” 85 line screen that you know where the carriers Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127931 are. You can also keep a small bag of food for each pet along with water, an empty kitty litter pan and kitty litter if needed. Keep a set of your most important papers in the glove compartment of your vehicle and another set in your purse or backpack. If your home is in a burned area you may not be allowed back in without You will need identification showing that you live there. Usually a gas and electric bill with your name on it will be enough. Keep a box of non-perishable foods near your front door along with water. Keep plenty of water. Keep your trees trimmed and keep all burnable things away from your house and other buildings. This is a good way to diminish fire danger, making your house a bit more fire safe. Keep your cell phone charged. Yep, I just now put mine on the charger just to make sure it has a full charge. Keep at least half a tank of gas in your vehicle that you will drive when you evacuate. A full tank is better. Back up as many of your computer files on a thumb drive as possible. Thumb drives take up very little space and if you have to evacuate, you may not have time to unplug your computer and all of its accessories. Let’s all do our best to stay safe. These are my thoughts.

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Julian Medical Clinic

Monday–Friday 8-4 pm 760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Unneetha Pruitt WHNP , Women’s Health Cathleen Shaffer, Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management

*127093*

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Food As Art

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS.

Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

Film at Horan Imaging 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127093

Japanese food is beautiful. Little lacquer boxes and lovely tiny dishes filled with artistically arranged and colorful pieces of...things... set against a black or red lacquer background. Each meal is different each a visual and gustatory adventure over a range of umami tastes. For a kid here, more years ago than anyone can count, Japanese food wasn't a favorite. The textures were too strange, an allergy to fish put much of it off limits and we won't even go into the question of tastes. In those days there wasn't much meat or chicken; Japan was still poor after the War and still traditional in many more ways than it is today. So returning back after, well...let's not go into how many years...one anticipated food being a new, interesting and pleasurable experience. And it has been an interesting experience but...all right. We'll be honest for once. It's mainly been the old college try. Many meals eaten in different regions, carefully chosen for a range of gustatory experience and, indeed, a gustatory experience. That old college try again...it's not possible to say that the attempt hasn't been there. But it is possible to say something else: For some of us Japanese food is better seen than eaten.

Kovels

continued from page 3 One way to achieve a reduction in eyestrain is to use indoor lighting such as the OttLite Wellness Series, a line of lamps that closely matches the spectrum of natural daylight to reduce eye fatigue and eyestrain by 51 percent. The line includes four models featuring stylish designs with ClearSun LED technology, high-quality diffusers for clear illumination and multiple brightness settings, all intended to help reduce eyestrain by providing "good" lighting, which means providing enough natural daylight-quality illumination to see clearly without being blinded by excessively high light levels or glare. The lamps also feature adjustable necks and shades to help direct light to fully illuminate an intended area and adjust for glare from reflective surfaces and smart features like USB ports to conveniently charge your

devices. Find more information at OttLite.com. Maintain overall health Living a healthy lifestyle overall can have a positive impact on your eye health, too. For example, maintaining a healthy weight can help avoid risks like diabetes, which can lead to vision loss from diabetic eye disease or glaucoma. In addition, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables aids eye health, along with fish high in omega-3 fatty acids. Wear sunglasses Overexposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays can increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration and blurred vision. It's important to protect the eyes from harmful UV rays when you're outside by wearing sunglasses that block out 99-100 percent of UV-A and UV-B radiation. Shield your eyes While sunglasses help block out the sun, protective eyewear like safety glasses and goggles can help shield the eyes while conducting physical activities

like yard work or playing sports. Be sure to use safety glasses specifically intended for the use you'll wear them for, as some varieties are designed for certain activities. Limit evening screen time The blue glare from traditional lighting and electronics (TV, cell phones, computers, tablets) used before bed may disrupt sleep patterns and circadian rhythm, and may even lead to sleep disorders, depression, cancer and cardiovascular disease.


6 The Julian News

Julian

and

Lake Cuyamaca

Back Country Dining Julian

&

Winery Guide

Julian

24th Annual Victorian Christmas Teas

Winter Hours 8am - 8pm

760•765•0700

Daily Lunch Specials

Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

15027 Highway 79 - at the Lake

760 765 0832

Daily Dinner Specials

er 3rd th b m e v No

Daily — Thurs. December 6th thru Mon .December 23rd www.juliantea.com

November 14, 2018

2124 Third Street

one block off Main Street

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

Julian 760

765-2655

Heather’s Tip ~ remove pens from pockets before you put them in laundry!

Sausage & Burgers Serving starting at Noon Friday’s & Saturday’s

Don’t forget Monday is Donuts Day OPEN: Monday 7:30 - 3:30 Wednesday-Friday 7 - 5 & Sat/Sun 7 - 6

Julian

Julian Gateway To All of The Back Country Corner of 78 & 79 in Santa Ysabel

open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun

Only a Short ride from downtown Julian

offering - tasters - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

760 765-1810

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

(2 BLOCKS OFF MAIN ON WASHINGTON)

OPEN 7 DAYS

11:30AM - 8:30PM

2128 4th Street • Julian

Drive Thru Service For To-Go Orders

Julian

Wynola

Julian & Wynola

ROMANO’S

Casual, Relaxed

Family Friendly

Ample Parking

RV • Trailer • Motorcycle

Julian’s First Producing Winery

COLEMAN CREEK CENTER

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

760 765 3495

MENGHINI WINERY

SENIORS THURSDAYS $6 -

YOUR CHOICE + DRINK

Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

Groups Please Call

Open:*Every Day

Established 1982

Tasting Room

Winter Hours and Picnic Area Monday - Friday 11 - 4 1150 Julian Orchards Drive Saturday & Sunday 10 - 5 2 miles North of Julian out Farmer Road *Except: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

760 765 2072 www.menghiniwinery.com

JULIAN GRILLE

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

RESTAURANT

ITALIAN & SICILIAN CUISINE

2718 B Street - Julian Reservations 760 765 1003 Dine In or Takeout • Wine and Beer See our menu at www.romanosrestaurantjulian.com

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS/WEEK Julian & Santa Ysabel

MORE THAN JUST GREAT PIZZA! Sunday thru Friday and Thursday Saturday 11am - 8:00pm 11am - 9:00pm

ENTERTAINMENT EVERY Friday & Saturday 6-9

2119 Main St. Julian

4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

760-765-2472 Your Location Here

• AWARD WINNING THIN CRUST

Two locations to serve you:

Julian

Santa Ysabel

2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

WOOD-FIRED PIZZA • Every Sat & Sun afternoon BBQ/Grill Specials • “From Scratch” Salads, Soups, Desserts (760) 765-1004 3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

Dine Inside, Outside Take Out Conference Facilities

Over 35 varieties of beer, ale and hard cider

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR

Lunch and Dinner • Patio Dining 765-0173 2224 Main Street •

Showcase Your Restaurant In Our Dining Guide

Mid-Week Dinner Specials

13 Weeks - $175 26 Weeks - $325 52 Weeks - $600 You Can Do It, for Tips!

Breakfast served Friday - Monday Open 7 Days a Week

Chef’s Corner Get the Scoop on Winter Squash

*** Gratitude is the inward feeling of kindness received. Thankfulness is the natural impulse to express that feeling. Thanksgiving is the following of that impulse. — Henry Van Dyke *** 1. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Who was the only U.S. president born on the island of Manhattan? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Ethiopia? 3. U.S. STATES: Which state is home to Mount Rushmore? 4. PSYCHOLOGY: What fear is represented by the condition astraphobia? 5. LITERATURE: Which of Shakespeare’s plays produced the line, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be”? 6. FOOD & DRINK: In which century was tea introduced to Europe? 7. MOVIES: Who sang the title song to the movie “Pretty Woman”? 8. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: What baseball great once said, “Never let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game”? 9. GAMES: What kind of word puzzle was introduced Dec. 21, 1913 in the New York World? 10. MEDICAL: What is a more common name for the condition called achromatopsia? Answers on page 12

Winter squash are prominently displayed at grocery stores in the fall and winter months, but many shoppers pass them by because they don’t know what to do with them. Winter squash are easy to prepare and are a healthy addition to any meal.

The Cucurbitaceae family is the Latin name for gourds, pumpkins and squash. The terms Summer and Winter can be deceptive and are based only on current usage, not on actuality. Summer squash is in the market all winter, and Winter squash is available in late summer and fall, as well as winter. This terminology was never meant to confuse -- it dates to a time when the seasons were more crucial to man’s survival. Vegetables that would keep until December became known as winter vegetables.

