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50¢

ESTABLISHED

An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola.

(46¢ + tax included)

Periodical • Wednesday

Time Sensitive Material

March 29, 2017

Volume 32 — Issue 34

Julian, CA.

ISSN 1937-8416

Music On The Mountain

www.JulianNews.com

1985

Nathan James “The Joy Of The Blues” Tuesday, April 4 - 6pm

Track and Field

Please join us for a great evening of music on Tuesday, April 4 at 6 PM as we welcome Nathan James to the Julian Library. He is a favorite in the area for his unique sound and guitars. He is definitely someone you should experience! Never one to follow convention , and always one to think for himself, James has created a musical identity with his homemade instruments and self- taught skills. Armed with his handcrafted washboard guitar and stomping out time on a box made of old fence boards, while singing and blowing harmonica, you are sure to be captivated. James is a well-respected and experienced artist in his field. For over 20 years now he has successfully made his living touring and recording, solely specializing in his passion for blues and American roots music. Drawing from a deep well of influences from many early roots artists and styles, James was quickly attracted to the individuality of self-made music and artistic expression from an early age. Growing up in the small agricultural town of Fallbrook has been influential in choosing his life path because he could relate to music originating from a rural environment. "There wasn't a lot to do here, so you either got in trouble or found something productive to do with what you had around you!" Having supportive parents that didn't force him into college after high school allowed Nathan to go straight into the real world of a ‘working musician’. At age 19 Nathan got the call from the internationally reknown blues veteran James Harman to join his band and tour the country. With Harman, James gained the experience that has shaped his own career. In 2007, James entered the International Blues Challenge in Memphis TN with Ben Hernandez and took 1st place. During his career Nathan has worked with other many well-known artists including: Kim Wilson, Pinetop Perkins, Billy Boy Arnold, Lazy Lester, Johnny Dyer, Rick Holmstrom, Janiva Magness, Mark Hummel and Gary Primich. Nathan has brought his music to concerts and festivals in Spain, Italy, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Faroe Islands, Taiwan, Canada and Mexico, as well as performing all over the United States. In March, 2017 he completed a tour in Russia. Knowing how to get people's attention, Nathan will often go out solo from the bandstand and burst into a frenzied ragtime breakdown that can lead to a washboard solo on his custom LED lit 'Washtar Gitboard'! Another unique aspect of a live show is band mate Troy Sandow. He may start off the set on upright bass while Nathan will play an uptown lead guitar style in the vein of B.B. or T-bone Walker. Then he will switch over to amplified harmonica and Nathan will fingerpick a driving groove on his baritone guitar in the style of R.L. Burnside or Lightnin' Hopkins. Although Nathan's band pays homage to these traditions and has the same quality of musicianship, there is an original and fresh new energy coming from musicians of a much younger generation. As we return to our regular schedule for Music on the Mountain, we invite you to come to the library to sit back and enjoy another great ‘Friends of the Julian Library” sponsored musical event. Following the music, refreshments will be served. The library is located at 1850 Highway 78, next to the High School. For more information please call the branch at 760-765-0370 or visit www.sdcl.org to see the online events calendar.

It Takes A Village To Create A Kingdom 20 Years Of Shakespeare At Spencer Valley SPENCER….Valley…..Spencer…..Valley……32 Minds, 1 Heart! Students have been robustly shouting a version of that chant after every Shakespeare performance since the year 2000. This week we’ll be smiling again as this year’s students add their performance to 20 years of happy Shakespeare memories. Our bulletin board display is chock full of history, honoring the many volunteers that have shaped the program, starting with “The Scottish Play” (Macbeth) in the 1997-1998 school year, adapted and directed by Don Winslow. This year, the show presented will be compilation of scenes – a nod to the present and the past…artfully arranged and directed by Elisabeth Jacobsen and Heidi Schlotfeldt, upper grade teachers at Spencer Valley. These accomplished teachers will also

Saturday, March 4 Mt Carmel Invitational Friday, March 10 Home - Citrus League #1 Saturday, March 18 9:00 Elmer Runge Invitational @Patrick Henry HS Saturday, March 25 10:00 Calvin Small Schools Invitational @Escondido HS Friday, March 31 2:30 Home - Citrus League #2 Saturday, April 15 8:00 Jim Cerveny Invitational @Mission Bay HS Friday, April 28 3:00 Dennis Gilbert Small Schools Invitational @Mtn Empire HS Saturday, April 29 Dick Wilkens Frosh/Soph Invitational@ Del Norte HS Thursday, May 11 2:30 Home - Citrus League Finals Saturday, May 20 CIF San Diego - Preliminaries @Mt. Carmel HS Saturday, May 27 CIF San Diego - Finals @Mt. Carmel HS

Softball

Track And Field Individual Achievement And Improvement

by Coach Sandy Balcom

Julian High School Track and Field competed at Escondido High School in the Calvin Christian Small School Track and Field Invitational for schools with 1000 or less enrollment. It was

Katie Huggins sails the discuss an exciting and successful day. The day started with 9 of kids competing in field events. Tamar Diliberti and Calea Cruz in the frosh/soph division of the long jump. Calea finished 9 of 20 with a 13-02.50 and Tamar jumped a PR of 11-10.25. Also in long jump were Juniors Will Hatch with his first meet of the season and Caleb Biliunas. Will also competed in the Triple Jump, he finished 9 of 35 with a mark of 37’. Throwing Shot for the boys were Cary Gannon who finished 7 of 41 with a PR throw of 38’10” and a season PR in his Discus throw finishing 5 of 38, teammates Alex Carson and Cory Flack also competed in both events Winning the girls Varsity shot put and discus was Katie Huggins who was awarded the Varsity

Girls Field event athlete of the meet. Katie was the only Varsity girl’s field athlete to earn two gold medals. Taking to the track first was Freshman Maya Moniz in the frosh/soph 1600. She took

2nd of 23 girls with a 32 second PR of 5:47.23. Maya also ran a PR in the 800 meter finishing 8 of 29. Calea Cruz qualified to the finals in the 100 meter where they took the top nine times of 5 heats. Calea finished 7th in the finals and Tamar Dilibetri ran the 100 for the first time. Wrapping up the day was our 3200 runners. PJ Davis Scholl finished 4th of 20 frosh/soph boys with a 43 second PR running 11:18.52. Teammate Dusty Flack ran his first 3200 finishing 3rd with a time of 11:16.01. Our last event of the day was Junior Ethan Elisara’s Varsity 3200. He finished 2nd with a time of 10:48.04. All in all it was a great day with 5 kids earning 6 medals and an athlete of the meet award. Friday March 31st we will be back at our home track for our 2nd Citrus league meet.

Thursday, March 2 L 2-12 Home vs Guajome Park Acdmy Tuesday, March 7 W 15-3 Home vs Maranatha Christian Friday, March 10 W 17-1 away vs Lutheran Tuesday, March 14 L 8-9 away vs Foothills Christian Wednesday, March 15 rain Home - Escondido Adventist Friday, March 17 W 23-1 Home - Lutheran Thursday, March 23 3:30 away vs Mountain Empire Thursday, April 13 3:30 away vs Calipatria Friday, April 14 3:30 Home - Borrego Springs Tuesday, April 18 3:30 Home vs Vincent Memorial Tuesday, April 25 3:45 Home vs Foothills Christian Thursday, April 27 3:30 away vs Borrego Springs Tuesday, May 2 3:15 away vs West Shores Thursday, May 4 3:30 Home vs Mountain Empire Tuesday, May 9 3:30 Home - Calipatria Thursday, May 11 3:30 away vs Vincent Memorial

Baseball

Tuesday, February 28 Home vs Liberty Charter Friday, March 3 Home - Calvin Christian Thursday, March 16 3:30 away vs Liberty Charter Wednesday, March 22 3:30 Home vs Rock Academy Wednesday, April 5 3:30 away vs Ocean View Christian Friday, April 7 3:30 away vs Mountain Empire Friday, April 14 3:30 Home vs Borrego Springs Wednesday, April 19 tba away vs Vincent Memorial Friday, April 21 tba Home vs Calipatria Wednesday, April 26 3:30 Home vs Lutheran Katie Huggins at the top of the podium

Continued on Page 7

Taste Of Julian - Saturday, April 8 1 - 5, Tickets = $25 per person at the Chamber Office www.visitjulian.com


2 The Julian News

March 29, 2017

This Weeks Sponsor

You can Sponsor Lunch, call 765-1587

provided by

Farm To School Lunch Program

Thursday

the 23rd Macaroni & Cheese - Mixed Veggie Salad / Fruit the 24th Chef’s Choice - Mixed Veggie Salad / Fresh Fruit the 27th Chicken Nuggets - Mixed Veggie Salad / Fruit the 28th Macaroni & Cheese - Veggie Salad / Fruit

Featuring the Finest Local Artists

Friday

Monday

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Tuesday

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Julian Warriors & Survivors

JULIAN, CALIFORNIA

CANCER & RARE DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP

First Meeting Tuesday, April 4th 3:30-4:30 pm at the Methodist Church New Julian group open to all folks impacted by cancer — patients, survivors, caregivers, family and friends. Please join us at this initial meet-and-greet. Refreshments will be served. For more information, please contact Evelyn Goldschmidt at 760-260-5052l.

Join Orchard Hill’s Supper Club and experience fine dining in an exclusive private setting.

Wednesday the 29th

Letter to the editor Target Registry for the New Fire Station The Julian fire station is just about ready but they need lots of items like pots and pans, sheets etc. We have set up a registry at Target, similar to a baby or bridal registry where you can get as small an item as a spatula all the way to a printer If you would like to donate, it is as easy as going to http://www.jcfpd. com/ and clicking on the Target Button. Target gives you a whole menu of items to purchase.

Grilled Cheese or PBJ Sandwich - String Cheese / Veggies / Fruit

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Outside Storage Trailers, Boats, Cars, RV’s Unit Sizes - 5x10, 10x10, 10x15, 10x20, 10x30

Orchard Hill is serving its fabulous fourcourse dinner on Saturday and Sunday evenings through the spring of 2017. Chef Doris’s fall menu includes tried and true entrées with seasonal sides and perfectly grilled Brandt’s beef.

The Fireplugs

Dinner is $45 per person. Reservations are required. Please call us for more information at 760-765-1700.

3582 Highway 78 at Newman Way Fax (760)756-9020 (760)

765-2601

Access 7 Days - 7a.m. to Dark • UNITS AVAILABLE NOW!

Julian High School to Host Mobile Drive In partnership with San Diego Blood Bank WHEN: Saturday, April 1, 2017 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Where: 1656 Highway 78 Julian, in the Parking Lot. Notes: About 1 in 7 people entering a hospital need blood. One pint of blood, which is the amount volunteers give when they donate blood, can save up to three lives. Approximately, 38% of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood but less than 10% do annually. Since blood is always needed, volunteers are asked to give blood for patients, such as those going through cancer or trauma. Donors must meet the following eligibility requirements: - 17 and older (Age 16 requires a parental consent) - 114 pounds and in good health It is recommended that donors consume an adequate meal and plenty of fluids prior to giving. A photo identification must be presented upon signing up to donate. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment for their convenience but walk-ins are also welcome. To schedule an appointment, please call 619 – 469 – 7322 or visit http:// www.sandiegoblodbank.org/

We look forward to seeing you!

WE INVITE YOUR OPINION! The views expressed by our contributing writers are their own and not necessarily those of The Julian News management. We invite all parties to submit their opinions and comments to The Julian News. All contributed items are subject to editorial approval prior to acceptance for publication. Letters must include your name and contact information. Letters may be mailed to: Julian News P.O. Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 email: letters@juliannews.com in person: Julian News Office 1453 Hollow Glen Road (9am - 5:00pm Wed-Fri) Deadline is Friday Noon for the next weeks issue

The Julian News

email = julianministorageteam@gmail.com

HOME SERVICES

Your Voice Counts Club Jaguar, our before and after school program, is in jeopardy. The proposed Federal budget will eliminate funding for after school and summer programs. This means we would have to shut down this whole program. But, this cut will have to be approved by Congress, so your voice counts! The program is funded through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC). Cite that program name, and how it serves your family, when you contact our elected officials: Duncan Hunter (202) 225-5672 and (619) 448-5201 Dianne Feinstein (619) 239-3884 and (202) 225-5672 Kamala Harris (213) 894-5000 and (619) 239-3884 If you have any questions, you are welcome to call me or Susi Jones at Pathways. Elem: 760-765-0661 Julian Pathways: 760-765-2228 Scot Copeland, Principal

Residential • Industrial • Commercial Serving Southern California

Ben Sulser, Branch Manager

Julian Branch: (760) 244-9160 Cell: 760-315-7696 • Fax 714-693-1194 emai: ben@allstatepropane.com • www.alstatepropane.com

ISSN 1937-8416

Michael Hart and Michele Harvey ..... Owners/Publishers Michael Hart .................................. Advertising/Production Circulation/Classified Michele Harvey .......................................................... Editor Don Ray .............................................................. Consultant

ESTABLISHED

1985 Featured Contributors

Michele Harvey Bill Fink H. “Buddy” Seifert Lance Arenson

Albert Simonson Greg Courson Kiki Skagen Munshi Pastor Rick Hill

Jon Coupal David Lewis Marisa McFedries Joseph Munson

Syndicated Content King Features Syndicate E/The Environmental Magazine North American Precis Syndicate, Inc. State Point Media The Julian News is published on Wednesdays. All publications are copyright protected. ©2016 All rights reserved. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, Case No. 577843 Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at Julian, California USPN 901125322 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036-0639 1453 Hollow Glen Road Office Hours: 9am — 11am Monday 2pm — 5pm Tuesday 9am — 5pm Wednesday — Friday

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submissions@juliannews.com The Julian News @JulianNews Information may be placed in our drop box located outside the office front door. The phone will accept succinct messages 24 hours a day.

