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PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

Julian News

PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036

1985

Change Service requested

DATED MATERIAL

For the Community, by the Community.

Wednesday

November 8, 2017 Volume 33 — Issue 14

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

www.JulianNews.com

Eagles Travel To West Shore And Bring Home Title 44-22

from Coach Scott Munson

At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of the year ... Please join the Lincoln Deming American Legion Post at the Julian Haven of Rest Cemetery - Saturday to honor our Veterans. The Women's Auxiliary will be providing light refreshments at Post 468 (2503 Washington Street) immediately following.

Library Becoming International Destination

Liberian Entrepreneurs visit Julian on November 1. (L to R Jarius Greaves, Joseph Pambu, Librarian Colleen Baker, Carter Draper and Thelma Ajalie) On November 1, the community of Julian had the honor of hosting four young entrepreneurs from Liberia, West Africa. This visit was coordinated by the US Department of State, as part of the International Visitor Leadership Program. They are listed as Technology entrepreneurs in Low-Tech Environments. Many people in Julian were able to meet with these visitors, but I want to touch on the time spend at the library and talking about the library. I was assigned to sit with them at lunch at Jeremy’s on the Hill. They asked excellent questions about the delivery of library services including the allocation of internet services to the community. We agreed that internet is the equalizing factor in remote areas where there are few other resources. One problem they have is the allocation of low speed internet services and it is not free. A person purchases a debittype card to be able to use the internet. It is not high speed, and many days it is not turned on. At times, when it is turned on, persons are allocated 30 minutes per day. Two of the visitors asked how libraries were funded and received new books. They indicated that their libraries have very few books, and nothing that is new. Wanting to make sure they were able to access some library materials, they were all issued San Diego County library cards. They could then access e-books and databases that are subscribed to by the San Diego County Library and use them for free. They were very complimentary about the Julian Branch, excited to see a 3-D Printer, and fascinated by how books and other library materials check out on the self-check machines with the Radio-frequency technology. After a week in Southern California, they would be traveling to Austin Texas and the surrounding area, then to Nebraska to round out their tour. It was an honor to serve as an ambassador of Julian, and of the San Diego County Library.

We are the champions. Friday night, your Julian Eagle football team showed what they were made of and made all of Julian proud. Your Julian Eagle football team traveled to Salton City to play the West Shores Wildcats in a game to determine the Citrus League football championship. West Shores might have had more players, larger players and even in some cases faster players, but they lacked one thing; the heart of this years Julian team. After going up 8 in the first quarter, Julian seemed to self destruct. Julian has the number one defense in the state of California, giving up less than 10 points a game but gave up 22 straight points in the second quarter. The half ended with the score 16 - 22 and the Eagles looked to be in trouble. Then the second half began. Though the Eagles were still shooting themselves in the foot, they were also delivering a physical pounding to West Shores which they had not

Fall Sports Schedules Football

experienced all season and it started to show. The second half belonged to your Eagles. They scored 28 unanswered points. In the end the score was 44 - 22. The Eagles were led by Ozzie Martinez's 198 all purpose yards, Will Hatch's 107 and QB Shane Cranfield's 162. It was definitely

the best team effort of the season. The intensity of Hatch, Martinez and Marriott were something to behold; there was no way they were letting their senior season end one game short of their goal. Julian will play in the San Diego Section final next Friday. The game is in the planning

stages to be played in Ramona on November 10th at 7. Please contact the High School office at 760-765-0606 later in the week to make sure there are no changes. Let's show your Julian Eagles and also the Calvin Christian Crusaders that the community backs out football team.

Cross Country Teams Set Their Goals High

from Coach Sandy Balcom

league season followed by Dusty Flack, PJ Davis-Scholl, Nikolas Carneiro and freshman Cory Flack with a PR of20:01, they scored a perfect 15, and Junior Ryan Lay finished a strong race in 10th. All 6 Julian boys finished in the top 10 and received Citrus League All League patches and medals. Ethan received the Citrus League Male Runner of the Year award. The boy’s team took first, finishing league competition undefeated. We have a bye week before heading to Morley Field for the San Diego CIF XC Championship race on Saturday, November 18th. The girl’s race at 8:30am and the boys at 9:40am. Come down and support these hardworking athletes.

Citrus League Champions - Boys Team Julian High School Cross Country finished up league competition Friday November 3rd at the Mountain Empire home course at Lake Morena. The Citrus League finals hosted Julian, Mountain Empire, Calvary Christian and Victory Christian. The girl’s race went off first with sophomore, Maya Moniz taking the race out in the lead. She finished first, giving her an undefeated league competition season and setting the Lake Morena course record in 21:43. The other 4 girls had the best races of their season. Senior Lakota Booth finished second for Julian and 7th overall with a season PR. Sophomore Calea Cruz was third for the team and 8th overall running a PR, Senior Esme Killiane 9th overall ran a season PR and Rylie Boyd ran a PR and finished 5th for the team. The top 10 individuals were honored with Citrus League All-League patches and Medals. Maya was awarded the Citrus League Female Runner of the Year. Julian girls finished 2nd in League to Mountain Empire. Julian boys went into this race with a goal of achieving a perfect score of 15 which would require the top 5 spots to be Julian runners. Ethan Elisara finished first, which, gave him another undefeated

All Citrus League - Girls

Friday, September 1 W 30-6 Home vs NOLI Indian School Friday, September 8 L 28 -24 @ Calvary Chapel (Downey) Friday, September 15 L 21-12 Home vs Desert Christian Academy Friday, September 22 W 62-0 Home vs Warner Friday, October 6 W 68 - 0 Homecoming vs St. Joseph Academy Friday, October 13 W 46-0 @ Ocean View Christian Friday, October 20 W 28-6 Home vs Borrego Seniors Game Friday, October 27 W 2-0 San Pasqual Academy Friday, November 3 W 44-22 @ West Shores Friday, November 10 7pm CIF 8 man Championship vs Calvin Christian @ Ramona High School

Cross Country

Friday, September 8 Citrus league Meet #1 (Ramona Community Park) Friday, September 15 Woodbridge Cross Country Classic Friday, September 22 South Bay Invitational Friday, September 29 Coach Downey XC Classic (Formerly Saints Invite) Thursday, October 5 Citrus League Meet #2 (Ramona Community Park) Saturday, October 7 36th Annual Running Center Southern Cal Invitational Friday, October 20 70th Annual Mt. SAC Cross Country Invitational Friday, October 27 Citrus League Meet #3 (Lake Morena) Friday, November 3 Citrus League Finals (Lake Morena) Saturday, November 18 San Diego CIF Cross Country Championships Saturday, November 25 CIF State Championship

Volleyball

Citrus League runners of the year: Ethan Elisara and Maya Moniz

Thursday, August 17 L 1-3 @ Borrego Springs Tuesday, August 29 L 1-3 Home - Borrego Springs Thursday, August 31 L 3-0 @ Mountain Empire Monday, September 18 L 0-3 Home vs Ocean View Christian Tuesday, September 19L 0-3 Home vs Mountain Empire Tuesday, September 26 L 0-3 @ Escondido Adventist Tuesday, October 3 L 0-3 Home vs San Pasqual Academy Tuesday, October 10 L 0-3 Home vs Warner Thursday, October 12 L 0-3 Home vs Escondido Adventist Thursday, October 19 L 0-3 @ San Pasqual Academy Tuesday, October 24 L 0-3 @ Ocean View Christian Thursday, October 26 W 3-2 @ Warner Friday,October 27 L 3-0 @ St. Joseph Academy

Julian Merchants Breakfast Wednesday, November 15th at 8:00 a.m. Hosted at The Apple Country Restaurant - Santa Ysabel www.visitjulian.com


November 8, 2017

2 The Julian News

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85 Dear parents, Iris community members, business owners, and

students: I wanted to let you know that I have resigned from the high school effective November 3, 2017. I will no longer be the English teacher there, nor be fulfilling any other duties related to the high school. JULIAN, CALIFORNIA For the past twenty years, I have greatly appreciated your time, encouragement, support, enthusiasm, energy, and love. You have been there for each field trip, each game, each activity, and have been a tremendous support throughout my teaching career at the high school. Many of you have driven to games and field trips, given for college survival kits, and have generously opened up your homes and businesses to help us fund raise for so many worthy causes Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club including raising money for uniforms, basketballs, literature books, and experience fine dining in an trips to Europe, field trips to the Old Globe and many others. You have exclusive private setting. helped with ten back to back girls’ basketball league championships The The most most dangerous dangerous Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourin the past. Last year I had the privilege and opportunity to coach animals animals in in the the forest forest course dinner on Saturday and Sunday the girls’ basketball team at the high school once again and it was don’t don’t live live there. there. evenings through the spring of 2018. one of the best years that I have had as a coach. Whether I needed Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried Kleenex, cookies, scholarships, donations, or volunteers for the and true entrées with seasonal sides and senior experience, athletics, classroom projects, field trips, or the perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. many community service club service projects, you have been there Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations for me for the past two decades. I can’t thank you enough for all of are required. Please call us for more your tireless efforts to support the high school kids and the youth information at 760-765-1700. of Julian. You have made an impact in my life and a tremendous ONLY YOU CAN PR E VE N T W I L D FIRE S. We look forward to seeing you! w w w . s m o k e y b e a r. c o m difference in the lives of so many young people who have looked to you for help, support, and encouragement – thank you for never letting me down. On behalf of my family and the many students that I have had the joy and blessing to teach over the years, thank you. OH203_AD_2018_Julian News_press.indd 1 9/17/17 11:39 AM Thank you for helping and thank you for believing in me. Thanks! Jennifer A. Wylie NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS.