Winter squash are picked when they are fully mature, and they have a thick, inedible skin. This thick skin provides a protective covering for the squash and allows for a long storage life. Winter squash can be stored for three months or longer in a cool, dry place, preferably in a single layer. Every part of the squash plant can be eaten, including the leaves and tender shoots, which can be cooked in omelets or made into soup. Winter squash are a good source of vitamins A and C, potassium and fiber. One-half cup of cooked winter squash has only 40 calories. Winter squash comes in shapes round and elongated, scalloped and pear-shaped, with flesh that ranges from golden-yellow to brilliant orange. Most winter squashes are vine-type plants whose fruits are harvested when fully mature. They take longer to mature than summer squash (three months or more) and are best harvested once the cool weather of fall sets in. Some of the most popular types of winter squash are butternut, spaghetti, acorn squash and delicata. continued on page 12


November 14, 2018

Wait, What? Scholarships Are Taxable?

(StatePoint) Everyone knows about scholarships. They’re nostrings-attached money to help students pay for their higher education. Right? Usually, but not always. In some cases, there are significant strings attached -- including situations in which scholarships are treated as taxable income. While unusual, it’s important for students, their families and scholarship providers to understand all the implications. Tax Status The tax status of scholarships first codified in 1954 was simple: for students pursuing a degree, all scholarships, fellowships and grants were tax-free. But later legislation specified portions of a scholarship could be taxed if it is considered “fees for services,” or if it’s used for living, travel or research expenses. What’s more, scholarships for non-degree-candidates are also taxable. As professional certifications and certificate programs become vital to certain industries, experts say these laws put nontraditional students at risk of a heavy tax burden. The Impact Some experts say taxing scholarships comes at a cost for students and scholarship providers and even the federal government. “For students, it can harm their ability to pay for their education,” says Robert C. Ballard, president and CEO of Scholarship America, the nation’s largest nonprofit scholarship and education support organization. “For providers wanting to make the biggest charitable impact, it can make providing scholarships less attractive than alternative philanthropic efforts.” With most federal financial aid calculations based on the pre-tax value of the scholarship, students risk a shortfall in aid. All of this has a disproportionate impact on low-income students. Those from the bottom income quartile spend the largest percentage of family income on higher education; almost half of that money is spent on the non-tuition costs for which scholarship awards are taxable. “Taxing scholarship funds may increase government revenue in the short term, but it’s short-sighted,” says financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz. “The federal government benefits financially long-term when students graduate and have the potential to earn more taxable income.” Should They Be Taxed? Kantrowitz, along with Scholarship America’s Despina Costopoulos Emerson, say restoring scholarships’ tax-free status will help certificate- and degree-seeking students, and those who must work out of necessity, pursue their education without undue financial burdens. To learn more about taxing of scholarships visit blog. scholarshipamerica.org. “Scholarship America and our partners are in ongoing talks with members of Congress, and we hope to see some progress on initiatives that will ensure qualified scholarships are available to students to pay the full cost of education and allow scholarships to be used, tax-fee, to pay for room and board, transportation and other college-related expenses,” says Ballard. “In the meantime, students and their families should research the specifics of all grants, scholarships, fellowships and tuition waivers they are offered in order to understand the true value of their financial aid package after taxes and plan accordingly.”

Great Holiday Gifts For Kids That Help Them Learn And Grow (StatePoint) It’s time to think about stuffing stockings and fulfilling wish lists. But if you want your holiday gifts for kids to deliver fun long after the holidays, you may want to consider gifts that will help them learn and grow. Here are some great gift ideas to enrich kids’ lives in a number of ways. Boost Creativity Art can inspire creativity, improve fine motor skills and even boost IQ. For beginners, art or crafting kits containing all the supplies they will need to create their own projects may be a great place to start. Thinking bigger? Consider helping your gift recipient create an continued on page 11

The Julian News 7

How To Raise A Source-Savvy Kid In The Age Of Fake News And Internet Hoaxes Although they were raised on technology, most kids can't tell truth from falsehood online. Here's how to teach your child to find reliable sources — and never fall for fake news or hoaxes again. Your child is researching a paper on the Civil War and Googles “Abraham Lincoln slavery.” Among the top results is an article titled “5 things you may not know about Lincoln, Slavery and Emancipation.” The child, who is speaking civilly to you today, asks you if this would be a good source to use. You look and see it’s from History.com. What’s your answer? Are you sure? It’s a simple question with no simple answer: What makes information trustworthy? For parents who grew up doing research with library card catalogs and encyclopedias, or in the early days of the internet, it’s a challenge to advise kids researching a school paper online. “Stick with reliable sources” is not very helpful advice if you can’t define reliable. Falling for fake news You might assume (or at least hope!) your digitally savvy offspring are better equipped than their parents when it comes to filtering the reliable from biased and outright false information online. They aren’t. “The fact that a kid can text without looking and can make an iMovie does not mean that that child, confronted with news stories from his or her Twitter feed, would be able to separate wheat from chaff,” says Sam Wineburg, Margaret Jacks professor of education at Stanford, Director of the Stanford History Education Group and author of Why Learn History (When It’s Already on Your Phone). Wineburg’s research team studied 7,804 middle school and high school students to determine their level of digital literacy. Among their findings was that 82 percent of middle schoolers could not tell the difference between a news story and native advertising (aka sponsored content). And 60 percent trusted an image posted on social media at face value — like the (fake) image of a daisy growing in a nuclear zone that pops up on social media feeds every few years. High schoolers and college students struggle with this as well, and if you make the advertisement a little more sophisticated, Wineburg says, more than half of adults can’t tell it’s marketing. A lot of parents (and, spoiler, teachers) simply don’t know how to determine the reliability of online information. But we often assume our kids do. Compounding the problem is that our kids get antiquated and bad advice on this subject. The checklists students are given to vet a site’s trustworthiness, advising such strategies as “read the About page” and “assess the article for spelling errors,” are time-consuming and won’t necessarily reveal when information is coming from a biased or outright deceptive source, because the sources of biased information are often sophisticated, designed to pass these checklists. Nearly anyone can create a sophisticated web presence that conceals their identity and objectives. Digital literacy is bigger than just being able to spot an online hoax, or even write a good research paper. Wineburg wants everyone — adults and future adults — to be able to make well-reasoned decisions at the ballot box and in everyday life. “People are confused about the information they need to make solid civic choices,” he says. To help all of us learn how to do this better, Wineburg’s team consulted professional fact checkers and then laid out powerful, flexible, and quick tools that can help everyone — parents and kids alike — be smarter consumers of online information. Scroll before you click: Search results are NOT listed in order of trustworthiness Students will click one of the first few links. Professional fact checkers won’t. Instead, they’ll

look specifically at the URLs under the article titles to see the source of the story and get an overall sense of where this search has landed them — are they seeing sources they know to be reputable? Do the results suggest that this topic is polarizing? Before they click, they’ll scroll to pages 2 or 3 to see if they can find less incendiary articles. Only then will they make a decision on which link to click. Kids need to know that search engine results are not ranked in order of trustworthiness. The top results are often paid ads, and ranking algorithms are a complicated game (and a story for another day). So before clicking on anything, kids should take a few minutes to read through the search results, to see if results further down offer a different perspective than the ones at the top. Ok, but how do you know which sources are reliable? To determine a site’s credibility or bias, you have to leave the site Your kids will be thrilled when you tell them this is not the time for close reading. Wineburg’s study showed that historians and students at elite universities did what most of us do when presented with an article. They read down the page — and were easily deceived — because close reading does very little to help you assess the credibility of a story. When professional fact checkers land on an article from an unknown source (or are considering clicking on one), the first thing they do is open a new tab and look up the source to find out what other sources are saying about it. Wikipedia is one place to do that. In the first couple of paragraphs of a Wikipedia article, you can find out that a source is known to be liberalleaning, or that it’s criticized by scientists. Many adults, including teachers, are wary of the online encyclopedia because it “can be edited by anyone.” That’s partly true (not true for many “locked” entries), but um, welcome to the Internet. Fact checkers will often skim the first few sentences of a Wikipedia entry but then dart to the bottom and harvest more authoritative references. Wineburg says kids and adults need to know that the internet abounds with “astroturfing” — the deceptive practice of making professional-looking sites that look like they’re run by grassroots

by Summer Batte (GreatSchools.org)