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• Full Table $100 or more: Name placed on table, Thank you article in the Julian News, and a Thank You Certificate. • ½ Table $50: Name placed on the table, Thank you article in the Julian News. • ¼ Table $25: Name placed on the table, Thank you article in the Julian News.

Please make checks payable to JUHS Class of 2018 PO Box 417, Julian, CA 92036

In Person

After Hours

The Julian High School 2017 JuniorSenior Prom is being held at Marina Bay on Saturday, May 13th. The Junior Class, who is hosting the event, would like to ask you to help them pay for this special event by Sponsoring a Table at Prom.

If you have any thoughts or ideas please contact Michelle Huggins(Advisor) mckjulian@sbcglobal.net (760) 522-5869

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POPE TREE SERVICE All Your Tree Service Needs Commercial & Residential Oak and Pine our Specialty CA. State License #704192 Fully Insured for Your Protection Workers Comp.

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The Julian News 3

March 29, 2017

Joe Garcia Exhibit “Entwined” At Santa Ysabel Art Gallery

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Health & Personal Services

General Dentistry & Orthodontics

“Dr. Bob” Goldenberg, DDS

Specializing in fixing broken teeth and beautifying your smile ! It’s time you had the smile you’ve always dreamed of ! Call today ! Most Insurance Plans Accepted Visa and Master Card

2602 Washington St • 760 765 1675

Julian Medical Clinic A Division of

• Complete Family Practice Services • Monthly OB/GYN • Digital X-ray Lab Services • Daily Borrego Pharmacy Delivery • Behavioral Health (Smart Care)

Now accepting: Covered California, Medi-Cal, Medicare, Community Health Group, Molina, Sharp Commercial, CHDP. Most PPO’s and Tricare. Sliding Fee Scale and Financial Assistance Available.

Monday–Friday 8-4 pm 760-765-1223 Blake A. Wylie, DO Candy Watts, Family Nurse Practitioner Randy Fedorchuk MD, Pain Management Borrego Dental Services 1st Friday of every month

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Wild Flower Show, One Month Away The annual Julian Wildflower Show, which is free of charge, returns to the Julian Town Hall on Wednesday, May 10 through Saturday, May 13, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With its diverse and distinct ecological regions, Julian is a unique area for wildflowers, with some 850 species of plant life. A resident expert will be on hand to answer questions about the wildflowers. Educational materials will be available for reference and for sale. Also, a downtown map of a self-guided walking tour of flowers will be available. Local school classwork related to wildflowers will also be on display. This year’s theme is “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” and an “Ugly Weed” contest will be held. Information for good and bad uses of wildflowers will be available. To enter the contest, bring your ugliest weeds to the Town Hall starting May 8th through May 13th by noon. The winner will be announced the afternoon of May 13th and a special

At Santa Ysabel Art Gallery, April 8 through June 4, 2017 will be Entwined, a one person show featuring the art of internationally known San Diego County painter Joe Garcia. On exhibit will be Garcia’s landscape and wildlife paintings in oil and in watercolor. Entwined, as an exhibit title, refers to the connectedness of the artist’s favorite subjects to paint, that is, wildlife, habitat and landscape. Opening Reception for Joe Garcia’s Entwined is Saturday, April 8, 4 - 7 PM. Admission is free. The public is invited. A native Californian, Joe Garcia grew up on a small ranch near Escondido, California where he developed an exceptional awareness of wildlife and habitat. He studied illustration at Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles and worked as an illustrator before deciding in 1983 to make fine art his primary focus. With this change of interest to fine art, Garcia took a step that would later turn out to be key to his career as a painter of wildlife. He built an aviary for various types of quail with the intent of drawing, painting and photographing them. He would go into this habitat and sit with the birds, eventually learning to draw and paint each quail type accurately and with feeling. Garcia's fame as a painter of birds grew, and was spread, in large part, due to his quail studies and to the early paintings that he did of the birds in his aviary. Garcia's work has appeared in the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum's Birds in Art exhibition in Wausau, Wisconsin and in the permanent collection of the Bennington Center for the Arts in Vermont. He exhibits annually in the major nature oriented art festivals throughout the United States and has been a demonstration artist for the PBS television series “The Artist's Workshop”. Garcia is as acclaimed for his landscape paintings as he is for his wildlife work. He is also very well known as a teacher of watercolor painting in this country and overseas. Joe Garcia is the author of The Watercolor Bible and Mastering the Watercolor Wash, now art book classics, and the recent Secrets of Watercolor, all published by North Light Books. He has been featured in numerous art books and magazines and has written a major article for the publication Watercolor Magic. In recent years, traveling to photograph painting reference has become an enjoyable and adventurous part of the painting experience for Garcia. In addition to taking photos he has been traveling and teaching painting workshops in the United States and in Greece, Italy, France and New Zealand. Joe Garcia lives in Julian, California with his artist wife Anne, where the oaks and pines support an abundance of wildlife, a good place for an artist with a specialty in painting creatures and habitat. Santa Ysabel Art Gallery is located at 30352 Highway 78 at Highway 79 in Santa Ysabel, seven miles below Julian. Admission to the gallery is free. Gallery hours are Thursday through Monday, 11AM - 5 PM, and by appointment. Closed Tuesday and Wednesday. For more information call 760-765-1676. prize will be given (you need not be present to win). Visitors view a variety of wildflowers on display from a variety of locations in the Julian area. With permission from landowners, the wildflowers are picked from five plant zones, and then taken to the town hall and arranged on tables representing the different geographical areas and plant zones from where they were picked. Display cards provide the names of the plants and describe their historical uses, including some for health and healing, by Native Americans. The show is organized by the Julian Woman’s Club and sponsored by the Julian Chamber of Commerce and has been a popular event since its first show in 1926. When: May 10-13, 2017 Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily Where: Julian Town Hall (downstairs), 2129 Main St, Julian Admission: Free. Donations gladly accepted. Julian Woman’s Club uses donations to support some 15 local organizations and provide scholarships to local students.

Club member June Learn brings Yucca from her property to the show.

Time Out, finch, 10.5 x 23 - watercolor

License #945348

WE-8690A


4 The Julian News

Julian Calendar

CALENDAR LISTINGS If you are having or know of an event in Julian, Lake Cuyamaca, Ranchita, Warner Springs, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley Sunshine Summit or elsewhere that should be listed in the Backcountry Happenings column, please contact the JULIAN NEWS at PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036, voice/fax 760 765 2231 email: submissions@ juliannews.com or bring the information by our office.

ONGOING EVENTS

Julian Community Planning Group 2nd Monday Every Month Town Hall - 7pm Architectural Review Board 1st Tuesday of the Month Julian Town Hall Downstairs - 7pm Julian Chamber of Commerce Mixer - 1st Thursday of Month Board - 3rd Thursday of Month Town Hall - 6pm 760 765 1857 Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District 2nd Tuesday of The Month 10am at the Julian Women’s Club House - 3rd Street Julian Community Services District Third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 A.M. at the San Diego County Sheriff ’s Office, Julian Substation, Public Meeting Room, 2907 Washington Street, Julian Julian Women’s Club 1st Wednesday - 1pm 2607 C Street information: 760 765 0212 Julian Historical Society Presentations, 4th Wednesday of the Month Julian Historical Society Building, 2133 4th Street - 7 pm Julian Arts Guild General Meeting: Second Wednesday of the Month, Julian Library - 4 pm Program: Fourth Tuesday of Month Julian Library - 6:00 ESL Class - Tuesday/Thursday Improve your English skills with a Palomar College Instructor Julian Library, 4-6pm Zumba Aerobics with Gaynor Every Monday and Thursday Town Hall - 6pm, info: 619 540-7212 Julian Arts Chorale Rehearsals at JCUMC Monday @ 6:15 Every Tuesday Tai Chi with Rich. Julian Library - 9 AM Healthy Yoga with Lori Munger HHP,RYT Julian Library - 10am Every Wednesday @ Julian Library 10am - Baby Story Time with Ms Sandi 10:30am - Preschool Story Time and Crafts with Miss Linda 11:00am - Sit and Fit for Seniors - Gentle Stretching and flexibility exercises with Matt Kraemer 4:30 - Qi Gong - An ancient Chinese healing system using physical postures and breathing to guide and replenish energy, with Vika Golovanova. Second & Fourth Wednesdays Feeding San Diego Julian Library parking lot - 10:00am

Every Friday Stories In Motion with Miss Edith - Julian Library 10am Kundalini Yoga - An uplifting blend of spiritual and physical practices. Kundalini yoga incorporates movement, dynamic breathing techniques, and meditation. With Edith Khalsa - Julian Library - 11am Homework Helpers. Math tutoring for grades 1-6. Julian Library 2:30pm. Every Saturday Techie Saturday at Julian Library - We now have a 3D printer! Come in on any Saturday and get individual instruction and assistance.

Wednesday, March 29 Top Talons Falconry Come join us at the Library for an afternoon of fascinating information, and close encounters with incredible birds! Cisco Clibourne is a Master Falconer who successfully uses his trained falcons and hawks to provide professional bird abatement, entertainment, and educational services. Julian Library - 1pm

Rise & Shine Breakfast Specials - 7 to 10 weekdays

Something different 5 days a week, includes house coffee

Bluegrass In The Red Barn With The Shirthouse Band OPEN DAILY - HOME STYLE COOKING 1921 Main Street 760 765 2900

ACTIVITIES & LODGING

Friday, March 31 The County of San Diego observes the Cesar Chavez Day holiday. All San Diego County Library locations will be closed. Friday, March 31 Dinner Theater @ Jeremy’s On The Hill “Love Letters” Friday, March 31 Out Of The Box Players presents: “Lizzie Borden Of Fall River” $5 tix or $40 wine/dinner/show packages, partnering with Hatfield Creek Winery reservations: (760) 789-0856

The Shirthouse Bluegrass Band returns this Friday to the Red Barn at Wynola Pizza starting at six. Featuring; Rich Craig on banjo, Peter Lauterbach on mandolin and guitar, Rob Lewallen on guitar, Conley Robinson on guitar and Len Claesson on bass. The Shirthouse Band, longtime favorites at the Red Barn they will give you three hours of fun this Friday night.

Cadillac Wreckers Swing The Blues - Saturday

APRIL

Saturday, April 1 April Fools Day Saturday, April 1 Gold Hill Musical Tour & Contra Dance Julian Town Hall - 1pm Saturday, April 1 Out Of The Box Players presents: “Lizzie Borden Of Fall River” $5 tix or $40 wine/dinner/show packages, partnering with Hatfield Creek Winery reservations: (760) 789-0856

Wednesday, April 6 Julian Mountain Lion Project Threats to Andes Cats discussion with Rocio Palacios and Rodrigo Villalobos of Alianza Gato Julian Library - 6pm Limited Seating(40) Reserve your seat: (760) 230-3301

Julian Historical Society

760 765 1020

Home Crafted & Vintage Items • Home Sewn Kitchen Items • Baskets • Glassware • Books • Souvenirs Open 11-5 • Wed — Sun closed Monday & Tuesdays 2116 Main Street - Downstairs

Monthly presentations on the fourth Wednesday of the month The Historical Society Building 2133 4th Street

Dane Terry and Dana Duplan bring their Cadillac Wreckers band back to Red Barn for an evening of swing, jazz and rhythm-and-blues. Saturday night starting at six it’s an evening of the swiningest cats to climb the mountain, Cadillac Wreckers at Wynola Pizza’ Red Barn, now home to Back Country Spirits, a upscale water hole for those with a distinctive taste in music.

