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Pg. 4A & 5A: See an array of photographs from Bid Night

Sunday, September 21, 2008 :: Vol. 97, No. 7 :: 2 sections, 16 pages :: www.acuoptimist.com

Inside This Issue:

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Students to lead, contribute to Summit throughout event

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Former ACU quarterback Rex Lamberti and others are inducted in Hall of Fame

For Rent: Movies one might have overlooked and shouldn’t have

‘Radical’ to launch Theme Conversations Sunday By Daniel Johnson-Kim Editor in Chief

When Dr. Leroy Garrett takes the stage at the Summit opening Theme Conversation in Moody Coliseum Sunday, it may be a moment of vindication for the 89-year-old scholar who was known throughout his life as a radical in the Churches of Christ. “During the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s I would go to the Lecture-

ships back in those days and I was a skunk at the garden party,” Garrett said of involvement in past Lectureships. The former “stinker,” a renowned scholar, preacher and historian Garrett from the Stone Campbell movement, will begin the

Theme Conversations at 7 p.m. Sunday with a lesson titled “Righteousness of God Revealed through Faith and for Faith.” Garrett said he will discuss Paul’s message in Romans 1:817 and how God’s righteousness encompasses all people. “You are not OK because of our selfishness and pride, and I am not OK but that’s OK because of God’s grace,” Garrett said.

After Garrett begins the Theme Conversations Sunday, David Fleer, Kevin Murray, James Thompson, Randy Harris, Eric Wilson and Chris Seidman will each speak throughout the week on various passages of Romans, tying into the Summit theme of the “Righteousness of God.” Brady Bryce, director of Ministry Events, said each speaker brings an original style to the stage that will provide variety

for the Summit audience. “Everyone needs to be who they are,” Bryce said of the theme speakers. “If the person is a scholar they don’t need to be cracking jokes pretending to be who they are not, if someone is a great orator, let them be that.” In an effort to make this a conversation and to step away from the old style of simply See

Theme page 7A

Theme Speakers Seven men will speak in the Theme Conversations in Moody Coliseum. n Leroy Garret n David Fleer n Kevin Murray n James Thompson n Randy Harris n Eric Wilson n Chris Seidman

Environment, Islam on slate for speakers

No Pain, No Entry

By Michael Freeman Managing Editor

One new session for this year’s Summit will include three featured guest speakers of national and international acclaim. Brian McLaren, J. Matthew Sleeth and Sam Solomon will discuss issues ranging from environmentalism to radical Islam. “Maybe the more exciting change is the featured guest slot,” said Brady Bryce, director of ministry events. “It perfectly lines up with the academic calendar.” Each lecture will start at 3 p.m. in Moody Coliseum and last 45 minutes. Students can earn three Chapel credits for attending each lecture. McLaren will speak Monday. He is an acclaimed author and church planter and has appeared on broadcasts including Larry King Live and Nightline. In Time magazine’s Feb. 7, 2005, issue, McLaren was recognized as one of the “25 Most Influential Evangelicals in America.” He has written more than

10 books and is a leader in the “emerging church movement.” In Monday’s lecture, he will discuss how to reach Christians for Christ. “It sounds kind of strange,” Bryce said. “A lot of us assume that we’ve already been reached for Christ. But Sleeth what about our perspectives of Jesus aren’t quite realistic and what needs to change?” The Graduate School of Theology, the McLaren Youth and Family Ministry program and the Adams Center for Learning helped bring McLaren to campus. The Adams Center, along with the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and See

Featured page 7A

Zak Zeinert :: chief photographer Jonathan Sanders, sophomore English major from Henderson, leans back in pain while holding a watermelon as part of a Gamma Sigma Phi Bid Night activity at Beauchamp Ampitheatre Friday afternoon. GSP pledges, or Siblings as they are called by members, held watermelons for two hours.

Freshmen dance, Social clubs begin first phase of pledging sing in ‘iFollies’ By Colter Hettich

acuoptimist.com: See video of each clubs’ on-campus Bid Night activities.

Features Editor

By Emily Jorgenson After receiving their bids Thursday, students pledging a social club endured the first, and notoriously most strenuous, night of pledging: Bid Night. Although the administration has tightened the reigns on clubs for Bid Night and pledging as a whole, club members were determined to make it a night to remember. Alpha Kai Omega put two to three months of preparation into the night. Alpha Kai President Erin Chappell said each

club must have an approved, Bid Night agenda, so careful planning is essential. “You have to know exactly what’s happening every minute of the night,” Chappell said. Derrick Bibb, Sub T-16 president, said he and fellow club members started planning for Bid Night in May. Friday marked the one-year anniversary of Bibb’s promotion from “Gob,” a Sub T pledge, to an official member, or “Subber.” “This is our chance to show [the

pledges] why this is so important to us,” Bibb said. “It’s a brotherhood.” He said the night’s events were “exactly, 100 percent like we did it last year.” With rules forbidding classic, Bid Night ingredients, such as “any activity that requires pledges to recite knowledge orally” or “any activity that involves water unless in a swimming pool with appropriate supervision,” See

Bid page 7A

Student Track gives opportunity to attend By Laura Acuff Opinion Page Editor

With increased student participation as a goal of this year’s Summit, the Student Track received a facelift this year, said Brady Bryce, director of Ministry Events. “How it’s been done differ-

ently is I feel like we’ve really involved students even better this year—really taken their ideas and run with them,” Bryce said. “I think the greater student involvement in the planning is going to show up. For this past year, we involved student leaders. We tapped the shoulders of different

ACU WeATher

people and said, ‘OK, who are leaders on campus? Who would be good to involve?’” While in the future, Bryce said even more student input may be sought in an effort to increase student input in planning Summit this year, an ACU Student Planning Team offered feedback on ways to

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Inside This Special Summit Issue:

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engage students. The team included students of a variety of classifications and backgrounds. The team began meeting last semester to discuss topics and speakers that would interest students, said team See

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View the complete Summit schedule Race addressed in Summit class

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Department of Journalism and Mass Communication ::

Staff Photographer

The freshman class participated in the traditional Freshman Follies to vocalize its experience at ACU so far in its production of iFollies Friday and Saturday in Cullen Auditorium. Freshman Follies was themed “iFollies” to convey the distribution of iPhones and iPod touches to the freshman class as part of the Mobile Learning Initiative. Tom Craig, director of Student Productions, said the production team focused on what is current for these students and relatable. Although this year’s program has a few changes to this year’s production, the purpose of iFollies was the same. “Freshmen Follies is a way See

Follies page 7A

Class to focus on drug abuse

acuoptimist.com See freshmen dance, sing and show of their talents online at www.acuoptimist.com

Online Poll :

How do you feel about Lectureship’s name change?

a. It’s about time they changed it. b. It was unecessary. c. Hopefully, the new name sticks. d. Who cares? I still won’t go.

Highlight Classes offer insight

Abilene Christian University

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer Lindsey Riley, freshman early childhood education major from Pampa, dances with McDonald Hall during Freshman Follies.

acuoptimist.com ::

Serving the ACU community since 1912


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Campus Day Sunday, September 21, 2008

Calendar and Events

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Sunday

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Wednesday

Tuesday

8 a.m. USTRC Team Roping Championships at the Taylor County Expo Center. Call the Expo Center at 677-4376.

7 a.m. Prayer at Jacob’s Dream.

8 a.m ACU golf at NSU Classic.

5 p.m. ACU Soccer at McMurry.

2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Vintage baseball practice at Buffalo Gap Historic Village.

8 p.m. JamFest auditions in the Bean Sprout. E-mail onstage@acu.edu.

9 a.m. 8th Annual West Texas Book and Music Festival. For more information, call 676-6017.

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Monday

9 a.m. 8th Annual West Texas Book and Music Festival. For more information, call 676-6017.

8 p.m. JamFest auditions in the Bean Sprout.

Online Newscast

Webcast

Check out a sportscast of highlights from last weekend’s football, volleyball and soccer games.

Log on to www.youtube.com/acuvideo for a preview of “Summit”, Freshman Follies and Bid Night.

About This Page The Optimist maintains this calendar for the ACU community to keep track of local social, academic and service opportunities. Groups may send announcements directly to jmcnetwork@acu.edu or to the Page 2 Editor at mab07d@acu.edu.

ChapelCheckup Credited Chapels to date:

18

New Collegiate Cards have arrived in the Students’ Association office. Collegiate Cards are available free to every ACU student.

JamFest auditions are Monday and Tuesday in the Bean Sprout at 8:30 p.m. If interested, e-mail onstage@acu.edu.

Students can join other students and faculty for a time of unified intercession Mondays at 7 a.m. at Jacob’s Dream. For more information e-mail kdl04a@acu.edu.

Freshman Follies tickets are on sale this week from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Campus Center. Tickets cost $10 per person and can be purchased in advance or at the door. More than 500 freshmen will go on stage to share how they are adapting to the new technology at ACU. Show times are Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. All shows will be in Cullen Auditorium. Doors will open 30 minutes prior to each show.

