Page 1

50¢

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola. For the Community, by the Community.

1985

(46¢ + tax included)

Periodical • Wednesday

Time Sensitive Material

September 27, 2017

Volume 33 — Issue 08

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District Update

www.JulianNews.com

Apple Days = Insanity On The Roads

by Michael Hart

Page 13

Return of the Eclipse Chasers

from Rick Marinelli Chief-JCFPD

I would like to take a moment and update you on some important information concerning the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District (JCFPD). As some of you may know the San Diego County Fire Authority (SDCFA) has been assisting the JCFPD by means of providing a fire engine staffed with paramedics in Julian, a cash subsidy of $60,000, dispatch services at no cost provided by Cal Fire and the use of a County owned water tender. In addition Cal Fire and JCFPD have maintained an automatic aid agreement for many years. Automatic aid means each agency responds to each other’s calls automatically. There is no need to request mutual aid unless additional resources are needed. Recently the SDCFA informed the JCFPD that all County assistance would end on January 1st 2018. If the JCFPD chose to, it could opt to file dissolution documents with San Diego County LAFCO and, after the dissolution process was complete, the SDCFA would assume JCFPD jurisdictional responsibilities for fire and EMS response in the District. In addition, Cal Fire will not renew the automatic aid agreement effective January 1, 2018. During the September 12, 2018 Board of Directors meeting, the BOD voted to reject the County offer. So what does this all mean to you? Effective January 1, 2018, all County assistance will stop. Additionally, Cal Fire automatic aid will stop. The JCFPD will handle all calls in the District and be required to request mutual aid from adjoining agencies in our area. The JCFPD is working on staffing options and fund raising efforts to raise the level of service in the District. Until significant funding is received the JCFPD will rely on our community volunteers and our reserve volunteers to handle the 500-600 calls per year. As the District Chief I will do everything in my power to ensure all calls are handled with the highest regard to the protection of life and property and within the capabilities of the JCFPD.

Pie Contest Winners The winners of this years Women’s Club Pie Baking Contest: First Place - Olivia Dolutkhan: Hill Cottage Apple Pie Second Place - Allyson Jasper and 2nd Grade Class of Spencer Valley School: Spencer Valley Old Fashioned Apple Pie Third Place - Erin Thompson: Toffee Apple Pie Although there were fewer entries this year, the results came out of the oven just a tasty as always.

Was it all the hype on the TV, or the need of city folk to escape? The charms of a small town? The opportunity to experience picking your own fruit? What ever it was the weekend was crazy. Traffic backed up down to Santa Ysabel on one side, from Wynola Road up Banner to lower Whispering pines and on the 79 beyond Jess Martin Park - you would think there was snow! The folks that got there early had a chance to shop the vendors and check out the various exhibits.

above - Maggie and Emma having some face painting fun left - Only in Julian - kids get to play in a “corn box” more photos page 8

Music On The Mountain

Chamber Music Takes The Stage at The Library

Please join us on Tuesday, October 3 at 6 PM for the monthly Music on the Mountain at the Julian branch Library. This month we are featuring The San Diego Chamber Music Society's hour-long concert program for 2017-18: "From Beethoven to Broadway, music for Horn and Piano", featuring selections from famous composers of the past; Corelli, Beethoven, Mozart, Strauss, Mendelssohn, SaintSaens, Cherubini, and 20th century American composers like Leroy Ostransky, Burt Bacharach, Leonard Bernstein, Richard Rogers and Henry Mancini. This is a light-hearted look at some of our most requested pieces from over 25 years of horn-piano concerts; there is something here for everyone to enjoy. The performers are Bruce Dorcy- horn and Beverly Reese Dorcy- piano. As usual, there will be an interesting dialogue about the pieces and the composers and an amusing anecdote or two. Beverly Reese Dorcy- a Minnesota native, is an active freelance timpanist and percussionist in both the San Diego and San Francisco Bay areas, she is also a former performer with the Fresno Philharmonic, Tacoma Opera, Bellevue Philharmonic, San Francisco Women's Philharmonic, Monterey Opera,

Golden Gate Opera and Classical Philharmonic. She has also performed extensively with the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, San Diego Symphony, San Diego Opera and Sun Valley Summer Symphony in Idaho. Bruce Dorcy- french horn, was a member of the National Ballet of Canada and Canadian Opera Orchestras for 24 years (asst. principal/third horn) and the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra for 11 years (principal horn) and also played on Broadway in New York for 6 years ("Fiddler on the Roof", "Promises, Promises", "Man of La Mancha"). Occasional performances with the New York City Opera, Seattle Symphony, Seattle Opera, Toronto

Symphony, San Francisco Opera, Western Opera Theatre, Opera San Jose, Monterey Pops Orchestra, Monterey Opera, Classical Philharmonic, San Diego Chamber Orchestra, Las Vegas Philharmonic etc. We invite you to join us to hear these accomplished musicians for a program that promises to be educational and inspiring. Performances at the library are always free and audiences are thoroughly entertained by the fabulous musicians that appear here. Come for the music, stay for refreshments and enjoy your time at the library. The Julian Branch Library is located at 1950 Highway 78, next to the High School. For more information, please call 760-75-0370.

Please join us on Saturday, Sept. 30, 10:30 AM at the Julian Library as we welcome the Return of the Eclipse Chasers! In early August, you learned about what makes an eclipse and why it is such a significant event. Now, you will see the Images and stories from Fred Delgado, Andrew Pittman, Ernie Huang, Bill Carter, Todd Rogelstad, and more. All of these people traveled to the path of the full eclipse, and have different stories about the different states and locations they visited. You will get to see dazzling Images and stories from the 2017 Total Eclipse of the Sun and hear about the effect of twilight at noon on street lights, humans, and animals. But best of all, you can be an arm chair traveler and learn what they experienced. We hope you will join us on Saturday, September, 30, 2017 at 10 30 AM at the Julian Branch Library. The library is located at 1850 Highway 78. This program will be in the community room. For more information, please call the branch at 760-765-0370. You may also contact Doug Sollossy via email curiositypeak@gmail. com if you would also like to contribute!

Melodrama Mixing In History Last week we said this year’s Melodrama, The Flume of Doom, was loosly based on Julian history. Is that true? Well, yes, but the flume was not built to bring water to the citizens of Julian. It was built to carry Julian’s water to San Diego. Twenty years of important Julian and San Diego History. 1870- City of San Diego population is 2300. San Diego County population is 4951. 1870- Black prospector Fred Coleman discovers placer gold near present-day Julian, setting off local “gold fever”. First lode mine, the George Washington Mine, is discovered in February of 1870. By 1875, mines in the area produce over $2 million in gold. By 1876, many of the mines are closed, though significant gold production continues until about 1911. 1880- City of San Diego population is 2,637. San Diego County population is 4951. 1882- San Diego Telephone Company begins operation and San Diego’s first public library opens. 1883-1884- John Montgomery makes world’s first “controlled flight” in a “heavier than air” craft, flying 600 feet in a glider at Otay Mesa and Leach’s Opera House opens on July 17, 1884, with a performance by a local group calling itself The San Diego Minstrels. 1885- 1886- Transcontinental railroad reaches San Diego, first electric street lights installed and first streetcars begin operating over two-mile track on Broadway. May, 1886Construction continued on page 3

Fall Sports Schedules Cross Country

Friday, September 8 Citrus league Meet #1 (Ramona Community Park) Friday, September 15 Woodbridge Cross Country Classic Friday, September 22 South Bay Invitational Friday, September 29 Coach Downey XC Classic (Formerly Saints Invite) Thursday, October 5 Citrus League Meet #2 (Ramona Community Park) Saturday, October 7 36th Annual Running Center Southern Cal Invitational Friday, October 20 70th Annual Mt. SAC Cross Country Invitational Friday, October 27 Citrus League Meet #3 (Lake Morena) Friday, November 3 Citrus League Finals (Lake Morena) Saturday, November 18 San Diego CIF Cross Country Championships Saturday, November 25 CIF State Championship

Volleyball

Thursday, August 17 L 1-3 @ Borrego Springs Tuesday, August 29 L 1-3 Home - Borrego Springs Thursday, August 31 L 3-0 @ Mountain Empire Monday, September 18 L 0-3 Home vs Ocean View Christian Tuesday, September 19L 0-3 Home vs Mountain Empire Tuesday, September 26 TBA @ Escondido Adventist Tuesday, October 3 4:00 Home vs San Pasqual Academy Tuesday, October 10 4:00 Home vs Warner Thursday, October 12 4:00 Home vs Escondido Adventist Tuesday, October 17 TBA @ St. Joseph Academy Thursday, October 19 TBA @ San Pasqual Academy Tuesday, October 24 5:00 @ Ocean View Christian Thursday, October 26 TBA @ Warner

Football

Friday, September 1 W 30-6 Home vs NOLI Indian School Friday, September 8 L 28 -24 @ Calvary Chapel (Downey) Friday, September 15 L 21-12 Home vs Desert Christian Academy Friday, September 22 W 62-0 Home vs Warner Friday, October 6 6:00 Homecoming vs St. Joseph Academy Friday, October 13 3:00 @ Ocean View Christian Friday, October 20 7:00 Home vs Borrego Friday, October 20 3:00 @ San Pasqual Academy Friday, November 3 6:00 @ West Shores

61st Triangle Club Melodrama on the Town Hall Stage

October Friday, Oct 20 at 7pm, Saturday, Oct 21 at 2 www.visitjulian.com

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7pm


2 The Julian News

September 27, 2017

HOME SERVICES

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Attorney General Becerra Issues Consumer Alert Following Equifax Data Breach

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Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2018. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef. Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

We look forward to seeing you!

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our 9/17/17 11:39 AM contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road (9am - 5:00pm Wed-Fri)

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Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

The Julian News ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Greg Courson Jon Coupal Bill Fink Kiki Skagen Munshi David Lewis Lance Arenson Pastor Rick Hill Marisa McFedries The Students Of Julian High School (The Eaglette)

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2017 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at Julian, California USPN 901125322 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036-0639 Contacting The Julian News In Person

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California Attorney General Xavier Becerra today issued a consumer alert following the Equifax data breach that affected 143 million Americans and over 15 million Californians. Equifax is one of the nation’s three major credit reporting agencies. According to Equifax, the breach lasted from mid-May through July, and compromised names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver’s license numbers. “Millions of Californians’ personal information has been compromised as a result of this massive data breach. Equifax's response to date is unacceptable,” said Attorney General Becerra. “My office has been and will continue to be in touch with Equifax until we get to the bottom of this massive data breach. We will do what's necessary to hold Equifax accountable. In the meantime, I urge all consumers to heed this alert to protect themselves.” To check whether you have been impacted by the Equifax data breach, please visit: https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potentialimpact/. If you use Wi-Fi, make sure that you are using a secure Wi-Fi connection before submitting your personal information. Consumers are also encouraged to take the following steps to protect their personal information: 1. Put a fraud alert on your credit file. A fraud alert helps protect you against the possibility of someone opening new credit accounts in your name. A fraud alert lasts 90 days and can be renewed. To post a fraud alert on your credit file, you must contact one of the three major credit reporting agencies below. If you contact any one of the three major credit reporting agencies, fraud alerts will be automatically added by the other two agencies as well. Experian 1-888-397-3742 experian.com/fraud/center.html TransUnion 1-800-680-7289 transunion.com/fraud Equifax 1-888-766-0008 alerts.equifax.com 2. Review your credit reports. Look through each one carefully. Check your credit reports from Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax — for free — by visiting annualcreditreport.com. Accounts or activity that you don’t recognize could indicate identity theft, especially accounts opened recently. 3. If you find items you don’t understand on your report, call the credit bureau at the number on the report. Credit bureau staff will review your report with you. If the information can’t be explained, then you will need to call the creditors involved and report the crime to your local police or sheriff ’s office. See the Identity Theft Victim Checklist: www.oag.ca.gov/idtheft/informationsheets. When he assumed office, Attorney General Becerra made protecting consumers a top priority. Among other actions, he has secured a record $18.5 million multi-state settlement with Target over data security failures that contributed to the compromise of 40 million customers' payment card information during the 2013 holiday season and a $3.5 million multi-state settlement with Lenovo to resolve allegations that it illegally preinstalled ad-injecting software that compromised the security of its computers.