7:00pm

Upcoming Wynola Pizza & Bistro Shows:

Every Thursday — Open Mic Nite 6 to 8 Friday, April 7 – Chicken Bone Slim Saturday, April 8 – Liz Grace and the Swing Thing For more information call Wynola Pizza & Bistro 760-765-1004 www.wynolapizza.com

Friday, April 14 Good Friday

YESTERYEARS

Downtown Julian - Cole Bldg.

(Right) Nora Waterman from Julian caught a 5lb trout off the south end t dock using speckled powerbait on 3/26 (Below) Brian Webb with a 3.75lb trout on 3/21. At chambers using green powerbait. (Lower Right) Randy Minniear from campo caught a 4lb trout on 3/26 using salmon peach and a nightcrawler near the west finger jetty. Randy lost his wife almost a year ago and this being their favorite lake, for her memory, he brings her fishing rod and dunks it in the water. Every time, he knows she is with him because that is the ONLY pole he ever catches a fish on. Including this 4lb.

Thursday, March 30 Dinner Theater @ Jeremy’s On The Hill “Love Letters”

Every 2nd and 4th Thursday Julian Lions Club 7pm downstairs at the town hall

JULIAN

They’re Catching At Lake Cuyamaca

MARCH

Tuesday, April 4 Music On The Mountain Nathan James - Blues Guitar Julian Library - 6:00

Every 3rd Thursday - Lego My Library, Lego building for kids grade K-5. All materials supplied. Julian Library - 2:30pm.

Back Country Happenings

Every Sunday (Weather permitting) Julian Doves & Desperados historic comedy skits at 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm – stage area behind Julian Market & Deli.

Every Thursday VET Connect - VA services available at Julian library. Call 858-694-3222 for appointment. Thursdays, 9am-4pm.

Third Thursday Book Club Meets at the Julian Library - 3pm

and

March 29, 2017

• On March 31, 1492, in Spain, a royal edict is issued by the nation's Catholic rulers declaring that all Jews who refuse to convert to Christianity will be expelled. Most Spanish Jews chose exile rather than renounce their religion and culture. • On March 27, 1905, the highprofile murder of two London shopkeepers is solved using fingerprint evidence for the first time when a thumbprint found on the side of the cashbox was matched to one of the suspects. • On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson asks Congress to send U.S. troops into battle against Germany in World War

I. Four days later, Congress obliged. Wilson then signed the Selective Service Act, which required men between 21 and 35 years of age to register for the draft. The Army quickly grew from 200,000 troops to 4 million. • On March 28, 1941, workers start clearing trees from hundreds of acres of land 30 miles west of Detroit, in preparation for construction of the Ford Motor Company's Willow Run plant, which will build B-24 bomber planes. Early on the plant was plagued by labor shortages and earned the nickname "Willit Run?" • On April 1, 1963, the ABC television network airs the premiere episode of "General Hospital," the daytime drama that will become the longestrunning serial program produced in Hollywood. On the same

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For More Information: 760-765-2179 or 800-379-4262 day, rival NBC debuts its own medical-themed soap opera, "The Doctors." • On March 29, 1973, two months after the signing of the Vietnam peace agreement, the last U.S. combat troops leave South Vietnam. The accord was short-lived, and by early 1974 full-scale war had resumed.

• On March 30, 1981, President Ronald Reagan is shot in the chest outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by deranged drifter John Hinckley Jr. As Reagan was prepared for surgery, he quipped to his surgeons, "Please tell me you're Republicans." © 2016 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


March 29, 2017

The Julian News 5

My Thoughts by Michele Harvey

A Really Good Week

EAST OF PINE HILLS

by Kiki Skagen Munshi

Classes Required Back in the day, Julian Union High School offered a bunch of Really Dull Classes about stuff you Really Needed to Know. “Offered” is probably the wrong word since they were required for graduation. The right word is most likely “imposed”. One of the things we learned in a class about Health, or Getting Along in The World, or Whatever You’d Rather be Doing Anything Else Than Learning This was how insurance works. First, you get insurance to cover things you really hope will never happen, but if they do you’d be wiped out if you didn’t have insurance. If you CAN pay for whatever you’re insuring, like replacing your space heater if it goes bust, you probably shouldn’t buy the insurance. This is because: Second, insurance companies need to have more money coming in than going out because if they don’t, they can’t make any profits… oops, no, of course that’s not why insurance companies exist, who would ever think those beneficent, caring organizations would want PROFITS. The important thing is that if they don’t have more money coming in than going out, they can’t pay insurance claims and stay in business. Let’s take an example. Say 100 healthy young people, 50 men and 50 women, buy health insurance for $10 a month (REMEMBER… this is hypothetical…) and having a baby costs $10,000. One of the women has a baby, there are no other claims. That’s $12,000 a year in income from premiums for the company of which $10,000 is paid out, $1,000 is for insurance company operating costs, and $1,000 is insurance company profit. Now if the men say they aren’t going to have a baby and are otherwise healthy and therefore can stop paying, that’s $6,000 in income for the year from the women. Then if one of the women has a baby for $10,000 it’s a huge loss and the insurance company goes out of business. Then if one of the men falls off a ladder, breaks his leg in three places, and…well, tough. So there are two reasons it’s necessary for young healthy people to pay for insurance. The first is that something might happen to them. The second is to support the old and sick and the insurance companies. If the young and healthy don’t get sick or hurt today and need insurance, time will pass and (who looks this far into the future?) in another 30 or 40 years THEY will depend on premiums from the new young and healthy generation to support their chemo-therapy and hip replacements. Give now and reap the benefits later and, besides, you just might need some of those benefits now. Bottom line: If there aren’t enough people paying for insurance and not using it, the insurance companies won’t make their profi…oops, have enough money to cover expenses. There was another Really Dull but Useful class we took at JUHS. It was called Civics and was about how the government works. Too bad some of our politicians missed this one.

20 Years Of Shakespeare At Spencer Valley

continued from page 1 accompany the students to the Student Shakespeare Festival in Balboa Park at the end of April. We invite the community, and all past players, to come and enjoy this year’s spectacle. Seats for the Tuesday and Thursday shows are available and the shows will begin at 6:00 each evening, with donations appreciated. The Wednesday dinner theatre and silent auction tickets are gone and the show is SOLD OUT. Theatre is the only art form that incorporates every other art form. Spencer Valley is extremely proud to have created a program that enhances students’ experiences in acting, writing, music, painting, dance, sculpture, poetry, stagecraft, architecture, history, literature, focus and discipline, responsibility, teamwork, and public speaking, not to mention the memories that will last a lifetime. Join us in supporting the Spencer Valley students in the Shakespeare Shake-up 2017!

This is a very exciting week for me. My brother, sister and I partly grew up with a family that consisted of a girl my age her dad and her 2 older brothers. After my dad who was an Air Force Captain and commander of a B-29 bomber died in the Korean War, Mom began to date a neighbor named Stew Montgomery. Grandma was against the relationship because Stew was a milkman and Grandma had higher goals in mind for Mom. Fortunately for us, Grandma’s opinion didn’t hold any weight. When Dad died, Mom had to work full time to support us. As a working mother, Mom relied a lot on Stew to help take care of us children. She once told me that Stew changed more diapers in our house than she did. I have lots of happy memories of Stew taking us to the public swimming pool in La Mesa. He and Mom took us on picnics and he was very loving and gentle. Mom and Stew were square dancers and I remember how much I liked the fancy dresses that Mom wore with lots of colorful petticoats and the matching western shirts that Stew wore. During those early years Stew’s children lived in Michigan with relatives. When his daughter Debbie and I were about 7 years old, Stew’s children came west to live with their Dad. We spent time together as one big family, but even as a child, I felt that he spent more time at my house than he did with his children. He had a housekeeper, Alice Thompson, to care for the children when he was at work and I guess when he was with us. It may have been the same year that Stew’s children moved to California that my mother bought a 5 bedroom house. Stew did a lot of painting inside the house and rock work in the yard and I’m sure he helped Mom in lots of other ways to fix up the house. As I remember Mom telling me, the original plan was for her and Stew to get married, but by then Stew worked for Ryan Aeronautics and often got laid off work. That’s how factory jobs were back in the 1950s, post war. Mom continued dating Stew until I began high school, then she and Stew split up. I’m not sure why they parted at that particular time, but life was never as good for us children afterwards. For years I wondered what happened to Debbie. She seemed more sophisticated than me. She lived in Normal Heights, in the city, while I lived in rural La Mesa. She was fond of telling me that I was a country hick and maybe I was. In the early 1970s when I was in my early 20s, my boyfriend and I moved to Hart Drive in El Cajon and so did Debbie. I don’t remember how long we were neighbors, but it wasn’t’ very long, not long enough. One of us moved away and we didn’t keep in touch. Through the years I tried to find Debbie and her Dad. I heard that Stew had married and moved to Anza, but I never met anyone from Anza who had heard of him. As for Debbie, I didn’t know her last name and she just disappeared. A few years ago I found Debbie on Classmates.com, but nothing really came of it. I found out that she had gone to Hoover High and that at some time she had moved to Montana. One evening, this past week we finally fully connected. Debbie found me on facebook and I sent her a message that I had to clear up a few things, like my tax appointment and paperwork that I promised to complete for a friend. I did all that was necessary and then sat down for a relaxing phone conversation with Debbie. That phone conversation was terrific. We did a bit of catching up and we filled each other in on details of family stories that we heard as children. For instance Debbie heard one story and I heard another story about why our parents never married. Each of us knew a detail or 2 that the other didn’t know, and together all the details fit together and made sense. I know some of you will ask, so part of the reasons are that my mother received a widow’s pension because my dad died in the Air Force during the Korean War. If she remarried, Mom would have lost that pension and we 3 children would have lost future claims to college funds as war orphans. Losing the pension that fully paid her mortgage every month was too scary for Mom. As I wrote earlier, Stew worked for Ryan Aeronautical, post war, when there wasn’t much work or much pay for people who worked in the aeronautical industry. That’s part of what was so scary for Mom. In those days people didn’t live as married couples if they weren’t married. We were a very conservative family in that respect. Love wasn’t able to conquer all of the obstacles that sat between Mom and Stew. Once we talked for about 30 minutes, Debbie and I had to get off the telephone because my cell phone battery was fading. However, Debbie and I are already looking forward to our next conversations. We have so much to say to each other and so much to hear from each other that I can’t imagine our friendship getting suddenly cut off as it did several times in the past. When we say that we knew someone our entire lives, Debbie told me that we really have known each other our entire lives. When I was born at San Diego’s Mercy Hospital on November 10th, 1950, it was a time when new mothers stayed in the hospital for 2 to 3 weeks. 10 days later my mother got a roommate who had just given birth. She gave birth on November 20th to Debbie! So we really have known each other for our entire lives. These are my thoughts.