Hispanic Heritage Month at the Abilene Public Library is celebrated Sept. 16 through Oct. 16. The theme for this year is Getting Involved: Our Families, Our Community, Our Nation. Spring Break Campaign Leader applications are available in McKinzie Hall Room 127 this week. Return to Room 127 by Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The Shinnery Review staff is now welcoming submissions for the spring literary magazine. Poetry,

short story, drawings, paintings, graphic design or any other original piece of work can be put towards consideration. Up to ten selections can be submitted for review. Send your submissions via www.acu.edu/students/shinnery. Sundaes on Mondays will begin with its first meeting on Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Living Room. There will be discussion on the cultural significance of interracial relationships, along with free ice cream. Let’s Start Talking will have their first event on Oct. 2 at 5 p.m. in the Living Room. For more information, call Jason Morris at ext. 2830 or Ryan Bien at (817) 684-7578 or visit the Web site www.lstu.org.

Volunteer Opportunities The H.E.R.O. Program (Hendrick Equine Rehabilitation Opportunities) needs volunteers to walk or jog alongside a horse on which a child with physical limitations will be riding. This is an eight-week program beginning Sept. 30 that requires one hour per week. Volunteers can help Tuesday or Thursday afternoons between the hours of 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Key City Kiwanis’ annual fish fry needs volunteers Oct. 3 and 4 at the Abilene Civic Center. Help is needed Oct. 3 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Oct. 4 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. with cooking, serving, cleaning tables and trash pick-up. Volunteers receive a meal ticket to eat meals while working. ACU’s Summit (Lectureship), Sunday through Wednesday, needs volunteers for a variety of jobs. Drivers are needed to drive 15 passenger vans for the shuttle service (training required through ACU Physical Resources). Meals on Wheels has an ongoing need for volunteers to deliver lunches. Delivery takes 1 to 1 1/2 hours, and efforts are made to assign routes that are close. Brief training is provided, and if you are a student, a Chapel exemption can be given for one day a week if your delivery time conflicts with Chapel. If you are able to help, contact Mitzi McAndrew at 672-5050. The Taylor Elementary Chess Club is seeking volunteers to help with the club Thursday from 3:15 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Volunteers do not need to know how to play chess. Find out volunteer opportunities by visiting the Volunteer and Service-Learning Center’s Web site at www.acu.edu/vslc and clicking on “Volunteer Opportunities”. For more information, contact the Volunteer and Service-Learning Center.

Credited Chapels remaining:

47

Outdoor Club seeks adventurous students By Linda Bailey Student Reporter

Announcements

To ensure that an item will appear on time, the announcement should be sent at least 10 days before. The Optimist may edit items for space and style. Corrections and clarifications of published news articles will be printed in this space in a timely manner.

After the success of its back-to-school barbecue, the Outdoor Club plans to embark on its annual camping trip to Abilene State Park within the next few weeks. In the past, the Outdoor Club camped Friday night and turned Saturday morning and afternoon into a service Saturday, said Outdoor Club President Alex Wann, junior environmental science major from Torrington, Wyo. This trip is only one of the many excursions and events the Outdoor Club has planned for this year. Kayaking, rock climbing, mountain biking, hiking and campfires are all activities the Outdoor Club wants to pursue during the semester, Wann said. The big event of the semester for the Outdoor Club, however, is its involvement in intramurals. Timber Barkley, junior environmental science major from Gruver, is the vice president of meetings for the Outdoor Club. Barkley said they plan to have men and women’s football teams and a tennis team. Unlike other clubs, the Outdoor Club’s activities are open to all students, even if they are not members. To become a member, students are encouraged to visit the club’s Web site at www.acuoutdoorclub. org and get on the e-mail list. Students on the e-mail list will be informed of upcoming events, job opportunities and any additional announcements. The officers of the Outdoor Club have not made any major changes to club activities, but they are trying to change the way the club runs from year to year and help establish a foundation for

the future. “We are refortifying all things of last year and doing them better this year,” Barkley said. The Outdoor Club is known for its adventurous trips, but the trips are not the whole purpose of the club.

It’s more than just simple adventure; it’s the whole experience of connecting with God and people. :: Alex Wann, junior environmental science major from Torrington, Wyo.

“It’s more than just simple adventure; it’s the whole experience of connecting with God and people,” Wann said. Students who are interested in being a part of this club are encouraged to come to events and hang out with members. The first club-wide meeting is scheduled Sunday at 7 p.m. “We are a really great group,” Barkley said. “It is a lot of fun to be in the Outdoor Club because you are still involved and active, but it isn’t as demanding as a social club can be. You make a lot of really great friendships too.”

E-mail Bailey at: ;


CAMPUS NEWS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

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Empty Bowls project fights hunger By Molly Byrd Page 2 Editor

Summit attendees have the opportunity to watch sculpture students as they create iron bowls in an effort to fight world hunger. Everyone is welcome to the event that showcases the process of melting and iron pouring using traditional cupola furnace techniques. “There is a real sense of energy, danger and a connection to timelessness that comes with the craft,” said Travis Eason, ACU alumnus from Sioux Falls, S.D. Art students have used class time during the past few weeks to design patterns and build molds for bowls that will be created in the ceremony, said Geoffrey Broderick,

There is a real sense of energy, danger and a connection to timelessness that comes with the craft. :: Travis Eason, ACU alumnus from Sioux Falls, S.D.

assistant professor of art. The iron pour will be Monday at 8:30 p.m. in the grassy area west of the Teague Special Events Center. After the bowls are cast, they will be placed on display in the Shore Art Gallery until Wednesday at noon when the bowls go on sale in an auction. “I want my students to know the art they are making will fight hunger because we are giving the proceeds to the Empty Bowls Project,”

Broderick said. Everyone can view the bowls, purchase a favorite, and then fill it with soup for the brown bag lunch and auction which will be sponsored by Jack Maxwell, professor of art and design. All of the proceeds go to the Empty Bowls Project, which fights hunger around the community. Special speakers will explain more about the Empty Bowls Project during the auction.

This will be the third annual iron-pouring event on campus, and it is the second time it will occur during Summit. “A challenge for us was tying the iron pour into Lectureship, so we decided to piggyback on the idea the Empty Bowls Project had,” Maxwell said. Maxwell said he would like the event to grow into something even bigger and wants ACU to have its own inhouse charity event with 3040 furnaces going at once. “I really support this event and the cause the Empty Bowls Project fights for,” Maxwell said. “So maybe one day we could have our own big ceremony to help the hungry.” E-mail Byrd at: mab07d@acu.edu

The Calm after the Storm

Kat Patton :: Staff Photographer Natasha Fowler, sophomore English major from Throckmorton, prays at the Chapel on the Hill during Thursday night’s prayer vigil for the victims of Hurricane Ike.

ACU students to lead CDs, DVDs to benefit Ghana Ministries two Summit lectures By Kimberly Wolford Student Reporter

By Cody Veteto

Chief Videographer

Two ACU students will lead a session for Summit, focusing on the book of Romans. Matt Worthington, senior English major from San Antonio, will speak on the “Violence of Love” Tuesday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Worthington plans on using both his degree expertise and his natural speaking ability. He used these traits to help him prepare for his session, he said. “Well as an English major, I do a lot of reading and a lot of text analysis,” Worthington said. Anna Peters, senior education and children’s ministry major from

Houston, will lead the “Sex, Lies and Relationships” session Thursday at 3 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Peters said she prepared for her session by studying scriptures, collecting topicfocused nationwide interviews, making her own “sex talk” video and praying. To Peters’ benefit, this year’s focus will be “to involve more people in conversation on daily ministry,” said Brady Bryce, director of ministry events. Peters and Worthington said that including students’ opinions was of the utmost importance to them. “I’m really pumped up about it,” Peters said. “I’m excited.”

E-mail Veteto at: cjv04a@acu.edu

All lectures and classes during Summit will be available on CD, DVD and iTunes U. “The iTunes initiative is a pretty exciting one because it expands our audience dramatically,” said Dr. Brady Bryce, director of ministry events. A group known as www. acureplay.org will record all audio material. This group consists of current students and is led by Lyndell Lee, ACU alumnus from Snyder. CDs will be sold by students at the Teague Special Events Center; they will cost $6. Bryce said all profits made off the CDs and DVDs will be given to Ghana Ministries. Dr. Jerry Taylor, associate professor of Bible, missions and

TEchnology FOR ChARITY

CDs and DVDs will be sold in the Teague Special Events Center. n Cost for CDs: $6 n Cost for DVDs: $15 n Selected lectures will be available for free on iTunes U.

ministry, along with a group of students will be working with the charity. Ghana Ministries will be using the donations in several ways: Village of Hope, Heritage Christian College and sponsoring several students planning on traveling to Ghana. Selected lectures also will be available for free download on iTunes U. Bryce said students wishing to download the lectures on iTunes can still donate to the Ghana initiative through the ACU Ministry Events’ Web site.