How Libraries Are Changing In Communities Nationwide (StatePoint) As we become increasingly reliant on digital content available on-demand, what happens to our repositories for printed material? The answer may be simpler than you think: Libraries aren’t just about books any more. Most have shifted focus from their collections to the communities they serve, and adjusted their designs to match. Library-sponsored programs, such as children’s reading hours and job-search assistance sessions, are bolstering many branches’ outreach and education efforts. A 2016 library use study from the Pew Research Center indicates an increase in the number of people visiting libraries for educational purposes: 27 percent of library users continued on page 10

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The Julian News 3

September 27, 2017

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Melodrama

continued from page 1 begins on Cuyamaca Dam and a wooden flume 35 miles long to bring water to San Diego, completed in 1888. 1887- San Diego population hits estimated 35,000-40,000 at its peak in 1887. Railroad rate war leads to population boom and land stampede. San Diego’s Victorian Santa Fe railway station opens downtowns and in Nov the first electric street railway system in the western U.S begins operation in downtown San Diego. 1888- San Diego’s 1880s real estate boom ends. By the end of the decade the population has dropped from 40,000 to 16,000. February 22, 1889 San Diego celebrates opening of the San Diego Flume. In honor of the event the Governor, R. W. Waterman, and other dignitaries ride down the flume in a flat-bottomed boat. A reservoir created at Bear Creek with the Cuyamaca Dam, completed in 1887, provides the water source. The flume is an open wooden ditch which crossed ravines and canyons by means of high wooden trestles. This great pioneer undertaking

by Jazmine Pitman

These last two weeks at the Julian schools have been pretty exciting! The fall season has started and everyone is ready for the upcoming festivals and events. Volleyball teams have been picked and are now practicing for their tournament in October. The Jr. High now has one more volleyball net to practice on and we are very grateful for that. As another fundraiser for the big D.C. trip in May the students are selling chocolate bars for $1 each. Make sure you get around to buying one! Another big field trip that just happened was The Star of India 5th grade trip. They left for this trip on September 20th and came back the 21st. As for the 8th graders they leave for Catalina on Monday the 25th. The eighth grade has been preparing months for this. Many tests and quizzes have happened these past weeks preparing for the absences of students going away for their field trips. The 7th grade, for social studies, is doing their traditional project for the Roman fashion show the week 8th grade gets back from Catalina. These weeks have been fun with an addition of Native American day on September 22nd including students getting a day off.

* Tree Consulting and Inspection * Long Term Forest Maintenance and Planning * Hazardous Removal and Precision Felling * Ornamental Pruning and Lacing * Brush Clearing and Chipping

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5 Helpful Ways To Actively Assist Your Community WE-8690A

was organized and carried out by far-seeing, courageous men, for the purpose of irrigating the rich lands of El Cajon Valley and also of bringing a supply of water to San Diego. Incidentally, but quite as important, they were aware that they were making a demonstration of the agricultural possibilities of San Diego’s derided back-country. Some citizens understood the importance of the undertaking but the majority were too busy with real estate speculations to be much concerned—at least, this was true of the floating population of newcomers. One writer said these men were “mere fools ‘monkeying’ with an impracticable scheme, and of no consequence anyhow.” On February 22, 1889, the completion of the flume was celebrated in San Diego, most impressively. There was a street parade over a mile long, and a display of the new water. A stream from a 1¾ inch nozzle was thrown 125 feet into the air, at the corner of Fifth and Beech Streets, and at the corner of Fifth and Ivy, another one 150 feet high, to the admiration of the citizens. It is really a pity to have to spoil the story of the celebration

Warren H. Hildreth died August 20, 2017 in his home in Julian with his family and beloved pets. Warren was born in Santa Ysabel on November 20, 1920 and was raised in Julian by his grandparents, Dr. Herman "Lee" Hildreth and Ada Hildreth. Warren married the love of his life, Jonalee, on October 7, 1961 and lived happily married for 56 years till his passing. Warren was survived by his wife, two sons, two grandchildren, and his great grandson. Services will be held at the Julian Pioneer Cemetery on Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 11am located at 1000 A St., Julian, CA. Followed by a small remembrance at Julians’ American Legion Post 468 located at 2503 Washington St., Julian, CA. In Lieu of flowers, donations can be given to Julian Historical Society, Julian Pioneer Museum or Julians’ American Legion Post 468.

of such an achievement, with a joke, but—the truth is, the water in the pipes at the time was not the Flume Company’s water, at all. The Flume Company had placed no valves in their pipes, and, consequently, when they turned the water on, it was

airbound and the water advanced very slowly. When the day for the celebration came, the water being still several miles away, the officers of the San Diego Water Company quietly turned their own water into the pipes, and had a good laugh in their sleeves while listening to the praises the people lavished on the fine qualities of the “new water.” The Flume Company’s water arrived three weeks later. The flume emerges from the San Diego River a short distance below the mouth of Boulder Creek, and proceeds thence down the Capitan Grande Valley to El Cajon Valley, about 250 feet from the Monte. From this point the flume curves to the east and south of El Cajon, at a considerable elevation. From El Cajon, the flume is brought to the city by the general route of the Mesa road. The total length of the flume proper is 35.6 miles. The reservoir is an artificial lake on the side of Cuyamaca Mountain, about fifty miles from San Diego, at an elevation of about 5,000 feet. Its capacity is nearly 4 billion gallons. It is formed by a breastwork of clay and cement, built across the mouth of a valley, forming a natural basin. The construction of this flume exerted a very important influence in bringing on and sustaining the great boom, although it was not completed until after the short-lived real estate boom had ended. Come and see Julian’s 61st annual comedy Melodrama at Town Hall the last two weekends of October. Tickets can be purchased at the Chamber Office, or on Eventbrite.com (type in Julian as the city). You can find more information at JulianMelodrama.com, Tickets are $10 for adults and teens, $5 for kids 4-12. Kids 3 and under are free. Proceeds go to scholarships and youth programs sponsored by the Julian Triangle Club.

(Family Features) Social responsibility comes in all shapes and sizes, but ultimately it comes down to one common purpose: making the world a better place. From volunteering at local shelters and community centers to feeding those in need at your local food bank, there are countless ways to give back within your community. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 25 percent of people in the U.S. volunteered in 2015. However, studies on health and volunteering show that people who volunteer report feeling continued on page 8

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4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month 10am at the Julian Women’s Club House - 3rd Street Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff ’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society Presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7 pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 3 pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00 ESL Class - Tuesday/Thursday Improve your English skills with a Palomar College Instructor Julian Library, 4-6pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 6pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15 Every Tuesday Tai Chi with Rich. Julian Library - 9 AM Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10am - Baby Story Time with Miss Joanne 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts with Miss Joanne 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 4:30 - Qi Gong - An ancient Chinese healing system using physical postures and breathing to guide and replenish energy, with Vika Golovanova. Second & Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 10:00am Every Thursday VET Connect - VA services available at Julian library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment. Thursdays, 9am-4pm. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall

and

September 27, 2017

Back Country Happenings

Friday Night In Wynola Shirthouse Bluegrass Band

Every 1st & 3rd Thursday Lego Club, Lego building for kids grade K-5. All materials supplied. Julian Library - 2:30pm. Every Saturday Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance. Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves & Desperados historic comedy skits at 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm – stage area behind Julian Market & Deli.

The Shirthouse Blugrass Band brings their harmonies to the Red Barn Friday from six to nine.

Classic ‘Old Guys’ Rock “After Hours” At Wynola Pizza

SEPTEMBER

Wednesday, September 27 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 10am Wednesday, September 27 Julian Art Guild Demonstration Kris Finch will be demonstrating how to draw portraits from a live model. Julian Library - 6pm Saturday, September 30 Join the Julian Dark Sky Network as we celebrate International Astronomy Day. They will also be doing a recap of the details from the recent solar eclipse, through stories and a slideshow. Julian Library - 10:30am

OCTOBER

Tuesday, October 3 Music On The Mountain San Diego Chamber Music Society “From Beethoven to Broadway, music for Horn and Piano” Julian Library - 6pm

No it’s not a late night this Saturday at Wynola Pizza the band is “After Hours.” Playing the classic stuff they grew up with. After Hours is Chris Bitner, Michael DeLuca, Larry Phillips and Will Wiscott. Self described as a group of old guys who still like to rock and roll, and they do - like the Ventures, Doobie Brothers, 50, 60’s 70’s is their groove and you’ll be signing along or dancing in yourseat all night long, show time is six. Upcoming Wynola Pizza & Bistro Shows:

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite 6 to 8 Friday, October 6 – Maddie Leigh Saturday, October 7 – Chris Clarke & Plow For more information call Wynola Pizza & Bistro 760-765-1004 www.wynolapizza.com

Tuesday, October 3 FREE Flu Shots Presented by Palomar Health Julian Library 4-6:30 Friday, October 6 JHS Homecoming Parade - Noon Football Game - 6:00

Proudly serving visitors for over 25 years, including friends and family of our backcountry neighbors and residents

Monday, October 9 Indigenous Peoples/ Columbus Day Wednesday, October 11 Feeding San Diego Free produce and select staple items. No income or eligibility requirements. Julian Library - 10am

Five unique guest rooms, near town, on 3 wooded acres with extensive gardens, benches and pathways. Our guests enjoy a full breakfast each day, goodies in the afternoon and unsurpassed hospitality.

Our adjacent BLACK OAK CABIN provides another option for your getaway! www.butterfieldbandb.com

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262

Wednesday, October 11 Crafternoon Crafts for kids with Crystal at the Julian Elementary Schools Club Jaguar. Only open to current JUESD students. Julian Library - 12:15 Saturday, October 14 Dulcimer & Ukulele Lessons with Dave Harding Julian Library - 10am Friday, October 20 61st Annual Melodrama Julian Town Hall - 7pm

Julian Historical Society

Saturday, October 21 Haunted San Diego Nicole Strickland from the San Diego Paranormal Research Society will be discussing San Diego’s North County haunted

• On Sept. 30, 1868, the first volume of Louisa May Alcott's beloved children's book "Little Women" is published. Alcott's subsequent children's fiction included "Little Men" (1871) and "Jo's Boys" (1886). • On Oct. 1, 1908, the first production Model T Ford is completed. Between 1908 and 1927, Ford would build 15 million Model Ts. The cars were powered by a 22-horsepower, four-cylinder engine and could go as fast as 40 mph. • On Sept. 29, 1913, Rudolf Diesel, inventor of the engine that bears his name, disappears while traveling by steamship from Belgium to England. On Oct. 10, his body was found floating in the water. His death was judged

a suicide, but many people believed Diesel was murdered. • On Sept. 26, 1928, work begins at Chicago's new Galvin Manufacturing plant. Galvin would introduce the Motorola radio, the first mass-produced commercial car radio. The name had two parts: "motor" evoked cars and motion, while "ola" derived from "Victrola" and was supposed to make people think of music. • On Sept. 25, 1957, under escort from the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division, nine black students enter all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Of the 517 black students in the district, 80 expressed interest and were interviewed by the school. Of the 17 chosen, nine decided to attend. • On Sept. 27, 1967, a French TV network begins to broadcast the first (and only) season of the American sitcom "My Mother,

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

7:00pm

*Newly Renovated*

All 23 rooms combine modern comforts of A/C, private baths, flat screen TV and free WiFi Vintage mountain charm perfect for groups or romantic getaways

4th and ‘C’ Street

The Car." The show's premise was a man visits a used-car lot and finds a 1928 Porter convertible that is, somehow, the reincarnation of his dead mother. • On Sept. 28, 1972, weekly casualty figures for the Vietnam

(760) 765 1420

War contain no U.S. fatalities for the first time since March 1965. Losses remained high among South Vietnamese forces, which had taken over the fighting. © 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


The Julian News 5

September 27, 2017

by Michele Harvey

While Michele recovers from her shoulder replacement we are publishing some past columns that are still relevant to, the following original appeared in September 2004. MjH

A Smile Goes Along Way

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Your Tax Dollars AT Work

Tips For Parents Of Teen Drivers

Providing a variety of toys inspires kids to play in many different ways, which helps them build a full arsenal of crucial developmental skills.