groups, when in reality they’re backed by corporations or special interests whose identities are hidden. For an example, yestoaffordablegroceries.com was launched early this year to support a measure that would prohibit a soda tax in Washington state. Their website says “Over 1,400 Washington small businesses, restaurants, cafes, grocers and other community organizations have joined in support of I-1634 to prohibit local grocery taxes. Stand with them to bring fairness to our tax structure, to protect jobs and neighborhood businesses, and to prevent increased taxation on the food and beverages upon which we depend every day.” Sounds like they’re fighting the good fight, right? Except that they’re funded by the soda industry, which has its own, hidden reasons for wanting to prevent a tax on soda. On these sites, you may not be able to tell whose perspective the information is coming from by reading the article or the “About” page. You’ve got to leave a site to find out what it really is and where they’re coming from. And be aware that .org does not automatically mean the site is dot-reliable. Many astroturfing sites are able to obtain 501c3 status. There’s not a right or wrong here. You get to decide which sources you honor with your trust. America magazine, one of the top results for the Margaret Sanger search, is published by religious groups. Wineburg’s point is that reading “laterally” — checking out the source by going to another source — enables you to be informed. You can’t evaluate information with clear eyes if you don’t know what perspective or point of view it’s coming from. Think like a search engine “If we are going to use our browser as the main portal to the world and information,” Wineburg says, “we have to think like Google.” There are some simple tricks your kids can use to get meaningful, reliable search results. Put it in quotes. To search on a contiguous term, like a name, you should search for “Sam Wineburg.” Without the quotation marks, you could get results with “Sam” but not “Wineburg.” Not super helpful. Go to Google News (under the search bar in your results, toggle from “all” to “news”) for

controversial issues or things you’ve seen on social media that seem kind of outrageous. Google News pulls feeds from publishers and can help weed out unsubstantiated rumors. Use Google Scholar for academic subjects. This is place to find peer-reviewed journal articles, citations by other scholarly sources, and whether some dude with a PhD is really considered a thought leader on a topic. (Hint: You’re looking for scholarly articles by said dude and appearances of his work in university syllabi.) Restrict by domain. You can limit your Google results to American universities by adding site:edu to your search. Add site:gov to your search to get only U.S. government sources in your results. Key words are… key. So choose them carefully. Think about which words will help you narrow down the search so that you get the information you’re looking for. Wineburg quizzed me to see what two words I would search for if I wanted to get only college syllabi in my results. I failed, and so do most other people. (The answer is “office hours.”) Bookmark fact-checking sites If your kid sees on social media that actress Jennifer Lawrence died last night, she can go to Snopes.com, a fact-checking, rumor-debunking site, to see if it’s been verified, or check Google News to see if major publishers are reporting on it. Politifact.com, a nonpartisan political fact-checking site, is a good place to check political claims. (Have your kid help you bookmark these sites on your phone for quick access.) Don’t litter Until you’ve checked a post out (Looked up the source on Wikipedia or checked the claim on a fact-checking site), don’t share it on social media. Model this for your kids to get them into the habit, too. The world doesn’t need garbage spread around. Explore Wikipedia’s “Talk” section On controversial issues, this is where kids can see people actually debating what is fact. Wineburg says this is where Wikipedia becomes more powerful than a textbook in understanding how knowledge is cited and debated. “It’s where you see how the sausage is made,” he says. But when he asked 1,000 continued on page 8


November 14, 2018

8 The Julian News

...parade and then having our feast!

We are marching in the Thanksgiving...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Our Thanksgiving holiday is based upon a December 1619 feast that the Pilgrims and Native Americans shared at Plymouth Plantation, where the Pilgrims lived in Massachusetts.

by Bic Montblanc

The Flu

Psssst... this year, think tofu or beef!

We travel ‘Over the River and through the Woods’ to places where ‘We Gather Together’ to 9 give thanks for our family, friends and all that we have!

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They had cabbages, carrots, corn, onions, wild plums, berries, and honey too.

Read these clues to fill in this et Am 10 puzzle about Thanksgiving: Samos eric ans 1. about half of these people moved to Holland, then to the “New World” th ank s so they could build a better life and worship as they pleased 2. Native ______ taught the Pilgrims some skills they would need to survive Squan to s 3. Native American who lived with the Pilgrims Pilgrim 11 4. number of braves who came to the Pilgrims’ feast 5. stone that marks the Pilgrims’ landing place (2 words) er 12 ayflow M 6. an agreement signed by the men to set up a new government (2 words) 7 8 4 5 6 7. Pilgrims’ ship, sailed 66 days and nights to America 3 9 Ooooo...cranberry 8. “wildfowl” was eaten at the Thanksgving feast – 2 10 bread pudding, today the centerpiece is often this large bird cheesecake, and 1 9. the first Native American to welcome the Pilgrims 11 44 walnut cookies. 41 40 37 36 33 32 30 29 26 25 22 21 19 18 15 14 10. to say or show that we are pleased, grateful 13 46 Connect the dots 45 43 42 12 11. big games played today 34 16 31 28 27 24 23 20 17 39 38 35 to see my favorite 53 12. on an early check of the land (Cape Cod) Pilgrims found 47 “ending to the feast.” 49 52 50 51 48 baskets of this buried in the sand in Native American fields

The End of the Feast!

BALL O PARA ON DES!

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4. My cousins and uncles will gather around the TV to ________ football. 5. When the game is over, we will _______ Thanksgivings from years ago. 6. Then, we will go into the kitchen to help ________ the food. 7. I will do my part to ________ the table and give it holiday cheer. 8. Once everyone is seated, we’ll _______ thanks for all we have. 9. We will ________ a huge feast with turkey, cranberry sauce, and mashed potatoes. 10. While we have our food we’ll ________ the holiday and family. 11. After dinner the family will go for a nice autumn ________ to get some fresh air. 12. Once our meals have settled down, everyone will gather outside to _________ a big family game of touch football.

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Dreaming of a Fun FAMILY WALKS! Family Thanksgiving!

I like the Thanksgiving holiday because of all the family, fun, football and feasting. I’m dreaming of a wonderful celebration!

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Fill in this puzzle to get an idea of the perfect Thanksgiving Day for Forest! 1. I’ll wake up to Mom and Dad making stuffing and getting the turkey ready to __________. 2. Next, we will go into town to __________ in the parade. 3. When we get home, the whole family will have arrived and we will all __________.

Another Name!

Do you remember the Thanksgiving picture that you made in first grade using the outlines of your hands?

Color Key: O = orange B = brown

Umm... yes, why?

Run away... it’s:

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O B B O O B O O B O O B

B O B O O B O O B O O B

O B O O B O O B O O B O

B B BO O B B O B O B B B BO O B B OB B O O B

O OB O B B O B B O O B O B O O O B B B O O B O O B

B O B O O OB O O O O O O

O B B BO B O B O

O O B O O B O O B O O B

B BO O B O B O B

O OB B O B O O B B O B O

O O

B O B O OB B B O O B B O O B O O B O O OB B BO O B O OB O B O O B O B B B O O B O O O B B BO O B O B O O B O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O B

B O B O O O O O O O O O O

Solution on page 12

Ground zero or origin of the flu was not Spain. In fact, Spain was neutral during the war and their press reported the devastation of the disease when it finally reached its borders. The countries at war tended to black out news of the flu because it might have adversely affected morale or give psychological advantage to the enemy. The outbreak of the flu in the United States appears to have occurred in Kansas in January of 1918. In March, a cook at Fort Riley, Kansas took ill and within two weeks over 500 men at the fort reported sick. Within days the sickness had been reported in New York. Now, maybe you don’t believe in vaccinations, or you’re tough, or maybe you think that a little flu won’t get you down. Even getting the shot is no guarantee that you won’t get a strain of the flu that

isn’t in this year’s formula. But for my money I’m getting the shot. Your decision should be based on discussion with your doctor about the risks and benefits. Plenty of places give it free but even if you have to shell out a few bucks, for my money, it’s worth it. So much for my advice except for these tips, during the season, wash your hands a lot, when you cough or sneeze, do it in the inside crook of your arm and for God sakes don’t sneeze on me. Our local Doc, Blake Wylie told me that the flu in San Diego county “red lined” last year as far as the flu was concerned. That means that there were a lot more reports of illness and hospitalizations than expected. The flu was serious last year and compounded with the fact that the formula for vaccination “missed the boat,” serious consequences were felt countywide. This year,

so far at least, cases of the flu seem to be down. But this is the time to be vigilant. I don’t know about you but I can’t afford to be in bed for a couple of weeks nor would I want the ravages of the flu wracking my perfect pink body. Call our local health clinic in Julian for information about “your” stick in the arm.