Due to the difficulty of coding and posting the audio onto iTunes, these lectures will be available within a few months after Summit. Bryce said there is a possibility that all lectures will be available, but as of right now, the plan is to have at least the seven theme conversations. DVDs of the seven theme conversations and at least two of the featured speakers will be sold. Bryce said that the company Infocus, the same group that records most ACU events such as Sing Song, will be recording

all the video. DVDs also will be available at the Teague Center; the cost will be approximately $15. “The thing I’m most excited about is that this allows the conversation to continue; it makes it a living conversation, not bound to this location,” Bryce said. An Internet blog also will be started with video and audio from Summit. Students can text or e-mail in questions to the speakers and the answers will be posted on the blog. After these are posted, people can comment and discuss further on the comment boards, Bryce said. Summit discussions can continue beyond the four days of events thanks to these initiatives of the ministry events. E-mail Wolford at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu


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Alpha Kai Omega

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer

Are we in yet? Zak Zeinert :: chief photographer

Sub T-16

Jozie Sands :: staff photographer

Ko Jo Kai

Frater Sodalis

Galaxy

Sigma Theta Chi

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer

GATA

Zak Zeinert :: chief photographer

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer

Jozie Sands :: staff photographer

Gamma Sigma Phi

Jozie Sands :: staff photographer


CAMPUS NEWS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

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Summit speakers to address racial issues “ By Michael Freeman Managing Editor

In light of the Students’ Association noose incident Sept. 3, race issues are heavily imprinted on students’ minds. But, the topics of race and racial reconciliation also were on students’ minds last year when Brady Bryce, director of ministry events, was planning the 2008 Summit. “It was really on student awareness then,” Bryce said. “And now, it’s back on the radar in a big, big way, probably even more so. It’s just something that’s there; it’s something that people wonder about.” Students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to discuss race issues in three different lecture sessions during Summit. “Transcending Racism” will

Diversity is probably the 21st century church’s greatest challenge. We want to diversify; we just don’t know how. :: George Pendergrass, director of the Office of

be Monday through Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 130. “Show Us How You Do It: Marshall Keeble and the Rise of Black Churches of Christ in the United States” will be Monday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 120. “Multiculturalism and Diversity: The 21st Century Challenges for the Church” will be Tuesday and Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 127.

Multicultural Enrichment

“Diversity is probably the 21st century church’s greatest challenge,” said George Pendergrass, director of the Office for Multicultural Enrichment. “We want to diversify; we just don’t know how. Pendergrass will be leading the “Multiculturalism and Diversity” lecture, where the focus will be on how Churches of Christ can best integrate diversity into their congregations. “You look at any organization that is diverse and

you look at the organizations that are not and you will see a major productivity and production difference,” Pendergrass said. Church leaders and alumni were not the only ones who were initially interested in these sessions. When Summit was being planned, the ACU Student Planning Team specifically requested race-related lectures. “There was not an intentional effort to just turn on a bunch of burners, and let’s talk about every controversial issue,” Bryce said. Douglas Foster, Travis Stanley, Walter Taylor, Damon Parker, Beatriz Walker, Edward Robinson and Pendergrass will all lead the different race-related lectures. Pendergrass said he is glad extensive planning went into bringing these speakers to Summit.

Where to be

Here’s where students can catch this year’s Summit sessions dealing with racism: n “Transcending Racism” — Monday-Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 127. n “Show Us How You Do It: Marshall Keeble and the Rise of Black Churches of Christ in the United Kingdom" — Monday at 4 p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 120. n “Multiculturalism and Diversity: The 21st Century Challenges for the Church” — Tuesday-Wendesday at 4p.m. in the Biblical Studies Building Room 120.

“I just applaud him in such a tremendous way,” Pendergrass said of Bryce. “He’s dealing with the Bible and making [it] applicable to contemporary issues. That’s what we need. And personally, I think our

young people appreciate it. They’re tired of the surfacelevel religion.”

E-mail Freeman at: mxf04b@acu.edu

Churches’ responsibility to join war against drug abuse By Daniel Johnson-Kim Editor in chief

Minister Kinwood H. DeVore wants visitors in his Summit class to understand two things: the war against drugs still rag-

es on and it is up to communities, churches and individuals to help end it. DeVore will lead the class “How to Win the War Against Drug Abuse” during the week to educate visitors on what he

calls a drug pandemic throughout the United States. “Since the government has given up and said we can’t win this war, then individual churches, individual communities and individual people will

have to equip themselves to win the war,” he said. DeVore, the minister for the Metropolitan Church of Christ in San Francisco, has been working in the drug and alcohol recovery ministry for more

than 35 years and is the founder and executive director of Metropolitan Fresh Start House, a faith-based 24-hour residential live-in drug treatment facility in the San Francisco Bay area. He founded the treatment facility in 1989 after he said he discovered no faith-based facilities existed that worked to help rehabilitate addicts in the Bay Area of California. “My first time I was a fulltime minister was at a place called South Side Church of Christ in Richmond, Calif., and the first thing I had to deal with was a heroine addict,” DeVore said. He said he took the addict to a nearby rehabilitation facility and was disappointed after finding God was never discussed in the rehabilitation process. “I did my research on these places, and what they practice was called assault therapy,” DeVore said. “They tell you to take your Bible and throw it away…and those were the only places I could take people to that were God’s people.” So DeVore launched his own rehabilitation facility, where he said he has been able to counsel addicts and their families.

His Summit class, which will be at 9:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, will be a place where attendees can hear how the Metropolitan Fresh Start House program has changed lives. He said he will talk about the “enemies and friends” of recovering drug addicts and hopes to have a dialogue with people in Abilene about how they can join the cause. “No. 1, we need to know we can win the war, and No. 2, we need tools on how to win the war,” DeVore said. Brady Bryce, director of ministry events, said he invited DeVore to lead the class because student leaders he visited with in fall of 2007 said drug abuse was a topic they wanted to have a conversation about at Summit. Bryce contacted DeVore and said the dialogue the California minister will bring to Summit will open conversations that may not have been discussed at past Lectureships. “We want this to be a place of conversation, not for safe conversation, but a safe place for conversations,” Bryce said.

E-mail Johnson-Kim at: djj04a@acu.edu


FROM THE FRONT/CAMPUS NEWS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

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Theme: Lessons cover Romans Continued from page 1A

Zak Zeinert :: chief photographer Sub T-16 pledges, or Gobs, jog around the track at the Larry “Satch” Sanders Intramural Fields Friday.

Bid: Activities focused on unity Continued from page 1A clubs were forced to moderate their agendas. Others, like Sub T, changed nothing. Eric Gentry, GSP president, said the Kinsmen’s night went smoothly and he was impressed with this year’s pledge class. “We were in line with the pledging requirements from

last year, so we didn’t have to change anything,” Gentry said. “We believe in the pledging process because it creates brothers in ways you couldn’t understand unless you have been a part of it.” Although some may have their differences, every club seemed to agree unanimously on one thing: the upmost essentiality of Bid Night. For

Sigma Theta Chi, the night meant keeping track of 48 pledges, the most possible. “We’re lucky to have these girls,” said Suzanne Langston, Sigma Theta Chi president. “But Siggies create a reputation throughout the year, and I think [the number of pledges] speaks highly of that.” E-mail Hettich at: clh05d@acu.edu

Student: Summit returns to roots Continued from page 1A member Crystal Chavez, sophomore elementary education major from San Antonio. Chavez said student input has a valuable place in Summit planning. “I think it’s very important,” she said. “A lot of the students have to go to Lectureship anyways or go for their Chapel credits, and it should be something that they’re interested in.” Prior commitments to other activities, school or just general fatigue may contribute to students’ lack of interest in Summit, Chavez said. But, she said attending is worthwhile regardless. “I’d say to go and listen and really be interested in what these people have to say be-

cause some of these people are really well-known authors and such, and they have interesting ideas and points,” Chavez said. Bryce said refocusing Summit on the students is part of a general movement to return the annual conference to its roots. “From a deeper perspective, back when this thing started, it was all about students and it was focused in on students,” Bryce said. “Here is a chance, whatever your discipline, to engage faith and life together in a place where faculty and students are presenting and sitting by one another, and church leaders are on campus, as well as Christianity at large.” Although Bryce said he hopes student involvement in the choosing of topics and speakers for this year’s student

track and scheduling all student track sessions in the afternoon will encourage and enable more students to attend. In the end, he said student participation is up to the students, and he has considered the possibility that efforts to involve students may come up short. “I think I’d be disappointed and I’d be surprised because I really feel like they’re going to be involved,” Bryce said. “If it doesn’t meet my expectations, it just means we look at it again and say, ‘All right, what could this be? Let’s dream all over again and plan for 2009.’”

having a lecturer and audience that listens, Bryce said that while each man presents, audience members can text message or e-mail questions for the speaker throughout the morning and evening’s Theme Conversations. Bryce said there will be an interview portion in which he will ask audience members’ questions to the speakers following their lectures; this way, members are an active part of the conversation on stage. Wilson, senior minister of Fairview Road Church of Christ in Columbia, Miss., said he believes this will be a great way to involve the audience in Moody. “It’s utilizing technology and an attempt to make

Continued from page 1A for freshmen to immediately develop relationships and work together,” Craig said. Some of the changes this year included the absence of emcees, the overwhelming participation from the freshmen class and the iPhone theme specifically tailored to this freshman class. Co-chair Lezlie Parrish, freshman math education major from Levelland, noticed these changes from the years past, but describes them as “not anything that’s really too different.” Parrish was convinced to go to ACU after watching Follies years ago and is more than excited to have been a part of it. She participated in large chorus, her hall act as well as fulfilling the role of co-chair. “It’s fun,” Parrish said. “I don’t know how else to describe it.”