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WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

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Self-Fulfilling Prophecies Humans are psychological critters. We tell ourselves what we want to hear, see and believe, and behave accordingly. We have the tendency to poorly or falsely define things or to let our emotions and feelings define them for us. Then we go about proving we are right by only accepting information that supports our perceptions. In its extreme case such behavior is called delusional. Politicians do it all the time by creating their vision of what they believe the rest of us want and then go about trying to prove they were right. Fighting this natural tendency is not easy. Human brains are packed with all kinds of self-serving and self-preserving mechanisms or biases. We come equipped with them. Sometimes these mechanisms become embedded deeply by trauma, ignorance, propaganda and behaviors unchallenged. Examples can be seen in knee-jerk responses, illusions, the falling-in-love syndrome, self-righteousness, cults, crowd behaviors and prejudice, accepting as fact and reality what we feel, see, read and hear, and arguing unmercifully and irrationally with any challenging alternatives. There is always a hypothesis underlying our behaviors. Interestingly we seem to have the ability to compartmentalize our views and opinions that are often divergently different: believing in only oneway, and behaving in another. It’s called cognitive dissonance when the disharmony becomes too uncomfortable. Behavior is the clue to understanding others, not what they say or write, but what they do. Thus, questioning and critical thinking is important to understanding, good mental health and decisionmaking. The hypothesis in self-fulfilling behaviors is always proven correct. We ask no questions or think too deeply about things for fear we might get an answer that doesn’t validate our inside notions with the incoming perception. Science, on the other hand, tries to disprove the hypothesis. Scientists frame a hypothesis by defining the questions in such a manner that they can be tested. When scientific inquiry can no longer disprove the hypothesis, the answer is considered supported, not proven. When a large body of fact-based evidence is gathered we become more convinced that we have the answer. Examples are vaccinations, the theory of relativity, structural physics, wine making, some economic theories and a plan of action that works over the long run. Obviously we cannot run everything we hear, read and see through a scientific test, but science teaches us to think rationally and critically about things. We can question and fact-check. So it is with us personally and with our town. We can operate on our own willy-nilly as long as there are no challenges like funding, overwhelming odds and consequences of substance. When the challenges become too great personally we retreat into the self, sometimes using defense mechanisms to increase the protection and insulating the self/ego. When it comes to decisions we make continued on page 8

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Julian Chamber of Commerce election

Five seats are up for election on t he Julian Chamber of Commerce Board. This is for a two year term beginning in January 2018. If ;you are interested in helping shape the direction of the business community and chamber sponsored community events this is your chance to step up. You may submit an application for the ballot to the chamber office. Send a statement of qualifications/intent in 2550 words or so. to the Chamber office by the end of the Chamber meeting on November 16th at which time nominations will close. You must be a member in good standing of the chamber in order to run. Ballots will be sent to the membership and results reported at the December meeting.

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson

Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Rick Hill Bill Fink

Jon Coupal David Lewis

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2017 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Contacting The Julian News In Person

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November 8, 2017

The Julian News 3

TREE N C A O I M L U J E HT Local Experience Since 1988PANY

Junior High-lights

by Jazmine Pitman Gabriella Copeland

On October 23, 2017, the Julian Jr. High kicked off Red Ribbon Week; a week where the students play games, wear funny clothes and learn the importance of living a drug-free and healthy life. All five homeroom classes decorated their class door about living the classic healthy life. Every day the students would dress up as whatever theme had been picked for that day. Monday was favorite celebrity or character. Tuesday: sports jersey day. Wednesday: pajama. Thursday: crazy outfit day, and Friday was your class college outfit. Last Wednesday was national Food Day. The school had speakers, presentations, and crafts. One presentation was about adding healthy foods to your meals due to all the carbs and junk food kids consume. The school had their second Spirit Day of the year. The classes are put into battle to see who can work together. It’s a day where shaving cream is everywhere and you can smell competitive energy in the air. The first quarter awards assembly was held to congratulate the amazing students at the junior high. They gave awards to the top five in each class, honor roll, straight A’s and perfect attendance. There was also the Fall Dance put on by Donna Cruz and Jenna Fletcher. Decorations were hung from the ceiling and walls. Music played and students danced. The attendees brought food and drinks. The next day was an amazing Halloween. Costumes were worn to the school by everyone including teachers. In social studies we learned the origins and history of Halloween. After school was the Halloween carnival put on by the teachers and PTO. It was an amazing turnout and the school raised a lot of money. There were obstacle courses, bounce houses, and the traditional carnival games. There was a haunted house put on by the remarkable Mrs.Cruz. She put together a team of creative students who along her side spent many painstaking hours decorating and acting in the haunted house. All in all, it was the best we could have hoped for. The soccer team was announced and it looks like we will have an amazing group of people. The anticipation had been building for a long time, but gladly that is now over. But all this doesn’t compare to the teacher the junior high is losing. Mr. Martineau will be taking another job. To all of his students, he was a role model, a friend, and a jack of all trades. He wasn’t a teacher - he was a mentor. Martineau is following his passion and we shall envy him for that. We will miss him dearly and we will never forget him.

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4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month 10am at the Julian Women’s Club House - 3rd Street Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff ’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society Presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7 pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 3 pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00 ESL Class - Tuesday/Thursday Improve your English skills with a Palomar College Instructor Julian Library, 4-6pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 6pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15 Every Tuesday Tai Chi with Rich. Julian Library - 9 AM Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10am - Baby Story Time with Miss Colleen 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts with Miss Linda 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 4:30 - Qi Gong - An ancient Chinese healing system using physical postures and breathing to guide and replenish energy, with Vika Golovanova. Second & Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 10:00am Every Thursday VET Connect - VA services available at Julian library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment. Thursdays, 9am-4pm. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall

and

November 8, 2017

Back Country Happenings

Blue Creek In The Red Barn Friday Night

Every 1st & 3rd Thursday Lego Club, Lego building for kids grade K-5. All materials supplied. Julian Library - 2:30pm. Every Saturday Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves & Desperados historic comedy skits at 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm – stage area behind Julian Market & Deli.

NOVEMBER

Wednesday, November 8 FREE Flu Shots Presented by Palomar Health Julian Library 10-1:00 Wednesday, November 8 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 10am Friday-Saturday, November 10, 11 The County of San Diego observes the Veterans Day. All San Diego County Library locations will be closed. Friday, November 10 Veterans Day Holiday Julian High School Julian Elementary Saturday, November 11 Veterans Day Celebration Julian American Legion Monday, November 13 Veterans Day (Holiday) Wednesday, November 15 Merchants Breakfast Chamber members - $10 Non-members/Guests - $12 Apple Country Restaurant - 8am

Blue Creek Band is a highly talented and energetic musical group, which specializes in Bluegrass, with a mix of blues, swing and gospel. Featuring exciting solos and strong vocals, they bring foot-tapping music that lifts the spirit. From festival stage to live radio, clubs, parties, weddings & fairs, Blue Creek performances consistently draw in audiences. With instrumental prowess, vocal harmony and upbeat music, Blue Creek has made many friends and fans. Will Jaffe, Dobro, Banjo and Vocals, Band Leader/Founder; Will’s mastery of stringed instruments has brought joy to audiences for over 40 years. Will has mastered many styles of music, including Blues, Country, Rock, Rock’n’Roll, Pop, Southern Rock, Swing, Jazz and Bluegrass. Paul Castellanos, Fiddle / mandolin / banjo/ bass and most anything with strings. Paul’s been playing fiddle and mandolin for over 30 years. Somewhere in that time he also picked up guitar, bass, banjo and keyboards. Did we mention he sings too. Susan Thoen, Bass and Vocals; A brief history, Susan grew up in Show business, the daughter of a gifted Jazz Musician. Her background is both rich and diverse. She has studied Classical music, reads, writes and uses these influences to bring out the best tones and tempo of every tune and genre played. Influenced early on, by the music of Mose Allison, and Ellington, then as a teenager the era of Hendrix and Clapton, these cemented rhythm and soul into her heart. Scott Crone, Mandolin and Vocals; Scott grew up in the Northwest Washington and Idaho then moved to Venice Beach, CA in the early 60’s. Listening and loving all of the music of that era, he was drawn especially to early LA Jazz and the great Blues Players that influenced the Rock music of that time. Grant Newton IV, Guitar and Vocals; Grant has enjoyed an immense following because of his strong, clear vocals and awesome guitar playing. Grant grew up in the Mid-West, hearing and then learning the music of America, Country, Southern Rock & Bluegrass. Check them out Friday Night from six to nine.

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Wednesday, November 22 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 10am Thursday, November 23 Thanksgiving Saturday, November 25 Country Christmas - Tree Lighting Pioneer Park Wednesday, November 29 Book Discussion. Author Kiki Skagen-Munshi discusses her new book, Nonny, Nani. Julian Library - 1pm

DECEMBER

Saturday, December 2 Christmas Bazaar Mission Santa Ysabel’s Ladies Guild will be hosting a Christmas Bazaar. We will be offering Christmas gifts, decorations and raffles, as well as Christmas Treats and Baked Goods. Santa will also be with us. 5x7 photo with Santa for only $5! The Mission is located at 23013 Hwy 79 in Santa Ysabel, CA. For information and ways to help, please contact our office at (760) 765-0810.

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents We electrified our delta blues just like Muddy and Howlin' Wolf did in the '40s, when they went up to Chicago," says Ramona-based Baja Blues Boys. The group began as an acoustic blues duo featuring Tim Atkins (guitar) and Andre Perreault (harmonica). They expanded in 2005 to a full band with Hank Hiskes on standup bass, Dave Finley on drums, and Bud Mayhew on guitar. Saturday night come get your blues fix from six to nine. Check out the Red Barns full compliment of cocktails and craft beers. Upcoming Wynola Pizza & Bistro Shows:

Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite 6 to 8 Friday, November 17 – Punk Grass Saturday, November 18 – TBA Friday , November 24 – TBA

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• On Nov. 8, 1895, in his lab in Germany, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen becomes the first person to observe X-rays while testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass. Rontgen received numerous accolades for his work, including the first Nobel Prize in physics in 1901. • On Nov. 9, 1938, German Nazis launch a campaign of terror against Jews in Germany and Austria. The violence was dubbed "Kristallnacht," or "Night of Broken Glass," for the countless smashed windows of 7,500 Jewishowned establishments. Some 100 Jews died, and hundreds of synagogues and homes were

damaged. • On Nov. 7, 1944, Franklin Roosevelt is re-elected president of the United States for a record third time, defeating Thomas Dewey, the governor of New York, and becoming the only president in history to win a fourth term in office. • On Nov. 10, 1964, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara says that the United States has no plans to send combat troops into Vietnam. By 1969, more than 500,000 American troops were in South Vietnam. • On Nov. 6, 1977, the Toccoa Falls Dam in Georgia bursts, and the resulting flash flood kills 39 people. The day before, a volunteer fireman had inspected the 100-year-old Earthen dam above the falls and found everything in order. • On Nov. 12, 1980, the U.S. planetary probe Voyager 1 edges within 77,000 miles of Saturn,

Julian Historical Society

r Monthly presentations be m on the fourthve No month Wednesday ofnthe I The iHistorical ng t Society ee Building M No 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

sending back 30,000 images that show hundreds of rings encircling the planet. Voyager 1, now in interstellar space, contains a disk featuring natural and manmade sounds of Earth. • On Nov. 11, 2000, a cable

car taking skiers to a glacier in Austria catches fire as it passes through a mountain tunnel; 156 people die. Only 11 people survived the fire, which was caused by an illegal space heater in the driver's cabin. ® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


November 8, 2017

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JULIAN

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• Wednesday - Sunday

Holiday Home Tour Make Your Reservations Now

The Julian Woman’s Club is hosting their annual Holiday Home Tour on Friday, December 8, 2017. There will be two tours on Dec. 8th. We will meet at the United Methodist Church on Hwy 78. At the church you will have the opportunity to purchase gifts from our wonderful crafters and quilters. Baked goods will also be available to buy. Refreshments will be served before each tour begins. The cost of this tour is $20.00. The first tour leaves promptly at 9 AM, so be at the church by 8:30 AM. The second tour leaves the church at 1 PM, so be there by 12:30 PM. Come early to shop at our fabulous craft and bake sale. The craft shop & baked goods sales will be closed after the second tour leaves. Reservations can be made on line. The Julian Woman’s Club website address is: julianwomansclub.org. Select FORMS, click on the Holiday Home Tour reservations form after you submit your reservation remember to mail your check to P.O. Box 482 Julian, CA 92036 Attn: Sherry Lutes. When Sherry receives your check she will secure your reservation and email you. Each guest will be assigned to a car with a driver that knows the route to each home on the tour. No guest will drive on the tour on their own. We will tour five fabulous homes. If you have any questions about the tour please call Sherry at 619-504-3508.