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Flu shots available at the Julian Clinic every day from 9-11 and 1-3. Appointment advised. Please call the clinic 760-7651223 for information. *** You either believe that people respond to authority, or that they respond to kindness and inclusion. I'm obviously in the latter camp. I think that people respond better to reward than punishment. — Brian Eno ***

Source-Savvy Kids continued from page 7

teachers at a conference, none of them had used it. (How to find it: On a desktop, look up anything on Wikipedia. At the top left, next to the globe icon, you’ll see you are currently in an “article.” Next to it is a tab called “talk.” On a phone, search for Talk:example, where “example” is whatever you are looking up.) This combined with using Wikipedia footnotes for sources is a great way to see the whole picture of a disputed topic. Take a really short course in social media fact checking, like the one offered by First Draft, a project of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard that uses research-based methods to fight mis- and disinformation online. In minutes, you can learn how the pros use free sites to check out social media claims. Like how to

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2018

Let me preface this column with the caveat that you have the freedom, at least for the time being, of a choice between having or not having vaccinations, preventative care, or post contractual care as it relates to diseases as long as it doesn’t compromise the general public health and welfare. Let’s face it, if you contract bubonic. Ebola, hemorrhagic monkey malaria fever disease they’re going to put you in an isolation ward and the only people you’re going to see if your eyes don’t melt are going to be in thick suits with glass faced head gear and breathing tubes whether you or the ACLU likes it or not. But have you ever had the flu? About thirty years ago I did. I didn’t have a “touch” of the flu like I’ve heard so often. I had a sledgehammer to the back of the head, stomach- turning, drench the sheets fever, delirium kind of flu that made me a believer. After a couple of weeks in bed I developed pneumonia and I was seriously ill. Only two good things happened as a result of my malady. I lost a lot of weight and I never missed getting a flu shot again. The flu is a serious illness causing hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and killing approximately 36,000 people in a normal year. Death estimates from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic range between 151,700 to 575,400 (source, The Lancet). As deadly as influenza is, it is not the killer of yesteryear due in part to flu vaccine, better care for secondary infections like pneumonia and drugs that may prove effective if administered within 72 hours of contracting the virus. However, with increased travel to even isolated parts of the world, the chances of a pandemic are always with us. The Spanish Flu was the most serious pandemic and in fact the most serious health crises that the world had ever known. It occurred during the First World War. The bubonic plaque that ravaged Europe during the middle ages was a drop in the bucket compared to the influenza scourge of 1918 and 1919. As Allied and Central Power troops were fighting the war to end all wars in the bloody, festering trenches of Europe, in a war where tactics lagged far behind the advancement of weaponry including the machine gun, rifled artillery and poison gas, the deaths paled in comparison to the flu pandemic. The death toll in WWI including military and civilians from direct military action and resulting disease including the Spanish Flu was approximately seventeen million people. The old estimates of the death toll from the Spanish Flu pandemic were between twenty-five to fifty million people worldwide. Modern forensics indicate that as many as one hundred million people may have died. About a third of the entire world’s population contracted the flu in some form. Estimates as high as twenty per cent of those infected died. What was unusual was that even remote areas of the globe suffered fatalities in addition to the populated areas. During the first wave of the flu it resembled the typical disease as it mostly affected the very young and the aged except for older folks who may have contracted the Russian Flu of the 1890’s and had it seemed, developed some resistance. But the deadly nature of the mutated strain in the second wave that traveled the world, preyed on young adults that were generally more hale and healthy by causing extreme immune reactions.

Annimills LLC © 2018 V15-45

Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone!

POST NOTES

by Joachin de Bachs

Kids: color stuff in!

watch a video frame by frame if your kid believes the videos of hawks flying off with toddlers. Check out the Civic Online Reasoning curriculum from the Stanford History Education Group. A series of free downloadable lessons teach students (and their parents!) these skills and more. So, what would you tell your child about History.com? Wikipedia shows that History. com, the website of the History Channel, is widely criticized by historians and scientists for its sensational and reality tvtype content. So is their list of Abe Lincoln facts trustworthy? Maybe. But it’s worth vetting them with another source. Knowing the source has been questioned gives you more power in deciding what information to trust. About the Author: Summer Batte - is a parent and homeschool educator of a middle schooler, and an editor for Stanford magazine.


November 14, 2018

The Julian News 9

Folk-Art Chair

It is sometimes the unique collectible at a show or sale that is a "must have" for an unsuspecting collector. Folkart collectors often see "oneoffs" that are too expensive, too large or too outrageous to fit into the house. Recently, James Julia auctions had a "Late 19thcentury American ... unique spool art chair." It was too big, too unfamiliar, too gawdy and too uncomfortable-looking for most collectors. It was made of padded upholstered panels joined to make arms, a seat and a back. The frame was made with spoolturned legs, and other parts of the frame looked like real spools. There was more -- the

Is this chair art? Collectors answer that type of question every time they go antiquing. Clever, unfamiliar designs are becoming more desirable and more expensive. This folk-art chair of no special design period sold for $968 chair featured gilt metal scrolling, cast metal serpents and brass

rosettes, and its back was 53 inches high. It sold for $968. Folk-art collecting started in the 20th century, and there are few rules about what is considered "good" or "bad." Collectors are writing these rules with their purchases. *** Q: When were typewriters invented? I know mine is very old. It is a Royal Quiet Deluxe, and it was bought by a relative in the 1940s to use at college. A: Your typewriter is not very old to a collector. The first commercial typewriter in the United States was the Sholes & Glidden typewriter, which was made by E. Remington & Sons in 1874. It typed only uppercase letters. Hundreds of different types of typewriters were made, and there were many that were very different in appearance and how they worked. The earliest ones did not have the letters in the order used today (known as the QWERTY keyboard). Your

typewriter was popular in the 1940s and would sell today for about $25. Unusual-looking, older typewriters can sell for thousands of dollars if they're in good condition with the original decoration. About 10 years ago, a new group of typewriter collectors started buying working machines. They wanted to use them instead of a computer or electric typewriter. Those who learned to type on the old machines with a bell, typing sounds and the noise of the return couldn't get used to the new improved machines. So there now are clubs, social events, type-ins, writing parties and even a typewriter orchestra. And there is even a book and a movie about the typewriter revolution. *** CURRENT PRICES Medal, red cross, donor award, Dr. Landsteiner portrait, bronze, 1939, 2 1/4 inches, $20. Book trough, carved oak,

arched ends with cut-out Winniethe-Pooh and Piglet figures holding hands, book storage, c. 1940, 8 x 20 inches, $80. Wristwatch, Omega, 14-karat continued on page 12

1. In 2017, Cincinnati’s Scooter Gennett became the second player since 1901 with four home runs and at least 10 RBIs in a game. Who was the other? 2. In the 1960s, three San Francisco Giants combined to win the National League home run title in seven seasons. Name the three.

3. When was the last time before 2014-16 that the University of Tennessee’s football team won three consecutive bowl games? 4. Name the last NBA team before the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2016 and 2017 to win their first seven playoff games in consecutive seasons. 5. Patrick Kane set a record for the U.S. men’s hockey team at the Ice Hockey World Championships in 2018 by tallying a total of 20 points. Who had held the record? 6. Jocelyne LamoureuxDavidson set a women’s hockey record at the 2018 Winter Games for fastest back-to-back goals in Olympic history (six seconds). Who had held the mark? 7. Who was the last men’s golf major championship winner before Francesco Molinari in 2018 (British Open) to play the final two rounds without going over par on a hole? Answers on page 12


November 14, 2018

10 The Julian News

® Dear EarthTalk: What are PFASs and why should we be concerned about them? -- Jim Stobbins, Cary, NC PFASs — short for perfluoroalkyl substances — are synthetic chemicals of various formulations (including PFCs, PFOA, PFOS and GenX, among others) that are used widely in various products for moisture and stain resistance. Non-stick pans, rain jackets and carpeting are among thousands of different types of consumer goods that now contain one form or another of PFASs. “Sealant tape, ski wax and floor wax are waterproof thanks to them,” reports the non-profit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), “and in machinery they reduce gear friction.” NRDC adds they are found in our homes, our offices, our supermarkets—practically everywhere. But while it’s nice that we can’t stain our carpeting no matter how messy we are, are we paying for this luxury with our health? The fact that these chemicals are so hard to break down in their intended applications also means they don’t easily break down in nature when released into the environment. Not only is this bad for ecosystems and wildlife, but it’s also risky for human health. A wide range of animal studies has linked the chemicals to kidney, prostate, rectal and testicular cancers, not to mention hormone malfunction, liver and thyroid problems, and abnormal fetal development. NRDC cites research showing that the offspring of human mothers exposed to certain PFASs had lower-than-average birth weights. Another recent study found that women with high levels of PFASs in their bloodstreams take longer on