Craig said among the various topics and themes the freshmen sang about, the majority of the themes centered on the addition of the iPhone to the campus. One act sang about maintaining long distance relationships via an iPhone, while another focused on Santa Claus dismissing his elves for the sole reason that all the freshmen already have their iPhones and don’t need the elves to make them. Kari Hailey, freshman nursing major from Lockhart described the theme of her act in relation to the iFollies theme. The act parodied the song “My Lipstick is Poppin’” by changing the lyrics to say “My iPhone is Poppin’”. In one word, Craig described this production as “creative”. “The production has a lot of funny and creative twists’,” he said. “There were several laugh-out-loud moments.”

The specialty acts consisted of individuals singing or playing instruments to songs with lyrics representing the ability to “have the world at your hands”, keeping in mind the addition of the iPhone. These themes took many hours and meetings to develop into acts. Some halls, like the women of Gardner 2nd West, had committees for lyrics, choreography and costumes, while other halls were not as organized. The production was one task that the freshmen did not take lightly. Practices began up to three weeks before the show and went through five nights per week for at least an hour for the majority of the acts. “It’s been so much fun actually getting to know the people down your hall,” Hailey said.

E-mail Jorgenson at: enj06a@acu.edu

E-mail Acuff at: lka06a@acu.edu

Featured: Former terrorist to speak the Department of Biology, also worked to invite Sleeth to speak. Sleeth, a former emergency room physician, is an environmental activist. His book, Serve God, Save the Planet: A Christian Call to Action, was a finalist for a 2008 Christianity Today Book Award. In Tuesday’s lecture, he will discuss his journey in changing his family’s lifestyle by reducing their fossil fuel and electricity use by more

E-mail Johnson-Kim at: djj04a@acu.edu

Professors cancel classes Head Copy Editor

than two-thirds. “They did a simple energy audit of their home,” Bryce said. “And they realized they were living a very materialistic life. He’s going to tell his story on how that became a Christian issue for him.” In Wednesday’s lecture, Solomon, a former Muslim terrorist trainer, will speak about his experiences in an al-Qaida-like terrorist cell and his conversion to Christianity. He is now a lawyer in the United Kingdom and advises Parliament. The Hon-

heritage of unity and diversity and become a part of the larger church.” Garrett profiled his journey in the Churches of Christ in his autobiography, A Lover’s Quarrel: My Pilgrimage of Freedom in Churches of Christ. And as the leading speaker for the Theme Conversations, it is a chance for him to be with “family” and lead them on a journey. “Because of my age I think it may be my last hoorah,” Garrett said. “When you get to this age you realize you don’t have all that much time and to be able to get up there and speak, you never know when you’re not going to be able to do that again.”

Follies: Students sing parodies

By Kelline Linton

Continued from page 1A

what was traditional be more relational and interactive,” said Wilson, the theme speaker for Wednesday’s 11 a.m. Theme Conversation. Garrett said he was seen as an outsider in the Churches of Christ throughout his career as a professor and editor of the periodical Restoration Review, after calling out things he considered wrong inside his church family. “Churches of Christ got caught into a web of sectarianism back in the ’40s and continued into the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s,” Garrett said. “My journey was a journey of freedom to make Churches of Christ what I thought what they should be more responsible in their interpretation of scripture to recover their

ors College and Adams Center helped bring him to ACU. “It’s a pretty stunning story,” Bryce said. He said he is excited about the featured guest lectures and about bringing diverse speakers to Summit. “That’s what I’m really pushing for is the bringing together of different people,” Bryce said. “I think this event is going to help achieve that in a small way.” E-mail Freeman at: mxf04b@acu.edu

As Summit works to draw a larger student crowd this year, professors around campus canceled classes to encourage participation and attendance. Caron Gentry, assistant professor of political science, called off three of her classes to encourage her students to attend Summit events. “I’ve always wanted to do more to support Lectureship,” Gentry said. If her students do go to the speaker lectures, they can write a one-page summary for extra credit. Gentry said she likes the Summit theme “The Righ-

teousness of God: Exploring Romans.” “Romans has been something I focused on this year, and I agree with Randy on a lot of things,” she said. Randy Harris, one of the theme speakers for Summit and instructor in Bible, missions and ministry, also canceled classes for some of his students. Professors from numerous departments gave students a free pass during Summit, including instructors in the departments of Journalism and Mass Communication, Psychology and Exercise Science and Health. Some department chairs encouraged professors to

release students from their classes, while others did not place as much emphasis on the matter. David Hogan, instructor of public relations in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, decided not to cancel any of his classes, especially since it was not discussed in his department. All of Hogan’s classes are in the afternoons, and he said students could attend events during the mornings or evenings. “I see classes more like a job,” he said. “Extracurricular activities should be outside of class.” E-mail Linton at: krl04b@acu.edu


CAMPUS NEWS

Page 8A

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Departments plan Summit exhibits Women for ACU By Lydia Melby Arts Editor

Campus is abuzz this week with the launch of Summit as students, faculty and visitors alike all try to decide which lectures and events they will be attending. With speakers from all over the nation and a few from other countries, many choices are available, but for those interested Hester in the arts, there are some events not worth missing. The Department of Art and Design has a few major Maxwell things this week beside just its lectures. Aside from the Empty Bowls charity event planned for Monday and Wednesday, the department will be featuring two different gallery exhibits for Summit attendees to enjoy. The first exhibit, courtesy of Ed Knippers, will be in the Shore Art Gallery. This exhibit is called “The Artist and the Bible: Twentieth Century Works on Paper” and relates to Summit through its theme of spiritual and religious subject matter. “People think of Christian art as being from 500 years ago, in Europe in the cathedrals and churches, but most people don’t know what’s going on today among contemporary artists,” said Jack Maxwell, chair of the Department of Art and Design.

People think of Christian art as being from 500 years ago...but most people don’t know what’s going on today among contemporary artists. :: Jack Maxwell, chair of the Department of Art and Design

“We are so accustomed to ‘Sunday-school Illustrations,’ most of us don’t have any concept of contemporary Christian art… [this exhibit] shows a different way; sometimes it’s new again,” he said. The department will sponsor two “roving gallery talks” for this exhibit Tuesday, one by professor Ronnie Rama at noon and one by professor Dan McGregor at 6 p.m. McGregor said he will touch on the theme of storytelling and response to Christianity and spirituality and encourages curious students to come; the exhibit is not intended for art experts only. “If you are interested in how Christians over the years have dealt with subject matter in art,” McGregor said, “even if you know nothing about art, especially Christian art, this is a lecture for you.” The department’s second show will be at the ACU-Cockerell Art Gallery downtown. The exhibit features art by Sandra Bowden and will follow a similar theme of modern representations of religious subject matter. “This is the first time ACU has been able to bring a show of that stature to Abilene,” Maxwell said. “We’re really excited that the community will have a chance to see an artist that does religious work of her caliber. It’s a beautiful show.” The Theatre Department also will be addressing the issue of how Christian artists

SUMMIT Art Tours

are to present their faith in the context of a secular world. Ginger Morby, a youth pastor from Arizona who is an ACU Theatre Department alumnus, will be speaking Monday at 8:30 a.m. and Tuesday at 9:45 a.m. in Fulks Theatre. Morby will be discussing the question, “How often does the Christian culture resemble just a subculture of America?” Adam Hester, professor and chair of the Department of Theatre, said Morby was “a real leader.” During her time at ACU, she created the tagline, “The artist who professes Christ has a unique calling to originality, relevance and truth.” “That line, as well as her topic, really resonates with us,” Hester said. “We’re looking forward to her because she’s always been able to deliver really convicting messages about who we would be as artists and about how to connect with the culture we live in and how to be in that culture as a Christian.” The department also will feature four theatre majors who will perform the traditional dramatic reading of scripture before each keynote speaker. The Department of Music will sponsor its own Summit event with a special musical production Sunday at 8:30 p.m. The Men of ACU, an allmale choir performance that features between 60 and 70 alumni will perform.

There will be two art-touring lectures during Summit. n Artist Brown Bag — “Seeing the Bible Through the Eyes of the Artist”, Tuesday, noon, ACU Shore Art Gallery. n Gallery Talk and Tour — "The Bible and Artists of the 20th Century", Tuesday, 6 p.m. ACU Shore Art Gallery.

On Tuesday night at 8:30 p.m., the department also will give an orchestral performance called Musica Romana. Greg Straughn, the chair of the Music Department, said Musica Romana “is sort of a potpourri of 2,000 years worth of music from or inspired by Rome.” The production will feature composers from Rome, music from Cinema Paradiso, pieces by American composers that are evocative of Rome, some Gregorian chants from Ancient Rome, more recent pieces from the 1970s and many others. “It’s a pretty broad collection just to capture the essence of Rome and what it meant,” Straughn said. “It seemed appropriate for the theme this year; as the speakers move through Romans, we wanted to connect with that.” Tickets to Musica Romana are free and can be obtained by calling the Music Department’s office. Straughn said it is expected to be packed, so those who are interested should get tickets soon and go to the performance early.