COPD Awareness Rising: What to Know

(StatePoint) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a progressive lung disease that makes it hard to breathe, is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. and a leading cause of disability. While awareness about the disease is on the rise, many people with symptoms of COPD are not talking to their health care providers about them. In fact, one in 10 Americans has symptoms of COPD, which include chronic coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. And, one in four adults with symptoms has not spoken about them with a health care provider. An earlier diagnosis can often lead to an improved quality of life. To learn more, visit COPD.nhlbi.nih.gov. November is National COPD Awareness Month. If you think you or someone you love may have COPD, talk to a health care provider.

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

Things Our Mothers Taught Us

My grandmother taught my mother 2 lessons that were very important to a girl growing up in the 1920s, to me growing up in the 1950s, to my boys growing up in the 1980s and to my young grandchildren growing up now. One lesson was the story of the Little Red Hen. The little red hen needed to plow the dirt so she could plant her grain seeds. She asked all of her animal friends if they would like to help and they all said “No.” When she planted the seeds she asked her friends who would help her and again they all said “No.” She asked her friends if they would help her water her seeds and harvest her crop and they all seemed to be too busy. When she took her crop of grain to the mill to be ground into flour, once again no one would help. However, when they smelled her bread baking, they all came and offered to help her eat her fine loaves of bread. The story of the little red hen and her animal friends who wouldn’t help her goes back many years and may have originally been a Russian fable. It teaches us lessons about working hard, helping others, and the importance of earning. The little red hen earned her reward of tasty bread through her hard work. The other animals did none of the work, so they earned none of the reward. I told this story to my children as an illustration of the importance of helping each other. They grew up to be helpers and volunteers and I’m proud of my boys for becoming giving adults. The other lesson that came down the generations through my family was of the Boy Who Cried Wolf. This was one of Aesop’s fables with a moral intended. The fable is about liars and the results of lying. People don’t believe liars even when they tell the truth because it’s difficult to tell when a liar is telling the truth. A shepherd-boy, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, thought it would be a fun joke to cry “Wolf!” to get all of the villagers to run to his aid. The boy thought that this was so funny that he repeated the lie three or four times by crying out, “Wolf! Wolf!” and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their efforts. Eventually the wolf really did come and eat the sheep, but by then the villagers didn’t believe the boy when he cried “Wolf!” “Wolf!” This was one way that Grandma taught my mother not to lie. I learned from my mother to lead by example and I also told my own children this story to show them a specific example. A fable is a short tale to teach a moral lesson, often with animals or inanimate objects as characters. A few days ago my brother and I compared other bits of wisdom that our mother taught us. One that was most important to Mom was to wear our best underwear when we left the house with friends. If we got in an accident, and had to go to a hospital where doctors and nurses had to undress us to save our lives, no one would think she was a bad mother who didn’t make sure we were dressed properly. Mom taught us that when we telephoned someone, we should let the phone ring 10 times. Each ring lasts 6 seconds from start to the beginning of the next ring, so letting the phone ring ten times gave the person at the other end 1 full minute to pick up the phone. I don’t think that timing works anymore, but I can tell you that when people call me and only let the telephone ring 3 or 4 times, they have no chance of getting me to answer the phone. As children we were taught to say “Please”’ “Thank you”’ and “Excuse me”’ at the proper times. This has always been a good idea. I taught my children the same words and the importance of using them and through their 30 plus years I’ve gotten lots of compliments on my son’s good manners. Mom taught us that if you are served a plate of food and you don’t like one of the items, eat that one first and save your favorite for last so you finish your meal with a good taste in your mouth. She said that we needed to finish our dinner because there were starving children in India or in China. Under my breath I often said she should send the food that I didn’t like to them. For most of us, our parents and grandparents do their best to teach us to become responsible caring adults. We who learned these lessons are the lucky ones. Having learned from our mother; my sister stretches meals by adding a can of niblets corn. This works for hot meals and for salads. Niblets corn is often smaller and sweeter that other frozen or canned corn. Mom taught my sister and I to machine sew and to hand sew. I sewed nearly all of the clothes I wore in high school and I still enjoy sewing. When it was my turn to teach children, I taught my cub scouts to sew by hand. Many years later, one of the mothers thanked me because when her son was away at college, he was able to replace missing shirt buttons by sewing on new ones. My sister and I have continued sewing on our machines. My sister rides in a cart in parades following her miniature horses. She creates all of her costumes on her sewing machine. I sew items that I sell in my gift shop, Julian Yesteryears. To me, yesteryears doesn’t just represent old things; it also means things made by hand or at home, not reproduced by the thousands. It’s what we were taught and it’s what we do. The most important lessons that Mom taught us were that swearing showed a lack of education and that you should always treat people the way you want to be treated. I a world of violence, this seems like such a simple solution and a good way to live. These are my thoughts *** The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense. — Thomas A. Edison ***

The Julian News 5

Linda Lee Narrin

December 14, 1944 - August 10, 2017 Linda passed away on August 10 in Poway, CA, with her husband Ken and friends by her side. Linda was born in El Centro, CA She lived and worked in Julian for many years before moving to Ramona. She had just started a new job at the Julian Chamber of Commerce four months before her passing. Linda is survived by her husband, Ken, 2 sons, Kent and Chris, 1 daughter, Heather, and her mother in law, Jan. Linda loved her mini horses and her donkeys, and is survived by her 2 dogs, Nakoda and Buddy, and 2 cats, Pookie and Floyd. Linda loved Julian and was excited about her new job representing the town on behalf of the Julian Chamber of Commerce. A celebration of her life will be held at Wynola Pizza in the Bistro on November 18th at 4:00 to 6:00 pm. Please call 760-765-0625 for more information is needed.

Preston V. Cheney

May 1, 1928 - October 27, 2017

Preston Cheney, former teacher at Julian High School (1967-1985) passed away on October 27, 2017. In his tenure at Julian High he taught; Chemistry, Physics, Math, French, Drivers Training and Computers. He enjoyed jogging and his four sons all attended Julian High. Memorial Services where held Monday, November 6th, at Bethel Baptist Church, 3215 Fisher Rd. NE. Assisting the family is Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Christmas Bazaar At The Mission Mission Santa Ysabel’s Ladies Guild will be hosting a Christmas Bazaar on Sat Dec. 2 from 9-5 pm and Sun Dec. 3 from 9-3 pm to help raise money for the replacement of the church’s roof. Start the Christmas season right by supporting our cause. We will be offering Christmas gifts, decorations and raffles, as well as Christmas Treats and Baked Goods. Santa will also be with us. So get your 5x7 photo with Santa for only $5! The Mission is located at 23013 Hwy 79 in Santa Ysabel, CA. For information and ways to help, please contact our office at (760) 765-0810.


6 The Julian News

Julian

Julian 760

and

Back Country Dining

Lake Cuyamaca

765-2655

Breakfast

&

November 8, 2017

Winery Guide

Julian

Daily Lunch Specials

Daily Dinner Specials

Breakfast Lunch or Dinner Your Table Awaits Open Daily 6am to 8pm

Wednesday thru Sunday - 7 to 3

Don’t forget Monday is Donuts Day OPEN: Mon/Tues 7:30 -3:30 Wed-Fri 7 - 5 Sat/Sun 7 - 6

2128 4th Street • Julian

15027 Highway 79 at the Lake

Julian

760•765•0700 Julian

Julian

ROMANO’S

open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun SENIORS THURSDAYS $6 -

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

YOUR CHOICE + DRINK

760 765-1810

COLEMAN CREEK CENTER (2 BLOCKS OFF MAIN ON WASHINGTON)

RESTAURANT

offering - tasters - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road

2718 B Street - Julian Reservations 760 765 1003 NOW OPEN 7 DAYS/WEEK

Julian

Julian & Wynola

Julian

JULIAN GRILLE

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR • Lunch and Dinner • Patio Dining 765-0173 2224 Main Street Mid-Week Dinner Specials

See our menu at www.romanosrestaurantjulian.com

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

2119 Main St. Julian

Ample Parking

RV • Trailer • Motorcycle

www.menghiniwinery.com

Established 1982

Open: *Every Day 11 - 4

*Except: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

Tasting Room and Picnic Area

1150 Julian Orchards Drive

2 miles North of Julian out Farmer Road

760 765 2072

Breakfast served Friday - Monday

4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

760-765-2472

Wynola

Julian

760 765 3495

Julian’s First Producing Winery

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

Drive Thru Service For To-Go Orders

Groups Please Call

MENGHINI WINERY Dine In or Takeout • Wine and Beer

11:30AM - 8:30PM

Only a Short ride from downtown Julian

ITALIAN & SICILIAN CUISINE

Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

OPEN 7 DAYS

Gateway To All of The Back Country Corner of 78 & 79 in Santa Ysabel

Open 7 Days a Week

23rd Victorian Christmas Teas

December 7 th thru 23 rd Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

Open 7 days a week December 7-31 (closed on Christmas day) 760 765 0832

www.juliantea.com

one block off Main Street

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

Wynola Casual, Relaxed

Julian & Santa Ysabel Family Friendly

MORE THAN JUST GREAT PIZZA! Sunday thru Friday and Thursday Saturday 11am - 8:00pm 11am - 9:00pm

ENTERTAINMENT EVERY Friday & Saturday 6-9

• AWARD WINNING THIN CRUST

WOOD-FIRED PIZZA • Every Sat & Sun afternoon BBQ/Grill Specials • “From Scratch” Salads, Soups, Desserts (760) 765-1004 3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

Dine Inside, Outside Take Out Conference Facilities

Over 35 varieties of beer, ale and hard cider

Two locations to serve you:

Julian

Santa Ysabel

2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

Your Location Here

Showcase Your Restaurant In Our Dining Guide 13 Weeks - $175 26 Weeks - $325 52 Weeks - $600 You Can Do It, for Tips!