Decoding Play: Why Variety Is Key To Raising Successful Kids (NAPSA) - Have you ever watched a child during playtime switch between building blocks, putting together a puzzle, and talking with their stuffed animals? Through each of these unique types of play, kids are building strong developmental skills that will no doubt come in handy later in life. According to experts at The Genius of Play, a national movement to bring more play into kids’ lives, children learn through both structured and unstructured play, with different types of play honing various abilities and behaviors. Just as kids need to study a variety of school subjects to stimulate distinct parts of the brain, engaging in diverse types of play will create a more well-rounded individual, ready to tackle life with all the skills they have learned early on. To ensure that your child is getting a balanced mix of play, check out these toy examples and their developmental benefits: • Games & Puzzles Build Mental Agility. Brainteasers, puzzles and strategy-based games strengthen critical thinking skills by facilitating a child’s ability to strategize and focus. They can also sharpen their planning skills and attention spans. • Dolls, Action Figures and Playsets Teach Emotional Intelligence. Kids are not yet able to express their emotions as adults would. These toys let kids show fear, frustration, anger or aggression, among other emotions, in a situation they can control. • Outdoor Toys Encourage a Physically Active Lifestyle. Active play is critical to proper physical development. Through outdoor activities like bike and scooter riding, kids can hone their coordination, balance, gross motor skills and even fine motor skills. • Arts & Crafts Nurture Creative Thinkers. Get kids thinking outside the box with activities like arts & crafts. Creative play provides children the freedom to explore new possibilities while coming up with unique ideas and solutions. • Dress-up/Role-Playing Is a Rehearsal for Future Star Communicators. Role-play gives children a chance to use words they’ve heard adults and other kids use - helping to improve their vocabulary. More expert advice and everyday play ideas based on a child’s age or developmental area are available at TheGeniusofPlay.org. Follow @GeniusOfPlay on Facebook and Instagram.

(NAPSA) - The National Safety Council reports that half of all teen drivers will be involved in a car crash before graduating from high school. Listening to these helpful tips and utilizing avail- able technology can help you keep your teen driver safer. Advice For Teens A safer driving experience can be achieved with deliberate steps like wearing your seat belt, putting your phone in your glove compartment, and obeying the speed limit. Driving at slower speeds will be especially helpful when driving in unfamiliar or difficult-to-navigate areas. Plan ahead! Knowing how to get to your destination ahead of time and how long it will take to get there will provide for a less stressful trip. Focusing on the road and not the passengers in the car can also help you reduce risk while driving - and perhaps the most important, if not the most obvious piece of advice, is to never drink and drive. Drinking and driving is illegal and impairs judgment and reaction time. Advice For Parents Being the parent of a new teen driver can be stressful and it’s a task parents must be vigilant about. Keeping a few tips in mind when preparing teens for driving can help you ready them for the responsibilities of the road. Understand and educate your teen about the laws your state has for the types and number of passengers allowed in your teens’ car and the times they are allowed to be driving. After this time is passed, only allow your teens to increase the amount of passengers and times they drive if you feel they are ready. Be a good example - make sure that you observe the rules of the road while driving to demonstrate the importance of safety. By occasionally riding with your teen, you can observe their driving skills to make sure they understand and are following all laws and safety precautions. Tim Hollister, a Teen Safe Driving Advocate and author of “Not So Fast: Parenting Your Teen Through the Dangers of Driving,” advises parents to approach their teens’ driving as if they were air traffic control and their teen were flying an airplane. “Every time your teen gets behind the wheel,” Hollister encourages, “go through a safety checklist, have a flight plan, and use monitoring technology to

760 765 1020

YESTERYEARS

Home Crafted & Vintage Items • Home Sewn Kitchen Items • Baskets • Glassware • Books • Souvenirs Open 11-5 • Wed — Sun closed Monday & Tuesdays Downtown Julian - Cole Bldg.

2116 Main Street - Downstairs

Kat's Yarn & Craft Cottage 2000 Main Street Suite #106

NE W

O

L

There was an article last Friday in a Government Executive Today e-mail that appears each morning in the old e-mail in-box. It said: “Federal employees all across government are learning a lesson this week in the form of new training: do not leak. “The government wide campaign against “the unauthorized disclosure of unauthorized information,” as well as “controlled unclassified information,” or CUI, came at the direction of the White House. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster last week sent a directive—subsequently obtained by several media outlets—to all federal agencies demanding they train their employees on the “serious consequences” of improper leaks of such information by Sept. 22.” Betcha didn’t know that some 4 million federal employees (civilian, that is) had to take time off from firefighting, research on hurricane paths, spying, whatever, to attend a class, ginned up at a large cost, no doubt, since none of this could be done cheaply or it wouldn’t seem serious, to learn what they were all told, in no uncertain terms, soon after they were hired? Betcha never thought that sitting in a class for…how long? How long does it take?....say an hour would stop people from leaking information they already knew they shouldn’t leak. Let’s say it’s an hour-long class. And it takes an average of fifteen minutes to get there, sit down, get ready, and fifteen minutes to get back to the old desk which may be in a different building. That’s six million person-hours (we used to say man-hours but some people now object to that) lost. Maybe more because you better believe people will take time to bitch about having to go to the class. Another 15 minutes per employee or 1.5 million person-hours. And handouts. What would such a class be without handouts. At least 10 pages long—we’ll dispense with the fancy binder for lack of time—but it still adds up to 40 million pages plus the time to produce them. And you wonder where your tax dollars go?

This column may seem redundant to some. However, I’m going to remind people anyway. I work in town, and see what happens between businesses and customers. This is primarily directed at business owners and employees who make their living from restaurant and retail sales. I’m a friendly person, and people tell me the good things that happen to them, and they tell me their complaints. Restaurants giving slow service, together with mixing up orders, is one of the commonest complaints I hear. People who work in town often order lunch in town. They have limited time to pick up their food. Getting an order that isn’t correct often means they don’t eat at all. Or they find themselves paying for food they didn’t want just to get some lunch. Add this to bad service such as employees showing more interest in having conversations with friends, instead of serving potentially paying customers, and business is lost. The same happens in retail shops. Employees are sometimes more interested in phone conversations than in helping potential customers. I’ve worked in retail and in restaurants for over 40 years. I began when I was young, and was taught from the beginning to always be nice to customers. Giving the best service possible doesn’t always mean giving good service. Sometimes employees trying to do several things at once means service suffers. However, a good attitude goes a long way toward keeping customers happy. Happy customers often stay long enough to find something to buy. I avoid using the word “No”. When asked a question such as “Do you take Discover? “ We don’t. Instead of answering with “No”, I say “We take VISA and MasterCard.” When people want to bring a stroller into the shop, I don’t tell them “No”. I say, “You can park it over there.” Even in negative situations I am always cheerful. It helps me and it helps everyone around me. This past year, I’ve heard lots of complaints about business being slow. I’ve also heard a few business owners, including Bed and Breakfast owners say that business is great. The difference between good business and slow business is often in the little extras we can do for customers. Local customers and tourists all appreciate the little ways we can make their day a good one. They tell their friends about their experience in Julian. Lets all work together to make it a good one. These are my thoughts

JULIAN

(619) 246-8585 Knitting/Crocheting classes

A new connected car device enables parents to have more-informed conversations with teens about their driving habits. make sure that flight plan is being adhered to.” New technology, such as Hum by Verizon, allows parents to receive the type of information

N

EAST OF PINE HILLS

My Thoughts

C ATIO

kat@julianyarn.com www.julianyarn.com

needed to help their teens drive safely. For example, parents can receive alerts if their teen drives outside a boundary they set or over the speed they select. Hum also offers pinpoint vehicle location, safety scores and crash detection so that emergency help is close at hand. When it comes to your family’s safe- ty while driving, you can never have too much information. Utilize these tips and technologies to help encourage safe driving every time your teen gets be- hind the wheel. Learn More You can purchase the Hum device and learn more by visiting a Verizon Wireless retail store or www.hum.com.


6 The Julian News

Julian

Back Country Dining

and

Julian

Julian

&

Winery Guide

Julian

www.menghiniwinery.com

Serving Afternoon Teas and Lunch

Our 15th Anniversa g n i t a r b e ry C el

SENIORS THURSDAYS $6 -

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE VISA/MASTER CARD ACCEPTED

COLEMAN CREEK CENTER (2 BLOCKS OFF MAIN ON WASHINGTON)

OPEN 7 DAYS

Julian 760

Julian Tea & Cottage Arts

765-2655

760 765 0832

Tasting Room and Picnic Area

Open: *Every Day 11 - 4

2124 Third Street

one block off Main Street

Drive Thru Service For To-Go Orders

10 am- 4 pm Thursday through Monday

Lake Cuyamaca

Julian

Breakfast Lunch or Dinner

Julian’s First Producing Winery

*Except: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

www.juliantea.com

11:30AM - 8:30PM

MENGHINI WINERY Established 1982

YOUR CHOICE + DRINK

760 765-1810

September 27, 2017

1150 Julian Orchards Drive

2 miles North of Julian out Farmer Road

760 765 2072

Daily Lunch Specials

Daily Dinner Specials

CLOSED Tuesday and Wednesday

ROMANO’S RESTAURANT

ITALIAN & SICILIAN CUISINE

Your Table Awaits

Breakfast

Open Daily 6am to 8pm

Wednesday thru Sunday - 7 to 3

Don’t forget Monday is Donuts Day OPEN: Mon/Tues 7:30 -3:30 Wed-Fri 7 - 5 Sat/Sun 7 - 6

Dine In or Takeout • Wine and Beer 15027 Highway 79 at the Lake

2128 4th Street • Julian

2718 B Street - Julian Reservations 760 765 1003

Julian

760•765•0700 Julian

See our menu at www.romanosrestaurantjulian.com

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS/WEEK

Only a Short ride from downtown Julian

Julian & Wynola

Pies, Soups & Sandwiches Holiday Baking

JULIAN GRILLE

Gateway To All of The Back Country Corner of 78 & 79 in Santa Ysabel

Groups Please Call

760 765 3495 Ample Parking

RV • Trailer • Motorcycle

Carmen’s Garden Friday Night Prime Rib is BACK! Friday and Saturday are Cheese Fondue nights A fun party for the family!

HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY – SUNDAY STEAKS • SEAFOOD • PRIME RIB • FULL BAR • Lunch and Dinner • Patio Dining 765-0173 2224 Main Street Mid-Week Dinner Specials

2119 Main St. Julian

4510 Hwy 78 Wynola

760-765-2472

2018 Main Street • 760 765 4600

Julian

Wynola

3:00 to 6:00

Homemade soups, fried chicken, pot pies, meatloaf, mac ‘n’ cheese and other delights. All homemade, soul-warming and DELICIOUS!!

open 2pm Mon-Thur open 11:30 Fri - Sun offering - tasters - pints - 32oz or 64oz jugs of beer to-go dog friendly Patio 1485 Hollow Glen Road Located just 1/2 mile east of downtown off Highway 78

Phone 760-765-BEER [2337]

Visit us online at: www.nickelbeerco.com

Wynola Casual, Relaxed

Breakfast served Friday - Monday

Julian & Santa Ysabel

Open 7 Days a Week

Family Friendly

MORE THAN JUST GREAT PIZZA! Sunday thru Friday and Thursday Saturday 11am - 8:00pm 11am - 9:00pm

ENTERTAINMENT EVERY Friday & Saturday 6-9

Two locations to serve you:

Julian

Santa Ysabel

2225 Main Street 21976 Hwy. 79 (760) 765-2449 (760) 765-2400 www.julianpie.com

Your Location Here

• AWARD WINNING THIN CRUST

WOOD-FIRED PIZZA • Every Sat & Sun afternoon BBQ/Grill Specials • “From Scratch” Salads, Soups, Desserts (760) 765-1004 3 miles west of Julian on Hwy. 78/79

Dine Inside, Outside Take Out Conference Facilities

Over 35 varieties of beer, ale and hard cider

Showcase Your Restaurant In Our Dining Guide 13 Weeks - $175 26 Weeks - $325 52 Weeks - $600 You Can Do It, for Tips!