E-mail Melby at: lgm05e@acu.edu

support band with $5,000 gift By Michael Freeman Managing Editor

As the “World Famous Bean” workers scurried from food station to food station, some cooking, some cleaning and some, namely chef John Smith, bellowing “Chicken fried chicken!” every few minutes, a group of about 50 women from the Women for ACU ate their lunches and socialized during the annual “Get Acquainted Event” Thursday afternoon. The Women for ACU is comprised of ACU alumni, current students or women interested in giving to the school. On Thursday, the group gave a $5,000 donation to the Big Purple Band for new instruments. “It was just something we felt was needed,” said Mary Manly, a member of the Women for ACU museum board. “I thought it was great that the band received that. The love of music is with all of us.” Since its founding in 1969, the Women for ACU has supported students and departments through fundraisers, scholarships and donations. After lunch Thursday, the Women for ACU presented the $5,000 check to Stephen Ward, director of the Big Purple in the Living Room of the Campus Center. “Through the years, we’ve given over a million dollars in one way or another,” said Hazel Fillmon, president of the local chapter for the

It was just something we felt was needed. The love of music is with us all. ::

Mary Manly, member of the

Women for ACU museum board

Women for ACU. Already this year, the Women for ACU has invested in the beautification of McDonald Hall and the furnishing of the College of Education and the Alumni Office in the Bob Hunter Welcome Center. The group also has provided water and cookies to incoming freshmen during Welcome Week and helped with meals for the women’s soccer team before the Bean opened this semester. In addition to the donation, Thursday’s event also served as an opportunity for members to meet and greet with potential members. For some members, it was their first time to visit the Bean since it had been renovated this summer. “It was my first time in the new Bean,” Manly said. “I thought it was great; it was a great experience.” E-mail Freeman at: mxf04b@acu.edu


SportsSunday

September 21, 2008

SCOREBOARD Standings Football Team

Div. 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Tarleton St. WTAMU ACU MSU TAMU-K ENMU Angelo St.

Volleyball Team MSU Tarleton St. TX Woman’s TAMU-C Cameron

Div. 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 1-1

ACU* *ACU ranked 7 of 14

Overall 14-0 9-5 8-5 7-5 6-5 11-2

Women’s Soccer Team

Div. 1-0 0-0 0-0 ACU Angelo St. 0-0 TX Woman’s 0-0 Central Okla. 0-0 East Central 0-0 MSU 0-0 NE St. 0-0 SW Okla. 0-0 ENMU 0-1 WTAMU TAMU-C

Volleyball team wins home opener, 11-2 overall By Chandler Harris Assistant Sports Editor

Overall 3-0 3-0 2-0 2-0 2-1 1-2 1-2

Overall 4-0-1 3-1-1 4-2-1 5-3 3-2 3-2-1 3-2-1 3-3 1-3-1 2-5 4-4

Scores Tuesday Soccer ACU 3, Hardin-Simmons 1

Volleyball ACU 3, UT-Permian Basin 0

Thursday Volleyball ACU 0, Tarleton State 3

Upcoming Monday Women’s Soccer ACU vs. McMurry 5 p.m.

Thursday Volleyball ACU vs. Eastern New Mexico, 7 p.m.

Friday Women’s Soccer ACU vs. Angelo State, 4 p.m.

Saturday Volleyball ACU vs. West Texas A&M, 2 p.m.

Football ACU vs. Eastern New Mexico, 7 p.m. :: Home games listed in italics

NEWS n Defender Anastasia Nelson earned LSC Defensive Player of the Week honors after leading the soccer team to three victories last week. The Wildcat defense has only allowed four goals in seven games this season. Last week, the team defeated John Brown, Our Lady of the Lake and HardinSimmons University.

The ACU volleyball team played its first home game of the 2008 season Tuesday, defeating Texas-Permian Basin 3-0 (25-23, 25-18, 25-22). The team battled back from deficits in all three sets for the match victory. In the first set, the Wildcats trailed 10-3 before coming back to win it 25-23. In the second set the team was down 16-12 but rolled off eight straight points to take the lead for good. In the third and final set the team was trailing for

Wildcats place third in opener

Volleyball the most part of the game but rallied to take a 23-22 lead before sophomore middle blocker Shawna Hines ended it with a kill. Freshman outside hitter Jennie Hutt and sophomore middle blocker Jordan Schilling led the team with nine kills each. Freshman outside hitter Britini Golden also added seven more to help the team to victory. Sophomore setter Ijeoma Moronu led the team with 30 assists and 17 digs. The Wildcats had seven total team blocks.

“It was extremely fun to be at home with all of our fans supporting us and to take the match in three,” said junior defensive setter Amy Wilson. “We look forward to more home games and having the same support in the future.” On Thursday, the team traveled to Stephenville to take on the TexAnns of Tarleton State. The TexAnns defeated the Wildcats for the first time since 2002, 3-0 (25-20, 25-12, 25-21). This was the Lone Star Conference opener for both teams. ACU was held to its lowest hitting percentage of the

By Jeff Craig

See

Volleyball page 2B

Former Wildcat quarterback joins ACU Hall of Fame

Sports Writer

Looking to win its first conference title since 1995, the Wildcat golf team began the 2008-09 season Monday at the 36hole Charles Coody West Texas Intercollegiate at the Diamondback Golf Club in Abilene. ACU finished third behind Cameron University and St. Edwards University. The tournament consisted of two par-71 rounds and featured 15 teams. Senior Hilton Funk talked about the struggles on the first competition of the year, but he feels good things are in store for the team. “We did OK; we are kind of struggling to find our top five, but we’ll be better coming up,” Funk said. “This year will be pretty good; we hope to make it to nationals.” The Wildcats came into the tournament ranked No. 18 nationally. Cameron was ranked No. 25, and tournament champion St. Edwards came in ranked No. 3 after putting together back-to-back top-five finishes in the national tournament in the spring. St. Edwards finished 10 strokes ahead of Cameron, shooting a 559 during two days. ACU finished third with a total score of 575 after Cameron came from two shots down to jump the Wildcats on the final day. Sophomore Cyril Bouniol and senior Patrick Hanauer finished tied for third place overall and had the top scores for the Wildcats with a total score of 3-under-par 139. Teammate Charles Levitte finished tied for See

season, hitting just .106 as a team. The team was out blocked 7-3 and suffered 21 attacking errors. Hutt led all players with 12 kills and a .300 hitting percentage. The team played Texas A&M-Kingsville Saturday, defeating them in three sets. The win improved the Wildcats’ record to 11-2 on the season and 1-1 in league play. “The match against Kingsville was fun to play and fun to coach,” said ACU volleyball coach Kellen Mock. “Tarleton played very

A Hallowed Hall

By Grant Abston Sports Editor

O

ne of the most successful quarterbacks in ACU history, Rex Lamberti, made national headlines when returning to ACU for his senior season at the age of 27. Lamberti is making headlines again, but this time as a 2008 ACU Hall of Fame inductee, joining three other Wildcat standouts. Lamberti will be inducted into the ACU Sports Hall of Fame Oct 24th along with three other athletes: former tennis national champion Michelle King, track and field standout Jerry Dyes and volleyball standout Linda (Evans) Halpayne. Lamberti was born in Iowa and grew up in Kansas City, Mo., before moving to Texas in middle school, quickly learning the importance of football in a town legendary for its Friday nights. Lamberti played his high school football at Odessa Permian and quarterbacked the Panthers to the quarterfinals his senior year, where they lost to Midland Lee in front of 38,000 people. “Odessa is football and the kids aren’t thinking about Roger Staubach or Terry Bradshaw; people are thinking about the quarterback or linebacker for Mojo,” Lamberti said. “You get a feel for football in the seventh grade and I loved the pressure to succeed and be the best.” After finishing his senior season, Lamberti was recruited by ACU and earned a full scholarship to play quarterback in 1984. Despite getting offers from out of state schools, Lamberti believed ACU was the best fit and moved to Abilene to play for head coach Ted Sitton. See

Rex page 2B

Golf page 2B

ACU defeats Hardin-Simmons 3-1 By Austin Gwin

Soccer

Sports Writer

Intramural Round-up Fall sports 4 X 4 Soccer Sign-up Deadline: Thursday, Oct. 23 Cost: $125 per team

3-2 Softball Tournament Sign-up Deadline: Thursday, Nov. 6 Cost: $80 per team

Page 1B

Kat Patton :: staff photographer Midfielder Jordan Reese goes for a ball during Tuesday’s game against Hardin-Simmons. The Wildcats beat the Cowgirls 3-1 in their home opener.

In Tuesday’s home opener against Hardin-Simmons University, the Wildcat soccer team sprinted out of the gate, scoring two goals in the first five minutes to help the Wildcats win 3-1, winning their third straight match and improving to 4-2-1 this season. In ACU’s first season, NCAA Division III powerhouse Hardin-Simmons defeated ACU 2-0 en route to a 19-2-1 season. The loss Tuesday drops the Cowgirls to 1-2-2, while the Wildcats jump to No. 3 in the LSC standings behind Texas A&M-Commerce and West Texas A&M. “That was the quickest we have ever scored in the history of our team,” said head coach Casey Wilson. “It was nice to get on the board that quickly against a team like Hardin-Simmons.” Midfielder Jackie Gentile scored with a header just 1:26

into the first half after defender Alyson Thomas dribbled the ball down the left side of the field; Thomas crossed the ball to midfielder Jordan Reese, who headed a pass to the right side of the box to Gentile to put ACU on top, 1-0. Gentile’s fourth goal of the season moved her past teammate Lyndsey Womack for ACU’s all-time leader in goals. Just minutes later, midfielder Courtney Wilson scored the second goal of the match and her first of the season for the Wildcats to give ACU a 2-0 lead. Reese recorded her second assist of the match on the play. The Cowgirls responded, scoring at the end of the first half when Miranda Berosa scored on a pass from Becca Gault to cut the deficit in half, 2-1. “[Courtney] is one of the captains and the team first See

Soccer page 2B

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer Outside hitter Jennie Hutt serves against Texas-Permian Basin.