average to get pregnant. “For years, bad-actor PFASs were used in food containers like pizza boxes, microwave popcorn bags, Chinese takeout containers and other food packaging to repel grease, and they could leach into the food,” reports NRDC’s Erik Olson, adding: “PFASs that enter the body through the foods we eat and products we use every day can linger there for years before they are eventually flushed out,” In 2016 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned three of the worst PFASs from food uses in response to a petition from NRDC and other non-profit partners. “But we’re worried that chemical cousins of those PFASs are being used,” says Olson. “And the trouble is, manufacturers don’t have to disclose to consumers that they’re using them.” While the battle to eliminate PFASs entirely rages on, NRDC suggests consumers can take matters into their own hands to minimize their exposure. For starters, ask manufacturers whether their products contain PFASs since such chemicals likely won’t be listed on labels. Steer clear of non-stick cookware, Gore-Tex clothing, personal care products with “PTFE” or “fluoro” ingredients, or textiles made with the original (pre-2000) formulation of Scotchgard, as these likely contain significant amounts of PFASs. Avoid carpeting and clothing hyped to be “stain-resistant”—a dead giveaway that they have been treated with PFASs. And never order or heat up food in grease-resistant paper unless you want a healthy portion of PFASs with your meal or snack. Likewise, ditch the microwave popcorn—most of which comes in a PFAS-treated bag—and make it on the stovetop instead (it’s more fun that way anyway). CONTACTS: NRDC, www.nrdc. org; EPA’s Basic Information on PFAS, www.epa.gov/pfas/basicinformation-pfas. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. To donate, visit www.earthtalk. org. Send questions to: question@ earthtalk.org.

Consumers looking to reduce their exposure to PFASs should steer clear of microwaveable popcorn, among other foods that are stored or cooked in bags treated with these potentially harmful synthetic chemicals. Credit: BooksCraftsPrettythings, FlickrCC.

4 Reasons To Start Your New Year’s Resolution Early (StatePoint) Chances are, if you’re contemplating a New Year’s resolution, shedding those extra pounds is at the top of your list, according to a Marist Poll. But the best time to make a weight loss commitment is sooner rather than later, according to Dr. Pamela Peeke, chair of the Jenny Craig Science Advisory Board, who is sharing four good reasons to make a pre-New Year’s resolution.

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Here are her insights to consider, and, if you add the help of Jenny Craig’s Rapid Results, you can lose up to 16 pounds in the first four weeks (average weight loss was 11.6 pounds for those who completed the studies), making it a great way to start an early weight loss resolution. 1: You’ll Love Your Holiday Photos. Whether work party snapshots or the chronicling of special moments spent with family and friends, the holidays are loaded with photo ops. But how often have you avoided pictures because you didn’t feel good about being in front of the camera? “A common refrain we hear from members is that they avoided having pictures taken of themselves because they weren’t happy with their weight,” says Carrie Elkins, division manager for Jenny Craig Anywhere. By making a commitment now, you can feel healthier and more confident during the holidays -- and have the photos to remember those moments. 2: You’ll Be More Proactive and Procrastinate Less. Let’s face it: If you know you want to lose weight but are waiting until January to start, you may just be delaying the inevitable. Waiting can set you up for procrastination, and procrastination can actually be harmful, according to the Association for Psychological Science, causing people higher levels of stress and lower well-being. Resolve to start losing weight now before the holiday madness begins and while you have the drive. “Motivation is key when it comes to preparing the psyche for any important behavior change,” says Peeke. 3. Starting Now Means a Different Resolution in January. Beginning your weight loss journey now can give you the confidence to tackle a different resolution in January. So, make a new New Year’s resolution! Use the motivation gained by following through on your weight loss goal to fuel your next challenge. 4. The Time is Right. For many Americans, the holiday season starts with Halloween. That’s three months of potential overindulgence. In fact, the average American starts to gain weight around Thanksgiving, with weight gain peaking around the December holidays or the New Year and it can take up to five months to lose it, according to Cornell University’s Food & Brand Lab. If you can adopt healthy habits before the holidays, you may just counteract these effects to gain less or even maintain your weight during the holidays. So instead of waiting until 2019 to start making changes, get a head start on your resolution and your journey to better health. *** When I pontificate, it sounds so, you know, Oh, well, she's preaching. I'm not preaching, but I think maybe I learned it from my animal friends. Kindness and consideration of somebody besides yourself. I think that keeps you feeling young. I really do. — Betty White ***

Howdy! From Lake Cuyamaca “Dusty Britches” here along with “Cuss Cussler”, “Moco Loco”, and “Slim”. Trout fishing is steady. If you check the gut barrels, trout are the most prevalent fish coming out of the lake right now. The bald eagles are making their presence known with daily sky shows dipping into the lake to pluck a trout. Lone Pine and Chamber’s are the two consistent spots for angler’s. Our next plant will be 1,200 pounds from Jess Ranch in Apple Valley. The favorite baits are still power bait (chartreuse or rainbow) and/or night crawlers. “Moco Loco” was going through the fish gut barrels the other day looking for hooks, sinkers, and lures when he found a box of red vines... and ate them. He usually walks the shoreline when the water level is down for that, but there must not be too many anglers getting their lines caught in the bullrush or weeds. Makes you wonder. The “Veterans Day” weekend was busy with a lot folks who served that are visiting the lake... we thank you for your service. Canada celebrates “Remembrance Day” on the same date. Daylight Savings Time has ended, so we are adjusting. Our new batch of fingerling trout seem to be doing fine. I will be asking our trout guru a question though... Why is it that the fish in one tank don’t grow as fast as all the other tanks? HMMM a head scratcher? Anyone who is interested in our trout raising feel free to stop by. There usually is someone here to show them

to you. We are getting a lot of folks who are headed to Julian for Apple Days stopping in to try out some of Dolores Gomez’s chicken pot pies, meatloaf, apple pie, or her “half pound” burger. Not much food coming back to the kitchen. The plates are wiped clean, a good thing for the dishwasher! Old “Fog Horn-Leg Horn” is cookin up a storm while listening to his favorite Wisconsin “Badgers” football games. This time of year the nights are cooler. My morning ranger reported 23 degrees this morning which was probably true because one of our swamp coolers for the restaurant broke a copper line... we haven’t started winterizing yet... I guess we better get going on that. I still can’t believe how smooth the ride is on the 79... I’ll say it again, it’s like flying in an airplane... I am spoiled. There’s not much more to report right now. We are holding our breath and hoping that nobody does anything stupid during the latest Santa Ana winds. The Camp, Hill, and Woolsey Fires have sustained enough damage... “Don’t let contrast morph into conflict” ...Harold Watson “Trey” Gowdy “Tight Lines” and “Bent Rods” Dusty Britches

*** Kindness boggles my mind. It's the only force in nature that increases simultaneously for the giver and the receiver. — Daniel Lubetzky ***

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email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

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All General Engineering $ hour . . 760 749 1782 / 760.390.0428

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Excavation / Site Work


The Julian News 11

November 14, 2018

California Commentary

California Spent $4 Billion On Medi-Cal For People Who May Not Have Been Eligible, Audit Finds

By Soumya Karlamangla (LA Times)

California spent $4 billion on Medi-Cal coverage between 2014 and 2017 for people who may not have been eligible for the governmentfunded health plan, according to a state audit released October 30. Medi-Cal provides health coverage to 13.1 million Californians, approximately one-third of the state’s population. To qualify, a single adult must make less than $16,754 annually. County workers typically determine whether someone is eligible for health coverage under Medi-Cal, then send that information to the state. But the records don’t always match up. The audit found 453,000 beneficiaries who were marked as eligible in the state’s system, but not in the counties’ — indicating that they may not have actually been eligible for Medi-Cal. These beneficiaries may have died, moved or begun making more money and no longer qualified for Medi-Cal. Yet the state’s Department of Health Care Services paid $4 billion to health plans and doctors for those patients’ medical care over four years. The audit found that 57% of the discrepancies lasted for more than two years. In one instance, a Los Angeles County resident died in December 2013, yet the state continued to make monthly payments to the beneficiary’s Medi-Cal health plan until August of this year. The state ultimately paid the plan $383,000 for a person who the state “should have known was no longer in need of services,” according to the audit. “Although Health Care Services has established a process for notifying counties of beneficiary records that require follow-up, gaps in this process allowed the problems we identified to persist,” State Auditor Elaine Howle wrote in a letter to the Legislature accompanying the audit. The audit also found 54,000 people who were marked eligible in the county system but not the state, which may have delayed or made it difficult for them to access services for which they did qualify. “These individuals may have experienced hardships in accessing health care services, as they would have been denied benefits until the system discrepancies were resolved,” the audit says. The audit recommended that the department implement a better system by the end of the year and recover erroneous payments by June. The department said it agreed with the recommendations but could not comply with them within that timeline.