1. TRAVEL: What West and East Coast cities does Interstate 10 connect in the United States? 2. ADVERTISING: Who was the mascot for Kellogg’s Froot Loops cereal? 3. TELEVISION: Who played the patriarch of the Clampett family in “The Beverly Hillbillies”? 4. LITERATURE: What 1969 novel begins with the line, “All of this happened, more or less”? 5. MUSIC: Where did Puff the Magic Dragon live in the Peter, Paul and Mary song? continued on page 12

Chef’s Corner Breakfast For Busy Days With the new school year upon us, it may be difficult to maintain a healthy meal schedule. Nutrition plays an important role in a successful school year for children and a productive workday for adults. Nutrition and mental alertness go hand in hand. It’s often said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, yet 35 to 40 percent of all Americans skip breakfast. The statistics for children are just as alarming -- as many as 48 percent of girls and 32 percent of boys do not eat breakfast every day. Additionally, for many children, breakfast is a trip to a convenience store or a vending machine for a soda and a high-fat, high-sugar pastry. This is definitely not the best choice for the nutrients they need, nor is it cheap. Children who are nutritionally fit are more likely to have the energy, stamina and self-esteem that enhance their ability to learn. But, as they run out the door with

thoughts of seeing old classmates, joining new clubs, participating in school sports and getting good grades, they might not be paying much attention to the proper nutrition needed to accomplish all of this. For children and teens, a morning meal is especially important to prepare them to meet the challenges of learning. Many studies have shown that those who eat a morning meal tend to perform better in school, score higher on tests, have higher school

attendance and less tardiness, and have better concentration and muscle coordination. Also, children who eat breakfast have fewer hunger-induced stomachaches and are less likely to be overweight. You can make breakfast fun by planning it with your child. Decide who prepares what and work together to get it done. If your child doesn’t like traditional breakfast foods, don’t worry -- breakfast food can be any food they like, even a slice of pizza. Keep quick-tofix foods on hand or get breakfast

continued on page 12


September 27, 2017

The Julian News 7

We like to check out the fire trucks...

Newspaper Fun! www.readingclubfun.com

Fire Safety is Smart!

Have you ever visited the firehouse or had a fire fighter come to your school to speak? It’s just plain smart to learn how to help prevent fires. When fire fighters talk about fire safety we tell students: • Get out of the house quickly if there is a fire. • Call the fire department from a neighbor's house. • If your clothes catch on fire remember to...

7

by Bill Fink

Sherman

by Bic Montblanc

When the Civil War began, the North was taken by surprise when the Southern armies proved to be a superior force. Perhaps because much of the warrior class of West Point graduates were from the South and with the training ground of the Mexican War, the superior leadership of southern generals and the perceived “righteous” cause of the South propelled them to initial victories. It took a while before the war became righteous for the North. The leadership of ineffectual northern generals gave way to the tactical, bludgeoning force commanded by Ulysses Grant who understood the industrial might of the North and the terrible toll it needed to exact on the enemy to win the war. Gone was the political general and in their place emerged the men who understood “total war” and the extreme cost they would need inflict, to bring a dedicated enemy to its knees. The triad of generals that ultimately turned the war for the North in addition to Grant were William Tecumseh Sherman and Cavalry General Phil Sheridan. To this day Sherman is reviled in certain quarters because of his burning of Atlanta and Columbia, SC and his decimation of the South in his “march to the sea.” Sherman is an interesting character not only because of his philosophy and mastery of total war “War is cruelty. There is no use trying to reform it. The crueler it is, the sooner it will be over” but his career in banking, as a business executive, teacher and lawyer. He was born in Ohio in 1820 and his middle name of Tecumseh was given by his father who admired the Chief of the Shawnees. He was one of eleven children and when his lawyer father died when he was nine. He was farmed out and raised by a neighbor Thomas Ewing who was a successful lawyer, Senator from Ohio and Secretary of the Interior under Zachary Taylor. Ewing was able to secure an appoint to the Military Academy for the sixteen year old Sherman. He excelled in mathematics, chemistry and philosophy as well as drawing which was an important skill in the mid nineteenth century. His demeanor was slovenly though and because of excessive demerits it caused him to graduate sixth in his class. After graduation he began serving in the Second Seminole War in Florida. He was serving in California when the Mexican - American War broke out and did not see action. He was in California and along with the Governor confirmed the discovery of gold and played a key role in laying out future communities including Sacramento. He left the military because he was disappointed in his non combat role and began his business career in banking, first in San Francisco, then New York. When the banks failed in the Panic of 1857 during James Buchanan's Presidency he moved to Kansas and opened a law practice. In 1859 he became the head superintendent of a military academy in Louisiana which eventually became LSU. Sherman was indifferent to slavery but not to the Union. South Carolina’s secession and other events caused him to leave his post. He knew early on that the South was doomed. “You people of the South don’t know what you are doing. This country will be drenched in blood, and God only knows how it will end.” War is a terrible thing! You mistake, too, the people of the North. They are a peaceable people but an earnest people, and they

Annimills LLC © 2017 V10-37

STOP, DROP AND ROLL!

Family Fire

Cook in the kitchen only when an adult is helping you. Don’t touch matches, lighters or candles. They are only for adults to use.

Safety Checklist

Families check out this list!

smoke

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ency emerg 7 grownu p

6 exit

esca 8 pe

rill fire d smoke

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hydrant

fire truck

2 Ways Out

Never use elevators if there is a fire (stairs are much safer). Smoke rises. If there is a fire, stay low: crawl under the smoke. Have you picked a place to meet the rest of your family once you are all out of the house? Once you are out of the house, stay out of the house.

A. fire pole B. fire dog C. schools D. inspection E. water rescue F. maintenance G. first aid

Match each word to the phrase that makes sense:

To complete the job, fire fighters may use (a):

stairs

In the Day of a

See the nine words in bold print to the left? Circle them in the fire extinguisher.

A. to reach high floors or windows when a door is blocked B. to protect their heads from flames and debris C. to spray gallons of water onto the fire D. to allow them to breathe in a smoke-filled room E. to get to a fire quickly with all the right equipment F. to lift water from a lake or pond to put out wildfires G. to protect their bodies from fire (flame-proof materials) and to be seen easily by others due to reflective strips H. to chop down doors or walls during a rescue

1. fire truck 2. helmet 3. axe 4. water hose 5. air tank 6. ladder 7. helicopter 8. coat

fire fi ghter 11

se hou

Finish each phrase with the word that makes sense: 1. spread fire safety and awareness by visiting 2. slide from the third or second floor to the first on a 3. use scuba gear and a boat for 4. go to public buildings or businesses for a safety 5. clean their vehicles and perform equipment 6. feed, play with and train the 7. teach classes about CPR and other

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fire statio Read each of n alarm the 15 words and phrases in the list below. Then, find a word or phrase above that means fire almost the same thing and fill in the puzzle. 1. fireplug 6. steps 13. flame 15 2. home 7. smoke alarm 14. firehouse 3. siren 8. fumes 15. adult New inventions help fire fighters 4. fireman 9. crisis do their difficult work. One invention is a scanner 5. getaway 10. fire engine that can detect faint heartbeats, which can help to find people trapped under rubble. Another is a 11. way out mask with built-in “thermal imaging” that lets fire 12. fire fighters “see” people and flames through smoke. exercise

Do you know two or more ways out of the house?

In a typical day, fire fighters may:

Hmm... I spy a hydrant!

14

13

Do you have smoke detectors on every level of your home? Test them monthly. Change the batteries at least once a year.

1 detec tor 4 2

F I R E D O G A F G S Q U O D H J I O S A N V Q W V H I Z A L F U R I E S V K S I P Q G L A D D E R M L F I D A O K E Z X V C S F A C P P O Q O D K I U O F U G P X J Z R L K N A T R I A T E C V B E C Z A E K Q F K R E T D R L S C H O O L S I I I F J S U W F D I A T S R I F

A T G A X E G H J U I T F V B X A W

F I R E

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F M C A K U E Q I W O X

ONCE YOU ARE OUT SAFELY, NEVER GO BACK INTO A O

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O

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Y

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What does this fire safety message tell you? Follow this color key to find out: R = red Y = yellow O = orange

BUILDING!

Newspaper Fun! Created by Annimills LLC © 2017

POST NOTES

...and ask the fire fighters questions.

Solution Page 12

will fight too. Besides, where are your men and appliances of War to contend against them? The north can make a steam engine, locomotive or Railway car, hardly a yard of cloth or pair of shoes can you make. You are rushing into war with one of the most powerful, ingeniously mechanical, and determined people on earth right at your doors. You are bound to fail.” He moved to St. Louis for a short time becoming the president of a railway company. In mid 1861 he offered his service to the military and through influence of his brother John, a U.S. Senator, he was offered a commission. He led a command at the early battle of Bull Run where the Union was trounced. His actions were meritorious though and he was promoted to Brigadier General. He was transferred to and gained command of the

Department of the Cumberland in Kentucky. The psychological toll of command was beginning tell on Sherman and he requested to be relieved. He was assigned to General Halleck in Missouri who shortly dismissed him as unfit to serve. He went to be with his wife in Ohio to recover from “melancholy” and his thoughts of suicide. Sherman recognized his own insanity. By the end of 1861 he was back serving under Halleck and providing the logistics for Grant in his battle at Fort Donelson. He was assigned to Grant and fought with him at Shiloh. He was shot in the shoulder and hand, had three horses shot from under him and recovering from a disastrous first day said, “Well, Grant, we've had the devil's own day, haven't we?” Grant replied, “lick them tomorrow though.” Sherman was promoted to Major General

after the battle. By 1864 Grant had gone east to take command of the army and Sherman was in command in the west. By mid year Sherman invaded Georgia with over 90,000 men. “I intend to make Georgia howl. He captured and burned Atlanta in September, which in addition to being a major victory inspired the North and virtually guaranteed Lincoln a victory against the democrat candidate, former Major General George McClellan, whose party’s platform would have ended the war and given the South its victory in secession. Then Sherman began his march to the sea. In a wide swath his army lived off the land destroying anything in its path. “I would make this war as severe as possible, and show no symptoms of tiring till the South begs for mercy.” Sherman

then marched south in Georgia, captured Savannah, (telegram to Lincoln) “I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah” and then north, taking particular fury in South Carolina who fired the first shots in the war. He burned the capitol continued on page 13

1. Rajai Davis, in 2016, became the eighth Cleveland Indian to hit for the cycle (single, double, triple, home run) in a game. Who was the last player to do it before him? 2. In 1998, Juan Gonzalez of

Texas became the second player to have 100-plus RBIs before the All-Star break. Who was the first? 3. Three times in the 1990s, quarterbacks went in the top two spots in the NFL Draft. Name two of the three sets. 4. Name the last school before Villanova (2014-17) to win at least three consecutive Big East regular-season titles in men’s basketball. 5. How many teams during the 2016-17 NHL season had 12 players score at least 10 goals each? 6. In 2017, Kyle Larson became only the second NASCAR Cup driver to win from the pole in Fontana, Calif. Who was the first? 7. Who was older when he won his last tennis major: Andre Agassi or Pete Sampras? answers on page 12


8 The Julian News

Ask Pastor Rick

September 27, 2017

Assisting Your Community

Apple Days

continued from page 1

continued from page 3

Specializing in Ranch & Equine Properties and the Custom Showing of your Investment

Debbie Fetterman

Your Personal & Professional Real Estate Expert

REALTOR®

CalBRE #01869678

debbiellama@live.com

Religion In The News Greek Orthodox Church Attempts To Block Jerusalem Property Sales In Court The Greek Orthodox patriarch in the Holy Land announced that his church will appeal an Israeli court decision that approved the sale of prime church property to companies seeking to expand their presence in Jerusalem’s Old City. The church had challenged the property deal in court for the past decade, arguing it was conducted illegally by the sincedeposed previous patriarch and was therefore invalid. The Jerusalem District Court upheld the deal paving the way for three large properties near the Old City’s Jaffa Gate to be leased for 99 years to Ateret Cohanim, a group that has been buying properties for Jews in traditionally Arab areas of Jerusalem. Patriarch Theophilos III alleged that the lower court ruling was “politically motivated” and said the church would appeal to Israel’s Supreme Court. The church will do “everything within its power so that this unjust ruling will be overturned,” he said at a news conference in the Jordanian capital of Amman. Theophilos leads a predominantly Arab flock of 220,000 Christians in Jordan, Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The Greek Orthodox church is one of the largest property owners in the Holy Land, including in Jerusalem’s Old City, one of the most sensitive areas of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Source: The Times of Israel, summarized by Pastor Rick

Ask Pastor Rick

I don’t go to your church, but I hear sermon after sermon each Sunday. How can I make the most out of what I hear? Great question, and I’m glad that you are in fellowship with a church body somewhere! If you want to make the most out of the sermons you hear, here is what I suggest: Take notes as your pastor speaks. Ask questions that arise from his sermon about the text. Pray through the text. Talk and pray about the sermon with friends after church and through the week. Start conversations by asking, “How did the Scripture challenge or speak to you today?” You can also encourage others by sharing what you learned about God and His Word during the sermon. Meditate and act on the sermon you heard throughout the week. Don’t let the Sunday sermon become a one-time event that fades from memory as soon as it is over (James 1:2225). Talk to others about how you can specifically apply what you learned in the week ahead. Choose one or two applications from the Scripture and prayerfully put them into practice. Prepare yourself to receive the sermon. Pray that your heart would be soft and humble before it. One more thing, pray for your pastor too. Rick Hill is the Senior Pastor at Hillside Church on 3rd and C Streets in Julian, CA. Direct all questions and correspondence to: hccpastorrick@ gmail.com or Hillside Church, Religion In the News, Box 973, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

emotionally, mentally and physically better. If that's not incentive enough, lending support to organizations in your community can often bring immediate and tangible results that give you a connection and sense of community. There are some programs that even enable people to make a difference by matching them with volunteer or funding opportunities. One example is the America's Farmers Grow Communities program, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund. "It's exciting to see communities strengthened by their residents," said Angela Allen, program manager for the America's Farmers Grow Communities program, which focuses on supporting local nonprofits in rural communities with the help of local farmers. "The good news is there are several simple and easy ways people can get involved in their communities and make a difference."