Junior Achievement Reaches 100 Million Student Milestone (NAPSA) - Were you in Junior Achievement? Since its inception in 1919, Junior Achievement (JA) has helped inspire more than 100 million young people with its programs focused on entrepreneurship, financial literacy and work readiness. Now, JA is hoping to engage these former students, today’s JA Alumni, as volunteers to inspire and prepare today’s young people for success. JA programs have been demonstrated to have a great impact on students. According to a survey of more than 700 JA Alumni conducted by JA USA, former JA students are 30 percent more likely to have a four-year degree, earn about 20 percent more than the average American, and are 2? times more likely to be involved in starting a business. Additionally, about one in three (30 percent) JA Alumni say their involvement with Junior Achievement influenced their career decision and one in five (20 percent) work in the same career field as the JA volunteer they had in school. “Our alumni are an important constituent group for Junior Achievement,” said Jack E. Kosakowski, president and CEO of Junior Achievement USA. “With our 100th anniversary coming up in 2019, we invite anyone who had a JA program during his or her school years to reconnect with Junior Achievement. Our goal is to engage with alumni to help empower local students to own their economic success.” Given the overall gains demonstrated by JA Alumni when compared to the general public, plus the benefits that many JA Alumni themselves attribute to their JA experience, what better way to engage today’s youth than through those who have already reaped its benefits? Did JA make a difference in your life? Do you want to reconnect with JA? You are encouraged to find out more by visiting www.JA.org/ Alumni, or by contacting your local Junior Achievement office.


iversar

6 The Julian News

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1. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is the world’s slowest mammal? 2. HISTORY: Which was the only Confederate state capital east of the Mississippi that did not fall to the Union Army during the Civil War? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel “Catch-22”? 4. MOVIES: What famous movie had the tagline, “In space no one can hear you scream”? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who does the Swiss Guard protect? continued on page 12

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Discovering Dr. Carver Dr. George Washington Carver is one of America’s most famous scientists. His work at Tuskegee University in Alabama included groundbreaking research on plant biology that brought him to national prominence. Dr. Carver’s scientific expertise made him one of the most famous African-Americans and one of the best-known black

intellectuals of his time. Many of his early experiments focused on the development of new uses for crops such as peanuts, sweet potatoes, blackeyed peas, soybeans and pecans to replenish soil depleted by planting cotton. The hundreds of products he invented include

plastics, paints and dyes, and created a new source of revenue for Southern farmers. Carver also worked as a consultant for Henry Ford and the Ford Motor Company. Ford worked with Dr. Carver to find ways to use alternative crops such as peanuts and soybeans to produce a substitute for gasoline through the production of ethanol (or grain alcohol). In 1942, Ford displayed a car with a lightweight plastic body made from a formula Dr. Carver developed from soybeans. Carver studied several plants, but is best known for his work with peanuts. He also developed a soothing ointment and massage treatment using peanut oil that he called Carvoline. Carvoline brought relief to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and many others suffering from polio or limb pain. President Roosevelt traveled to Tuskeegee University continued on page 12


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Did You Know Veterans are at a higher risk of mental health disorders than civilians, which may create hurdles when pursuing a career or continuing education. University of Phoenix has the tools, resources and support to help veterans reach their career and educational goals. Learn more at www.phoenix.edu. *** You’ll be less likely to worry there’s an error on your tax return if you get help from an enrolled agent— the only federally licensed tax practitioners who both specialize in taxation and have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS. Learn more at www.eatax.org. *** The world’s leading online vacation rental marketplace, HomeAway, has more than a million vacation

homes for rent around the world. It sees its mission as helping families disconnect from everyday life and spend time reconnecting with each other. Learn more at www.homeaway. com/lp/vacation-equation.

Baseball

continued from page 1 Friday, April 28 3:30 Home vs Ocean View Christian Wednesday, May 3 tba Home vs Mountain Empire Wednesday, May 10 tba Home vs Vincent Memorial Friday, May 12 3:30 away vs Borrego Springs Wednesday, May 17 tba away vs Calipatria Friday, May 19 3:30

the second-fastest NFL player to reach 70 quarterback sacks (75 career games). Who was faster? 4. When was the last time that the Pacific-12 Conference had a team in the NCAA’s Final Four in men’s basketball? 5. How many teams did Hall of Fame goalie Rogie Vachon play for during his 16-season NHL career? 6. In 2016, Vancouver’s 1. In 2015, Washington’s Bryce Alphonso Davies became the Harper became the fourth- second-youngest player (15) youngest player (22) to win an to start a Major League Soccer MVP award. Who was younger? game. Who was the youngest? 2. Which pitcher is the all-time 7. Michael Bisping set a UFC strikeout leader for the Kansas record in 2016 for most career City Royals? victories (20). Who had been tied 3. In 2015, Houston Texans with him at 19? defensive end J.J. Watt became continued on page 12 *** The artist’s world is limitless. It can be found anywhere, far from where he lives or a few feet away. It is always on his doorstep. — Paul Strand ***

...on our friends on April Fool’s Day.

We like to play harmless pranks...

John Wayne Comics Q: I have two John Wayne comic books, both very old. Can you tell me how much they are worth and where I can go to sell them? -- Sally, West Bloomfield, Michigan A: Since you sent me an incomplete question, I will provide you with an incomplete answer. It would have been helpful for me to know the publisher of the comics, the dates they were issued and, of course, the condition. If your comics are from the Adventure Series and produced by Toby Press during the winter of 1949, the two you have could be quite valuable. For example, some of the titles and values are Mysterious Valley ($2,200), Flying Sheriff ($1,000), Duel of Death ($900) and Double Cross ($400). As with most collectibles, condition is extremely important. For example, if you have Mysterious Valley but the cover is worn and there are marked or missing pages, it would be worth a fraction of $2,200. To sell you might contact Heritage Comics, 3500 Maple Avenue, 17th Floor, Dallas, TX 75219; 214-528-3500. *** Q: I have about 30 DeGrazia figures from his "Wistful Children" collection. Are they worth anything and, if so, where can I sell then? -- Marie, Rio Rancho, New Mexico A: The page you sent me already had values marked on it, so that part of your question has already been answered. To sell them might take a little time and patience. You could begin by checking the values on eBay. DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun also is a good resource. The gallery's address is 6300 N. Swan, Tucson, AZ 85718. Incidentally, DeGrazia could be a little cranky. When he got into a dispute with the IRS, he took a large collection of his paintings and burned them in the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix. *** Q: I have an old iron that my mother gave me years ago. It is a cast-iron No. 5 manufactured by B. Finley. Does this have any value, or should I continue to use it as a bookend? -- Elizabeth, Oviedo, Florida A: Continue to use it as a bookend and enjoy it. Its value is probably in the $15 to $25 range, since irons of this type are fairly common. *** Write to Larry Cox in care of KFWS, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or send e-mail to questionsforcox@aol.com. Due to the large volume of mail he receives, Mr. Cox cannot personally answer all reader questions, nor does he do appraisals. Do not send any materials requiring return mail. ©2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

*** Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our irritation and resentments slip away, and a sunny spirit takes their place. — Mark Twain ***

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April Fool‛s Day Surprises The first day of April is April Fool’s Day. It is a time for lots of fun. People like to play harmless jokes and pranks. One favorite trick is to point out something that’s not really there! April Fool’s Day used to be called All Fool’s Day. It is thought to have started in France. A long time ago, March 21st was the date of the New Year. A little over a week of parties and fun followed. On the last day of the festivities, April 1st, formal visits were paid and gifts exchanged. In the 16th century, the Gregorian calendar was introduced. March 21st was no longer New Year’s Day and April 1st was no longer the right day to visit and give gifts. News traveled slowly in those early times, so many people continued to celebrate April 1st as the last big day of the holiday season. Many others did not like the change of date and refused to change their ways. People who clung to the old ways were called “April fools.” Today, on April 1st, you might hear someone call out, “Poisson d’Avril!” They have fooled someone and are calling them an “April fish.” The person took the “bait” and was easily “caught.” April Fool’s Day is a day for tricks that hurt no one. It is a time for laughter.

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4

underst and Jesters were people who would entertain crowds at 10 marketplaces or festivals. Read the clues below to Today we learn about jesters and have clowns to entertain us. to fill in the puzzle: We put a 1. ________ jesters entertained the king 6. some jesters used ________ or props rubber 2. ________ jesters entertained crowds 7. sometimes they were allowed to ________ in ducky in of people in marketplaces or at festivals ways that were not allowed for other people the fridge. 3. some people thought jesters were 8. dressed in many kinds of ________ “unlucky” and others thought they 9. sometimes they helped people or a king to would bring good ________ ________ what was going on by telling stories 4. jesters might wear ________ to 10. a man or a ________ could be a jester surprise people 11. the _________ day of April is April Fool’s Day 5. they told stories and ________ 12. it is a day to play fun, harmless ________

Really? Can I see it?

Mustard

Ketchup

Help me find my bag of pranks. Then find and circle the words in the puzzle that describe jesters and some of the talents or skills they display.

Boy, little kids are easy to fool.

I love to make people laugh!

1

Jester‛s Bag of Tricks

Hey! A spaceship is landing on the school parking lot!

Kids: color stuff in!

• trickster • clown • magician • jester • fool • joker • prankster • buffoon • entertainer • actor • acrobat • puppeteer • juggler • storyteller • fire-eater • contortionist • tightrope walker • animal trainer

P R A N K S T E R B T C N A I C I G A M

K J C X W T I O I X Y O O U F O P P F C

D I B B T I G I H T W N I R O T C A J O

P J U U Y O H C G O O T S N B O B V I P

E E U E I E T B N A C O R I V C V E O U

O S C G E P R W Z Y J R P I N Y N N E P

I T N X G C O A P J Y T O O C U C T P P

W E V B N L P X T O T I N P S K U E O E

Y R P I C V E Z S K A O A Z T P S R H T

T P A U O N W R B E H N Y F O S Q T T E

R O A N I M A L T R A I N E R O U A E E

A L P A G O L B S Y O S B N Y U T I V R

G N O S H E K N O U N T V S T C E N J C

Z U R O T Y E V T E U N Y S E T I E I I

L Y T T F I R E E A T E R I L Y C R O O

P W Y T B F N P P P P O P R L E S P P P

A E W I V H V O W O O H O P E S D O Y A

S N O O F F U B Q T S W A C R O B A T S

All in Good Fun!

April Fool’s Day is a lighthearted celebration. Many countries around the world have special days of fun, with people playing good-natured jokes on one another. These surprise-filled days almost always occur when the season of spring is coming. Do you think that the sunnier, warmer weather puts people in a lighter mood? Below are some things we like to use to fool or kid our friends. Can you match each item to its description? 1. joke 2. riddle 3. hoax 4. wisecrack 5. pun

A. a puzzling question or problem posed: the answer is hard to figure out B. a “fresh” or “smart” remark C. a false story told in such a way as to make people think it is real D. something done for fun; a jest E. clever use of a word to have more than one meaning Solution Page 12

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8 The Julian News

POST NOTES

by Bill Fink The Bataan Death March

by Bic Montblanc

In 1894 Japan invaded China in the first Sino-Japanese War. Issues between the two countries were never fully resolved and Japan whose twentieth century industrial modernization and militaristic control of the government invaded China again in 1937. With aid from Germany the second Sino-Japanese War had begun and so too, what eventually became the Asian theater of WWII. Within days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese military invaded the Philippines island of Luzon at Lingayen Gulf. Conquering the Philippines was a strategic key to controlling the Pacific and Manilla, with excellent, deep port facilities of Manila Bay was just south of Lingayen. While there was an American and Filipino garrison to meet the Japanese under General Masaharu Homma, they were generally poorly trained and not equipped to defend the beaches at Lingayen against the experienced Japanese force. Major General Douglas MacArthur evacuated his force and the Philippine government from Manila to Corregidor. MacArthur ordered King to retreat to the Bataan Peninsula which was west of and across the bay from Manilla. Bataan’s southern tip was at the entrance to the bay. Whoever controlled Bataan would control the bay and MacArthur ordered King to defend it to the end. 76,000 American and Filipino forces retreated to Bataan, a 15 mile wide by 30 mile long peninsula. The retreat was so rapid that the troops were without adequate food, water, weapons and ammunition and most importantly battle experience against 43,000 hardened Japanese troops. The Americans and Filipinos did fight and for a little over three months of mostly jungle warfare they held Homma’s forces off. More than anything else though, starvation, thirst, malaria, dysentery and dengue decimated the troops to the point where they could fight no more and surrendered on April 9th to Colonel Nakayama of the Japanese 14th Army. Despite the grueling heat and humidity, lack of food, water, medical supplies and the constant combat against a superior force, the horror for the Americans and Filipinos had not yet begun. Over 76,000 of the combined force surrendered which was much more than the Japanese had anticipated and

March 29, 2017 along with the thousands of non-combatants, the logistical nightmare of moving the large numbers in an undeveloped area lacking transportation and roads was the start of the misery. Japanese military culture placed little value or regard for prisoners and particularly those that surrendered. They were not signatory to the Geneva Convention and consequently provided little or no medical care or food. The fact is that the Japanese military held prisoners of war in disdain and their only use was for slave labor. In one notable instance, over 300 men and officers had surrendered near the Pantingan River. They were executed by Colonel Tsuji’s troops despite orders from General Homma to transport them. Tsuji clandestinely gave an order to execute all Americans. The captured troops were marched east to the Bataan Road to begin a 60 mile journey to Camp O’Donnell via the railhead at San Fernando. Despite the dreadful condition of the troops the Japanese were merciless. There were constant beatings from face slaps to blows to the head with rifle butts. Faces were bashed in and jaws broken as the Japanese knocked out or extracted gold from the teeth of the prisoners. Many men died of starvation or thirst along the way. Others perished from untreated wounds or disease. In one case during a search, men who were found to have Japanese money or souvenirs were summarily shot. The sadistic killing never stopped as prisoners were indiscriminately bayoneted, shot or beheaded. If a prisoner was unable to rise in the morning after the previous day’s gruelling march without food or water, he was often buried alive on the spot where he lay. Men were tortured by being stripped and forced to sit or stand in the sun in sight of water. Often when they succumbed to the heat they were run over by trucks. The horror for the troops that made it to the rail head at San Fernando was not over. One hundred men or more were loaded onto old, enclosed cars designed for forty. They were crammed in so tight in temperatures that exceeded 100 degrees that there was no option but to stand with their bodies hard pressed against each other. As men died they were so tightly packed they would not even drop to the floor. At the end of the line at Capas the men who survived were hard marched the last nine miles to their prison at Camp O’Donnell, a former troop training center. Once at the camp, men continued to die by the hundreds per day. Out of the 76,000 men who began the Bataan Death March, only 54,000 made it to Camp O’Donnell. Twenty two thousand died on the march that lasted for up to ten days for some of the men. The horrid conditions of the camp with its lack of food, water, sanitation and medical care caused another 20,000 or more deaths. Many of the men died while performing slave

labor building military facilities. The Japanese buried the men in mass unmarked graves. Of approximately 22,000 American prisoners only 15,000 returned to the U.S. after the war. On April 9, 1942 when General Edward King surrendered at Bataan, it was the largest American Army to have ever surrendered. For three and a half years General King withstood torture and harsh treatment as a prisoner. He returned home and was the recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross. General Homma was tried for war crimes and executed by firing squad on April 3, 1946. Seven other Japanese Generals involved in the march were hung on December 23, 1948.

Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

This Friday, March 31, the American Legion Auxiliary will be preparing a great Chicken Alfredo dinner. You can expect all the great side dishes that they normally serve with their great meals. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and at $10.00, there should be a good crowd so get there early. The money they raise will fund the Pat Watson Scholarship.

Ask Pastor Rick

Religion In The News The Reverend Barry Lynn Announces Retirement The Rev. Barry W. Lynn, an outspoken champion for churchstate separation, has announced he will retire at the end of 2017. “The last 25 years have been amazing,” Lynn said in a March 15th press conference about his pending departure as executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State. He stated openly that it was time for new leadership. Lynn, 68, a lawyer and United Church of Christ minister, started his post at Americans United in 1992 and often drew criticism from the religious right. Previously, he worked for the American Civil Liberties Union. Over a quarter century, his name was often synonymous with liberal advocacy for secularism in the public square. Source: The Colorado Springs Gazette, summarized by Pastor Rick

Ask Pastor Rick

If God destroyed fishes in the flood, where did all the fish today come from? Noah didn't put them on the ark did he? continued on page 12

• FISHING REPORT •

Howdy! From Lake Cuyamaca Ole “Dusty Britches” here healing sore muscles and taking a break from the fishing at Lake Cuyamaca. While taking the break I headed out with Tom Chapman in search of some yellowtail off the Mexican Coast. We were invited to go along on a charter by Lance Withee on the “Mission Belle”… a ¾ day boat out of Point Loma Sportfishing that just completed some welding work and was back in action. A boat I would recommend for ¾ day trips because they have never disappointed me and always seem to put us on the fish. Steve, Karen, and Cam were the boat’s captain and crew. We left the landing sometime before 6:00 a.m. , baited up and headed south. Oh yeah, while getting the bait on board Steve and Karen had to fend off several HUGE sea lions that also wanted in the bait receiver… and 4 of them did. As soon as Steve opened the pen up, one of the sea lions was right there… and aggressive. At least one of the sea lions won out, so we left him in the pen… he was happy and occupied… eating bait. Talk about shooting fish in a barrel! My previous trip was down to Punta Colonet, but this time we were initially headed to the “rock pile” about 5 miles south of the Coronado Islands. Steve said that “nobody had been there in a while, so we should try it out”. I was able to spend some time up in the wheel house with Steve explaining his sonar and electronics to me. My interest was how Steve could not only use this technology to find the fish, but tell what kind of fish they are… how they act when a boat comes overhead, when chum is thrown into the water, and eventually see the fish break apart and head up to the chum. At that time Steve’s voice goes up a couple of octaves when he let’s us know when the fish will hit, and where… port side or starboard, in the bow or stern. So far no fish seen all the way past the Coronado Islands and all the way to the “rock pile”. Our original intent was to check this out and if it didn’t produce anything, we would head back to the north side of the north island. That didn’t happen. The water was cool, but not cold (59-60), clear and calm (like a swimming pool). Steve has these cool looking gyro-binoculars that help you see a long way off and can freeze frame anything you are looking at. He kept looking

(and heading) south because we coming upon more and more groups of birds and sea life like dolphin and whales etc. He decided to continue down to the “finger bank” which was a piece further down the Mexican Coast and it was a good thing that he did… our first school of yellowtail were very good quality and very agressive hitting on yo-yo jigs and flat falls. We had 15 folks on board and everyone was busy. The quality of the fish was from 18 to 30 pounds. Tom Chapman reeled in 2 “mossbacks”. For the day… 36 yellowtail were taken by the 15 anglers along with some bottom fish of different varieties… not bad for the middle of March, and the first trip of the season for the “Mission Belle”. We hit 5 or 6 good schools of yellowtail, but in the afternoon the fish were boiling around the boat and wouldn’t bite. We headed home… looking for more fish all the way. We were back at the landing on time and anxious to go home. I traveled a longer time and distance than ever before on a ¾ day boat which meant less time at the rail but we all had confidence in Steve Peterson to put us on the fish… and he didn’t disappoint any of us. Karen was out of nowhere whenever anybody needed help and like a precision surgeon with no wasted motion while filleting our fish. Cam took care of us in the galley, helped chum, and worked along with Karen when she was filleting our fish. It was obvious that Steve, Karen, and Cam have worked together a lot because they cover each other well and can anticipate each other’s moves. For a 3-person team, they were well versed in what they needed to do… cudos to the crew. When I bring this up to Steve, he just says that all the boat captains and crews are very competitive… a humble retort. As for this ole dog, I was tired, sore… and happy. On my way home I dropped off a present

for the thankful firefighters at Heartland “Fire and Rescue” Station #6. “Dusty Britches” here, back at the lake, giving an update on the fishing at Lake Cuyamaca. Mostly all successful fishing has been done with bait… either night crawlers or power bait. Most often bought power bait is rainbow for now. (7 year old)Tyler Kinnard of La Mesa tied into his first trout… a 3 pounder on the shoreline at Chamber’s Park using a night crawler; Becky Timms, visiting from Quebec, Canada reeled in a 4 pound catfish using a night cawler on the bottom fishing the west finger jetty. Her friend said it was more fun watching her clean it than catch it. David Miller of Solana Beach caught his limit of trout using the Cuyamaca Sandwich” at Lone Pine; Betty Miller, Dave’s mom… was the hero of the day nabbing a 4 pound 8 ounce “Bow” on a slow retrieve from shore using a Thomas Buoyant 1/6th ounce red and gold spoon. Chamber’s Park shoreline is picking up in numbers of fish, Lone Pine is still the most consistent producer. Our last plant was March 7th and that 1,200 pounds went to the upper basin. The discharge of water has been closed down for now so we will be keeping the water in the upper basin for some time. Ranger Jay Blaylock says that flyfisherman are having a ball at the east end of the upper basin. We will be getting more of the Marvel flies to re-stock. We have run out of them for now. It’s a small fly with a propeller that spins as the fly is retrieved attracting the trout. It was very popular in the eastern Sierra and is effective here as well. We haven’t decided whether or not to place our next stocking of trout in the upper basin or the west side. Until next time… happy trails. “Tight Lines and Bent Rods”… Dusty Britches

PETS OF THE WEEK

Tigger is a 10 years young neutered brown tabby who weighs 14lbs. His previous owner could no longer provide for him so this handsome guy is looking for a quiet home to spend his retirement years. Tigger is mellow gentleman who asks for little more than a sunny window to nap in and a human pal to cuddle with. Meet him by asking for ID#A1768321 Tag#C143. Tigger can be adopted for $35.

Jazzie is a 10 years young spayed Australian Cattle Dog Mix who weighs 60lbs. She is a sweet girl who found herself at the shelter by no fault of her own. Jazzie will steal the heart of those willing to look past her age and instead see the benefits of adopting a senior pet. Meet this wonderful girl by asking for ID#A1766953 Tag#C289. Jazzie can be adopted for the Senior Fee of just $35.

All adoptions will include vaccinations, spaying/neutering (upon adoption), a microchip and free Vet visit. Dog fees also include a 1 year license. Tigger and Jazzie are at our Central County Shelter, 5480 Gaines Street, San Diego . The Shelter hours are 9:30AM to 5:30PM, Tuesday through Sunday or visit www.sddac.com for more information.


March 29, 2017

The Julian News 9


March 29, 2017

10 The Julian News

®

Dear EarthTalk: The environmental movement was built on the philosophies of people like Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson. But who are the great environmental visionaries of our own day and age? -- Betsy Englund, Boston, MA Thoreau, best known for his book “Walden,” taught us how to live a simple life and take pleasure in nature’s splendor all around us. Leopold’s 1949 book, “A Sand County Almanac,” encouraged us to respect the land and its inhabitants and manage it with future generations in mind. And Carson, whose book “Silent Spring” is credited with advancing the global environmental movement, taught us that the world would be sick, let alone way too quiet, without the soundtrack of wildlife. While these voices from the past still guide our conservation ethic, a new generation of visionaries is reimagining what it means to be an environmentalist in response to the new existential challenges facing our species and our planet. One of them is Winona LaDuke, who cut her activist teeth in the 1980s when she helped launch the Indigenous Women’s Network and campaigned for tribal land claims in Minnesota. In 1993 she partnered with the folk-rock duo Indigo Girls to

launch Honor the Earth, which raises awareness and support for Native environmental issues and develops resources for the survival of sustainable Native communities. Honor the Earth uses music, the arts and the media to spread awareness about our dependency on a clean, healthy planet. Most recently, LaDuke set up her tipi at one of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest camps; she has been outspoken about the need to reject such projects and the oil slated to run through them. Many Americans first learned about the potential perils of climate change from Bill McKibben’s 1989 book The End of Nature. McKibben has subsequently penned more than a dozen books on related topics, and in 2006 crossed over into activism, helping lead a five-day walk across Vermont calling for action on global warming. He went on to launch 350.org, a global climate organizing effort named after climate scientist James Hansen’s contention that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide above 350 parts per million would be unsafe for humanity and the planet. Pioneering the use of social media to grow its ranks, the group coordinated 5,200 demonstrations in 181 countries as part of its “International Day of Climate Action” in October 2009 and rallied hundreds of thousands more people at subsequent events. 350.org is currently gearing up for the People’s Climate Mobilization on April 29, 2017 and is hoping for a record turnout in Washington DC and at other simultaneous rallies around the world. McKibben remains an outspoken critic of both the Keystone XL and Dakota

Access Pipeline projects. While McKibben worked his way into our hearts through his writing, Josh Fox did it with video. The filmmaker’s 2010 documentary Gasland focused on the environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) of shale formations to recover natural gas deposits. The Oscar-nominated film became a key lever in the anti-fracking movement and Fox went onto become a vocal opponent of fracking. In 2016, Fox traveled the country on behalf of Bernie Sanders’s campaign for President and helped pen a historic climate amendment to the Democratic Platform calling for the institution of a national carbon pricing

system, the phase out of gasfired power plants and higher efficiency standards for federal energy projects. Fox currently works as Creative Director for Our Revolution, a non-profit Sanders launched following the 2016 Democratic primaries to get more Americans involved in the political process and organize and elect progressive candidates. CONTACTS: Honor the Earth,

www.honorearth.org; 350.org, www.350.org; Our Revolution, www. ourrevolution.com. EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of the nonprofit Earth Action Network. To donate, visit www.earthtalk.org. Send questions to: question@earthtalk. org.

Activist Winona LaDuke recently set up her tipi at one of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest camps and has been outspoken about the need to reject such projects and the fossil fuels slated to run through them.