1. SCIENCE: What is the first element on the Periodic Table? 2. MYTHOLOGY: What was the name of King Arthur’s sword? 3. ASTRONOMY: Which planet in our solar system has the most moons? 4. GEOGRAPHY: Which U.S. state is host to the Mount Rushmore National Memorial? 5. CHEMISTRY: What two elements is the alloy bronze usually made of? 6. GAMES: In Scrabble, what is the value of the letter Z? continued on page 12

Chef’s Corner Cook Up A Fall Feast

It’s important to include fruits and vegetables in your diet yearround to stay healthy and to ward off diseases, but serving fresh vegetables can be a bit challenging during the winter months. If you enjoy eating seasonally, there are still a good variety of delicious, flavorful vegetables available. Here are some of the superstar fruits and vegetables of the fall and winter months. Sweet Potatoes: They have more nutrients than regular white potatoes and can replace white potatoes in some recipes. Sweet potatoes are loaded with beta-carotene (which the body makes into vitamin A), vitamin C, potassium, fiber, iron and vitamin B-6. Try them mashed, baked or as a dessert. Apples: A traditional fall favorite, apples are easy to find in the supermarket, or you can pick your own at a nearby orchard. They’re a quick, easy snack that can be paired with peanut butter or cheese for protein. Apples contain

antioxidants, which may help protect against certain cancers and reduce levels of LDL, or bad cholesterol. Apples have vitamin C, vitamin K and fiber. Remember the old saying: “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Broccoli: This is one vegetable that can be eaten raw or cooked, hot or cold, by itself or with other foods. Broccoli can help prevent cancer and heart disease, while boosting the immune system. Nutrients in broccoli include vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, iron, calcium, magnesium and vitamin E. Pumpkin: It’s is a great source of potassium and beta carotene, a powerful antioxidant that is good for the eyes. Canned or prepared

fresh, pumpkin can be made into a variety of soups, baked goods and desserts. Kiwi: This fruit can be eaten alone (after peeling) or can be added to many different dishes, including soups, salads and desserts. Kiwi contains antioxidants, which can help protect the eyes, heart and colon, plus vitamin C, fiber, potassium, magnesium and vitamin E. Avocado: While avocados contain healthy monounsaturated fat, even healthy fat is a dense source of energy, so it’s important to eat them in moderation. Avocados also contain vitamin E, fiber, potassium, folate and vitamin C. They can be continued on page 12


November 8, 2017

The Julian News 7

...robotics, rocketry, engineering...their choice!

Girls Girlscan cando doanything: anything!hiking, baking...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Kids: color stuff in!

Annimills LLC © 2017 V14-43

Girls In Action!

Read the clues to learn about the Girl Scouts and to fill in the puzzle: 1. in Savannah, Georgia in 1912, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low held the first meeting (18 girls) of what would become the Girl ________ of the USA 2. in the U.S. there are over three ________ members (including adults); worldwide there are 10 million girls and adults in 146 countries 3. ________ are grouped by grade: Daisies (K-1), Brownies (2-3), Juniors (4-5), Cadettes (6-8) Seniors (9-10), Ambassadors (11-12) 4. they meet in groups at schools, churches and homes and are led by adult scout leaders who help them ________ what they want to do 5. Girl Scouts keep learning and doing; they earn ________ of their choice 6. they learn about ________ and wildlife while having fun – hiking, camping 7. they gain ________ skills by selling cookies and earning money 8. they take field trips to visit places and mingle with ________ everywhere 9. Girl Scouts try to be honest, friendly, caring, ________ and respectful... 10. they learn ________ tips, how to live well, and even learn some first aid 11. ________ service projects, like food drives, are high on their lists 12. Girl Scouts work to “...make the ________ a better place”

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during the Iran hostage crisis and other engagements. One of our Navy pilots did hundreds of carrier landings during Vietnam. Another was a Marine sniper in multiple wars. We have combat infantry, tankers, and sailors. We have medics and corpsman. We have men that froze in the Ardennes and Korea. Baked in the searing heat of the Middle East and those who languished at sea waiting for rescue. Others fought on D Day, while others prepared for the invasion of Japan. Most of our men and women served multiple tours of whatever deadly engagement our country was involved in. Some came home, some were wounded or poisoned by gas or Agent Orange, and others lost their lives. We have many members of our American Legion that served as supply or as Corpsman. Some

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were out of the field of fire in supporting roles, but they’re Veterans nevertheless that did their best at what was asked of them. One of our Marines complains that he did nothing in his rear echelon role. But my hat is off to him as well, because he stood up and served. Julian’s finest have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, Bronze Star and many, many Purple Hearts. There are many other awards for Service and Valor among “our” Vets. These brave men and women who are mostly gray now, don’t stand quite as erect as they used to and some, like one decorated old tanker, told me “that my proudest achievement was that me and my buddies never ran,” are the pride of Julian, and our Nation. If you haven’t haven’t stuck

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*** Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents which, in prosperous circumstances, would have lain dormant. — Horace ***

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

At the 11th hour, on the 11th day, on the 11th month, the American Legion will be having a full service at the ceremony to honor our Veterans who gave the last of their measure in service to our nation. After the ceremony there will be at pot-luck at the Legion. Everyone is invited to this event. *** Middle age is when you’ve met so many people that every new person you meet reminds you of someone else. — Ogden Nash ***

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World War I, the war to end all wars was fought with the tactics of the nineteenth century and the modern, mechanized weaponry of the twentieth century. It was fought in the horrid, muddy trenches in Europe. The machine gun and mobile artillery were introduced and gas, which has been banned from every convention of war since, was common weaponry. The war finally ended with victory against Germany with no small contribution from the American Expeditionary Force led by John (Black Jack) J. Pershing. The armistice was signed on November 11th at 11 a.m. in 1918. WWI was one of the most deadly conflicts in history with over 41 million casualties. The U.S. suffered nearly 117,000 deaths from a population of about 100 million at the time. President Wilson proclaimed in November, 1919 that November 11th was to be the first commemoration of the armistice. "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…" In 1926 Congress declared that Armistice day would officially become an annual holiday. On May 13, 1938 it became a national holiday and on June 1, 1954 it was changed from Armistice Day to Veterans Day and that the holiday would honor all Veterans. On November 11th (Saturday) at the 11th hour, The American Legion will be at the cemetery taking part in their tribute to honor of those that came before. The Color Guard, will present arms and fire a twenty-one gun salute. Service Officer, Howard Simpson will play taps. Commander McNatt and Chaplain Carter will addresses the guests and well wishers. “On this day, Veterans Day, we are commemorating the service of Veterans of all wars. We remember how men and women set aside their civilian pursuits to serve their nation’s cause, defending the freedom of mankind and preserving our precious American heritage. We believe our strength on the field of battle, on the supply lines which nourished our armed might, lay in the justice of our cause against the forces of evil. We believe our determination made us better warriors because we fought with our minds and our hearts as well as our bodies. We recognize service to our country and her cause does not end with the termination of military service. We continue our endeavors in behalf of an honorable world peace with a feeling of profound gratitude to God, and to the men and women who gave their lives as their part of the cost of this noblest of causes. Out of blood and sweat we learned of purpose, sacrifice, tolerance, bravery and discipline. These are solid foundation stones upon which a great nation is built. In our continuing quest for an honorable world peace we must cultivate these virtues.” Julian’s finest, served on the ships at sea, and the deserts and jungles, Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America. They fought in places called Viet Nam, Cambodia, Laos, Granada, Somalia, and Lebanon. Some served actively but clandestinely

Have you ever thought about joining a Girl Scout group? Millions of girls and women across the United States gather to have meetings, plan their schedules and then spring into action! Girl Scouts can work in groups to help their communities and take part in fun activities. They also can choose areas of interest of their own and work by themselves to build skills and earn badges. Some of the scouts I know are interested in the fields of science, technology and engineering. They are designing or programming robots. I like to learn about and cook up dishes from around the world. There’s something for everyone.

T

11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour

Celebrating the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. and all over the world!

Solution Page 12

National League roster? 3. In 2016, Oakland’s Sebastian Janikowski became the NFL’s alltime leader in field goals of 50 or more yards. Who had held the mark? 4. During the 2016-17 season, two Division I men’s college basketball coaches reached the milestone of 800 career victories while coaching at their alma mater. Name them. 5. Who was the fastest NHL coach to 400 career wins? 6. Who was the last rookie driver before Alexander Rossi in 2016 to win the Indianapolis 500? 7. For the first time in 40-plus years, the ATP men’s tennis rankings at one point in 2017 had all five of its top players age 30 or older. Name them. Answers on page 12


8 The Julian News

November 8, 2017

Ask Pastor Rick

(StatePoint) U.S. health officials are predicting a harsh flu season. While there is still no cure for flu, there are steps you can take to reduce suffering while the virus takes its course. Some experts suggest starting the quest to feel better by exploring your local health food store. Dr. Lawrence Rosen, author of several books based on 25 years of practicing pediatric integrative medicine, is offering some advice to ease flu symptoms. While none of the items mentioned in this article have been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, most have a long history and are relatively inexpensive.

Odd-Shaped Objects Sometimes Part Of A Set

This set, called a supper set, sold at a Skinner sale in Boston for $923. It was made by Coalport about 1860. Strange antiques and collectibles with mysterious shapes and unknown purposes sometimes are part of a larger piece. Mysterious wooden wheels with wooden spokes and about a 45-inch diameter were popular in the 1950s. They were hung on a wall as a decoration or put flat in a flowerbed. Each section between the spokes was planted with a different herb or flower. The wheels were copied in giftware catalogs but were never identified as part of a "walking" spinning wheel used to spin woolen yarn. A curved "bowl" shaped like part of the border of a circle is sometimes sold at an antique shop. The bowl usually is made by important porcelain companies and it seems to be a bargain. It is part of a set of four crescent-shaped bowls and one round bowl that fit together to make a circle. The curved bowls held foods like olives, pickles and sauces or several types of vegetables with sauce in the round center bowl. Most sets were made with the five bowls and a lid for the center piece. Once a piece broke, the set couldn't be used. But the pieces still were attractive when used alone. A set made by Coalport porcelain in the Imari pattern sold in 2016 for $923. Single curved bowls can be found for $50 to $75. A covered center bowl might fetch $100. *** Q: I have a Sarah Coventry necklace that I was told is 85-90 years old. It's about 16-18 inches long and has graduated glass beads strung on fine copper wire and a copper ring and clasp. I was told it is Waterford crystal. I'd like to know how old it is and what it's worth. A: It's newer than you think. Sarah Coventry was founded in 1949. Jewelry was designed by freelancers and made by other companies. It was sold through home parties. The company went bankrupt in 1981 and was sold several times after that. Sarah Coventry jewelry is no longer being made, but is sold online. Waterford is the name of a company known for its glass, but some people use the name for other clear glass. The value of your necklace is about $50 retail. *** Tip: Take batteries with you to toy sales if you plan to buy a battery-operated toy. Check to see if the toy really works. ***

Write to the Kovels in care of KFWS, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. By sending a letter with a question and a picture, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Due to the large volume of mail they receive, the Kovels cannot personally answer reader questions, nor do they do appraisals. Do not send any materials requiring return mail. Sign up for our free weekly email, "Kovels Komments." Terry Kovel writes about the latest news, tips, questions and her views of the market. If you register on our website, kovels.com, there is no charge. The 50th Anniversary edition of “Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2018” has just been published. Along with Terry Kovel’s reflections on 50 years of collecting, the book features 20,000 listings and more than 2,500 fullcolor photographs, plus trends, special events and surprises. Visit KovelsOnlineStore.com for the new price guide and other resources. (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