Gifts For Kids continued from page 7

artist’s studio. A craft or art table, an easel and a project caddy make a great combination gift for kids. Spark Imagination For toddlers, play time can be an extremely valuable opportunity to build skills and reach milestones -- with the right toys at hand. Maximize toddler fun with toys such as VTech’s Go! Go! Smart Wheels playsets, which spark imagination and deliver multi-sensory learning, teaching first words, letters and more. The line-up includes the new Launch & Chase Police Tower, which lets kids serve and protect with Po the Police Car. They can launch Po from the dual launchers and chase the Getaway Car through the switch tracks, trap doors, and road obstacles, promoting important

motor skills. Po responds to SmartPoint locations throughout the playset with lights, sounds and music, encouraging first words and imaginative play. Another option from the lineup is the Tow & Go Garage, letting kids explore along with Trent the Tow Truck as they exercise important motor skills with this multi-level interactive playset. They can give a friend a lift, go up the elevator to the repair platform, or race down the ramp and get a car wash while exploring SmartPoint locations. Lastly, the interactive Go! Go! Smart Wheels Take Flight Airport playset strengthens fine motor skills as kids fuel up at the gas station, spin the weather vane and check bags at the luggage belt. They can also launch Aaron the Airplane to take off for flight, spin around the clouds and use the ramp to make a safe landing. Encourage Movement Habits formed in childhood can

set the precedent for a lifetime. View gift-giving as an opportunity to encourage kids to engage in healthy hobbies. Whether it’s a baseball glove and bat or a set of skates and protective gear, you can encourage kids to get active in a way that’s fun, by outfitting them with all the equipment they need to play their favorite sports. This holiday season, make sure your gifts for kids go further to enrich, engage and educate.

• It was civil-rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. who made the following sage observation: "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." • Everyone knows that a sophomore is someone in his or her second year of high school or college. Most people don't realize, though, that the word is derived from the Greek words "sophos," which means "wise," and "moros," which means "stupid." • Have you ever tried to hum while holding your nose? It can't be done. • The creator of the ubiquitous smiley face earned a grand total of $45 for his creative effort. • If you're a pet owner, you probably know that the epidemic of obesity is not limited to humans; many pets are overweight, too. You might be surprised to learn, though, that some pet owners choose to deal with the problem in a way that we usually associate only with people: liposuction. Yes, you can get cosmetic surgery for your pets. • If you hear the word "Bilbo" you might think of a famously adventurous hobbit, but a bilbo is also a finely tempered Spanish sword. • A recent study by scientist Karl Berg suggests that an adult green-rumped parrotlet, a tiny bird native to Venezuela, will "name" its babies, assigning each a particular series of peeps to identify it. Not only that, other parrotlets then learn to associate that exact series of peeps with that particular bird, and actually use the sounds to get that bird's attention. • In the original version of the Grimm Brothers' fairy tale "Cinderella," doves peck out the stepsisters' eyes at Cinderella's wedding. *** Thought for the Day: "Life is not a spectacle or a feast; it is a predicament." -- George Santayana ® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** One who knows how to show and to accept kindness will be a friend better than any possession. — Sophocles ***

® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** A kindness received should be returned with a freer hand. — Saint Ambrose ***


The Julian News 12

L E GA L NO TI C E S

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027350 COMMERCIAL LOAN ORIGINATORS 2888 Loker Ave East, Suite 111, Carlsbad, CA 92010 (Mailing Address: 6475 Terraza Portico, Carlsbad, CA 92009) The business is conducted by An Individual Christian Carlisle Clauson, 6475 Terraza Portico, Carlsbad, CA 92009. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 31, 2018.

L EG A L N O T I C ES AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00055599-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2018-00047520-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JAZMINE SILVA GARCIA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: JAZMINE SILVA GARCIA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: JAZMINE SILVA GARCIA TO: JAZMINE SILVA BLANCHARD

LEGAL: 08136 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

PETITIONER: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: DUSTIN GARRETT PILKINGTON TO: DUSTIN GARRETT LEBSOCK

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 10, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 2, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027727 ITS FITZ 1846 E. Westinghouse St., San Diego, CA 92111 The business is conducted by An Individual Duane Martin Fitzpatrick, 1846 E. Westinghouse St., San Diego, CA 92111. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 5, 2018. LEGAL: 08138 Publish: November 14, 21, 28 and December 5, 2018

Chef’s Corner

continued from page 9

continued from page 6

gold, oval face, brushed gold band, felt case, Swiss, woman's, late 1900s, $375. Weathervane, silhouette of St. Florian, patron saint of firefighters, black metal, stand with arched base, Austria, 1700s, 30 x 15 inches, $1,500. ***

Butternut squash is tan in color and has a long, bell-like shape. Spaghetti squash is oblong or oval in shape and yellow in color. Acorn squash is actually shaped like an acorn. It is dark green in color and has a ridged rind or skin. Delicata squash is oblong, ridged, yellow and green. The skin is soft and edible. When shopping, look for squash that are heavy for their size, free of soft spots and have a dull sheen (a shiny skin is an indicator the squash is not fully mature). All winter squash bakes well. Cut the squash in two (be sure to use a sharp, heavy-duty knife if the squash has a hard shell), scoop out the seeds and brush the cut surface with oil. Place cut side down in a baking dish with 1/4 cup of water. Bake uncovered at 350 F until the flesh is soft. Once butternut or acorn squash is cooked and cooled, it can be peeled away from the skin, cut into cubes, and used in soups, stews and casseroles along with other vegetables. Butternut or acorn squash can be used interchangeably in recipes. Spaghetti squash is the exception. Once cooked, use a fork to peel the flesh away from the skin. It looks just like spaghetti as it peels away. You can serve it with any type of pasta sauce, in the same way you would serve spaghetti noodles. Delicata squash is the easiest squash to prep and cook because of its soft, edible skin. It contains seeds in the center, but they can easily be removed by scraping them out with a spoon. This delicious recipe for MapleGarlic Delicata Squash Oven Fries is a wonderful side dish on a cold winter’s day! MAPLE-GARLIC DELICATA SQUASH OVEN FRIES 1 large or 2 small delicata squash 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon pure maple

TIP: Don't store costume jewelry in the bathroom. The moisture will damage the plating. Keep jewelry in another room in cloth bags or a plastic bag with a piece of cloth.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 10, 2019 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 7, 2018.

LEGAL: 08137 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

Kovels

For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com © 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

When there are multiple versions of a story, you really have three ways to go. You can pick the most sensational version. You can try to balance things in your gut to get to what you think is the honest truth. Or you can err on the side of kindness. Walter Isaacson

LEGAL: 08139 Publish: November 14, 21, 28 and December 5, 2018

Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone! 2

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$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa & Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

MISC. FOR SALE

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

RAIL ROAD TIES - perfect for landscaping, etc. call Bruce, 619 972- 0152 12/31

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place. Julian Camp Housekeeping & Foodservice - jobs available, full-time and part-time. Contact us at 760-765-1600 or jobs@whisperingwinds.org. 12/5

Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Public Notices, Liens, etc.

$15.00 per column inch for first week and $10.00 per column inch for each additional week. Notice must be submitted to the Julian News for a quote.

All Legal Advertising is subject to restrictions of the court, or agency requiring publication. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for deadlines which are missed because of late filings or other requirements beyond our control.

***

Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www. divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. © 2018 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the publisher prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. Publisher accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall Publisher’s Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Publisher is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. Publisher accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

RENTALS

PUBLIC NOTICE

November 14, 2018 syrup or agave syrup 1 garlic clove, crushed or minced 1 teaspoon sea salt 1. Heat oven to 375 F and line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or foil. Place the pan in the oven to provide even roasting on the top and bottom of the squash. 2. Cut the ends off the delicata squash, halve it lengthwise, scrape the seeds out (using a small spoon) and slice each half into thin half-moons. 3. Combine the olive oil, maple syrup, garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt in a medium-sized mixing bowl, then add the delicata and toss until it is evenly coated with the oil mixture. 4. Remove the hot pan from the oven and carefully arrange the squash in a single layer on the lined baking sheet. 5. Roast for about 15 minutes, then stir the squash and rotate the pan. Continue to roast the squash for another 15 minutes until the it starts to turn brown and crispy. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and serve immediately. Serves 4.