5 Things To Know If Someone You Love Is Addicted To Painkillers (StatePoint) Fifty-two people die every day from opioid overdoses nationwide, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported more than 12 million U.S. residents used prescription painkillers non-medically in the past year. Unfortunately, even a small dosage can depress respiratory function, and these drugs can be especially dangerous when combined with other common substances like alcohol and sleeping pills. What’s more, prescription drug abuse can be addictive, and even lead to heroin use. If you love someone who may be addicted to prescription painkillers, here are five things the National Safety Council says you should know. 1. Addiction is a chronic disease that affects the brain. Addiction, like heart disease or diabetes, leads to increasingly poor health, and can be fatal if it’s not effectively treated and managed. People who suffer from addiction still have self-worth and should be treated with dignity. Unfortunately, shame and discrimination prevent continued on page 13

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March 29, 2017

The Julian News 11

California Commentary

Proposition 13 Is The Original Victim Of ‘Fake News’

by Jon Coupal

As Proposition 13 approaches its 39th birthday, it is still subject to the same dishonest attacks in the media that were used against it when it was on the ballot in 1978. Proposition 13 was one of the first victims of “fake news.” “The bigwigs in labor and business went all out to defeat 13,” said its principle author, Howard Jarvis. “They tried to outdo one another in issuing doomsday prophecies about what passage of 13 would mean.” The media slavishly supported the exaggerated and dishonest claims, often endorsing them through editorials and by giving prominent placement to negative stories on the tax revolt. The politicians, including Gov. Jerry Brown, and government agencies from top to bottom weighed in. Here is a typical example: Before the election, Alameda County Transit told the public that passage of Prop. 13 would result in the termination of 80 percent of its 2,000 employees. Two months later, the Fremont-Newark Argus reported on the aftermath of the passage of Proposition 13, “To date, no one in the district has been laid off and officials now believe there will be no massive layoffs.” The paper added that three local fire districts that anticipated losing one-half to three-fourths of its staff, had not lost a single firefighter to Prop. 13. When the scare tactics were rejected by the public, some media attacked Prop. 13 sponsors Howard Jarvis and Paul Gann with false stories. Two weeks before the election, the Monterey Peninsula Herald editorialized that the public had “been so outrageously deluded by a pair of slick Southern California real estate operators.” The Herald was 0-for-2. Gann was from Sacramento, which Herald editors should know is in Northern California, and neither man owned any California real estate except for their own homes. A month before the June 6 election, the Los Angeles Times repeated the claims of Prop. 13 opponents in a lengthy editorial in which the lies were treated as facts: “Los Angeles County would eliminate all of the Fire Department’s paramedic units, could close half of the 129 fire stations. It would close half of the county’s 93 libraries. ... More than 30,000 county employees would be laid off. The city of Los Angeles is considering the dismissal of 2,152 police officers and the closing of six stations.

More than 1,000 firefighters would be cut, and 56 stations would be shut down. ... The prospect for Los Angeles schools is even darker. More than 18,000 teachers would be laid off.” The same editorial in the Times included the following statement in italics: “Vote yes on Proposition 13 and send a message to tens of thousands of teachers, librarians, firefighters, police officers, sanitation workers and public-health specialists that you can safely dispense with their services.” Howard Jarvis commented, “It was tough having 90 percent of the media against us.” Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Freidman summarized the fake news campaign against Prop. 13 in his column in Newsweek several weeks after the overwhelming passage of the measure: “Despite the use of scare tactics including notices to teachers of automatic dismissal on passage of Jarvis-Gann [Prop. 13], advance local budgets threatening drastic cuts in police and fire protection, and whatever other portents of catastrophe desperate feeders at the public trough could devise, the public refused to be bamboozled this time, as they had so often before while watching taxes mount and government services deteriorate. This time, the scare tactics simply produced a backlash.” But the beat down of Prop. 13 goes on. Some years ago, a newspaper editorial asked if Prop. 13 was responsible for a measles epidemic saying it may have limited the availability of vaccine. A national publication suggested that O.J. Simpson’s acquittal of murder charges was due to the tax limiting measure because prosecuting attorneys may not have been paid enough. More recently, a column by a West Coast writer published in the New York Times claimed that one of the reasons that Los Angeles is becoming a “third world” city is reduced funding for education caused by the tax revolt that passed Prop. 13. As is typical, the writer ignores the fact that California now spends 30 percent more per pupil, in inflation adjusted dollars, than the amount spent just prior to the passage of Prop. 13 — a time when both liberals and conservatives agree that California schools were among the best in the nation. Today, those who want to bring down Prop. 13 are a little more clever with their fake news. We are seeing claims, that the media delights in repeating, that

Prop. 13 has caused the housing shortage, that Prop. 13 only helps the wealthy, and, of course, that Prop. 13 is responsible for our poor performing schools, even when our teachers are the thirdhighest paid in all 50 states. Taxpayer advocates in California are still dealing with “fake news” as they have for nearly 40 years. It is doubtful that that battle will end anytime soon. *** Jon Coupal is president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association — California’s largest grass-roots taxpayer organization, dedicated to the protection of Proposition 13 and the advancement of taxpayers’ rights.

• It was 20th-century American author and playwright Rose Franken who made the following sage observation: "Anyone can be passionate, but it takes real lovers to be silly." • There are only three places in the world that include St. Patrick's Day among their official public holidays: Ireland (of course), the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Caribbean island of Montserrat. • It's not clear exactly how they do it, but, according to those who study such things, bald eagles mate while they're in midair. • Do you ever get to the end of a relaxing weekend, only to feel depressed at the prospect of heading back to work Monday morning? Well, the Germans have a word for that: sonntagsleerung. It literally means "Sunday emptying." • Some historians claim that President Andrew Jackson believed the world was flat. * If it could avoid its inevitable dissipation, the typical cloud could circumnavigate the earth in less than two weeks. • In the United States, nuns have a longer life expectancy than any other demographic group. *** Thought for the Day: "Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America ... when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what's true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness." -- Carl Sagan © 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc. © 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

*** Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing. — William James ***


March 29, 2017

12 The Julian News

L E GAL N O TI C E S

L EG A L N O T I C ES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-007612 SOCAL EQUIPMENT RENTAL 9666 Indian Creek Way, Escondido, CA 92026 The business is conducted by A General Partnership - Xiaodan Xu 9666 Indian Creek Way, Escondido, CA 92026 and Jihua Wei, 9666 Indian Creek Way, Escondido, CA 92026. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 20, 2017.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00009707-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: ALLISON JEANETTE LUCKEY FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: ALLISON JEANETTE LUCKEY HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: ALLISON JEANETTE LUCKEY TO: LUCK PECAS LUCKEY IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on MAY 5, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 20, 2017.

Name Change Orders Published for only $45

We send a proof of publication to the Court with a copy mailed to you, for your records.

Call the Julian News Office

LEGAL: 07586 Publish: March 29, April 5, 12, 19, 2017

April Fool‛s Day Surprises Aw! C’mon, I’m not that easy to “hook”! P R A N K S T E R B T C N A I C I G A M

K J C X W T I O I X Y O O U F O P P F C

D I B B T I G I H T W N I R O T C A J O

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O S C G E P R W Z Y J R P I N Y N N E P

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LEGAL: 07588 Publish: March 29 and April 5, 12, 19, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-007995 a) STARR-MATTERHORN b) STARMAT 3530 Avondale Cr., Carlsbad, CA 92008 (Mailing Address: PO Box 159, Carlsbad, CA 92018) The business is conducted by A Married Couple Geraldine A. Matter, 3530 Avondale Cr., Carlsbad, CA 92008 and John T. Matter, 3530 Avondale Cr., Carlsbad, CA 92008. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 22, 2017.

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to personally thank Dr. Carver. Carver studied this legume because he wanted to help poor cotton farmers in the South improve their depleted soil. He found that peanuts also are an inexpensive protein food crop. Carver discovered more than 300 uses for peanuts, although he didn’t invent peanut butter, he used peanuts to create everything from shaving cream and shampoo to wood stains and plastics. Carver died in 1943 at the age of 78. His epitaph reads: “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.” Dry-roasted peanuts are an excellent source of magnesium, niacin and potassium. They’re also a good source of zinc, copper, thiamine and phosphorus, are high in fiber and contain iron, pantothenic acid and vitamin B-6. Peanuts are high in fat -- mostly unsaturated fat, which is a healthier choice than the saturated fat found in meat. A half-ounce of peanuts or tree nuts or a tablespoon of peanut butter counts as the equivalent to 1 ounce from the protein group. Most older children and adults need approximately 4 to 6.5 ounces from this food group each day. It’s also a good source of protein for children who don’t like to eat meat. Try my recipe for Asian-Style Peanut Noodles for a new way to incorporate peanuts into your diet. ASIAN-STYLE PEANUT NOODLES 1 pound whole wheat spaghetti 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger) 1/4 cup smooth peanut butter 3/4 cup milk (whole, 2 percent, skim or soy are all fine), divided 1 (12 ounce) package broccoli slaw

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I’m taking this as a legitimate question rather than rhetorical or cynical. Not all fish were destroyed in the flood. We know many were because fish fossils have ended up in places where fish should not have been. But, it is rather obvious that the fish we have today came from survivors of the flood. Ancient sages wrote about this and concluded that God left fish in abundance so that the survivors of the flood would have an ample supply of food until crops and harvest could resume.

continued from page 6

Rick Hill is the Senior Pastor at Hillside Church on 3rd and C Streets in Julian, CA. Direct all questions and correspondence to: hccpastorrick@ gmail.com or Hillside Church, Religion In the News, Box 973, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.)

LEGAL: 07589 Publish: March 29 and April 5, 12, 19, 2017

760 765 2231

Chef’s Corner

continued from page 8

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-007903 WORLD’S DEADLIEST 6261 Beaumont Ave., La Jolla, CA 92037 The business is conducted by An Individual Samuel Kressin, 6261 Beaumont Ave., La Jolla, CA 92037. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 22, 2017.

LEGAL: 07587 Publish: March 29 and April 5, 12, 19, 2017

Ask Pastor Rick

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All in Good Fun!

Did you match each word to its definition? A. a puzzling question or problem: the answer is hard to figure out B. a “fresh” or “smart” remark C. a false story told in such a way as to make people think it is real D. something done for fun; a jest E. clever use of a word to have more than one meaning

BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS

Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa & Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231.

PERSONAL SUPPORT

WORSHIP SERVICES

San Diego Intergroup of Gamblers Anonymous Toll-Free Hot Line (866) 239-2911

Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message

www.sandiegoga.org

MEETINGS

AA Meetings Monday - 7pm 3407 Highway 79

Tuesday - 11am

Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors Location: 2898 State Hwy 78

Shelter Valley Community Center

Phone: 760-765-0114 E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com

Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study)

(Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527)

Tuesday - 7pm

(just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence)

Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Childcare – Birth Through 5th Grade

Connecting People With God And Each Other . . . Changing Lives

Teen Crisis HotLine

1-800- HIT HOME SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE

1•888•724•7240

Tuesday - 6:00pm

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Wednesday - 6pm

Thursday - 7pm

BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study

Julian United Methodist Church

Friday - 7pm

Details

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False Alarm

SERVICES OFFERED

Are you willing to lease exclusive access for hunting of Turkey and Deer (during legal seasons) to myself and immediate family members. Life long residents of San Diego and are looking for access to a beautiful place for our children, myself and wife to enjoy the natural wildlife.We are east county residents and would be super respectful of your property and any requirements you would have.Please call and or email. thank You. Denny Moody 619 572 8623 dennymoody@gmail.com 5/3

Saturday - 7pm

Julian-Cuyamaca Fire — Activity Log Location Medical Sunrise Dr. Medical Manzanita Dr. Medical Farmer Rd Medical Washington St Medical Harrison Park Rd. Alarams Ringing Navajo Rd

SOUPS AND SUCH CAFÉ is looking for an experienced server for a part time position. Call Lani at 760 825 9330 or apply in person 4/19

“Friday Night Survivors” 3407 Highway 79 “Open Step Study” 3407 Highway 79

The Black Ball Line in New York advertised in 1818 that it was the first shipping company to offer regularly scheduled service from the United States to England. It also publicized the idea that it was concerned with the comfort of its passengers.

RENTALS

PUBLIC NOTICE

JULIAN HOTEL - Housekeeper Part Time Approximately 28 hours per week. weekdays and weekends. Must be work Holidays. Please call 760-765-0201 4/12

$ Attention $ Land Owners

Julian Mens Meeting

3407 Highway 79

Incident

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place.

Tuesday - 7pm

Thursday - 7pm

Date 3/19 3/20 3/22 3/23 3/24 3/25

RV FOR SALE

HUNTING

3407 Highway 79

Time 1500 2200 1500 1400 1900 0900

*** A sense of humor is a major defense against minor troubles. — Mignon McLaughlin ***

24 FOOT, 1996 CLASS C RV, New tires and brakes, leveling jacks. Runs excellent, low miles (60, 630) asking $12,500. call 3/22 760 765 0265 or 760 445 7268 (cell)

St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs)

Wednesday - 7pm

To learn more, go to www.stopalcoholabuse.gov or call 1.800.729.6686

© 2017 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

EMPLOYMENT OFFERED

Sisters In Recovery

(open to all females - 12 step members)

(Across street from Warner Unified School)

Kids who drink before age15 are 5 times more likely to have alcohol problems when they’re adults.

*** Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her website is www.divapro.com. To see howto videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis.