Volunteering. Nonprofit organizations rely on the support of loyal donors and volunteers to deliver on their missions to improve the communities they serve. Time and talent are among the most valuable gifts you can give a deserving cause. One of the greatest benefits of volunteering is the chance to put your energy and abilities to use for a cause you care about, whether it's feeding the hungry, rescuing animals or some other cause that is close to your heart. Giving blood. There is an ongoing need to replenish communities' blood supplies, whether for medical uses or in the aftermath of a tragedy. Giving blood is fast, relatively painless and can save lives. Donating. Money doesn't make the world go 'round, or so the saying goes. However, it can make a difference when it comes to bettering the community. Nonprofit and community organizations rely on monetary contributions not only to fulfill their existing program needs, but also to expand those services to impact more people. Rather than a single, one-time gift, consider setting up an ongoing donation so your impact continues over time. Applying for funding opportunities. Another way to help your community thrive is by exploring avenues to create new funding opportunities for nonprofits. For example, the America's Farmers Grow Communities program provides farmers an opportunity to help a nonprofit of their choice. Eligible farmers can enroll in the program until Nov. 1 at GrowCommunities. com for a chance to direct a $2,500 donation to a local eligible nonprofit organization. Since 2010, the program has given more than $26 million to nonprofits, including food banks, emergency response organizations, youth agriculture programs and more. Paying it forward. Not every step you take in support of your community has to be a large one. In fact, the ripple effect of a series of smaller deeds can have a truly momentous impact. You can set the feel-good wheels in motion in your own community by simply thinking about a time when someone generously gave their own resources to benefit you and paying forward that kindness with a matching endeavor. You might let a frenzied mom go ahead of you in line at the grocery store or pay for a meal for the elderly couple behind you at the drivethru.

760.522.4994

Lake Cuyamaca

O.P. Ball “Kids Fishin’ in the Pines” Derby

vintage tractors on display

Judy Taylor doing rope tricks

Cisco and Kiersten Clibourne with their falcon Kauai

The kids came to fish, hundreds of them Saturday at Lake Cuyamaca for the Annual “O.P. Ball - Kids Fishin’ In The Pines - Derby. Free food being cooked by the San Diego Anglers….good food like blue fin tuna, dorado, yellow fin tuna, wahoo, yellowtail, hamburgers, and hot dogs. And plenty of prizes for the little anglers. The annual event at the lake introduces some of the little shavers to the fine sport of fishing and a lucy few learn what catching is all about. It provides a great day for families to do some bonding and enjoy the great outdoors. A big THANK YOU has to go to the San Diego Anglers for all the preparation and then running the event every year.

SPRAGUE REALTY RESIDENTIAL – COMMERCIAL – LAND – RENTALS – APPRAISAL

2110 Main Street, Julian

(760) 765-0035

~PENDING~

Luneta Dr, Pine Hills 1.1 ac Lot - $79,000

Iron Springs Rd, Harrison Park .82 acre lot, $92,000

Pima Trail, Lake Cuyamaca .2 ac. Lot $69,777- $77,900

Ritchie Road Classic Cabin 1 BR / 1 Bath - $264,000

New Modular Homes Starting Under $250,000

J.R. Straus Appraiser/Agent

www.SouthernCaliforniaAppraisalReview.com Serving San Diego & Imperial Counties Since 1986 Sales or Appraisals Text J.R. @ (619)733-4330 Jeffrey Robert Straus OREA Cert. #010605 /CA BRE Lic# 02029788 Sue Solleder Broker/Owner CA BRE Lic# 00958581


September 27, 2017

The Julian News 9


September 27, 2017

10 The Julian News

®

Dear EarthTalk: I'm finally ready to join the 21st century and commit to putting solar panels on my roof. Where do I start? -- Henry Hughes, Washington, DC Good things may in fact come to those who wait. There’s never been a better time to go solar, given how much prices for panels have come down while efficiency in converting sunlight to electricity—even in less-than-sunny locales—has risen dramatically. Of course, you can’t just snap your fingers and get panels on your roof. First you have to navigate a confusing maze of regulations, incentives and installers before anyone even looks your roof over for feasibility.

The first place to start is to find out which federal, state and local incentives may be available in your neck of the woods for going solar. Check out the free online Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), a comprehensive information resource that’s updated by North Carolina State researchers working off a U.S. Department of Energy grant. How does solar work? Is my home suitable for solar panels? Will I save money by going solar? Can I get financing? How will solar impact my home’s resale value? If you’re looking for answers to questions like these, the Department of Energy’s Homeowner’s Guide to Going Solar has you covered. Trying to figure out if it's better to lease or buy your solar panels? You’re not alone, and it's hard to do the math given the apples/ oranges scenario. Luckily, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) spells it all out clearly—not just whether to lease or buy but also how to get multiple bids to save money and which questions to ask before

There’s never been a better time to go solar, given how much prices for panels have come down while efficiency in converting sunlight to electricity—even in less-than-sunny locales—has risen dramatically. Credit: Chris Kantos, FlickrCC.

entering into an agreement with an installer—in its recently updated Residential Consumer Guide to Solar Power. Given how new the solar industry is, it's often hard to know whether a given installer is going to be reputable, let alone be able to survive the next economic downturn. Angie's List offers several pearls of wisdom—how the cheapest bid may not be the best deal, why extended warranties may not be worthwhile, how to save yourself from death by paperwork—in a recent article on the topic. When you’re finally ready to find an installer, check out the “Find a Certified Professional” page on the website of the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP), a trade group that offers the “gold standard” in professional certification and company accreditation programs to renewable energy professionals. If you’re a quote-comparing type, you'll also want to check out Energy Sage, a website that lets you compare quotes from solar installers in your area. This free service is maintained by the Department of Energy’s (DoE’s) SunShot Initiative, a national effort to support solar energy adoption by making solar energy affordable for all Americans. While you can’t go wrong with a highly touted local installer, there are also benefits to choosing one of a handful of companies leasing or selling solar panels on a larger scale across the country and beyond. SolarCity/Tesla, Vivint, Sunrun, Sunnova and SunPower are a few of the leaders, each offering solar installs in California and several other states including New Jersey, Massachusetts, Arizona and Hawaii. CONTACTS: DSIRE, www.

dsireusa.org; NABCEP, www. n a b c e p .o r g /c e r t i f i e d - i ns t a l l e rlocator; Energy Sage, www. energysage.com; Angie’s List, www. angieslist.com/ar ticles/how-hiresolar-panel-installer.htm; SEIA, www.seia.org; DoE, energy.gov/ eere/sunshot/homeowner-s-guidegoing-solar. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of the nonprofit Earth Action Network. To donate, visit www.earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk. org.

What may be the oldest musical instrument was found in a cave, a Neanderthal site in Slovenia. The instrument is the 43,000-yearold femur of a bear that has two evenly spaced holes.

Libraries Changing Communities

PETS OF THE WEEK

continued from page 2

said they’d attended classes, programs or lectures at their local institutions, a 10 percent increase over 2015. But the breadth of events a modern library can host relies upon the physical space within each building, which is why a major part of this change comes in the form of reconfigured spaces. To accommodate shifts in usage, library systems have been improving their physical structures. For example, marquee projects by renowned architects have reinvigorated the Washington, DC, Public Library (DCPL) system, with 15 completed remodels (two of which were designed by the pairing of Adjaye Associates and the Freelon Group, of National Museum of African American History & Culture fame). Six more library upgrades are currently on the horizon in DC, including a renovation and addition to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. An architectural team comprised of Martinez + Johnson Architecture and Mecanoo will modernize that facility, aiming to improve overall transparency and visibility while adding amenities such as a café, a roof terrace event space and spaces for music production and fabrication. The end goal, according to DCPL, is to position the library as an engine for social improvement as opposed to simply being a place to pick up or drop off a book. To learn more about how libraries are changing in communities nationwide, visit topicarchitecture.com. Even as new digital technologies emerge, modern libraries will always remain home to large holdings of printed material. Many collections have already expanded to include e-reader versions of popular titles, music and video on a variety of media. But the latest design improvements to libraries make them not only enjoyable venues for reading, but also welcoming places to build community.

Jasmine is a five year old spayed black feline who weighs 9lbs. She is a friendly gal who will come trotting right over to you when you call her name. Jasmine is currently in the shelter's "zoo" with several other felines and gets along just fine. However, Jasmine does prefer human companionship over her kitty pals and loves to be petted and adored. Meet this sweet gal by asking for ID#A1772306 Tag#C107. Jasmine can be adopted for $35.

Miracle is a two year old female Chihuahua/Corgi Mix who weighs 11lbs. Her previous owners could no longer care for her so Miracle is in need of a new home. Miracle resembles a miniature Corgi and has the silly personality to match. She is playful with plenty of energy for all kinds of adventures. Bring your current dog to the shelter to meet her if you are looking for a playmate for your pooch. Meet Miracle by asking for ID#A1805473 Tag#C278. She can be adopted for $69.

All adoptions will include vaccinations, spaying/neutering (upon adoption), a microchip and free Vet visit. Dog fees also include a 1 year license. Jasmine and Miracle are at our Central County Shelter, 5480 Gaines Street, San Diego . The Shelter hours are 9:30AM to 5:30PM, Tuesday through Sunday or visit www.sddac.com for more information.

• CUSTOM HOMES • DECKING • DOORS & WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL SERVICE • HARDWOOD FLOORING •

C O N T R A C T O RPROBLEM S WATER?

• G R A D I N G • PA I N T I N G • R E M O D E L I N G • S E P T I C S Y S T E M S • T I L E W O R K • WAT E R S Y S T E M S • W E L L D R I L L I N G • Carpet / Flooring / Window Treatment

Plumbing

Electric

Contractor

Gus Garcia’s

Call – Bert Huff ! For 30 years I have been taking care of San Diego and the backcountry’s water problems. Home and Business taste. odor, hard water, iron ... no mater what your water problem I can Electrical Servicebig or small. Badguarantee the highest quality products at the best price.  New Meters  New Panels  Fans & Lighting  Additional Circuits  Water Well Electrical

GENERAL CONTRACTORS

WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS • www.haguewatersandiego.com

760•789•5010

Office 760 788-7680 Cell 760 519-0618 • Mike DeWitt Cell 760 522-0350 • Pat DeWitt

SALES • SERVICE Residential & Commercial Water Treatment Systems - Water Testing License No. 415453

PO Box 518 Julian, CA 92036

cell (760) 271 0166 License # 678670

Painting

GOT WATER PROBLEMS?