Simple Tips To Reduce Suffering This Flu Season Debbie Fetterman

REALTOR®

CalBRE #01869678

debbiellama@live.com

Specializing in Ranch & Equine Properties and the Custom Showing of your Investment Your Personal & Professional Real Estate Expert

760.522.4994

• FISHING REPORT •

Religion In The News Bias Lawsuit Dropped A Florida-based ministry that sued the Southern Poverty Law Center for labeling it a hate group has agreed to dismiss its related claims against a website that maintains a massive database of information about U.S. charities. D. James Kennedy Ministries of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, didn't explain in a court filing why it voluntarily dismissed its federal lawsuit's claims against GuideStar USA Inc. The organization still has discrimination claims pending against the Alabama-based law center and Amazon.com Inc. The Alabama-based law center labeled the ministry a hate group for its stance on LGBT issues. The lawsuit says Amazon. com excluded the ministry from a donation program because of the label. GuideStar had flagged dozens of nonprofits as hate groups based on the law center's labels. Source: Associated Press, summarized by Pastor Rick

Ask Pastor Rick

Is there any truth about Jesus having brothers and sisters? I personally believe Jesus had brothers and sisters. The Bible names some of them, “… is this not the carpenter’s son? Is not His mother called Mary? And His brothers James, Joses, Simon, and Judas [quite possibly the author of the book of Jude]? And His sisters, are they not all with us? Where then did this Man get all these things?” (Matthew 13:55-56) There are two issues here. One, there are specific Greek words for “cousin” and “nephew/niece,” none of which are used in Matthew’s passage. That being said, number two, the Greek word in Matthew’s passage may also be translated “cousin.” Those who don’t want to believe that Jesus had brothers and sisters will translate the passage using cousins or relatives. Because I have no theological issue with Mary having children other than Jesus, I have no problem rendering the passage as siblings.

• Curative Foods and Beverages: The digestive tract accounts for 70 to 80 percent of the immune system. When battling a virus, foods rich in vitamin C are essential to immune function. Try drinking a cup of hot water and lemon daily. Onion tea can promote a healthy respiratory system by relieving a cough and sore throat. Honey, which is a superfood, is a good choice, coating and soothing the throat, helping control cough, and promoting a restful night’s sleep that is necessary for healing. • Spiced-up Recipes: Add garlic and oregano to foods for immune support. Basil, rosemary and thyme help the respiratory tract. Try different recipes, too. One traditional bedtime treatment in the Dominican Republic is a paste of honey, finely chopped onion and garlic, and the juice of at least half a lime. The vitamin C content found in its ingredients helps boost immunity. • Indispensable Oils: Add eucalyptus oil to a bath to ease body aches from flu, or inhale drops added to a steaming bowl of water for clearer nasal passages. Inhale fennel oil similarly as a cough expectorant. • Homeopathic Medicine: There are few conventional over-thecounter (OTC) drugs specifically for flu symptoms. Antihistamines and decongestants help with head and upper respiratory symptoms that are mostly associated with colds. Flu affects the whole body with fever, chills, aches and fatigue, and a pain reliever can address some of these symptoms. To shorten both the duration and severity of flu-like symptoms, consider a homeopathic medicine, such as Oscillococcinum. When patients took it within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms, nearly 63 percent showed “clear improvement” or “complete resolution” within 48 hours. It’s the number one over-the-counter flu medicine in France, where it’s been on the market for more than 70 years. The key is to take quick action against early symptoms. Recommended for anyone age 2 and up, Oscillo is non-drowsy and doesn’t interact with other medications. • Healing Herbs and Plants: Homeopathic OTCs use microdoses of plants, animals and minerals; whereas herbal supplements are less diluted with a different therapeutic principle. Astragalus and echinacea supplements purportedly boost immunity. Try teas with eucalyptus leaves or calendula for fever. Elderberry, when taken in extract form, boosts the immune system, which helps the body respond quickly and strongly to viruses such as influenza. For more information, check out Dr. Rosen’s book, “Treatment Alternatives for Children,” a comprehensive reference guide for nearly 100 common illnesses, offering side-by-side comparisons between conventional and alternative treatment options. Don’t suffer more than you must this flu season. Homeopathic medications and natural homemade treatments may help reduce the severity of symptoms.

Rick Hill is the Senior Pastor at Hillside Church on 3rd and C Streets in Julian, CA. Direct all questions and correspondence to: hccpastorrick@ gmail.com or Hillside Church, Religion in the News, Box 973, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

Letters

continued from page 2 that affect others, whether family, friends or community however, we cannot afford to act on the basis of that which serves the self. We are required under such circumstances by moral standards, mental health, law or basic “common sense” to listen, study, learn and act for the general good. The soldier knows this ethic well and so does the firefighter. The private practitioner in a number of professions assumes an oath to do no harm, backed up by professional standards and licensing/certification laws and requirements. A person serving the public should make the same promise and behave accordingly. Soul-searching or due-diligence can be good for self and others. Remember, the standard of care for a business or public officials is legally much higher than that which we apply to ourselves. C. Englund

Tips For Choosing And Using Your 2018 Medicare Health Plan (StatePoint) It’s that time of year again: The Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP) began Oct. 15 and runs through Dec. 7. Medicare is a critical source of health care for millions of Americans who are age 65 and older and for younger people with certain qualifying disabilities. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) sets this time for people eligible for Medicare to select or make changes to their plans for the following year. For people with Medicare, there is nothing more important than maintaining physical and financial independence. The right health care plan can help. It can ensure you have access to fitness programs, preventive services, engaged doctors, maintenance medications and transportation, all at an affordable price. That’s why it’s so crucial for Medicare consumers to consider their health and budget needs as they evaluate their health care options for 2018. “Choosing a plan isn’t as simple as just keeping the one you had last year or looking only at the monthly premium costs,” says Brian Evanko, who leads Cigna’s government programs, which include Cigna-HealthSpring. “The goal should be to choose a plan that best meets your individual needs. It’s important to find the right balance for you between benefits and affordability.” To help you choose a plan and get the most from it, consider these five tips: 1. Make a list of your priorities and health care needs. Focusing on prevention? Keeping out-of-pocket costs low? Staying active? Needing dental, vision or hearing coverage? Seeking comprehensive

Howdy! From Lake Cuyamaca “Dusty Britches” here along with “Calamity Jane” and “Shorty”. The “Lone Pine” area is the spot to catch your trout these days here at the pond. Limits coming out, although the size is just so-so. Fish are being caught all around the lake, but the hotspot is Lone Pine for consistency. Some blue gill being hung at the dike. No other reports so far. The recent cold snap has livened up the trout.

The bald eagles are back cruising the perimeter of the old water hole looking for an unsuspecting trout to venture into the shallows. The grackles are gone now and so are the black birds. I don’t know if this is a temporary thing or they are migrating. We have had our share of birders out here lately. Lots of dog owners also out giving fido a walk. What’s the thing about pinning your handkerchief on your dog ? Mostly a triangular one wrapped around the neck like John Wayne. The prediction is that things will be warming back up soon. Our turkeys are ripe and ready for the Thanksgiving axe. With them will go the old chickens whom are producing 1 egg per day. This year we might try turducken. The new chicks, dogs, and rabbit are all doing fine… E-I-E-I-O… “Classic” ...a book that people praise, but don’t read… — Mark Twain “Tight Lines and Bent Rods”… Dusty Britches

I received a nice picture of a local mountain lion that was quite healthy. It was estimated to be around 160 pounds or better which reminds me that we have a lot of those cats hanging around in San Diego County. The picture was taken between Cuyamaca and Julian just off highway 79.

prescription drug coverage? Take time to evaluate plan options according to your health and financial goals. 2. Know your network. Many plans offer choices with a network of doctors. Navigating the health care system can be complex, timeconsuming and costly. Without the right support, you can feel very alone. That’s why it’s critical to surround yourself with a team of providers who are committed to getting to know your needs and to meeting them through open communication and care coordination. The primary care physician serves as your quarterback, directing your care through a network of like-minded specialists. 3. Take advantage of preventive care benefits. Medicare plans offer many preventive health benefits. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 100,000 lives could be saved each year if everyone received recommended preventive care, which often starts with seeing a doctor for an annual check-up. So go to your doctor, know the health screenings you need for your age and get them to take control of your health. For more information about preventive care, visit www.cigna.com/takecontrol. 4. Stay active with fitness benefits. Exercise is essential to healthy aging. Original Medicare doesn’t cover gym memberships or fitness programs, but some Medicare Advantage plans offer such benefits as part of their coverage at no extra cost. 5. Use no-cost resources to help pick the right plan. CMS’ Plan Finder helps you compare costs, covered medications and other items. Many insurance plans offer seminars at no cost and with no obligation to sign up. You can also check health plans’ websites or call customer service for more information. Local and state agencies on aging also connect older adults and caregivers with community resources. As you weigh the options, Evanko offers this advice: “It’s worth it to take the time to set your priorities and see how plan benefits stack up. Only then can you choose a plan that really helps you get the most from it and reach your goals.”


November 8, 2017

The Julian News 9


November 8, 2017

10 The Julian News

®

stepped up their commitment to installing more bike lanes accordingly. While a bike, either the traditional kind or one of the new battery-assisted models, works fine if you have somewhere safe to lock it up or can bring it inside, folding bikes may be a better option for “intermodal”

CONTACTS: TransLoc, transloc. com; Stigo, stigobike.com; Segway, segway.com; Brompton, brompton. com; StreetsBlogUSA, usa. streetsblog.org. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of the nonprofit Earth Action Network. To donate, visit www.earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk. org

Prepare Your Teen For A Safe Driving Experience

Folding bikes like this model from London-based Brompton can be folded up and brought on-board a bus or train, not to mention inside your office. Credit: Jeremy Tarling, FlickrCC. Dear EarthTalk: What are commuters (who pair biking planners and designers doing with a bus or train or ferry). Hip to solve the so-called “last-mile” London office workers swear by problem regarding transit? their folding Bromptons. Another -- Ginny R., via e-mail increasingly viable option is hopping on a pay-as-you-go Solving the “last mile” (or “first- share bike which you can pick mile”) problem—that is, getting up in one part of town and drop transit riders from their bus stop, off in another. Beyond bikes, train station or ferry terminal e-scooters—check the Stigo “the last mile” to the doorstep of E-Scooter and Segway’s new their home or workplace—has MiniPro—are gaining traction plagued urban planners since and market share across the the dawn of public transportation. country. “Most people in the United And let’s not forget about the States are ‘comfortable’ walking oldest last mile option of all: less than a quarter mile to or from walking. Denver, Nashville and public transit stops,” says Alex Los Angeles have made strides in Gibson of TransLoc, which works fixing infrastructure to encourage on solutions to transit problems transit riders to go the extra mile using app-based technologies. on foot. “Because most riders in “The problem arises when a high ridership systems walk to potential rider is further than catch buses and trains, transit a ‘comfortable distance’ to the stops must be supported by wellnecessary fixed-route stop.” designed streets and sidewalks,” Widespread suburbanization reports the Transit Center, a across the U.S. is part and foundation that supports transit parcel of the problem, given that reform advocacy. “Yet many cities fewer and fewer of us now live in America have built streets within walking distance to public without sidewalks, or allowed transportation options. The property owners to encroach on result is more private cars on or neglect them.” the road (and the accompanying Even more important than carbon and air pollution) and spiffing up sidewalks would underutilized public transit be macro-level changes to systems. how municipalities manage So, what can be done to development. “Transit-oriented overcome this last-mile hurdle? development and zoning Some municipalities and counties changes are other highly run feeder buses that circle the effective strategies that put more ‘burbs and bring riders right from people within walking distance their homes or a nearby corner to to transit,” reports Angie Schmitt a transit hub. Likewise, Uber, Lyft of StreetsBlogUSA. “Removing and other ridesharing services barriers to walking and transitcan help transit riders fill in this oriented development are likely to gap, especially in a pinch. But yield better ridership and financial these are hardly the most cost- return on investment than others or energy-efficient fixes to the designed to draw transit riders last-mile problem. from suburban environments— One time-tested solution is the transportation equivalent of bicycles. Many regions have swimming upstream.”

?SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of death for teenagers, ahead of all other types of injury, disease, or violence. To bring awareness to this epidemic and reduce the number of lives lost, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) recognizes National Teen Driver Safety Week, October 1521. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that nationwide in 2015, 1,972 drivers, age 15-18, were involved in fatal collision, resulting in 1,730 teen deaths nationwide. In 2015, in California, 283 teens were behind the wheel at the time of fatal collisions, and 63 percent of those young drivers were at fault. “This week is dedicated to focusing attention on setting rules for your teen driver before allowing them to get behind the wheel,” said CHP Acting Commissioner Warren Stanley. “Parents and guardians who set firm driving rules can impact their teen’s driving behavior and can be the difference between life and death.” Inexperience is one of the leading causes of teen collisions. The most important thing you can do for your new teen driver is to stay involved in their driving life. Frequent drives with teens allow parents and guardians to monitor their teen’s progress and reduce their being involved in deadly behaviors, such as: alcohol consumption, driving without seat belts, speeding, carrying extra passengers, and driving distracted. “Cell phone use continues to be a serious and often deadly distraction for all drivers, but it’s a significant problem among young, inexperienced drivers,” said Rhonda Craft, Director of the California Office of Traffic Safety. “If you’re a parent, guardian, or mentor to a teen driver, lead by example and encourage them to put the phone down and focus on the road. No text message or social media post is more valuable than their lives or the

lives of others around them.” As part of its commitment to educating the motoring public, the CHP has developed several programs for teen drivers and their families: Start Smart is a driver safety education class that targets new and future licensed drivers between the ages of 15-19 and their parents/guardians. The CHP has released a mobile application (app) for Start Smart, designed to assist young people through the process of obtaining their California driver license. The app includes a step-by-step guide covering everything from the Department of Motor Vehicles Driver Handbook and the final steps for obtaining a provisional license, to ultimately achieving an unrestricted California driver license. Every 15 Minutes focuses on high school juniors and seniors, challenging them to think about drinking, driving, personal safety, the responsibility of making mature decisions, and the impact their decisions have on family, friends, and many others. The CHP also works with Impact Teen Drivers, a nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives through evidencebased educational programs that support good decision-making strategies behind the wheel. “Seventy-five percent of teen fatal car crashes do not involve drugs or alcohol. However, everyday behaviors become lethal when a new inexperienced driver chooses to engage in them behind the wheel—talking to friends, putting on makeup, texting, selfies, or social media posts are just some of the activities that are perfectly safe and legal to do, until you choose to do them behind the wheel,” said Dr. Kelly Browning, Executive Director of Impact Teen Drivers. “It will take a holistic approach that combines education, experiential learning, and enforcement to change the driving culture to one that is distraction-free.” The CHP is aware of the importance of role models in a youth’s development. Education of new drivers and their families is regarded as a critical function by the CHP to help keep everyone safe on California’s roadways. The mission of the CHP is to provide the highest level of Safety, Service, and Security.

California’s almond crop is the biggest in the world.

PETS OF THE WEEK

Sadie is a three year old spayed Shepherd/Lab Mix who weighs 79lbs. This gentle giant loves to be petted, massaged, and will give tons of kisses and cuddles. While she enjoys going for walks, Sadie much prefers to simply hang out with her humans and be the center of attention. She is highly food motivated and will take treats gently from your hand. Meet this wonderful family companion by asking for ID#A1618507 Tag#C444. Sadie can be adopted for $69.

Fergus is a six year old neutered black feline who weighs a generous 17lbs. A bit shy and reserved at the shelter, he will need patient pet parents to coax him out of his shell. He's warmed up to several volunteers who say he purrs and purrs and purrs when receiving attention. Fergus doesn't mind being picked up and has been cordial with the other felines in his cattery. Meet this handsome guy by asking for ID#1811852 Tag#C931. Fergus can be adopted for $35. All adoptions will include vaccinations, spaying/neutering (upon adoption), a microchip and free Vet visit. Dog fees also include a 1 year license. Autumn and Tigger are at our Central County Shelter, 5480 Gaines Street, San Diego . The Shelter hours are 9:30AM to 5:30PM, Tuesday through Sunday or visit www.sddac.com for more information.

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The Julian News 11

November 8, 2017

California Commentary

Legislative Report Card Ignores The Spin, Exposes The Truth In 2017, the California Legislature launched a sustained and withering assault on middleclass taxpayers. Its victories were numerous and significant: A $75 per document recording tax was approved, affecting up to 400 different transactions; a gas and car tax, which takes effect November 1, will cost California households another $600 a year; and an increase in environmental regulations, known as cap-andtrade, could increase the cost of fuel by an additional 70 cents/ gallon by 2030. In the face of such devastating policies, it is easy for taxpayers to question whether legislators will ever be held accountable. However, a useful tool to assist taxpayers is the annual legislative Report Card published by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association. Introduced back in 2007, the point of the report card is to document how lawmakers have voted on issues important to taxpayers. Lawmakers tend to hide behind statements, often of dubious veracity, to justify their votes. The report card sets aside motives, politics and party affiliations and simply asks one question: did legislators stand up for the interests of taxpayers? While politicians may obfuscate, the numbers don’t lie. HJTA’s 2017 scorecard featured a list of 22 bills which, represents a broad sample size, making it easy to see who is either a friend to taxpayers or beholden to the special interests that pervade the state Capitol. Beyond the obvious tax increases listed above, other bills include those that make it easier for local governments to increase sales taxes, and allow for San Francisco Bay Area residents to increase bridge tolls. Attacks on the initiative process are another common theme highlighted in the scorecard. Given the policy breadth of the bills listed above, it should come as no surprise that the 2017

by Jon Coupal

scorecard was nothing short of abysmal. A record 79 legislators failed the scorecard while only 24 got a grade of “A.” Ten legislators received the coveted and difficult to get perfect score in 2017: Assembly Members Travis Allen, Brian Dahle, Vince Fong, Jay Obernolte and Jim Patterson. They were joined by State Sens. Joel Anderson, Patricia Bates, Jean Fuller, Mike Morrell and Jeff Stone. These legislators should be commended for their diligence on behalf of taxpayers. Increasingly, party affiliation is not always an indicator of sympathy toward taxpayer issues. Los Angeles Democrats Matt Dababneh and Blanca Rubio received a grade of “C” for carrying important HJTA legislation signed by Gov. Brown. For years, HJTA has rightly rewarded legislators who assist us in crafting policy that aids taxpayers. Dababneh’s Assembly Bill 1194 increases transparency for local bond measures by showing voters how much more in property taxes they will pay if a bond is approved. Rubio’s AB1625 allows individuals to be able to park at broken parking meters for up to four hours, unless otherwise indicated. This common-sense solution will allow people to more easily park in big cities, while also incentivizing local municipalities to quickly fix broken meters. Conversely, Republican State Sen. Anthony Cannella received a failing grade of “F” for casting pro-taxpayer positions less than half the time. To view the 2017 Legislative Report Card, and find which representatives are proud of their grades and which would rather they not be posted on a refrigerator, please go to www. hjta.org where the scores can be found under “Hot Topics.” *** Jon Coupal is the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.

*** “Everyone’s talking about the death and disappearance of the book as a format and an object. I don’t think that will happen. I think whatever happens, we have to figure out a way to protect our imaginations. Stories and poetry do that. You need a language in this world. People want words, they want to hear their situation in language, and find a way to talk about it. It allows you to find a language to talk about your own pain. If you give kids a language, they can use it. I think that’s what these educators fear. If you really educate these kids, they aren’t going to punch you in the face, they are going to challenge you with your own language.” ― Jeanette Winterson ***

Stephen Poplawski invented the blender in 1922. He put a spinning blade at the bottom of a container and used the device to make soda fountain drinks.