$27 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD

ELDER CARE - Christian woman with excellent references looking for folks who need elder care, cleaning and cooking - 617 850 5631 4/12

San Jose Valley Continuation School

START TALKING BEFORE THEY START DRINKING

1. Cook spaghetti according to package directions. Be sure to reserve at least 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid when you drain it. 2. Meanwhile, heat a large saute pan over medium heat and add olive oil. Add garlic and fresh ginger, and saute for 30 seconds. 3. Add peanut butter and 1/2 cup of the milk; stir well to combine and melt the peanut butter. 4. Add broccoli slaw and stir to get it well-coated. Reduce the heat to low and let simmer for 3-4 minutes, until broccoli slaw is softened. 5. Add frozen peas and soy sauce, salt, pepper, cayenne and the remaining 1/4 cup milk. Stir well to combine. Let simmer for another 2 to 3 minutes. 6. Add the spaghetti to the pan once it’s cooked, along with 1/4 cup of reserved cooking water to loosen the mixture and help the sauce adhere to the noodles, more as needed. Serve warm or cold with a wedge of lime

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the publisher prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. Publisher accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall Publisher’s Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Publisher is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. Publisher accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar.

(across from new Fire Station)

Community United Methodist Church

1 cup frozen green peas 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper Chopped roasted peanuts, for garnish (optional)

continued from page 7 1. Stan Musial (1943), Johnny Bench (1970) and Vida Blue (1971) all were a younger 22, with Blue the youngest. 2. Kevin Appier, with 1,458. 3. Hall of Famer Reggie White did it in 57 games. 4. It was 2008 (UCLA). 5. Four teams -- Montreal, Los Angeles, Detroit and Boston. 6. Freddy Adu was 14 when he started an MLS game in 2004. 7. Georges St-Pierre and Donald Cerrone. ® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in the Julian News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served notice that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

LOFT FOR RENT Adult Female, 617 850 5631

Christian 4/12

PROPERTY FOR SALE LOT FOR SALE - 5 Acre corner lot, Harrison Park Rd and Hwy 79. call 575 590-0750 3/22

Trivia Time

continued from page 6 6. MEDICINE: What is an otolaryngologist more commonly known as? 7. MUSIC: Which 1980s song featured the lyrics, “Risin’ up, straight to the top, had the guts, got the glory”? 8. FOOD & DRINK: What is sauerkraut made from? 9. AD SLOGANS: What product featured the slogan, “When it rains, it pours”? 10. FAMOUS QUOTES: Which U.S. president once said, “Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves”?

Answers

1. The three-toed sloth 2. Tallahassee, Florida 3. Joseph Heller 4. Alien (1979) 5. The pope 6. Ear, nose and throat doctor 7. “Eye of the Tiger” 8. Cabbage 9. Morton Salt 10. Abraham Lincoln

® 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


March 29, 2017

Smart Tips To Prevent Identity Theft

(StatePoint) More than 13 million U.S. consumers fall victim to identity theft each year, according to Javelin Strategy and Research, with more than $15 billion stolen. Fortunately for consumers, many of these crimes are preventable. “Falling victim to identity theft can be financially devastating for many consumers, a consequence that only further emphasizes the importance of safeguarding your personal information,” says Guy Abramo, president of Experian Consumer Services. The identity protection experts at Experian recommend the following tips to better protect yourself. • Protect your home: Your home is your castle and identity thieves know this is where your most valuable possessions are likely stored. Diminish your vulnerability by using a safe to store sensitive information, such as birth certificates, social security cards and passports. You should also use a shredder to reduce your paper trail. Pay and immediately shred utility bills, credit card statements and other paperwork that includes your personal information. • Be cautious at work: “Familiar fraud” is common and occurs when a victim’s identity is stolen by someone he or she knows. At work, store personal items like wallets and smartphones in a locked cabinet. Don’t copy or scan sensitive documents, as memory functions can save your data. At night, turn your computer off and sign out of sensitive sites. Change passwords often. If you have any concerns with the way your company stores personnel records, talk to your employer or human resources department about their protocols. • Get smart with your smartphone: Smartphones and other devices can be a data goldmine for identity thieves. Use locking features on all your devices, including your laptop. Don’t use automatic login features and always log off when you are finished. Always keep your computer’s anti-virus software up-to-date and be cautious when using public wi-fi. Finally, when upgrading your mobile device to the latest model, be sure to scrub all the data from your old device before switching to your new phone. • Monitor your credit: Consider enrolling in a credit monitoring product such as Experian CreditWorks, which offers additional peace of mind through real-time notifications of any changes to your Experian Credit Report. Changes to your report are important to review, as they may be signs of fraud. The newest CreditWorks feature, Experian CreditLock, can be especially helpful in taking greater control over your credit information. This product feature allows you to easily lock and unlock your Experian Credit Report in real-time without formally freezing your credit report, which can be a cumbersome process. By locking your Experian Credit Report, creditors no longer have access to it (except for soft inquiries from creditors with whom you already have a financial relationship), which means criminals can’t apply for credit in your name. This should help deter identity thieves, as well as block unwanted inquiries that result in extensions of credit, which can impact your credit scores. In addition, if a creditor or lender tries to access your report, you’ll receive a real-time alert via email and app notification so you can take action immediately. By safeguarding your information and monitoring your credit, you can better ward off the threat of identity theft.

5 Things To Know

continued from page 10 many individuals from seeking treatment. Recovery can be achieved in many different ways and all recovery efforts should be celebrated. 2. Medication Helps. Opioid and heroin addiction cause a chemical imbalance in the brain, which medication can help repair. There are three major medications typically used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling and participation in social support programs: Buprenorphine, methadone and naltrexone. Buprenorphine and methadone diminish the effects of withdrawal and cravings restoring brain chemistry. Naltrexone blocks the euphoric effects of opioids and heroin. Buprenorphine and naltrexone can be administered by health care providers. Methadone is delivered in specialized clinics. 3. Traditional treatments aren’t always effective. Recovery is a lifelong journey. Unfortunately, some traditional treatments focus on quicker fixes like attempting it alone or by going cold turkey, which ultimately can be detrimental. Indeed, rates of relapse for people who have gone through in-patient treatment programs are up to 56 percent within the first year following discharge. However, medications, can offer longer-term solutions, and are often less expensive than inpatient treatment. If traditional substance abuse programs haven’t worked, consider medication. 4. Support is critical. A failed cycle of detox and inpatient therapy, then relapse, can leave a person feeling hopeless. This is why support is critical. Doctors and treatment counselors are important, but even more so is a well-informed support group of family and friends. “Addiction is not a broken arm that can be fixed. It’s like being on a permanent diet with a piece of candy staring at you every day,” says Avi Israel, a survivor advocate who lost his son after battling a prescription drug addiction. He advises friends and family of patients to, “Know the signs of addiction. Don’t judge. Throw tough love out the window. Love. But love with structure.” 5. Understanding addiction is crucial. Both patients and their friends and family should understand that addiction is a disease, and know what is needed to manage it. “My son had Crohn’s disease, and I knew everything about that. I wish I had known as much about addiction,” says Israel. There are more options than traditional 30-day-treatment programs and 12-step programs. In addition to medication, there are support programs like SMART recovery, which provide attendees with tools based on the latest scientific research, as well as a worldwide community with self-empowering, science-based support groups. A road of recovery is paved by many people – not just those in recovery. With the right support systems in place, a successful and sober life is possible.

The Julian News 13

When We See The Flag, We See The Nation To Honor Our Flag, this year's July 4 Parade Theme is, Old Glory on Parade A fund raiser for the 2017 July Fourth Parade will be held at on April 10th at 5:30 in the barn. There will be a silent auction with beautiful baskets filled with gift certificates and local merchandise. Wynola Pizza has graciously consented to donate a portion of the food and drink profits to the parade. There will also be vintage tee shirts from past years for sale at bargain prices. Come to Wynola Pizza and support the Julian July 4 Parade while enjoying wonderful food and a chance to take home some terrific hometown items.

Today’s Students Want To Read The Latest Textbooks (NAPSA) - Here’s something parents, teachers, students and taxpayers may be glad to learn: An answer to education costs could be in the palm of your hands...if, that is, you get your hands on the latest thing in schoolbooks-digital textbooks, which can provide more and cost less than traditional ones. They make learning easier and more fun for students through a blend of text and media, by accommodating different reading levels and languages, and by providing a text-to-speech feature. They save teachers time with model lessons, student activities, assessments, and data dashboards embedded at point of use. They empower teachers to engage today’s tech-savvy students through video, audio, text, and interactives with handson activities. The books are platform neutral and can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many configurations. In fact, some of the country’s most respected curriculum leaders and classroom teachers say Discovery Education Techbooks - from the leading provider of digital content and professional development for KÐ12 classrooms - provide standards-based content that’s relevant, dynamic and carefully vetted. These Techbooks are available for math, science and social studies. What’s more, they’re updated regularly at no additional cost so the school system doesn’t have to decide between buying new books or teaching with outdated ones. While the average cost of a traditional textbook is approximately $70 per student, these are only $45 to $55 per student for a six-year subscription, so schools save money that can be used for other education needs. These award-winning digital textbooks are currently used by more than 3 million students in all 50 states and several Canadian provinces. Many people in other districts are encouraging their school systems to adopt digital textbooks for teaching and learning. What Else You Can Do In addition to helping make sure kids get good textbooks, there are three steps parents can take at home to help their youngsters succeed in school. 1. Make it easy to study. Create an area that works for your child. Does he work best at a desk in a quiet area of his room? Or is the dining room table a better place? Does music distract her or help her focus? 2. Stress goal setting. At the start of every school year, have children write down their goals for that year. 3. Help kids manage time. Create a family calendar of afterschool activities, homework due dates and chores. Learn More For further facts, visit www. discoveryeducation.com.

Ninth Annual - Taste Of Julian 2017 Julian will hold its ninth “Taste of Julian” event on Saturday, April 8th from 1 pm to 5pm. “The Taste of Julian” is a self –guided culinary & libation tour to explore the one-of-a–kind unique restaurants & wineries/breweries throughout Julian and its surrounding area. Tickets are $25 per person and will be available at the Chamber Office prior to, as well as the day of the event. Tickets are also available on Pay Pal on www.atasteofjulian.com The day of the event each ticket will be $30 each. Special PRESALE pricing for locals. The price for locals will be 2 tickets for $40 to take advantage of this offers, locals may call Robin at 619-672-1613. 2017 also brings back WTT transportation to offer shuttle service to participants. Tickets for the shuttle are also available online. Participants will pick up colored wristbands to easily identify them, along with a map of participating restaurants/wineries/breweries upon check-in at Town Hall on April 8th Parking will be free in the Catholic Church’s parking lot on 4th Street across from the Birdwatcher. Just show your receipt or ticket that proves you have paid for the Taste of Julian and they will let you in free. The restaurants, wineries and breweries that are participating in 2017 are: Apple Alley Bakery, Apple Country Restaurant, California Mountain Bakery, Candied Apple Pastry Co., Granny’s Kitchen, Jeremy’s on the Hill, Julian Tea & Cottage Arts, Julian Candy Basket, Julian Hard Cider, Julian Café & Bakery, Julian Grille, Julian Pie Company, Kat’s Yarn & Craft Cottage, Menghini Winery, Miner’s Diner, Mom’s Pie Shop, Nickel Beer Company, Orfila Winery, Poncho Villa’s, The Cooler, Volcan Mountain Winery The monies raised at this year’s event will go to promote our special and unique community.

Never Too Late To Finish High School (NAPSA) For many adults, passing a high school equivalency test (such as the GED¨ test) is the first step toward a better job, a college degree and a brighter future. Last year, adults in the U.S. who had a high school diploma or equivalent earned nearly $10,000 per year more than those without a high school diploma, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate was also lower for those who had a high school degree. Finishing high school is important, and free adult education classes are the best place to start. If you or someone you care about is thinking of finishing high school, there is more support than you may realize. You can find free test prep classes near you by entering your zip code at FinishYourDiploma.org. Free Classes Are Available Before taking a high school equivalency test, it’s best to prepare by taking classes. In most areas, non-profits and literacy centers offer free classes to help prepare for the official test. Each adult education center will work with new students to place them in the right classes and create a custom learning plan. Teachers and tutors in each program help students learn the material and support them as they earn their diploma. Each test

also offers at least one retake in case someone doesn’t pass the first time. FinishYourDiploma.org provides more information on what to expect. Finish Your Diploma The Finish Your Diploma campaign, created by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation and the Ad Council, has helped more than 900,000 people find free adult education classes across America since 2010. The support of family, friends and local centers can help in a big way. New PSAs celebrate hardworking people and families who improved their Adults looking to complete their education, highlighting how no education may find support in some one gets a diploma alone. “As surprising places. people consider finishing their diploma, the biggest challenge are asked to share a video or photo of themselves tossing a can be simply knowing where 204985A02 to go for support and having the graduation cap, baseball cap or courage to take the first step,” any other hat into the air on social says Denine Torr of the Dollar media using the hashtag. Recent General Literacy Foundation. graduates are also encouraged “We hope the campaign inspires to share their stories to inspire and empowers people to pursue others around the country. their dreams through education.” Share Your Story and Support Finish Your Diploma also launched a new Instagram channel to support and inspire people to get their diplomas. The #HatsOffToYou promotion asks people to join in celebrating adults graduating across the U.S. through a celebratory toss of any hat representing the iconic graduation hat toss. People

get history buff.