Yankees dynasty dies off The New York Yankees will miss the playoffs. I thought I would never see this become a reality, but with each passing day in September, it sure looks to be true. The Yankees have made the playoffs in every season since 1995. Baseball is by far my favorite sport and the Texas Rangers have always been my team, Thoughts from even bethe Bleachers fore I can remember. I grew up By Chandler watching Harris Tettleton, Pudge, Juan, Clark, Sele, Wetteland, Greer and McLemore. I watched them carry us to three AL West Division titles in four years (1996, ’98, ’99), our only playoff appearances in franchise history. I was there in 1996 when we won our first division crown, a 15-inning loss to the then California Angels, and for every home playoff game but one. The sad thing is, each of those years of glory ended the same way, with losses in the first round to the Yankees. In those three divisional series, the Rangers had a 1-9 record, including nine straight losses. Each of those seasons ended in a very different way for the Yankees with World Series’ victories. The Yankees effectively killed my childhood dream of rooting for a world champion. It was not that they were dominant, but how they were dominant. They seemed to get every free agent who could throw a ball or hit a home run. George Steinbrenner paid more for his players than some third world countries’ total GDP. The Yankees had every call, break, bounce and sportscaster go their way. Nothing was worse than Yankee fan and NBC commentator Bob Costas smiling after he would call yet another World Series victory for the Yankees. But now, after 13 straight years of having to root for whomever the Yankees are playing, I can just enjoy the playoffs without having to worry about watching Derek Jeter celebrate again. Jeter won’t know what to do with himself in October. He has played a game in the month of October in each of his 12 professional seasons. Poor Alex Rodriguez also will have to find new ways to spend the largest contract in MLB history with an extra month off. This will be the first time A-Rod has missed the playoffs since leaving the See

Yankees page 2B


SPORTS JUMPS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Page 2B

Rex: QB honored by ACU for record-setting career Continued from page 1B “Back then, there weren’t many schools throwing the ball, not like now where everyone and their dog is throwing the ball and running the spread,” Lamberti said. “Back then, it was the veer and wishbone and there were not many colleges or opportunities to throw the ball 35-40 time a game. ACU presented that, and it seemed like a great opportunity and it was close to home.” Lamberti came to ACU and went from being a high school starter to a backup, only earning 13 snaps his freshman year. However, Lamberti earned the starting spot his sophomore year under head coach John Payne and led the Wildcats in total offense and a 5-4-2 record. Lamberti also became the first quarterback in LSC history to throw for more than 3,000 yards in a season (3,010). In his junior season, Lamberti once again led the Wildcats in total offense and a 7-3 record in 1986. Lamberti also led all-collegiate quarterbacks in touchdown passes with 32 and was a candidate for NCAA Division II Player of the Year after leading ACU to a No. 10 national ranking at the end of the season. After leaving ACU his junior season, Lamberti returned to ACU in 1993 after sitting out six seasons. The 27-year-old senior quarter-

back threw for 2,052 yards and 28 touchdowns to lead the Wildcats to a 7-3 record. Their 7-3 record was the program’s first winning season since Lamberti had led the Wildcats to a 7-3 record in 1986. He earned first team all-LSC honors and was one of eight national finalists for the Harlon Hill award. Lamberti also was third team all-America by CoSIDA and was honorable mention all-America by USA Today and Football Gazette. “It was just incredible being out for seven years and coming back,” Lamberti said. “When you’re gone for any period of time, you kind of have guys wonder if you can do it or not.” Lamberti finished his ACU career atop the record books in the LSC and at ACU. After finishing his senior season, Lamberti was the LSC all-time leader in completions (595), touchdown passes (84) and yards passing (7,934). He also was the LSC and ACU single-season leader in touchdown passes with 32, third in ACU history in total offense (7,546) and 300-yard passing games with 10. “That’s the tough thing about [finishing], you have that competition that is instilled and the desire to compete and do well and be the best at something,” Lamberti said. “You can never replace that and you find ways to substitute things,

and I have an awesome family who is dear to me.” Lamberti now lives in The Woodlands with his wife Jodi and three children: Regan, 10; Jett, 6; and Jax, 3. He currently works for Bayes Achievement Center, a residential placement center for emotionally disturbed, autistic and mentally retarded children ranging in ages from 6 to 22. “Some of the people I met at ACU through the years have been a really good influence on me throughout my life,” he said. The class of 2008 will be officially inducted Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. at the Teague Special Events Center at the 24th annual Hall of Fame festivities. Tickets to the dinner are $20 per person and can be purchased by calling the Department of Athletics office. The ACU Hall of Fame will now include 130 members. “It’s just amazing; I never expected it,” Lamberti said. “It’s very unexpected, but I’m very thrilled and excited to be a part of something like this, and it makes me feel really good that people who saw me play and people who were there were able to vote on me and consider me a hall of famer. It’s just amazing.”

E-mail Abston at: gda04b@acu.edu

2008 ACU Sports Hall of Fame Inductees n Rex Lamberti was the ACU quarterback in 1985-86 and 1993. He finished his career as the Lone Star

Conference’s all-time leader in completions (595), touchdown passes (84) and yards passing (7,934). He also was the LSC and ACU single-season leader with 32 touchdown passes in 1986. n Michelle King won the 1992 NCAA Division II national championship in women’s singles. She remains the

only ACU tennis player to win an individual national championship. n Jerry Dyes has both participated in and coached college track and field for the past 40 years. While at

ACU from 1961-64, he won numerous events in long jump, javelin and decathlon. n Linda (Evans) Halpayne ended her volleyball career as the Wildcats’ all-time leader in kills (1,560) and blocks (676). Her 186 blocks in 1991 are the second-best single-season total in school history. Halpayne owns four of the top six single-season block marks in school history.

Emily Jorgenson :: staff photographer Setter Ericka Dickinson digs a ball in front of defensive specialist Amy Wilson at home against Texas-Permian Basin. The Wildcats will play Eastern New Mexico at home on Thursday at 7 p.m.

Volleyball: Cats to face ENMU Continued from page 1B good volleyball. It was a good wake-up call for the girls. They realize it’s conference time now. We were able to be that serious about Kingsville and come

down here and beat them.” “We came back and everything was clicking today, and it was a huge game to win on the road,” said Wilson. “The most important part about today was our perseverance and

character. We came back from losing in three and bounced back to win in three. It was awesome.”

E-mail Harris at: tch05f@acu.edu

Yankees: Golf: Notheastern Playoff St. Classic up next run ends, so does stadium Continued from page 1B

Continued from page 1B Rangers in a trade following the 2003 season (which I’m still bitter about). I have always known the best formula for the Yankees to miss the postseason would be for a team, besides

The Yankees effectively killed my childhood dream of rooting for a world champion.

Boston, from the AL East to step up and have a great season. I thought maybe the Blue Jays with Burnett and Halladay or maybe even the Orioles with some young bats, but never could you have convinced me it would be the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. I mean, Rays. Despite being completely bummed about my own Rangers missing the postseason yet again, I can at least find joy in the fact that no fair weather Yankee fan will be able to hop on that bandwagon for another World Series title in 2008.

E-mail Harris at: tch05f@acu.edu

28th with a score of 5-overpar 147, Jose Gutierrez finished tied for 51st (11over-par 153) and Morgan Johnson finished tied for 72nd (18-over-par 160). “Patrick and Cyril played very well and I expect nothing less of them,” Funk said. ACU junior varsity team also competed in the tournament. The team placed 14th overall, led by Hilton Funk, who shot a 4-overpar 146 and finished tied for 22nd. Other notables

included Michael Andruchek, who finished tied for 35th (7-over-par 149), Zach Sadau finished tied for 38th (8-over-par 150) and Jeff Warr finished tied for 75th (21-over-par 163). The Wildcats’ next test will be Monday and Tuesday at the Northeastern State Classic at the Emerald Falls Country Club in Broken Arrow, Okla.

E-mail Craig at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu

Soccer: Wildcats defeat HSU cowgirls Continued from page 1B looks to her to take charge,” said assistant coach Thomas Pertuit. “Her game against HSU was her best game, and she’s starting to play the way she did last year and starting to come together now.” The two teams played evenly in the second half, until Wilson scored her second goal of the match on an assist from midfielder Bree Craig. Wilson’s goal put the Wildcats up 3-1 and shut the door on the Cowgirls. Defensively, it was another solid performance by ACU, allowing one goal on 13 shots. The Wildcats have only allowed a total of four goals to their opponents in seven games this season. Defender Anastasia Nelson was named Lone Star Conference Defensive Player of the Week

after helping the Wildcats to their third straight win. “Anastasia has had a key role in our success this season both offensively and defensively,” Reese said. “She’s an incredibly consistent player and the recognition is well-deserved.” The Wildcats’ next opponent will be another crosstown rival, McMurray University, at 5 p.m. Monday. ACU will begin conference play against Angelo State at home Friday. “We have been prepared for conference teams with the seven games we have played this season,” coach Wilson said. “Every game has been tough, and it has really brought our team together.”