• It was 20th-century American author and college professor David Foster Wallace who made the following sage observation: "There is no such thing as not voting: you either vote by voting, or you vote by staying home and tacitly doubling the value of some diehard's vote." • Those who study such things say that many ancient Greeks carried coins in their mouths -- clothing of the time lacked pockets, you see. • In late 19-century America, parts of New England had a rather unusual Halloween tradition. Evidently, in many rural communities, boys would celebrate by throwing cabbage, corn and other rotten vegetables. • If you're like many wage slaves, as the end of the workweek approaches you might find yourself doing busywork -- trying to look as if you're working when, in fact, you're just shuffling papers or otherwise avoiding productivity. Well, there's a word for that: fudgel. Fudgeling may not be an approved workplace activity, but it's undeniably a part of the American workplace. • If you look closely at the Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci's famed masterwork, you might notice that the famously enigmatic subject is entirely lacking in eyebrows. • It may not come as a surprise that when scorpions mate, it's a rather violent affair. When the act is completed, the female stings her partner to death, then eats him. • In 1993, voters in San Francisco voted on a ballot measure to determine whether police officer Bob Geary would be allowed to walk his neighborhood beat while carrying his ventriloquist's dummy, known as Brendan O'Smarty. The measure passed, and O'Smarty remained on the job. • It's been reported that in the Mexican city of Tehuantepec, women outnumber men by five to one. *** Thought for the Day: "Life is a four-letter word." -- Lenny Bruce ® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your grandfather was. — Irish Proverb ***

® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Knowledge is more than equivalent to force. — Samuel Johnson ***


12 The Julian News

L E G AL N O TI C ES

L EG A L N O TI C E S

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026283 a) REAL TEAM SPORTS INC b) REAL VOLLEYBALL c) REAL TEAM SPORTS d) REALVOLLEYBALL.COM e)REALFIELDSPORTS.COM f) REAL FIELD SPORTS g) FAIRWAY VOLLEYBALL h) FAIRWAYVOLLEYBALL.COM i) REALVOLLEYBALL, INC 8911 A Complex Dr, San Diego, CA 92123 The business is conducted by A Corporation Real Team Sports Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 27, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026251 COLEMAN JORDAN REAL ESTATE 2875 Torry Ct, Carlsbad, CA 92009 The business is conducted by A Corporation Coleman Jordan, Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 24, 2017. LEGAL: 07776 Publish: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2017

LEGAL: 07779 Publish: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026649 a) JULIAN FIREWOOD b) PURE H2O 4655 Belvedere Dr., Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 868, Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by An Individual Joseph Paul Liggett, 4655 Belvedere Dr., Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 30, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026283 a) CJ REAL ESTATE b) COLEMAN JORDAN GROUP 2875 Torry Ct, Carlsbad, CA 92009 The business is conducted by A Corporation Coleman Jordan, Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 25, 2017. LEGAL: 07777 Publish: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00041427-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ELAINA ANN FREEMAN FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ELAINA ANN FREEMAN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) ELAINA ANN FREEMAN b) ELENA ANN FREEMAN c) ELENA ANNE FREEMAN TO: ELENA ANN WEISSMAN

A T Y J

4. comic artist

T G A R D E N E R G

C O M I C A R T I S T R

K V C K O S H F T E T S T Q

S T A Y I N G F I T G M P R L D

J E S H B O U B A R G S E M S R E H

E G T B D R O N V S E S W E A N K C

W O M P W W Y I P T R H T W A E T A

A E O U O H O A G N A I S I F L W L M A

T L A L I S O P H T I L N O I P C E P K

N E L T T L I T T A D G M H G N U R I E

K R I R H O F O O K I F G A N U I H N I

P T O S W G S O W G F L O W E R S T G A

H A E N K H H L R R C V N W N I B N

L P U B L I C S P E A K E R G N O R

K J E B C G E W C A P V R B E E

V G R S G E O C A C H E R T A

W O O D W O R K E R X Y L R

S W B A G W E E Z X I

M U S I C I A N

4 P 12 W O R L D A 8 P 6 N A E 11 C O M M U P 1. jeweler L 3 M E M B E

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MEETINGS

AA Meetings Monday - 8am Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center

LEGAL: 07783 Publish: November 8, 15, 22, 2017

3. flowers 10 S 5 B A D 7 F B T U R E T S N I T Y N E R S 9 S T R O

G E

2 M I L L I O N G

1 S C 2. gardener O U T S

PERSONAL SUPPORT

WORSHIP SERVICES

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 6:00pm

Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Childcare – Birth Through 5th Grade

Connecting People With God And Each Other . . . Changing Lives

Sisters In Recovery

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Trivia Time

Tuesday - 7pm

San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911 www.sandiegoga.org

continued from page 6 7. U.S. STATES: What is the capital of Hawaii? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: How many time zones are in the world? 9. GOVERNMENT: How many electors are in the U.S. Electoral College? CLNTS 1 127093 22:03 10. INVENTIONS: Where was inventor Alexander Graham Bell born?

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

Tuesday - 7pm Julian Mens Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 6pm

1. Hydrogen 2. Excalibur 3. Jupiter with at least 67 4. South Dakota 5. Copper and tin 6. 10 points 7. Honolulu 8. More than 24 9. 538 10. Scotland

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Wednesday - 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Thursday - 7pm

1/15/02

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Friday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

Teach carefully. We can show you how. Call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure or visit www.actagainstviolence.org.

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 9am Book Study 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 7pm

“Friday Night Survivors” 3407 Highway 79 (across from Fire Station)

Saturday - 7pm “Open Step Study” 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Julian-Cuyamaca Fire — Activity Log

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS.

Act Against Violence - Magazine & Newspaper (2 1/1 6 x 2) B&W APARD2-N-05130-D “What a Child Learns” Line Work

Time 1300 1500 1900 0800 1900 1700

Date 10/29 11/1 11/2 11/3 11/3 11/4

Incident Traffic Accident Res. Structure Public Assist Medical Smoke Check Medical

RENTALS

PUBLIC NOTICE

Location Hwy 78/ Banner Grade Country Villa Rd Pine Hills Rd Pine Hills Rd A St Hwy 79

Film at Horan Imaging 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127093

Details Solo MC; Minor Injuries Tender Assist to Ramona Lift Assist UTL Walk-in

HOUSEKEEPER - Julian B&B hours Flexible - Fri & Sun + minimum 1 weekday 11/8 call Linda 760 765-1890

RV FOR SALE

B/W DOLEV

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

Closed meeting; book study

® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in the Julian News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served notice that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

KENTWOOD - 4 bedroom 2 full baths, jacuzzi 2,000 square feet. $1,500.00 to 11/8 right tenant. text at 619-562-5446

Teen Crisis HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

continued from page 7 1. Roy Halladay won 15 in a row in 2003. 2. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Stan Musial all played in 24 All-Star Games for the N.L. 3. Detroit’s Jason Hanson, who had 52 field goals of 50-plus yards. 4. Bob Huggins (West Virginia) and Roy Williams (North Carolina). 5. Bruce Boudreau did it in 663 games (2007-16). 6. Helio Castroneves, in 2001. 7. Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic, Stan Wawrinka, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer.

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

AVAILABLE IN JULIAN

® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book

© 2017 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

Keystone Hideaway Camping Trailer (2014)

Answers

San Jose Valley Continuation School

*** Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www. divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis.

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

WYNOLA PIZZA currently interviewing for cook/chef position. Full time. Looking for focused work ethic and experience in the kitchen. Please contact Sabine 11/29 at 760 550-3737.

(open to all females - 12 step members)

pepper 1/4 teaspoon sugar 1. Heat oven to 375 F. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or foil. 2. On the pan, combine the sweet potato, apples, broccoli, green beans, onion, garlic, raisins or cranberries, and walnuts. Drizzle with the oil, dried seasoning, salt, pepper and sugar; toss to coat. Spread the ingredients into one even layer on the pan. Cover with foil and bake for 20 minutes. 3. Remove pan from the oven, and remove the foil. Using a spatula, turn the ingredients over to brown on top, and place them, uncovered, back into the oven. Bake for another 5 minutes, as needed or until the sweet potatoes are soft

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the publisher prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. Publisher accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall Publisher’s Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Publisher is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. Publisher accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

(Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - 7pm

used on sandwiches or salads, or made into guacamole. Spinach: Dark-green veggies contain lots of nutrients that a healthy body needs. Spinach is packed with vitamin A, vitamin K, iron, folate, magnesium, vitamin C, calcium, potassium, fiber and vitamin E. Spinach also has antioxidants and anti-cancer agents. Frozen or fresh spinach can be added to just about any meal. Try using it on pizza or lasagna, or use it instead of lettuce in a salad. Pears: This fruit is a good source of fiber, antioxidants and vitamin C. Research suggests that regularly eating pears and other fruits may guard against macular degeneration. Pears seldom cause allergies and usually are safe for infants and small children. Green Beans: They are high in vitamin K, which protects red blood cells and helps reduce the severity of asthma, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. They also contain vitamin C, potassium, folate, iron and magnesium. Green beans can be served as a side dish or used in salads, soups or casseroles. This recipe for Sweet Potato, Apple, Broccoli and Green Bean Bake uses these superstar fall vegetables in an interesting and delicious new way! AUTUMN’S BOUNTY BAKE 1 large sweet potato, cut into 1/4 inch small cubes (1 1/4 cups) 4 large Granny Smith apples, cut into 1/4 inch small cubes 3-4 cups broccoli florets 2 cups green beans, trimmed 1 small red onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 cup raisins or cranberries 3 tablespoons chopped walnuts, pine nuts, pecans or nuts of choice, optional 1/3 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons dried Italian or poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa & Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9027055 AGENT CANNABIS 2820 Camino del Rio S. #314, San Diego, CA 92108 (Mailing Address: 6191 Rancho Mission Rd #202, San Diego, CA 92108) The business is conducted by An Individual Jason Robert Klein, 6191 Rancho Mission Rd #202, San Diego, CA 92108. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON November 2, 2017.

Celebrating the the Girl Scouts of the United States of Am erica

Learning and Earning!

Badges

continued from page 6

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026836 CHANALL MON PRIVATE LOAN CONSULTANT 768 17th Street, Unit 4, San Diego CA 92101 The business is conducted by An Individual Chanall Mon, 768 17th Street, Unit 4, San Diego CA 92101. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 31, 2017.

LEGAL: 07781 Publish: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

Girls In Action!

Chef’s Corner

LEGAL: 07782 Publish: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on DECEMBER 12, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON November 1, 2017.

LEGAL: 07780 Publish: November 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

We love Scouting. It’s a great group to belong to!

November 8, 2017

*127093*

Model 24RLSWE Immaculate condition, used only twice for short trips, Solar, new 10-ply special tires, stored indoors, electric hitch, all modern construction and technology. Take a look CALL: 760.765.4662 11/8

MISC. FOR SALE USED - 55 Gallon Barrels FOR SALE Blue Poly Food Grade, closed top. Stores up to 800 lbs liquids/solids. Two 2" openings to pour and vent. $20each Contact Sandy @ Julian Cider Mill (760)765-1430 11/22

*** The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense. — Thomas A. Edison ***

Julian Library Hours Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

closed 9:00 - 8 9:00 - 6 9:00 - 6 9:00 - 5 9:00 - 5 closed

Friends of the Library

Book Store Hours

Tuesday - Saturday 11am - 5 pm 1850 Highway 78 765 - 0370


November 8, 2017

The Julian News 13

FREE

EXPECT RESULTS

CALL NOW FOR A MARKET ANALYSIS ON YOUR HOME

www.JulianRealty.com

Dennis Frieden

760-310-2191

Owner/Broker - CA 00388486

Dennis has 35 years of real estate experience in Southern California. A skilled and experienced agent can be a tremendous benefit when considering buying or selling property in the Back Country. Dennis was born in San Diego and has brokerage experience in both San Diego and Orange Counties. His grandfather owned two gold mines in town during the 1920’s and he has loved Julian since his youth.

Acres

Available Land

Julian • Santa Ysabel • Shelter Valley •

Location

Price

Acres

1 Acre 7263 Starlight . . . . . . . . . PENDING 4.15 Acres Incense Cedar . . . . . . .$109,000 4.91 Acres Incense Cedar . . . . . . .$109,000

Location

Price

4.42 Acres Yuma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SOLD 8.99 Acres Eagle Ridge . . . . . . . . .$239,000 27.49 Acres Slumbering Oaks . . . .$299,000

This Week's Feature Property

E G L N A I S ND PE

"Julian Country Inn"

Located in Julian's Historic District and a short walk to town from this charming 5 Bedroom Country Inn. A great business opportunity on 0.51 Acres, or bring your large family.