14 The Julian News

LEGAL

NOTICES

JULIAN YESTERYEARS Vintage, Collectible & Handmade Items 2116 MAIN STREET

The Julian News is authorized to print official legal notices of all

types including: Liens, Fictitious Business Names, Change of Name, Abandonment, Estate Sales, Auctions, Public Offerings, Court ordered publishing, etc. Please call The Julian News at (760) 765 2231 for our competitive rates. The Julian News is a legally adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation in the State of California, County of San Diego on February 9, 1987. Case No. 577843

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR BUSINESSES

Renewal filing of Fictitious Business Name Statements (your DBA) is now required by the County of San Diego every five (5) years. If your business name was originally filed or renewed prior to March 1, 2012; you need to re-file. If you have not renewed since that date call The Julian News office, (760) 765-2231. We can provide this essential legal service at a very reasonable rate. County forms are available at our offices - we can complete the re-filing for you without your having to take a trip to the city. Failure to re-file could result in the loss of the exclusive rights to your business name. You may use the Julian News or any other publication that is authorized to publish Fictitious Business Name Statements and Legal Notices.

Julian Union School District Governing Board Vacancy Announcement The Julian Union School District is seeking applications from interested residents within the school district’s boundaries to serve as an appointed member of the Governing Board to fill the position until the next election in November 2018. A vacancy occurred due to the resignation of Board Member Joy Booth on March 1, 2017. In accordance with the law, the appointment must be made prior to May 1, 2017 and is expected to be filled immediately after interviews are conducted at the regular Board meeting on April 12, 2017. If you are interested in being considered for appointment to this vacancy, you may obtain an application at this time by visiting the district website at www.juesd.net or contacting the Superintendent’s office at (760)765-0661 or picking up an application in the office at 1704 Cape Horn, Julian, CA 92036. Please submit your application to: Secretary of the Board/Superintendent Julian Union School District P. O. Box 337 Julian, CA 92036 FAX: (760)765-0220 Email: brian.duffy@juesd.net Application materials must be received no later than 3:00 P.M. Wednesday, April 6, 2017 LEGAL:07571 Published: March 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005505 SUGAR AND THE WOLF 839 Rose Dr., Vista, CA 92083 The business is conducted by An Individual Erika Sanchez, 839 Rose Dr., Vista, CA 92083. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 28, 2017. LEGAL: 07563 Publish: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005496 LAGUNA WATER COMPANY 10678 Sunrise Hwy #126, Mt. Laguna, CA 91948 (Mailing Address: PO Box 126, Mount Laguna, CA 91948) The business is conducted by A Corporation - Laguna Mountain Mutual Water Company. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 28, 2017. LEGAL: 07564 Publish: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005070 THRIVING HOME SOLUTIONS 2880 Acer St., San Diego, CA 92117 The business is conducted by An Individual Gary Colon, 2880 Acer St., San Diego, CA 92117. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 23, 2017. LEGAL: 07567 Publish: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00007232-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JOSEPH MICHAEL CORY FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JOSEPH MICHAEL CORY HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: JOSEPH MICHAEL CORY TO: JOSEPH MICHAEL MITCHELL IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 14, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 28, 2017. LEGAL: 07565 Publish: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005932 DINE N VINE 1720 29th Street., San Diego, CA 92102 The business is conducted by A Corporation City Enterprises, Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 3, 2017.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2016-00044892-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: VICTOR JESUS LOPEZ and REBECA ACUNA-DIAZ FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: VICTOR JESUS LOPEZ and REBECA ACUNA-DIAZ HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: a) VICTOR JESUS LOPEZ b) REBECA ACUNA-DIAZ TO: a) VICTOR JESUS LOPEZ-ACUNA b) REBECA LOPEZ-ACUNA IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 7, 2017 at 9:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON February 10, 2017. LEGAL: 07566 Publish: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006070 SOLUCIONES SUMAC 11639 Riverside Drive, Suite 103 Lakeside, CA 92040 (Mailing Address: PO Box 710732 Santee, CA 92072) The business is conducted by A Corporation - G3 bTapes, Inc. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 6, 2017.

LEGAL NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00008164-CU-PT-CTL

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: MIN-HUI WANG TIN FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: MIN-HUI WANG TIN HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: MIN-HUI WANG TIN aka: MIN-HUI WANG MAY TIN aka: MINHUI MAY WANG aka: MIN HUI WANG TO: MAY MIN-HUI WANG-TIN IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 21, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 8, 2017. LEGAL: 07574 Publish: March 15, 22, 29, April 5, 2017

LEGAL: 07570 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006462 ALSANNAH’S SKINCARE AND WELLNESS THERAPY 339 Main Street, Ramona, CA 92065 (Mailing Address: PO Box 722 Santa Ysabel, CA 92070) The business is conducted by An Individual Wendy Gonsalves, 25714 Mesa Grande Road, Santa Ysabel, CA 92070. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 9, 2017.

LEGAL: 07575 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

Tires and Service CUSTOMER SERVICE IS OUR #1 GOAL

NOBODY BEATS OUR PRICES!

Open 7 Days A Week

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Monday – Friday 8am — 6pm Saturday 8am — 5pm Sunday 9am — 4pm

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760•789•8877

www.TractionTireSD.com

© 2017 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Automotive Marketplace Tires/Brakes • Trailer • Auto • Trucks

RON’S

TIRE & BRAKE

Mon-Fri: 8 - 6 Sat: 8 - 4

40TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

FREE Road Hazard Warantee with Purchase

Stop by Now and Register for Prizes and Give-Aways

2560 Main St Ramona

Saturday - April 8

760-789-3600

Collision Repair - Body Shop

JULIAN AUTO BODY AND PAINT Why Get Towed Down The Hill?

ALL Insurance Companies Welcome

(760) 765-3755 3582 Hwy 78 at Newman Way

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006785 NORTH COUNTY POWERSPORTS 2333 Montiel Road, San Marcos, CA 92069 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - SMTV Cycles LLC, 2333 Montiel Road, San Marcos, CA 92069. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 13, 2017.

Locals Discount

Free Mini Detail

JulianAutoBody@gmail.com Stefan Mussen

LE G A L N O TI C E S

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006930 KOC PITT 7707 Misson Gorge Rd #150, San Diego, CA 92120 The business is conducted by A Corporation Maikau Corp, 521 Ala Moawa Blvd. Honolulu, HI 96813. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 14, 2017.

Case Number: 37-2017-00009352-CU-PT-CTL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006532 a) LAIR NIGHT CLUB b) LAIR LOUNGE 615 Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101 (Mailing Address: 7222 Opportunity Road San Diego, CA 92111) The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company - WSA Entertainment LLC, 7222 Opportunity Road, San Diego, CA 92111. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 9, 2017. LEGAL: 07582 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 2017

LEGAL: 07579 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 2017

LEGAL: 07568 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005068 THE WORKMANSHIP 9502 Trevors Court, Lakeside, CA 92040 The business is conducted by An Individual Makenna Yarbor, 9502 Trevors Court, Lakeside, CA 92040. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 23, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-005062 EDUARDO HERNANDEZ 3245 University Ave. #366, San Diego, CA 92104 The business is conducted by An Individual Eduardo Hernandez, 3245 University Ave. #366, San Diego, CA 92104. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON February 23, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-007020 ALMENDRO ARTS 1804 Garnet Avenue #479, San Diego, CA 92109 (Mailing Address: 4836 Narragansett Avenue #7 San Diego, CA 92107) The business is conducted by An Individual Jonathan Szatkowski, 4836 Narragansett Avenue #7, San Diego, CA 92107. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 14, 2017.

LEGAL: 07569 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

LEGAL: 07576 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

LEGAL: 07581 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 2017

LE G A L N O TI C E S

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

LEGAL: 07578 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 2017

LEGAL: 07573 Publish: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-006237 NOT YOGAL 4048 Morrell St. Unit A, San Diego, CA 92109 The business is conducted by An Individual Lauren Scherr, 4048 Morrell St. Unit A, San Diego, CA 92109. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/ COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 7, 2017.

[K-Mart Parking Lot]

t. aS

LEGAL: 07580 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 2017

1811 Main Street

on

Copies can be obtained at the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District office located at 2645 Farmer Road, Julian, CA 92036 Monday- Thursday from 8-4.

that means you should move on to other things that are important to you. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Spend this weekend recharging your physical and spiritual energies. When you return to your workaday world, you'll be ready to take on that new project. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Be careful how you advise a troubled friend. Even your wise counsel could be misunderstood. Better to suggest that he or she seek professional help. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Family problems once again dominate and, once again, everyone seeks your guidance in these matters. Later, you can indulge in some muchneeded relaxation. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Some mixed signals create confusion in the workplace. Best advice: Ask for explanations before you attempt to deal with any of these matters on your own. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A patch of roiling water in the workplace could be threatening, but stay the course and you'll soon be clear of it. Then go out and have a great time with loved ones. BORN THIS WEEK: Your extraordinary leadership qualities mark you as someone people can turn to for guidance in difficult situations.

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Notice is hereby given: the Board of Directors of the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District will hold a public hearing on April 11, 2017 at 10:00 am at the Julian Womens Club located at 2607 C Street. Julian CA, 92036 to adopt continued participation. Resolution 2016-08, Benefit Fee, Annual Special Benefit Tax for Structural Fire Protection Service within the boundaries of the Julian Cuyamaca Fire Protection District and Resolution 2016-09, Annual Special Benefit Tax for the new fire station construction, and Resolution 2016-07, Mitigation Fee and 5 Year Multi-Year Facilities and Equipment Plan.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Put your restlessness to good use by indulging the Arian love of exploring new places and seeking new challenges. There also could be a new romance waiting to be "discovered." TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A surprise message from someone in your past could lead to a long-awaited reunion with a once-close friend. Also, look for a workplace problem to be resolved in your favor. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your self-confidence is rising, and that should be a significant factor in helping you adjust to a new social situation, as well as adjusting to a series of changes in the workplace. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Turnabout could be lots of fun when someone who previously accepted your tender, loving care without question now suggests that he or she wants to start taking care of you. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Put the lessons you learned from past disappointments to work in planning your future. The way ahead opens to opportunities "purrfectly" suited to the adventurous Lion. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a good time to renew contacts with family members and/or old friends who somehow slipped off your personal viewing screen in recent years. Travel also is favored. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Most problems surrounding that recent personal situation have been resolved, and

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District

Wednesday - March 29, 2017

Volume 32 - Issue 34

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2017-007214 KD WILLIAMSON WOODWORKING 2001 Hartwright Rd, Spc #8, Vista, CA 92084 The business is conducted by An Individual - James Williamson, 2001 Hartwright Rd, Spc #8, Vista, CA 92084. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH ERNEST J. DRONENBURG JR., RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON March 16, 2017. LEGAL: 07583 Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 2017

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: JOSHUA LEGGETT and JESSICA WISNOSKY FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER: JOSHUA LEGGETT and JESSICA WISNOSKY and on behalf of: EMMALEE NIKOLE NEUBERGER-LEGGETT, a minor HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: EMMALEE NIKOLE NEUBERGER-LEGGETT, a minor TO: EMMALEE NIKOLE LEGGETT, a minor IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 46 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (220 West Broadway, San Diego, CA 92101) on APRIL 28, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 16, 2017. LEGAL: 07584 Publish: March 29, April 5, 12, 19, 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case Number: 37-2017-00009488-CU-PT-NC

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF: CAITLYN BAKER FOR CHANGE OF NAME PETITIONER:

CAITLYN BAKER HAS FILED A PETITION FOR AN ORDER TO CHANGE NAMES FROM: CAITLYN BAKER TO: CAITLYN CARNEVALE IT IS ORDERED that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court in Department 26 of the San Diego County Superior Court at the address shown (325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081) on MAY 2, 2017 at 8:30 a.m., and show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE be published in the Julian News, a newspaper of general circulation published in this county, at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the day of the hearing. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COURT CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON March 17, 2017. LEGAL: 07585 Publish: March 29 and April 5, 12, 19, 2017

Juliannews 32 34  

Wednesday - March 29, 2017

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