E-mail Gwin at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu


CAMPUS NEWS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Environmentalist to speak at Summit By Ryan Self Broadcast Assistant

J. Matthew Sleeth, author, scholar and environmentalist, will be a featured speaker at this year’s Summit, dialoguing with students, faculty and friends about Creation Care. Sleeth, who will speak Tuesday at 3 p.m. in Moody Coliseum, has spoken at Harvard University and the Sierra Club, as well as numerous colleges and organizations. Sleeth’s lecture will focus on the Christian’s responsibility to care for the environment. One of the central themes to his message is the biblical call for Christians to be good stewards of the earth. He uses scripture to define his case for Christian stewardship; he points to the story of the creation of the Garden of Eden in Genesis as an example that the Earth belongs to God, not human beings, and Christians must protect and preserve their planet. After seeing a growing number of his patients die from cancer caused by environmental factors, Sleeth said he left a prominent job as a hospital chief and emergency room director to learn more about Creation Care. After resigning from his post at the hospital, he immersed himself in study and writing on the subject, leading him to write his first book, Serve God, Save the Planet: A Christian Call to Action. The book helped spur the Creation Care movement in many churches across the nation, and Sleeth now is a visiting scholar at Houghton College and the first visiting scholar of Creation Care. In addition to his first book, Sleeth also wrote the in-

troduction to The Green Bible, set to release Sept. 19. The Green Bible, written on recycled paper and produced in an eco-friendly printing process, has more than 1,000 textual references to the environment highlighted in green. Many notable names accompanied Sleeth in his call for environmental stewardship in The Green Bible. Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the late pope John Paul II, author Brian McLaren and Jewish environmentalist Ellen Bernstein along with others, combined their thoughts on the human environmental impact in the first-ever publication of a “green” Bible. With gas prices and energy now serious concerns for many, Sleeth’s message not only is a moral one, but a practical one as well. “You can absolutely have a functional life without everything you think you need,” said William Sears, a spokesman for Sleeth. Sleeth said one of the biggest surprises while lecturing was the response he received from secular establishments. He believes his message of environmental stewardship not only has created a dialogue among Christians, but with non-believers as well. “I can walk into these secular institutions and read the Sermon on the Mount; it is an opportunity to open the door to non-Christians,” he said. Sleeth will speak on campus because of the efforts of the Adams Center for Teaching and Learning, the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science and the Department of Biology. E-mail Self at: rcs06g@acu.edu

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Money Talk

Zak Zeinert :: chief photographer Spencer Hemphill, senior accounting major from Longview and Students’ Association executive treasurer, discusses the budget with the SA Congress during the SA meeting Wednesday. The Students’ Association distributed more than $34,000 among 46 student groups.

Lectures highlight controversial topics By Laura Acuff Opinion Page Editor

As a new facet of this year’s Summit, well-known speakers Rubel Shelly, Rick Atchley and Jeff Walling will present “Highlight Classes” on topics including atheism, church orthodoxy and relationships at 1:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. “Highlight classes just mean ‘of interest’ speakers,” said Brady Bryce, director of ministry events. “Students told us [of] several ministers or preachers that they really liked hearing from, so rather than putting one of them opposite a lesser-known faculty member or an unknown student who might be presenting,

we put those three guys—Jeff Walling, Rubal Shelly and Rick Atchley—in one time slot.” The Highlight Classes feature several potentially controversial topics, but Tom Sheldon, junior psychology major from Colorado Springs, who participated in leading a session on PostSecret during last year’s Lectureship, said controversial topics can lead to valuable discussion. “I think it’s great,” Sheldon said. “I’ve always thought that we should be more open with those kinds of things instead of trying to suppress what people think.” While Highlight Classes are not as specifically geared toward students as the actual

student track, Sheldon said he believed both older and younger generations might benefit through attendance. “I definitely think both can benefit,” Sheldon said. “It would be really great to have students actually go to some of these things. We’ll see if that happens this year.” With Summit moving toward a more studentoriented function this year, Bryce also said he hoped for increased student involvement. But, in the end, what students take away from the annual conference depends on the individual. “It’s up to them,” Bryce said. “I’m kind of excited about what I’ve been hearing from

students about how they like the diversity of people that are coming, the topics that they hear, but then when the event comes, you’ve got to kind of see how it goes.” Sheldon said he believes the relevancy of topics alone will interest more students. “I don’t know that the fact that they’re controversial would be the draw, just the fact that they’re relative,” Sheldon said. “Unfortunately, things that are actually relative to our lives are usually controversial.”

E-mail Acuff at: lka06a@acu.edu


ViewsSunday

Page 4B

September 21, 2008

Lectureship attendance policy merits consideration

I

t’s that time of year again. ACU will launch what might be its most prepared-for annual event, second only to Sing Song in hype. But this year, it’s the changes to Lectureship, now called Summit, that will make all the difference. The re-imagining of traditional Lectureship goes far beyond just a name change. Brady Bryce, director of ministry events, defined his vision for Summit as “conversation where life and faith converge in Christ.” Bryce explained this evolution towards a more conversational time of learning and fellowship is geared towards engaging participants on a deeper level. Several changes were made in the way Summit will operate in contrast to traditional Lec-

...the many changes will only be effective if students are actually able to attend.

tureship, including the style of presentation and the smaller, more precisely planned number of speakers invited. But perhaps the most radical change is increased focus on students. Not only is the new conversational format intended to actively involve the audience, but many lectures have been slated for times later in the afternoon to promote student attendance. The schedule booklet was redesigned to be less confusing and there are more student-oriented tracks available. Bryce

also said the completely new “Featured Guest” slot at 3 p.m. in Moody Coliseum was created with students in mind. “We’re stepping back into tradition, back into what Lectureship first was,” Bryce said. “It was first created for students, and I hope people realize that’s what we’re returning to.” Although this effort is greatly appreciated and sure to enhance the Lectureship experience, the many changes will only be effective if students are actually able to attend. The changes in timing will

certainly help more students plan attendance around classes, but what about those students whose teachers don’t feel the need to cancel class or allow absence in exchange for knowledge? One would think, with as much planning as goes into this four-day event, that ACU would find a way to work with faculty and departments in order to allow all students to attend Summit/Lectureship at will. However, Summit is the result of a lot of effort and consideration; Although, no blanket allowance yet exists concerning class attendance versus Summit attendance, change is possible. We students can call for change in the attendance policy all we want but we need to real-

The issue:

Not all classes dismiss or allow for absences for Summit attendance.

Our view:

Students should be allowed to take advantage of Summit resources, especially with the new effort to refocus the event around them.

The solution:

ACU should construct a university-wide policy for Summit attendance. Students must earn it by displaying genuine interest and actual attendance. ize that, in exchange, we have a responsibility to show that we are as interested and committed to learning as we claim. We have an opportunity to not only prove ourselves responsible and eager but also to take advantage of resources laid at our feet by attending free lectures by some of the most knowledgeable people in their fields on topics chosen

with our student body in mind. Such rare opportunities are a shame to miss. So, in continuance with the theme of this year’s Summit as an open conversation, let’s participate in this discussion and appreciate what’s been done for us. Then our requests will have true clout. E-mail the Optimist at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu

Concrete columns impede campus fun Unless you are a hermit, you’ve probably noticed a plethora of changes to campus this semester. During the summer, construction workers built the Bob Hunter Welcome Center at a speed that will allow them to finThe Fro Knows ish by early January; By Michael Physical Freeman Resources strategically installed 23 new card readers in Moody Coliseum; and the administration oversaw a colossal and appealing facelift to the “World Famous Bean.” But the biggest change of all came in the form of several concrete columns. Ten concrete columns, each standing only two and a half feet tall, were placed at either end of the red brick sidewalk between the Biblical Studies Building and the Campus Center. Their mere presence impedes and discourages one of students’ most treasured guilty pleasures. Let’s face it: Abilene is boring. To remedy the ennui, some ACU students flee to Dallas on the weekends. Others take it a step further by going home—regardless of where that may be. But a few students use their creative geniuses to concoct exciting, yet juvenile activities to engage in on campus. One such adventure, called parkour, involves running, jumping and climbing over various campus buildings. Another popular activity is spotlighting, the act of throwing water balloons and

Duty of campus cleanliness belongs to everyone It’s happened to almost everyone on campus. You’re either jogging around the track or playing football, softball or some other athletic event on the intramural fields, and then IT happens. You feel a sudden People Say I squish, and Talk Too Much a rank aroma suddenBy Tanner ly fills your Anderson nostrils. You already know what happened; you don’t even need to check the bottom of your shoes but you do it anyway to confirm your suspicions. Then the realization sets in—you’ve just been added to the growing statistic of

I have learned many people assume it is the grounds crew’s responsibility to take care of matters such as these. This assumption is completely wrong...