Heating / Air Conditioning Service

General Contractor

License # 737182

LARRY NOBLE CONSTRUCTION INC. General Contractor

New Construction Room Additions Decks Remodels

• Exterior/Interior Specialist • Reliable - Over 35 Years Experience • Fully Licensed and Bonded • Power Washing Lic # 792234 Serving All of • Free Estimates San Diego County LOCAL JULIAN RESIDENT

Over 35 Years Experience Lawrence Noble, Owner Julian Resident for 27 years

760 212 9474

State Lic.602654

Excavation / Site Work

RICTOR

Dozer Work Clearing, Grading, Roads, Pads

95/

Larry Herman Licence 938001-A

PO Box 1342 JULIAN, CA 92036

Contractor

Bull Dozer Services

All General Engineering No Move In – $ hour Charge . . . 760 749 1782 / 760 390.0428

760 • 765 • 2363

CONSTRUCTION

www.haguewatersandiego.com

DECKS • FENCES • METAL ROOFING License No. 415453

Highest Quality Lowest Prices Free Estimates WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS

760-765-2222

Lic. #834174 PLUMBING • ELECTRICAL • REMODELS


September 27, 2017

The Julian News 11

California Commentary

California Legislature Abandons Middle Class

by Jon Coupal

Does anyone honestly think that the California Legislature’s complete abandonment of the middle class is unrelated to the state’s highest-in-the-nation poverty rate? This past week presented a stark contrast in the Golden State. First, the controller reported state tax proceeds from all categories are exceeding budget projections. Specifically, the state brought in almost $9 billion in August, exceeding projections in the state budget by over $340 million. All three of the major sources of state revenue — personal and corporate income tax plus sales tax — were up over last year. While a substantial portion of this uptick in economic activity can be attributed to the Trump recovery, there is no denying that California remains an economic powerhouse in its own right. However, about the same time as we were getting cheery news about state revenue, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that over 20 percent of Californians live in poverty. The “Supplemental Poverty Measure,” which takes into account California’s absurdly high cost of living, gives us the highest poverty rate in the country while the rest of the nation has shown improvement. So how is it that the most economically powerful state in the union has a poverty level that would make even Mississippi blush? In large part, the answer lies in California’s toxic mix of crony capitalism with mindless pursuit of progressive policies. And both were on full display in the final week of this year’s legislative session. Few bills moving through the last hectic hours at the Capitol could be remotely characterized as helping the middle class. For example, Assembly Bill 1250 is a complete sop to labor interests. It would prohibit counties from contracting out for services “customarily” performed by county workers unless 14 complicated requirements are met. This would drive up the costs of county government — ultimately paid by taxpayers — and would hurt nonprofits which provide low cost, effective services to county governments. Fortunately, it appears that AB1250 has been stymied this year but will be pushed into 2018. On a more grand scale, little compares to the various bills moving through the Legislature to deal with the housing crisis. Special interests have formed a conga line outside the governor’s

and legislative offices to get a slice of the public pie (baked, of course, with taxpayer dollars). First, is a massive housing bond. Keep in mind that a $4 billion dollar bond will likely incur $8 billion in taxpayer costs after interest and the cost of bond underwriting (Wall Street loves California debt). Second, labor once again wants any public dollars spent on housing to be subject to costly labor restrictions such as Project Labor Agreements or prevailing wage requirements. Who pays for the higher costs? Why, taxpayers, of course. Overall, California’s housing policies being pursued are designed to reward special interests rather than increase housing stock in any significant way. It is totally lost on our elected leadership that the best housing policy would be for government to reduce regulations that stand in the way of housing construction rather than increase regulations. One bill, Senate Bill 35, does provide a little relief from burdensome CEQA requirements but it contains 18 separate provisions that developers must meet in order to qualify for the expedited permit process for residential development. The only bill of which we are aware that would have significantly helped housing affordability was Assembly Bill 1100, coauthored by Assemblymen Phil Chen, R-Brea, and Matthew Harper, R-Huntington Beach, to increase both the current homeowners exemption (which provides homeowners with a scant $70 of annual tax relief) and the renters credit. This proposal would require no new government program nor impose new regulations, which probably explains why it lacked popularity in the Capitol. However, it would have put immediate cash into the pockets of all Californians who have to pay for the roof over their heads. That’s what we call middle-class tax relief. Middle-class Californians have a choice. Stay in California and continue to be the piñatas for progressives and special interests or bail out to other states. Increasing numbers of California’s middle class are choosing the latter. *** Jon Coupal is president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association — California’s largest grass-roots taxpayer organization, dedicated to the protection of Proposition 13 and the advancement of taxpayers’ rights.

Summons, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Public Notices, Liens, Probate Hearings, etc.

$15.00 per column inch for first week and $10.00 per column inch for each additional week. Notice must be submitted to the Julian News for a quote.

email: legal@juliannews.com All Legal Advertising is subject to restrictions of the court, or agency requiring publication. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for deadlines which are missed because of late filings or other requirements beyond our control.

• It was American author and political activist Barbara Ehrenreich who made the following sage observation: "No matter that patriotism is too often the refuge of scoundrels. Dissent, rebellion and all-around hell-raising remain the true duty of patriots." • Coke has the honor of being the first soft drink in space. Members of the Space Shuttle Challenger drank the beverage from a specially designed "Coca-Cola Space Can." • Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States, was one tough son of a gun. In his youth, his fighting prowess won him fame as a national hero for defeating the British at the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812 -- and he never slowed down, it seemed. At the age of 67, he was at a speaking engagement when a member of the audience pulled out a gun and tried to shoot him. When the gun misfired, President Jackson used his walking stick to beat his attacker almost senseless. • If you're like the typical human, it takes your brain about 0.0004 seconds to retrieve any given memory. • Even in these modern days, certain maritime traditions hold on. For instance, when a new ship is launched for the first time, the water that first touches the ship is caught in a bottle. Once sealed, that bottle stays with the ship; it's typically displayed in the captain's office, near the bridge. • On a per-capita basis, residents of Mexico consume more carbonated drinks than people in any other country on Earth. *** Thought for the Day: "I have always supported measures and principles, and not men. I have acted fearless and independent, and I never will regret my course. I would rather be politically buried than to be hypocritically immortalized." -- Davy Crockett © 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundredand-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before. — Jacob A. Riis ***

© 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** There is always a voice saying the right thing to you somewhere, if you’ll only listen for it. — Thomas Hughes ***


September 27, 2017

12 The Julian News

L E GA L N O TI C E S

L EG A L N O T I C ES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00033414-CU-PT-NC

Case Number: 37-2017-00034612-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: KRYSTAL TAVALE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: GALEN MICHAEL SHERWOOD FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: KRYSTAL TAVALE and on behalf of: TAJ BENJAHMEN BARBER, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: TAJ BENJAHMEN BARBER, a minor TO: TAJ BARBERTAVALE, a minor

PETITIONER: GALEN MICHAEL SHERWOOD HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: GALEN MICHAEL SHERWOOD TO: MICHAEL RONAN SINCLAIR

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on NOVEMBER 7, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 12, 2017.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on NOVEMBER 3, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 19, 2017.

LEGAL: 07744 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11, 18, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9023364 a) TINT TECHNOLOGY b) TINT TECHNICIAN c) TINT TECHNIQUE d) TINT TECH 10659 Prospect Ave, Santee, CA 92071 The business is conducted by An Individual Joshua Sunny Jade Howell, 1570 Souvenir Dr, El Cajon, CA 92021. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 18, 2017.

ONCE YOU ARE OUT SAFELY, NEVER GO BACK INTO A

BU R N IN G

6

BUILDING!

In a typical day,

fire fighters may:

1. spread fire safety and awareness by visiting 2. slide from the third or second floor to the first on a 3. use scuba gear and a boat for 4. go to public buildings or businesses for a safety 5. clean their vehicles and perform equipment 6. feed, play with and train the 7. teach classes about CPR and other

A. fire pole B. fire dog C. schools D. inspection E. water rescue F. maintenance G. first aid

To complete the job, fire fighters may use (a): 1. fire truck 2. helmet 3. axe 4. water hose 5. air tank 6. ladder 7. helicopter 8. coat

A. to reach high floors or windows when a door is blocked B. to protect their heads from flames and debris C. to spray gallons of water onto the fire D. to allow them to breathe in a smoke-filled room E. to get to a fire quickly with all the right equipment F. to lift water from a lake or pond to put out wildfires G. to protect their bodies from fire (flame-proof materials) and to be seen easily by others due to reflective strips H. to chop down doors or walls during a rescue

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

MEETINGS

AA Meetings Monday - 8am Monday - 11am

Shelter Valley Community Center

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4 F I I R S E F F I R G H T R E 14 R

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A T G A F I R E D O G A X E F G S Q U O G D H J I O S A N V H Q W V H I Z A L F J U U R I E S V K S I I P Q G L A D D E R T M L F I D A O K E F Z X V C S F A C P V P O Q O D K I U O B F U G P X J Z R L X K N A T R I A T E A W C V B E C Z A E K Q F K R E T D R L F S C H O O L S I I M C A K U E I F J S U W F Q I W O X D I A T S R I F

E

7 S M O K E O K 11 E E D X E I T A T I E C T O R O W N

9 E M E R G E O N C Y

U P

1. Mask with “thermal imaging” built in, can “see” people through smoke. 2. A scanner that can detect heartbeats!

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa & Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

WORSHIP SERVICES

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3 A 5 L E S T A R C M A P 10 E

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foods ready the night before, such as mixing a pitcher of juice. If children say they’re not hungry, start them out with something light like juice or toast, and send them off with a nutritious midmorning snack such as yogurt, cheese or a bagel. Some children believe skipping breakfast may help them lose weight, but just the opposite is true. Skipping meals often leads to overeating later in the day. Getting too hungry can lead to a lack of control and the inability to determine when you are full. This can result in consuming more calories than if you had eaten a good breakfast. Good nutrition is crucial for social, emotional and psychological development. Teaching children how to eat healthy will enable them to establish a foundation of good nutrition and healthy lifestyle habits that will benefit them for the rest of their lives. This easy, make-ahead recipe for peanut butter and jelly scones can be a quick breakfast along with a cup of milk or a smoothie, a lunch-time treat or an afterschool snack. It’s also a fun way to teach your children basic baking skills! PBJ SCONES 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup natural unsalted creamy peanut butter 1 package (5 ounces) mixed dried berries (about 1 cup) 3/4 cup fat-free vanilla Greek yogurt 1 large egg 1. Heat oven to 400 F. Line a heavy baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. Combine the flours, brown sugar, baking soda, cream of

Answers

LEGAL: 07743 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11,18, 2017

7

6. MOVIES: What was the last movie that singer Elvis Presley starred in? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Which California city has an area code of 415? 8. GEOLOGY: What are the softest and hardest minerals on the Mohs scale? 9. GAMES: What color is Kentucky Avenue in the Monopoly game? 10. GEOGRAPHY: What country has the most natural lakes?

continued from page 6

1. Santa Monica, California, and Jacksonville, Florida 2. Toucan Sam 3. Buddy Ebsen (Jed) 4. “Slaughterhouse-Five” (Kurt Vonnegut) 5. The land of Honalee 6. “Change of Habit” 7. San Francisco 8. Talc and diamond 9. Red 10. Canada

LEGAL: 07745 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11, 18, 2017

Fire Safety is Smart!

Chef’s Corner

continued from page 6

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9022783 ELYSIAN PHYSICAL THERAPY 731 S. HWY 101, Solana Beach, CA 92075 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1078, Cardiff, CA 92007) The business is conducted by An Individual Elyse Marie Tomasello Quartini, 2218 Edinburg Ave, Cardiff, CA 92007. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 12, 2017.