WORSHIP SERVICES

MEETINGS

AA Meetings Monday - 8am

Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Childcare – Birth Through 5th Grade

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station) All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in the Julian News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served notice that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

*** I'm a big believer in acts of kindness, no matter how small. — Liam Neeson ***

Monday - 11am

Connecting People With God And Each Other . . . Changing Lives

Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

*** Industry, economy, honesty, and kindness form a quartet of virtues that will never be improved upon. — James Oliver ***

Trivia Time

continued from page 6

Answers

1. Theodore Roosevelt 2. Addis Ababa 3. South Dakota 4. Fear of thunder and lightning 5. “Hamlet” 6. 16th century 7. Roy Orbison 8. Babe Ruth 9. Crossword puzzle 10. Color blindness

PERSONAL SUPPORT

Tuesday - 6:00pm Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Tuesday - 7pm

Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

Tuesday - 7pm

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

3407 Highway 79

Wednesday - 8am

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

(across from Fire Station)

1•888•724•7240

Open Discussion

(across from Fire Station)

3407 Highway 79

Wednesday - 6pm

San Jose Valley Continuation School (Across street from Warner Unified School)

Wednesday - 7pm

® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book

Julian-Cuyamaca Fire — Activity Log

Time Date Incident Location Details 2100 11/4 Medical Whispering Pines Dr 0800 11/5 Debris Fire Wynola Rd 1000 11/7 Medical Hwy 79 Walk in to Sta 56 1500 11/7 Medical Wild Rose Rd 0100 11/8 Medical Whispering Pines Dr 0900 11/9 Medical Washington St 1400 11/9 Medical Pueblo Dr 2000 11/9 Medical B St 0700 11/10 Medical Hwy 78 0800 11/10 Traffic Collision Hwy 78/ Pine Hills Rd Solo MC: Non-injury 1200 11/10 Traffic Collision Hwy 78/ Sentenac Creek Rd 0400 11/11 Traffic Collision Engineers Rd/North Peak Rd Solo Veh; Fatal

continued from page 9 1. St. Louis’ Mark Whiten, who had four home runs and 12 RBIs in a game in 1993. 2. Orlando Cepeda (1961), Willie Mays (‘62, ‘64, ‘65) and Willie McCovey (‘63, ‘68, ‘69). 3. It was the 1994-96 seasons. 4. The Minneapolis Lakers in 1949 and 1950. 5. Richard Roberge, with 16 points in 1962. 6. Canada’s Caroline Ouellette scored goals 16 seconds apart in 2006. 7. Steve Elkington, at the 1995 PGA Championship. ® 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Friday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911 www.sandiegoga.org

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 7pm

“Friday Night Survivors” 3407 Highway 79 (across from Fire Station)

Saturday - 7pm “Open Step Study” 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. — Aesop


November 14, 2018

The Julian News 13

FREE

EXPECT RESULTS

CALL NOW FOR A MARKET ANALYSIS ON YOUR HOME

www.JulianRealty.com

Dennis Frieden

760-310-2191

Owner/Broker - CA 00388486

Dennis has 35 years of real estate experience in Southern California. A skilled and experienced agent can be a tremendous benefit when considering buying or selling property in the Back Country. Dennis was born in San Diego and has brokerage experience in both San Diego and Orange Counties. His grandfather owned two gold mines in town during the 1920’s and he has loved Julian since his youth.

Acres

Available Land

Julian • Santa Ysabel • Shelter Valley •

Location

Price

.23 Acres - 34739 Yuma Rd.. . . . . $119,000 .37 Acres 3316 Sunset . . . . . . . . . . $84,900 1 Acre 7263 Starlight . . . . . . . . . . . $69,000 2.03 Acres 15962 North Peak Rd . .$149,000 3.89 Acres - Manzanita . . . . . . . . . $79,900 4.15 Acres Incense Cedar . . . . . . .$109,000

Acres

Location

Price

4.91 Acres Incense Cedar . . . . . . .$109,000 7.07 Acres West Incense Cedar . . . $198,000 8.19 Acres Black Oak Lane . . . . . $229,000 8.99 Acres Eagle Ridge . . . . . . . . .$195,000 39.2 Acres Engineers Rd. . . . . . . . . $398,000

This Week's Feature Properties

2033 Main Street

2152 Ticanu - Deer Lake Park Beauty

Main Street Commercial Opportunity - Located on the corner of Main and B Streets with 18 space parking area. Large Lobby, several back rooms, two large restrooms. 16' ceilings. Built in 1968.

Lovely home on 2 acres with large kitchen living room windows overlooking forested yard, 1000 sq. ft. master bedroom, 3,604 total sq. ft. A Must-See Beauty!!

$845,000

$789,000

7.07 Acres West Incense Cedar Rd. - Julian Estates

View Property - With some clearing the home site will have panoramic western views to the ocean. Gated community with many lovely homes. Just bring your plans!

$198,000

4430 Luneta - Charming Pine Hills Cabin

Knotty pine wall ,and ceiling, real hardwood floors. Remodeled in 2000 with addition to master suite including expanded bathroom. Detached office, large deck, AC and tankless water heater.

A Bargain at Only $399,000

JULIAN REALTY 760-765-0818


14 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

JULIAN YESTERYEARS Vintage, Collectible & Handmade Items 2116 MAIN STREET

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to November 1, 2013; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can explain how to complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

Julian Community Services District NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Section 6061 of the Government Code, the Julian Community Services District will hold a public hearing to adopt Ordinance 18 - 02, Amendment to the Rules and Regulations of the Julian Community Services District, Section 6-04: Metered Water Charges, on November 20, 2018, at 10:00 a.m. The hearing will be held at the Julian Sheriff’s Substation Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian, CA 92036. The Amended Ordinance was read at the Board of Directors’ meeting at 10:00 a.m. on October 18, 2018, at the Julian Sheriffs Substation Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street. A copy of the Amended Ordinance is posted at the same address in the District office window. Copies may also be obtained (during normal business hours) at the District office. LEGAL: 08128 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

Notice of Dissolution Space Puppets, PBC A Delaware Public Benefit Corporation Pursuant to Section 280 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the "Law")

LEGAL: 08121 Publish: November 7, 14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9025346 EVERY HOME NEED 2211 Encinitas Blvd. Ste 249, Encinitas, CA 92024 The business is conducted by An Individual - Robert Lee Patrize, 7520 Jerez Ct. Unit D, Carlsbad, CA 92009. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 5, 2018. LEGAL: 08118 Publish: October 24, 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026218 171COMPLY 1521 Donita Dr., El Cajon, CA 92020 The business is conducted by A Corporation - CommTech Systems Inc, 1521 Donita Dr., El Cajon, CA 92020. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 17, 2018. LEGAL: 08120 Publish: October 24, 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9025935 AGRICULTURAL GROUP OF OCEANSIDE 734 Wilshire Rd, Oceanside, CA 92057 (Mailing Address: PO Box 407, San Luis Rey, CA 92068) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Keeler North River Road LLC, 734 Wilshire Rd, Oceanside, CA 92057. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026157 AUTOLINE DIAGNOSTICS 20930 Via Mediterrane, Penn Valley, CA 95946 (Mailing Address: PO Box 388 Penn Valley, CA 95946) The business is conducted by An Individual Moses Novikoff, 20930 Via Mediterrane, Penn Valley, CA 95946. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 16, 2018.

LEGAL: 08119 Publish: October 24, 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

LEGAL: 08123 Publish: October 24, 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00052906-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: RACHEL MARIE PROULX FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: RACHEL MARIE PROULX HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: RACHEL MARIE PROULX TO: RACHEL MARIE JACKSON IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on DECEMBER 11, 2018 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 19, 2018. LEGAL: 08122 Publish: October 24, 31 and November 7, 14, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9025386 STRINGS CARDS 3465 Charter Oak, Carlsbad, CA 92008 The business is conducted by An Individual Scott Gilbert Snow, 3465 Charter Oak, Carlsbad, CA 92008. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 8, 2018. LEGAL: 08124 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21, 2018

LEGAL: 08131 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

www.RamonaTirePros.com

LONG TERM CLASSIFIED’S

4 weeks = $27.00 13 weeks = $75.00 26 weeks = $150.00 52 weeks = $300.00

Julian News 760 765 2231

ALL Insurance Companies Welcome

(760) 765-3755

Locals Discount Free Mini Detail JulianAutoBody@gmail.com Stefan Mussen

3582 Hwy 78 at Newman Way

Open 7:30-3

Tires And Brakes

RON’S

TIRE & BRAKE

2560 Main St Ramona

LEGAL: 08127 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21, 2018

LEGAL: 08125 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21, 2018

760•789•8877

Why Get Towed Down The Hill?