$779,000.

8.99 Acres Eagle Ridge Pine Hills Area

7263 Starlight Way

Black Oak Gated Community - Underground electric and telephone, septic layout for 3-Bedroom Home. Panoramic western views.

$69,000

$239,000

One gently sloping acre with views to the west. Water meter on property. Dirt road may require 4-wheel drive.

D L O S

JULIAN REALTY supports Julian Dark Sky

4.42 Acres - Yuma Road

4.91 Acres - West Incense Cedar Road

Located in gated Julian Estates, property is gently sloping with many mature oaks and abundant wildlife and open space. Adjacent 4.15 acres is available - both for $199,000

Spectacular Cuyamaca Lake view property. There are two existing pads, water meter is in, and power is nearby. Septic system and leach field are needed. Lots of room for your dream home!

$109,000

$309,000

JULIAN REALTY 760-765-0818


14 The Julian News

LEGAL

Volume 33 - Issue 14

NOTICES

JULIAN YESTERYEARS Vintage, Collectible & Handmade Items 2116 MAIN STREET

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to October 1, 2012; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO JULIAN COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP P. 0. BOX 249 JULIAN, CALIFORNIA 92036 REGULAR MEETING MONDAY • November 13, 2017 • 7 P.M. JULIAN TOWN HALL, Washington and Main Street, Julian, CA

LEGAL: 07778 Publish: November 8, 2017

LEGAL NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00038981-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ENEIDA TELLEZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9024179 FOX PEST MANAGEMENT INC. 15677 Davis Cup Lne, Ramona, CA 92065 The business is conducted by A Corporation Fox Pest Management Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 27, 2017. LEGAL: 07761 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00037328-CU-PT-CTL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9023718 a) JULIAN NATURALS b) THE JULIAN SPICE & PROVISIONS COMPANY c) DOWN THE ROAD FARM d) THE JULIAN WOOD CO. e) JULIAN DESIGNS f) JEREMYS GARDEN 3803 Wynola Rd, Julian, CA 92036 The business is conducted by An Individual - Joshua Michael Rasmussen, 3803 Wynola Rd, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 21, 2017. LEGAL: 07765 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ERIKA ESCOBEDO FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ERIKA ESCOBEDO and on behalf of: MELANIE ESCOBEDO CABRERA, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MELANIE ESCOBEDO CABRERA, a minor TO: MELANIE CABRERA ESCOBEDO, a minor IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 1, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 6, 2017. LEGAL: 07762 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9024298 SOHO TELECOM 523 North Vulcan #40, Encinitas, CA 92024 The business is conducted by An Individual - David Luis Haist, 523 North Vulcan #40, Encinitas, CA 92024. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 28, 2017. LEGAL: 07763 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9025345 a) LA BREA LAND AND CATTLE b) LA BREA LAND & CATTLE 2621 Collier Ave, San Diego, CA 92116 The business is conducted by An Individual Lorelei Helane Bunjes, 2621 Collier Ave, San Diego, CA 92116. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 13, 2017.

ENEIDA TELLEZ and on behalf of: a) ADRIANNA ZABELLE DIAZ, a minor b) ISAIAH DIAZ, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) ADRIANNA ZABELLE DIAZ, a minor b) ISAIAH DIAZ, a minor TO: a) ADRIANNA ZABELLE TELLEZ, a minor b) ISAIAH ALEJANDRO TELLEZ, a minor IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 27 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 6, 2017. LEGAL: 07769 Publish: October 25 and November 1, 8, 15, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00038086-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2017-00036383-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MARIEL GÓMEZ ALBA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: NINA ANNE OCIO HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: NINA ANNE OCIO TO: NINA CAMERA OCIO IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 1, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 29, 2017. LEGAL: 07767 Publish: October 25 and November 1, 8, 15, 2017

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© 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Automotive Marketplace Tires And Brakes

RON’S

TIRE & BRAKE

Over 40 Years Serving All Your Tire and Brake Requirements

2560 Main St Ramona Mon-Fri: 8 - 6 Sat: 8 - 4

760-789-3600 FREE Road Hazard Warantee with Purchase

Collision Repair - Body Shop

JULIAN AUTO BODY AND PAINT Why Get Towed Down The Hill?

LEGAL: 07766 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: NINA ANNE OCIO FOR CHANGE OF NAME

[K-Mart Parking Lot]

t. aS

Members: Pat Brown, Chair; Bob Redding, Vice Chair; Kiki Skagen Munshi, Secretary; Woody Barnes, Betty Birdsell; Herb Dackermann, Keith Krawiec, Katherine Moretti, Kenny Mushet, Rudy Rikansrud

1811 Main Street

on

The Julian Community Planning Group (JCPG) is a voluntary organization representing the community. The function for the JCPG is advisory to the County Planning Department, Planning Commission, and the Board of Supervisors with regard to land use matters.

& SERVICE CENTER

m

ALL ITEMS ON THE AGENDA ARE FOR DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE DECISION BY THE GROUP, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

*** A FINAL AGENDA WILL BE POSTED ON THE BULLETIN BOARD ON THE PORCH OF THE TOWN HALL 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE REGULAR PLANNING GROUP MEETING.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) While you're to be admired for how you handled recent workplace problems, be careful not to react the same way to a new situation until all the facts are in. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Rely on your keen instincts as well as the facts at hand when dealing with a troubling situation. Be patient. Take things one step at a time as you work through it. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your curiosity leads you to ask questions. However, the answers might not be what you hoped to hear. Don't reject them without checking them out. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Be careful not to tackle a problem without sufficient facts. Even surefooted Goats need to know where they'll land before leaping off a mountain path. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Appearances can be deceiving. You need to do more investigating before investing your time, let alone your money, in something that might have some hidden flaws. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your recent stand on an issue could make you the focus of more attention than you would like. But you'll regain your privacy, as well as more time with loved ones by week's end. BORN THIS WEEK: You're a good friend and a trusted confidante. You would be a wonderful teacher or a respected member of the clergy.

RAMONA

Ra

* * * PRELIMINARY MEETING AGENDA * * * A. ROLL CALL OF MEMBERS B. REVIEW & APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF October 9, 2017 C. PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS: Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the group on subject matter within the Group’s jurisdiction that is not on the posted agenda. D. Action Items 1. PLDO – Priority List & Recreation Programming; Plan priority list and review of parks master plan 2. Santa Ysabel Nature Center – Driveway 3. Cal-Fire – Discussion and questions, scheduled for November 13, 2017; Tony Mecham, Unit and County Fire Chief, Cal-Fire San Diego 4. Letter of Invitation to the Transportation Department 5. Honorary Bridge Naming – Wynola Bridge E. GROUP BUSINESS 1. Announcements and correspondence received 2. Discussion items a. Senator Joel Anderson, California 38th Dist.–Follow-up letters 1a. Forest Management 2b. Improve traffic flow between Julian and Ramona b. New Post Office Box 3. Zoning Verification Agricultural Store; PDS2017-AD-17-022; 1284 Julian Orchard Drive; Wynola and Farmer Roads; APN 250-272-01-00 4. Subcommittee reports a. San Dieguito River Valley Park Citizens Advisory Committee (Herb Dackermann) 5. Meeting updates a. BOS and PC Hearings b. Future Group Meeting Dates (December 11th, 2017) F. ADJOURNMENT

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your honesty continues to impress everyone who needs reassurance about a project. But be careful you don't lose patience with those who are still not ready to act. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Pushing others too hard to do things your way could cause resentment and raise more doubts. Instead, take more time to explain why your methods will work. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be more considerate of those close to you before making a decision that could have a serious effect on their lives. Explain your intentions and ask for their advice. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might have to defend a workplace decision you plan to make. Colleagues might back you up on this, but it's the facts that will ultimately win the day for you. Good luck. LEO (July 23 to August 22) The Big Cat's co-workers might not be doing enough to help get that project finished. Your roars might stir things up, but gentle purrr-suasion will prove to be more effective. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone you care for needs help with a problem. Give it lovingly and without judging the situation. Whatever you feel you should know will be revealed later.

November 8, 2017

PETITIONER: MARIEL GÓMEZ ALBA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MARIEL GÓMEZ ALBA TO: MARIEL ALBA IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 27 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 12, 2017. LEGAL: 07770 Publish: October 25 and November 1, 8, 15, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9025057 a) THE ORIGINAL OLD TOWN RAMONA ANTIQUE FAIR b) THE ORIGINAL OLD TOWN RAMONA CANDY COMPANY c) RAMONA ANTIQUE FAIR d) ESTATE SALES BY RAMONA ANTIQUE FAIR e) RAMONA ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLE SELLERS ASSOCIATION 734 Main Street, Ramona, CA 92065 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Lyman Family, LLC, 734 Main Street, Ramona, CA 92065. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 10, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9025550 CONSULTANT ALLIES, LLC 2020 Running Mare Lane, Alpine, CA 91901 (Mailing Address: 2710 Alpine Blvd. Ste O-105, Alpine, CA 91901) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Partner - Institute for Mastering Success, LLC, 2020 Running Mare Lane, Alpine, CA 91901 and Wave 3 Consultants, 27572 Country Lane Road, Laguna Niguel, CA 92677. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 17, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9026569 WORLDWIDE EXPRESS 5375 Mira Sorrento Pl, Suite 290 San Diego, CA 92121 The business is conducted by A Corporation Rolla inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON October 27, 2017.

LEGAL: 07764 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

LEGAL: 07768 Publish: October 18, 25 and November 1, 8, 2017

LEGAL: 07775 Publish: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2017

ALL Insurance Companies Welcome

(760) 765-3755 3582 Hwy 78 at Newman Way Locals Discount

Free Mini Detail

JulianAutoBody@gmail.com Stefan Mussen

LE G A L N O TI C E S

LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00039454-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: TINA WIGHT FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER:

TINA WIGHT and on behalf of: ALANA MATTIE MAE LIU DIXON, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ALANA MATTIE MAE LIU DIXON, a minor TO: ALANA SEGI WIGHT, a minor IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on DECEMBER 5, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 20, 2017. LEGAL: 07771 Publish: October 25 and November 1, 8, 15, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00038257-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2017-00040750-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: RITA MARTIN KHANANIA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: SHI CHING CHOW FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: RITA MARTIN KHANANIA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: RITA MARTIN KHANANIA TO: RITA MARTIN TALIA

PETITIONER: SHI CHING CHOW HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: SHI CHING CHOW TO: TIFFANY SHICHING CHOW

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 27 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 10:00 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 13, 2017.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 27 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on JANUARY 11, 2018 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON October 27, 2017.

LEGAL: 07773 Publish: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2017

LEGAL: 07774 Publish: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2017

Juliannews 33 14  

Wednesday - November 8, 2017