LEGAL: 07746 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11,18, 2017

Trivia Time

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Tuesday - 6:00pm

PERSONAL SUPPORT

Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Childcare – Birth Through 5th Grade

Connecting People With God And Each Other . . . Changing Lives

Sisters In Recovery

San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

www.sandiegoga.org

Tuesday - 7pm Tuesday - 7pm Julian Mens Meeting

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Wednesday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

San Jose Valley Continuation School

Teen Crisis HotLine

3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

1-800- HIT HOME

Thursday - 7pm

SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

(across from Fire Station)

*** If you want to recapture your youth, just cut off his allowance. — Al Bernstein ***

1•888•724•7240

3407 Highway 79

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Friday - 8am 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 9am Book Study 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

Friday - 7pm

“Friday Night Survivors” 3407 Highway 79 (across from Fire Station)

Saturday - 7pm “Open Step Study” 3407 Highway 79

(across from Fire Station)

RENTALS

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

PUBLIC NOTICE

COACHING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 2017-2018 School Year

Please submit a Letter of Intent and Resume to: Yvonne Fleet, yfleet@juhsd.org or P.O. Box 417, Julian, CA 92036 10/11

Wednesday - 6pm Wednesday - 7pm

Time 1300 0300 0600 1100 1800 0900 1100 2200 2000 0500 0500 1300 1400 1600

Date 9/17 9/18 9/19 9/19 9/20 9/21 9/21 9/21 9/22 9/23 9/23 9/23 9/23 9/23

Julian-Cuyamaca Fire — Activity Log Incident Comm. Struture Medical Medical Medical Medical Traffic Collison Medical Medical Alarms Ringing Alarms Ringing Medical Medical Traffic Collison Medical

Location B St Ramona Dr Belvedere Dr Sunrise Dr C St. Wynola Rd/ Hwy 78 Whispering Pines Dr Whispering Pines Dr Main St. 4th St Helitrope Hwy 78 Hwy 79/ Paso Pichaco Hwy 79

Corn flakes were so popular in the early 1900s that there were over 40 companies producing this breakfast cereal in and around Battle Creek, Michigan.

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

POSITION: Julian High School Boys Soccer Coach – Paid Stipend QUALIFICATIONS: for this position are as outlined in the JUHSD Athletic Program Policies and Procedures Manual and JUHSD Board Policies regarding Coaches. JOB REQUIREMENTS: Practice every day after school, Travel periodically through the season; Work well with others. EXPERIENCE/EDUCATION: Demonstrated successful ability to work with young adolescents; to coach and teach designated sport; to teach, enforce, advocate and model appropriate behavior, character traits and educational values to student athletes.

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

© 2017 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

WYNOLA PIZZA currently interviewing for cook/chef position. Full time. Looking for focused work ethic and experience in the kitchen. Please contact Sabine 10/18 at 760 550-3737.

(open to all females - 12 step members)

*** Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www.divapro.com. To see howto videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the publisher prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. Publisher accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall Publisher’s Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Publisher is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. Publisher accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

(Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Monday - 7pm

tartar, cinnamon and salt in a food processor. Pulse to combine. 3. Add the peanut butter by spoonfuls to the flour mixture. Pulse until the mixture is combined and looks like sand. Transfer to a mixing bowl and stir in the berries. 4. Stir the yogurt and egg together in a small bowl and add to the flour mixture. Stir with a spoon until combined. Use your hands, if necessary, to ensure that all of the flour is incorporated. 5. Transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface and gently pat into a circle about 1 inch thick. Cut the dough into 8 equal wedges. Arrange wedges on the baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, or until lightly browned. Let cool slightly and serve warm. Makes 8 servings. TIP: Scones can be frozen and then reheated by wrapping them in a damp, food-safe paper towel, and heating on DEFROST in the microwave for 45 seconds.

Details Tender Assist to Ramona

COACHING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 2017-2018 School Year

POSITION: Julian High School Girls Basketball Coach – Paid Stipend QUALIFICATIONS: for this position are as outlined in the JUHSD Athletic Program Policies and Procedures Manual and JUHSD Board Policies regarding Coaches. JOB REQUIREMENTS: Practice every day after school, Travel periodically through the season; Work well with others. EXPERIENCE/EDUCATION: Demonstrated successful ability to work with young adolescents; to coach and teach designated sport; to teach, enforce, advocate and model appropriate behavior, character traits and educational values to student athletes. Please submit a Letter of Intent and Resume to: Yvonne Fleet, yfleet@juhsd.org or P.O. Box 417, Julian, CA 92036 10/11

Solo Veh; Non-injury False Alarm False Alarm Non-Injury; Units Cancelled

*** Nature will bear the closest inspection. She invites us to lay our eye level with her smallest leaf, and take an insect view of its plain. — Henry David Thoreau ***

All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in the Julian News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served notice that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

MISC. FOR SALE Big Tex Gooseneck Flatbed Trailer M-2010 - 14GP

14,000 GVR Three Axle Bed = 28 feet long X 83 inches wide Diamond Plate Floor Heavy Duty Ramps w/ diamond plate top Heavy duty frame and cross members on 12-inch centers 17-inch side rails with tie downs 9000# Superwinch $10,500 (760) 705-0437 11/30

continued from page 7 1. Travis Hafner, in 2003. 2. Detroit’s Hank Greenberg had 103 RBIs before the All-Star break in 1935. 3. Drew Bledsoe and Rick Mirer (1993), Peyton Manning and Ryan Leaf (1998) and Tim Couch and Donovan McNabb (1999). 4. The University of Connecticut (1994-96). 5. Four -- Calgary, Columbus, Minnesota and Nashville. 6. Jimmie Johnson, in 2008. 7. Andre Agassi was 32 when he won the Australian Open in 2003; Pete Sampras was 31 when he won the U.S. Open in 2002. ® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


September 27, 2017

Blinking-Eye Clocks

The Julian News 13

Volume 6 - Issue 1 September 27, 2017 Page 1 Joseph Munson, Advisors Student Editor

Fun And Games At High School Retreat

photos by Mr. Marushige

This gentleman with hat, jacket with tails, ruffled shirt and patent leather shoes has the clock in his stomach. The Bradley and Hubbard "blinking eye" John Bull clock sold for $416. Clocks were an important part of the Victorian home. Large grandfather clocks were kept in the front hall or living room to tell time, ring chimes on the hour and even tell the phases of the moon. The only public sources of time were the train station, city hall or church tower clocks. Smaller clocks that told time were kept on the fireplace mantle and were made to be decorative with bronze figures as part of the case in formal homes, and plain or even comic cases in others. Almost all clocks had to be wound for up to eight days. Bradley & Hubbard, a Connecticut company that made many iron and other metal items, had an 1857 patent for a figural novelty clock that could blink its eyes. "Blinkers," also called "winkers," were made in many shapes. An organ grinder with a monkey, Topsey, Mammy, Sambo the Banjo Player and John Bull examples have sold in auctions during the past five years for prices from $500 to about $1,000. John Bull is a character who was a popular symbol of England from 1712 to the 1940s. New England Auctions sold a 16-inch John Bull blinking eye clock for $416 in 2016. *** Q: I have a coffee bin that was in my grandparents' general store in the late 1800s or early 1900s. It's marked "Dilworth's Prime Grade Coffee." The markings were made with a stencil. There is a shipping label on top, but I can't read the date. Does it have any value? A: Dilworth's was in business in Pittsburgh during the late 1800s and early 1900s. John Dilworth was one of the founders of a wholesale grocery company, which operated under various names until 1881, when it became Dilworth Brothers Co. Collectors like early advertising items and if the lettering is in good condition, your bin has value. The shipping label is a plus. Large wooden coffee bins sell for $300 to $500. *** CURRENT PRICES Toy noisemaker, dancing woman, celebrating new year, multicolor tin litho, wood handle, shaped oval, twirls, 1930s, 5 inches, $15. Tin plaque, Martin Luther King Jr., portrait, "I have a dream, Freedom for all my people," 1960s, 8-inch diameter, $40. Appliqued quilt, American Glory pattern, spreadwing eagle, flowers, scrolling vine border, white, red and teal, 1950s, 80 x 90 inches, $580. ***

The 50th Anniversary edition of "Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2018" will be published Sept. 19. Along with Terry Kovel's reflections on 50 years of collecting, the book features 20,000 listings and more than 2,500 full-color photographs, plus trends, special events and surprises. Check out KovelsOnlineStore.com for the new price guide and other resources. (c) 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** A weed is no more than a flower in disguise. — James Russell Lowell ***

The all school retreat, hosted by the Associated Student Body in the beginning of the school year at YMCA Camp Marston. Throughout the day every team played one another to determine the top team of students. We compete in games such as capture the flag, bucket brigade, steal the potato,blanket fold, junga ropes, jacobe cancan, and blanket fold. Added to this years activities was a school wide slip and slide, just for fun. The retreat is special because it helps to create a sense of school pride, unity, and camaraderie among the students and staff, teaches teamwork and promotes good sportsmanship.

Eagles Ravage Wildcats

Eddie Phillips defends a pass, and tackles Wildcat for short gain

Thunder Lopez tries to tag Frankie Alvarado

Post Notes

continued from page 7

Keegan Barry passes the water bucket to Cristian Abarca

in Columbia and then marched to North Carolina. Shortly after overwhelming North Carolina he accepted the surrender of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. Unauthorized, he offered magnanimous terms that he believed were the wishes of Grant and Lincoln including his offer of 40 acres and a mule for the freed slaves. “I want peace, and believe it can only be reached through union and war, and I will ever conduct war with a view to perfect and early success. But, my dear sirs, when peace does come, you may call on me for anything. Then will I share with you the last cracker, and watch with you to shield your homes and families against danger from every quarter.” These terms were revoked by the new President Andrew Johnson. In 1869 when Grant became President, Sherman dedicated to Grant always, “He stood by me when I was crazy, and I stood by him when he was drunk; and now, sir, we stand by each other always” was promoted to the Commander of the Army and was chiefly responsible for the Indian Wars in the west where he continued his total war and scorched earth policy. After his retirement in 1884 he lived in New York City becoming a sought after speaker and engaging in many artistic and literary endeavors and societies. The Republican party sought him out in 1884 for their candidate for the presidency to which he replied in the now famous Shermanesque statement, “I will not accept if nominated and will not serve if elected.” Sherman died on February 14, 1891. He understood and practiced war as only a handful of men before and after him did. His combination of belief in his cause, madness and determination have left an incomparable legacy.

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

More from Sherman; “War is cruelty. There is no use trying to reform it. The crueler it is, the sooner it will be over.” “There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.” “If the people raise a great howl against my barbarity and cruelty, I will answer that war is war, and not popularity seeking.” “War is at its best barbarism.” “War is hell.”

Caleb Biliunas goes high to intercept a Warner pass

Joey Romano, Ben Elliot, and Shane Cranfield carry Emilly Villarta in the trash can relay

Rylie Boyd and Calea Cruz cool off on the Slip-and-Slide

Ozzie Martinez behind his blockers for a long touchdown run. Warner 0 0 0 0 0 Julian 14 24 8 16 62 The Eagles offense and defense had an easy time of it with their neighbors from down the 79. The Eagles ran almost at will and with the occasional pass kept the out manned squad from Warner off balance throughout the afternoon. The defense similarly kept the Wildcats boxed up with only one play looking to give Warner a score, it was called back after an officials conference and ruled a penalty and not a touchdown. The Eagles will next take the field for Homecoming on October 6 against last years league champs St. Joseph’s Academy, six o’clock kickoff. The Homecoming parade is at noon down Main Street.

LEGAL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9023502 a) SMITH CREATIVE b) COUNSEL ADVERTISING AGENCY c) COUNSEL AGENCY d) LASTBAG 8583 Aero Dr #2057, San Diego, CA 92123 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - Counsel Consultancy, LLC, 8583 Aero Dr #2057, San Diego, CA 92123. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 19, 2017. LEGAL: 07747 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11, 18, 2017

NOTICES Name Change Published for only $45

We send a proof of publication to the Court with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Call the Julian News Office

760 765 2231


14 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

JULIAN YESTERYEARS Vintage, Collectible & Handmade Items 2116 MAIN STREET

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to September 1, 2012; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

- PUBLIC NOTICE Vacancy on Julian Community Planning Group Notice is hereby given that there is a vacancy on the Julian Community Planning Group. Applications are invited from persons interested in filling the vacancy. Applications should be submitted by October 5, 2017. Applicants will be interviewed at the regular meeting of the Planning Group on October 9, 2017. The term of the office that is vacant expires on January 4, 2021. In order to serve on the Julian Community Planning Group a person must be a registered voter who resides within the Julian Planning area. Application forms can be obtained by contacting Kiki Munshi, Secretary to the Planning Group by calling (760) 765-0484 or (cell) (252) 671-3727 or by email at kiki@skagenranch.com. Mail requests may be mailed to P.O. Box 1557, Julian, California 92036. Kiki Munshi, Secretary Julian Community Planning Group LEGAL: 07738 Publish: September 20, 27, and October 4, 2017

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CIRCULATE INITIATIVE PETITION

Notice is hereby given of the intention of the persons whose names appear hereon to circulate a petition within the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District for the purpose of repealing the existing annual benefit fee approved in 1984, to be replaced with an annual benefit fee more consistent with current expenses, and to raise the level of services for emergency medical response, fire suppression and related services.