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 13, 2018 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 9, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027174 THRIVE CREAMER 400 Via Los Arcos, San Marcos, CA 92069 (Mailing Address: 960 Postal Way, Suite 3332 Vista, CA 92085) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Essential to Life Products, LLC, 400 Via Los Arcos, San Marcos, CA 92069. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 30, 2018.

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JULIAN AUTO BODY AND PAINT

PETITIONER: FROILAN MEDINA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: FROILAN MEDINA TO: FROILANI DI FACCIO

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026608 ELKWOOD GARDENS 143 Elkwood Ave, Imperial Beach, CA 91932 (Mailing Address: PO Box 61, Jamul, CA 91935) The business is conducted by An Individual Keith Michael Carty, 2215 Honey Springs Road, Jamul, CA 91935. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 22, 2018.

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Collision Repair - Body Shop

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: FROILAN MEDINA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

LEGAL: 08130 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

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Automotive Marketplace

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026012 MEDIATION SOLUTION 1981 St. Vincent Dr, Borrego Springs, CA 92004 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1915 Borrego Springs, CA 92004) The business is conducted by An Individual - Lee A. Scharf, 1981 St. Vincent Dr, Borrego Springs, CA 92004. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 15, 2018.

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boxed ads + $5.00

Case Number: 37-2018-00049585-CU-PT-CTL

LEGAL: 08129 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21, 2018

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© 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

LEGAL: 08126 Publish: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026968 3 MISCHIEF MAKERS 1746 Naranca Ave, Unit B, El Cajon, CA 92021 (Mailing Address: PO Box 2984, Attn: J.L.Craig, El Cajon, CA 92021) The business is conducted by A General Partnership - Judith L. Craig, 1746 Naranca Ave, Unit B, El Cajon, CA 92021 and Amy L. May, 1746 Naranca Ave, Unit B, El Cajon, CA 92021. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 26, 2018.

CUSTOMER SERVICE IS OUR # Open 7 Days A Week

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This Notice does not revive any Claim barred or subject to a statute of limitations as of the date hereof or any date after the date hereof, nor does it consHtute acknowledgment that you are a proper claimant of the Corporation. The Corporation is an independent and separate legal entity and maintains itself as such. The Corporation reserves the right to reject, in whole or in part, any daim submitted to it in response to this Notice. This Notice does not operate as a waiver of any defense or counterclaim that the Corporation may have in respect of any daim asserted by you. SpacePuppets, PBC Adam Rudder, President September 20, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026862 SAN DIEGO SENIOR CARE 2173 Salk Ave., Suite 250, Carlsbad, CA 92008 The business is conducted by A Corporation Provider Enterprises, 2173 Salk Ave., Suite 250, Carlsbad, CA 92008. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 24, 2018.

NOBODY BEATS OUR PRICES!

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Any and all such claims will be barred if not received by December 1, 2018. As permitted by the Law, the Corporation or their successor entities may make distributions to other claimants and to the Corporation' respective stockholders or persons interested as having been such without further notice to the claimant. The aggregate amount, on an annual basis, of all distributions made by the Corporation to its present or now former stockholders for the year the Corporation was dissolved and in each of the three calendar years prior to such date was as follows: (1) 2018: $0.00; (2) 2017: $0.00; (3) 2016: $0.00; (3) 2015: $0.00. The Corporation has not made any distributions to any of their respective present or former stockholders in the three years prior to the date of dfssolution.

LEGAL NOTICES

1811 Main Street [K-Mart Parking Lot]

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You usually have no problem rushing to the defense of someone you perceive as being treated unjustly. But perceptions could be deceiving this week. Check the facts before you act. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Before you point fingers at who might be to blame for the unexpected change in your plans, take a few moments to reflect on how this turn of events might be a blessing in disguise. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You seek out advice in the first part of the week. But be careful not to let counsel from others overshadow your own sense of perception. Things become clearer by the week's end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) The trusted colleagues you relied on earlier continue to offer support with your project. But you take more control, and by the week's end, you should be in full command. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Rely on your practical side while exploring investment possibilities. Caution is still your watchword in these matters. Your social life takes a gratifying turn by the week's end. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) An already confusing situation appears to grow murkier during the first part of the week. But it all starts to clear by the week's end. Plan to spend the weekend with someone special. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a passion for life that inspires others to follow your example. You could be a motivational speaker.

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Accordingty, if yoll believe you have (i) a claim, or (ii} a contractual claim contingent upon the occurrence or nonoccurrence of future events or otherwise conditional or unmatured (each a nclaim0) against the Corporation, you must present each such Claim in accordance with the procedures set forth below. a, All Claims must be presented in writing and must contain information sufficient to reasonably inform the Corporation of the identity of the claimant and the substance of the Claim. b) Claims for the Corporation should be sent to the following address: Space Puppets, PBC Attn: Adam Rudder 6575 Paseo Frontera #F Carlsbad, CA 92009. c) All Claims must be received at the address listed above on or before December 1, 2018.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Keep your feelings to yourself as you work through an awkward circumstance. Complaining is useless, and also unwise since your words could come back to haunt you. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A sudden flash of Bovine practicality shows you how you might be able to turn your artistic pursuits into a profitable venture. A spouse or partner offers some sage advice. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be prepared with several "Plan Bs" that you might have to use as backups just in case you encounter some troublesome complications with your carefully constructed schedule. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might think you'll never have a free moment again with the demands of the workplace piling on. Cheer up. The pressure eases as holiday time nears. An old friend brings good news. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your Leonine pride might make it difficult to offer an apology to a co-worker you unintentionally offended. But a quick and sincere "I'm sorry" could prevent problems down the line. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a good time to tackle those backed-up chores that have kept you from moving into other, potentially more worthwhile projects. A personal matter needs your attention.

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This notice is being sent to inform you that on September 20, 2018, the shareholders of the outstanding shares of Space Puppets, PBC (the ,.Corporation") having at least the minimum number of votes necessary to authorize or take the action, authorized and approved, by written consent, to dissolve and wind up the corporation in accordance with Section 275 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the "Law"). The certificate of dissolution became effective on that date. Thus1 the Corpe ration has been dissolved and the period for winding up its affairs has begun. This notice is being sent pursuant to Section 280 of the Law. Under Section 280{a)(l) of the Law, a corporation or any successor entity may provide notice of its dissolution to all persons having a Claim (as defined below} against the corporation, other than a claim against the corporation in a pending action1 suit or proceeding to which the corporation is a party, to present their Claims against the corporation in accordance with such notice. Under Section 280(b){l) of the Genera& Corporation Law, a corporation or any successor entity is also required to provide notice of its dissolution and of the procedures for filing claims to all persons with contractual claims contingent upon the occurrence or nonoccurrence of future events or otherwise conditional or unmatured (other than any claim pursuant to an implied warranty as to any product manuractured, sold, distributed or handled by the dissolved corporation). THIS NOTICE CONSTITUTES THE NOTICE CONTEMPLATED SY SECTIONS 280(a)(l) AND 280(b}(l) DF THE LAW.

Wednesday - November 14, 2018

Volume 34 - Issue 15

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LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2018-00052406-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2018-00055278-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: HANNAH LEE ADYE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: THOMAS FRITZ FRITZ HOOPER FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: HANNAH LEE ADYE HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: HANNAH LEE ADYE TO: HANNAH LEE BOLZ

PETITIONER: THOMAS FRITZ FRITZ HOOPER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: and on behalf of: THOMAS FRITZ FRITZ HOOPER TO: THOMAS FRITZ HOOPER

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 20, 2018 at 9:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 17, 2018.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 903 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (1100 Union Street, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 10, 2019 at 10:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 1, 2018.

LEGAL: 08132 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

LEGAL: 08133 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9026782 ROYAL NAILS 2530 Vista Way, Suite E, Oceanside, CA 92054 (Mailing Address: 2783 College Blvd Oceanside, CA 92056) The business is conducted by A Married Couple - Ly Thi Kiev Phan, LLC, 2783 College Blvd., Oceanside, CA 92056 and Kevin Tran, 2783 College Blvd., Oceanside, CA 92056. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 24, 2018. LEGAL: 08134 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2018-9027348 LAW OFFICES OF CHRIS C. CLAUSON 225 S. Lake Ave, Suite 300, Pasadena, CA 91101 The business is conducted by An Individual Christian Carlisle Clauson, 6475 Terraza Portico, Carlsbad, CA 92009. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 31, 2018. LEGAL: 08135 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

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Wednesday - November 14, 2018  

Wednesday - November 14, 2018