CITIZENS’ INITIATIVE TO REPEAL AND REPLACE JULIAN-CUYAMACA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT BENEFIT FEE

Karen Kiefer Paramedic-Firefighter 3836 Crescent Drive PO Box 1978 Julian, CA 92036

September 22, 2017 LEGAL: 07749

Publish: September 27, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9021588 a) JULIAN LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL b) JULIAN LITTLE LEAGUE SOFTBALL 2819 Hwy 79, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 2073, Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by A Corporation Julian Youth Baseball, Inc., 2819 Hwy 79, Julian CA. 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON AUGUST 28, 2017. LEGAL: 07733 Publish: September 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9022371 FAMILY HEALTH SERVICES TRAINING CENTER 3500 5th Avenue, San Diego, CA 92103 The business is conducted by A Corporation - Healthy Services Academy, Inc., 2685 San Clemente Terrace, San Diego CA. 92122. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 7, 2017. LEGAL: 07734 Publish: September 13, 20, 27 and October 4, 2017

1811 Main Street

[K-Mart Parking Lot]

Tires and Service CUSTOMER SERVICE IS OUR #1 GOAL

NOBODY BEATS OUR PRICES! Open 7 Days A Week

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Monday – Friday 8am — 6pm Saturday 8am — 5pm Sunday 9am — 4pm

St

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t.

William Everett Retired JCFPD Volunteer Firefighter 4824 Pine Ridge Way PO Box 2468 Julian, CA 92036

© 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

& SERVICE CENTER

aS

Patricia Landis Former JCFPD Board Member 3617 Calico Ranch Gate Julian, CA 92036

LEGAL NOTICES

RAMONA

on

Statement of the reasons for the proposed action as contemplated in said petition is as follows: The revenue from the increased benefit fee will provide sufficient funds to raise the level of fire and emergency medical services to residents and visitors within the District by hiring a Fulltime Fire Chief, paying the increased operational expenses of the fire district, replenishing the general reserves that were diminished by costs associated with building the new fire station, adding staff (e.g., paramedic firefighters) and providing stipends to volunteers and reserve firefighters, as deemed appropriate and voted for by the Board of Directors of Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District.

possible career change. But you should have no problem making a decision about an important personal matter. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You're respected by most people for your direct, no-nonsense approach to the issues. But be careful you don't replace honest skepticism with stinging sarcasm. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A newly emerging situation could require a good deal of attention and some difficult decision-making. However, close friends will help you see it through. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Family matters need attention. Check things out carefully. There still might be unresolved tensions that could hinder your efforts to repair damaged relationships. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Of course you deserve to indulge yourself in something special. But for now, tuck that bit of mad money away. You'll need it to help with a looming cash crunch. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A temporary setback in your financial situation is eased by changing some of your plans. You'll be able to ride it out quite well until the tide turns back in your favor. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a gift for understanding people's needs. You have a low tolerance for those who act without concern for others.

m

Section 3. Cost of Living Increase. The fee imposed by this initiative shall be subject to an annual cost-of-living increase that is based on the Consumer Price Index for San Diego County area, determined by the U.S. Department of Labor. The maximum increase for each year shall not exceed three percent (3%). Section 4. Low-Income Homeowner Exemption. The tax imposed by this initiative shall be subject to an exemption for owners of single-family residential units in which they reside whose combined family income, from all sources for the previous calendar year, is at or below the income level qualifying as “very low-income” for a family of such size under Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. §§ 1437 et seq.), for such year. Owners who qualify for this exemption shall be taxed at $50.00 per parcel. The application process will be in the form of self-certification under penalty of perjury. Owners must apply for the exemption provided for in this section annually by petition to the Fire Chief of the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District in the manner and at the time set forth by the Fire Chief. Such petitions shall be on forms provided by the Fire Chief and shall provide such information as the Fire Chief may require. Section 5. Such charges shall be charged to any parcel, improvement, and use of property to which fire protection services may be made available, whether or not such fire protection service is actually used upon such parcel, improvement, or use of property except such tax shall not be imposed upon a federal or state governmental agency or other local agency. Section 6. The Citizens of Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District do hereby propose that the appropriations limit of the District established under Article XIIIB of the California Constitution shall be increased by the amount collected by the levy of this special tax in accordance with the applicable requirements of state law. Section 7. Pursuant to Government Code Section 53724(c), the special benefit tax proposed by this initiative shall be submitted to the voters within the boundaries of the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District in conjunction with the statewide primary election to be held on June 5, 2018. The ballot initiative shall be worded as provided by agreement of the voters of the District. Section 8. If adopted by fifty percent (50%) plus one (1) of the voters, the special tax shall be collected in the same manner and shall be subject to the same penalties as assessments and other revenues collected for the District by the County of San Diego. Section 9. If the initiative is approved, the special benefit taxes shall not exceed the maximum charges set forth in Section 2 hereof. Section 10. Accountability Measures. (a) Account. Upon the levy and collection of the tax authorized by this initiative, an account shall be created into which the proceeds of the tax will be deposited. The proceeds of the tax authorized by this initiative shall be applied only to the specific purposes identified in this initiative. (b) Annual Report. An annual report that complies with the requirements of Government Code Section 50075.3 shall be filed with the District Board of Directors no later than January 1 of each year in which the tax is levied. Section 11. Pursuant to Elections Code Section 9141(a)(3), and California Supreme Court Opinion S234148 dated August 28, 2017, this initiative shall be considered adopted and go into effect if this initiative is approved by fifty percent (50%) plus one (1) vote of the voters. Section 12. If any portion of this initiative shall be declared unconstitutional, invalid, or otherwise unenforceable, the other provisions of this initiative shall remain in full force and effect. Section 13. The special benefit tax proposed by this initiative shall have no effect upon Proposition S, commonly known as the Benefit Fee for Construction of a New Fire Station and maintenance of District’s real property, passed by the voters of the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District on November 7, 2006. Section 14. Definitions. The term “fire protection services” includes both fire protection and emergency medical services.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) This is a good time for the usually outspoken Lamb to be a bit more discreet. You still can get your point across, but do it in a way less likely to turn off a potential supporter. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Good news: All that hard work you put in is beginning to pay off. But you need to watch that tendency to insist on doing things your way or no way. Be a bit more flexible. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might want to delay making a decision on the future of a long-standing relationship until you check out some heretofore hidden details that are just now beginning to emerge. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your reluctance to compromise on an important issue could backfire without more facts to support your position. Weigh your options carefully before making your next move. LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is a good time for ambitious Leos or Leonas to shift from planning their next move to actually doing it. Your communication skills help persuade others to join you. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Relationships -- personal or professional -- present new challenges. Be careful not to let a sudden surge of stubbornness influence how you choose to deal with them. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might need more facts before you can decide on a

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CITIZENS RESIDING WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF THE JULIAN-CUYAMACA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT ARE PROPOSING FOR ADOPTION THE REPEAL OF THE EXISTING ANNUAL BENEFIT FEE APPROVED IN 1984, TO BE REPLACED WITH AN ANNUAL BENEFIT FEE MORE CONSISTENT WITH CURRENT EXPENSES, AND TO RAISE THE LEVEL OF SERVICE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE, FIRE SUPPRESSION AND RELATED SERVICES WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF THE JULIAN-CUYAMACA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT. Citizens of Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District propose as follows: Section 1. It is the purpose and intent of this initiative to authorize the levy of a special tax on parcels of real property on the secured property tax roll of San Diego County that are within the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District (the "District"), to raise revenue for the District for the purpose of providing and enhancing necessary fire protection, prevention and emergency medical services. Specifically, the special benefit tax shall be imposed for the purpose of staffing the District with a full-time Fire Chief and adding personnel deemed necessary to reduce the time in responding to structure fires and medical emergencies. Fees will also bring revenue into line with current costs and replenish the District’s general reserves for operational expenses. Section 2. The citizens within the District do hereby determine and propose for adoption the repeal and replacement of the annual Benefit Fee approved by voters on November 6, 1984, with a new annual Benefit Fee for emergency medical response, fire suppression and related services within the boundaries of the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District, to be levied upon parcel, class of improvement to property, and use of property basis, in an amount not to exceed the following: (a) Parcels with existing construction shall be taxed according to the following schedule: (1) Improved Property: Every parcel within the District with a Single (1) Unit (single family residence or commercial structure): $200.00 (2) Improved Property: Every parcel within the District with Two (2) Units (residential or commercial): $250.00 (3) Improved Property: Every parcel within the District with Three to Ten (3-10) Units: $300 (4) Improved Property: Every parcel within the District with More than Ten (>10) Units: $350.00 (b) Separate parcels attached to a parcel containing a Unit shall be assessed as Vacant Land. (c) Vacant parcels shall be taxed according to the following schedule: (1) Vacant Land: Each parcel within the District containing less than one (0-.99) acres, without a Unit: $2.00 (2) Vacant Land: Each parcel within the District containing one to five (1-5) acres, without a Unit: $20.00 (3) Vacant Land: Each parcel within the District containing 5.1 to 10 acres, without a Unit: $30.00 (4) Vacant Land: Each parcel within the District containing greater than ten (>10) acres, without a Unit: $50.00

Wednesday - September 27, 2017

Volume 33 - Issue 08

760•789•8877

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Automotive Marketplace Tires/Brakes • Trailer • Auto • Trucks

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Over 40 Years Serving All Your Tire and Brake Requirements Collision Repair - Body Shop

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9020691 VERIKILL PEST CONTROL INC. 3034 McGraw St, San Diego, CA 92117 The business is conducted by A Corporation - Verikill Pest Control Inc., 3034 McGraw St, San Diego, CA 92117. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON August 15, 2017.

Why Get Towed Down The Hill?

ALL Insurance Companies Welcome

(760) 765-3755

LEGAL: 07736 Publish: September 13, 20, 27 and October 4, 2017

3582 Hwy 78 at Newman Way Locals Discount

Free Mini Detail

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00030956-CU-PT-CTL

JulianAutoBody@gmail.com Stefan Mussen

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ROSA ELENA SANCHEZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ROSA ELENA SANCHEZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ROSA ELENA SANCHEZ TO: ROSA ELENA SALAZAR IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on OCTOBER 6, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON August 22, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9022640 JULIANTLA CHOCOLATE BOUTIQUE 2608 B St, Julian, CA 92036 (Mailing Address: PO Box 1814, Julian, CA 92036) The business is conducted by An Individual - Yesenia Rodriquez, 2126 2nd St, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 11, 2017. LEGAL: 07740 Publish: September 20, 27 and October 4, 11, 2017

LEGAL: 07735 Publish: September 13, 20, 27 and October 4, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9022639 JULIANTLA CHOCOLATIER 2126 2nd St, Julian, CA 92036 The business is conducted by An Individual - Yesenia Rodriquez, 2126 2nd St, Julian, CA 92036. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 11, 2017. LEGAL: 07739 Publish: September 20, 27 and October 4, 11, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-9023653 GRUBER DESIGN STUDIO 6460 Convoy Ct #217, San Diego, CA 92117 The business is conducted by An Individual John F Gruber, 6460 Convoy Ct #217, San Diego, CA 92117. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON September 20, 2017. LEGAL: 07748 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11, 18, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00033815-CU-PT-CTL

Case Number: 37-2017-00033327-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: RICHELLE MARIE SZCZYGIEL FOR CHANGE OF NAME

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: SARA JEAN MARIE BRUNETTA FOR CHANGE OF NAME

PETITIONER: RICHELLE MARIE SZCZYGIEL HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: RICHELLE MARIE SZCZYGIEL TO: RICHELLE MARIE JETT

PETITIONER: SARA JEAN MARIE BRUNETTA HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: SARA JEAN MARIE BRUNETTA TO: ALISHA MARLEE PARARIDGE

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on OCTOBER 27, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 14, 2017.

IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on OCTOBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON September 11, 2017.

LEGAL: 07741 Publish: September 20, 27 and October 4, 11, 2017

LEGAL: 07742 Publish: September 27 and October 4, 11,18, 2017

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Wednesday - September 27, 2017