students who have fallen victim to a fresh dog log. You might think I am just writing about an immature subject like dog droppings, (and in a way I am) but more importantly I would like to address the situation of students cleaning up their own messes. Now as a former employee of the on-campus grounds crew, I have learned many people assume it is the grounds crew’s responsibility to take care of matters such as these. This assumption is completely wrong; the

grounds crew already works hard enough mowing, trimming, weed eating and edging everyday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., and they definitely don’t deal with any contributions your dog Rufus might leave behind. This problem isn’t a horrendous epidemic; it’s just inconsiderate. It’s sad that no matter where you walk on campus, you’re bound to find a piece of garbage, litter or knocked over trashcan in your way. The amount of effort it takes to solve this situation is mini-

Letter to the Editor

been used as a tool for political, economic and ideological posturing from the moment of its commencement. The last decade of research has brought us three “indisputables.” First, the global temperature has increased about 1°C in the last 100 years. Second, carbon dioxide present in the earth’s atmosphere has increased about 20 percent in the last 60 years. And yes, humans do contribute to it. Finally, it is well understood that carbon dioxide is an efficient absorber of heat emitted by the surface of the earth. Yet there are even more “disputables” that we just don’t know. For instance,

Climate Science unknowns taint political stances Climate Science, like all other sciences, depends on the scientific method of deduction. The scientific method subsequently hinges on the ability to interpret objective data without bias. The fact of

the matter is that the extreme political and economic implications of Global Climate Change (GCC) have subjected the research to a large source of potential biasing. This fact, in and of itself, is sufficient to warrant healthy skepticism and criticism from those in the scientific community. Let me begin by saying that I believe this effort is completely worthwhile and necessary. Yet, it is my humble opinion that GCC research has

Editorial and letter policy Unsigned editorials are the opinions of the Optimist and may not necessarily reflect the views of the university or its administration. Signed columns, cartoons and letters are the opinions of their creators and may not necessarily reflect the viewpoints of the Optimist or the university. The Optimist encourages reader response through letters to the editor but reserves the right to limit frequent contributors or to refuse to print letters containing personal attacks, obscenity, defamation, erroneous

information or invasion of privacy. Please limit letters to 350 words or fewer. A name and phone number must be included for verification purposes. Phone numbers will not be published. Address letters to: ACU Box 27892 Abilene, TX 79699 E-mail letters to: jmcnetwork@acu.edu

mal. It doesn’t take exuberant strength to walk over to another trashcan if the current one is already full. This might sound extreme, but it’s not hard to find a plastic baggy and take it with you when you take Scooby, or whatever you decide to name your k-9 companion, for a walk. By the way, these aren’t demands, they’re just suggestions. The campus looks great thanks to the efforts of our grounds crew and the Physical Resources Department. It’s just important to know that when it comes to on-campus matters and cleanliness, they’re not the only ones who are responsible.

E-mail Anderson at: tsa04a@acu.edu

we don’t have experimental evidence that CO2 is the primary mechanism forcing the temperature increase. This assertion has been made via climate model data. This sounds like a reasonable statement until you understand that numerous “parameters” are fudged until these models reflect known trends in historical datasets; only then are mechanisms, like CO2, tested to produce current trends and make future projections. Secondly, we have yet to understand seemingly fundamental processes, like cloud formation, and how they affect the global mean tem-

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perature. Finally, there is still some uncertainty as to how the biosphere and oceans will react to the increasing CO2, much less if the measured increase is completely a function of human fossil-fuel consumption and not geological events like forest fires and volcanic eruptions. So there are obviously more than a few “what ifs.” Ultimately, my point is that the Earth’s climate is a highly complex, non-linear system of interacting mechanisms, most of which we don’t fully understand. Couple this with the fact that our only reliable and comprehensive dataset is just 60 years old, a speck

blowing air horns at passionate couples parked in their cars. But the childish tradition now in peril entails students driving their cars down the red brick sidewalk between two highly crowded buildings on campus. Driving where you’re not supposed to can infuse into students a sense of exploration, enthrallment and exhilaration. It can evoke nostalgic feelings of youthful wonderment. It may even inspire some to study harder, invent more fuel-efficient cars and cure world hunger. OK, maybe not. Nevertheless, the concrete columns now block cars from entering either

Let’s face it: Abilene is boring.

side of the sidewalk. While the columns easily can be moved, their existence implies students need to keep their vehicles in designated driving areas. As long as students safely and responsibly engage in their tomfooleries, they should be able to do them. College students live in the unique position of being between a professional adult life and cherishing their last vestiges of childhood. They should be able to enjoy both worlds as long as they can. After all, they won’t have the opportunity to be excused for acting stupidly again until they each reach their respective mid-life crises.

E-mail Freeman at: mxf04b@acu.edu

in the understood lifetime of the earth’s climate, and we simply find ourselves closer to a common goal of understanding. This does not, as I would argue, equate to the level of certainty at which we should be taking huge steps toward government regulation under the banner of “Climate Regulation.” That is not to say that we shouldn’t avoid wasteful consumption or fund research for alternative fuels; but simply, climate change should not translate into a political carte blanche for world governments.

Austin Basye senior physics major from Canyon

Editorial and Management Board Cody Veteto

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Laura Acuff

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ArtsSunday

September 21, 2008

Austin City Limits 2008 offers acts from well-known, emerging artists By Grant Boston Student Writer

Next weekend, Austin should more than live up to its reputation as the Live Music Capital of the World. Soon tens of thousands will descend upon Zilker Park for the seventh annual Austin City Limits Music Festival Sept. 26-28. More than 65,000 people per day will battle parking, crowds and stifling Texas heat to hear more than 130 bands from every genre imaginable. The wide-ranging lineup is almost as appealing as the eclectic crowd gathering to watch. Highlighted by established stars like the Foo Fighters, Robert Plant, Beck, John Fogerty and Iron & Wine, ACL serves up more than enough big names to satiate the average music fan. However, it is the names at the bottom of the billing that serve to excite the more refined music palates. Every year the festival features several up-and-coming acts poised to make it big. In 2007 one such act was Abilene’s Homer Hiccolm & the Rocketboys, who competed for and won the right to play on the festival’s Dell stage. Another act benefiting from the festival’s exposure was the Kaiser Chiefs from Leeds, England, which used

Graphic courtesy of http://www.ecorazzi.com

its 2006 festival experience to transition from European stardom to increased sales in the United States. MGMT, the psychedelic rock band from Brooklyn, has every indication of being this festival’s breakout band, said Chris Derrick, junior criminal justice major from Monahans. “They just sound so different from anyone else out there,” Derrick said. “I swear I’ve had Time to Pretend [the band’s single] on repeat for

the past week on my iPod.” The bizarre duo seems well suited to represent ACL’s unique atmosphere.The festival’s colorful assortment of concert-goers certainly can compare with similarly sized events across the country. It is not uncommon at any point of the weekend to see people wearing sarongs, paper-mache masks or Halloween costumes. This year, face paint and burnt orange also may be spotted among the crowd. As a result of Hurricane

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BOX OFFICE STATS Top ten movies last weekend with weekend gross (Sept. 12-14): n Burn After Reading (R): $19.1 Million

Ike, the Arkansas-Texas football game was postponed from Sept. 13 to Saturday. Already a highlypublicized tilt between the two storied rivals, the game has become even more anticipated because of the delay. As if the festival did not have enough appeal, this year’s experience will be unlike any other. The combination of concerts and contact sports is sure to provide a tremendous boom for the Austin economy and a memorable experience for everyone involved. Travelers to Austin City Limits this weekend should arrive early before the gates open at 10:30 a.m. to snatch one of the few parking spots from the 100,000 or more other pigskins and pop music pilgrims. Festival-goers are permitted—and advised—to bring bottles of water to combat the expected 90-degree temperatures, made worse by the numerous crowds. Those planning to stay for the evening acts are encouraged to bring blankets and folding chairs to sit in the grassy fields. Those wishing to bring cameras to the show are welcome, a fortunate fact because this weekend promises to be a memorable one.

n Tyler Perry’s The Family That Preys (PG-13): $17.3 Million n Righteous Kill (R): $16.2 Million n The Women (PG-13): $10.1 Million n Tropic Thunder (R): $4.1 Million n The House Bunny (PG-13): $4.1 Million n The Dark Knight (PG-13): $5 Million n Bangkok Dangerous (R): $2.5 Million n Traitor (PG-13): $2.1 Million n Death Race (R): $2 Million

MUSIC SCENE Coming Soon in Abilene: n Sunday, Sept. 21: The Men of ACU, an acapella choir comprised of alumni, will give its first performance at 8:30 p.m. in Cullen Auditorium. n Tuesday, Sept. 23: The ACU Music Department presents Musica Romana, a pastiche of Roman-themed pieces, in conjunction with Summit at 8:30 p.m. Call Ext. 2199 for free tickets. n Sunday, Sept. 28: The ACU Music Department will perform Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale, featuring mime artist Doug Berky as well as Thomas and Sherry Ward at 3 p.m. in the WPAC Recital Hall.

E-mail Boston at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu

Break from the banal: Rent outside the box By Grant Vickery Student Writer

So it’s a Friday night. You’re broke like always, and every member of the opposite sex has previous engagements. You and your friends decide to watch a movie because you’re in college; that’s what you do. Instead of watching Casino Royal for the third time this week, why don’t you take a look at some of these films that may not have crossed your mind in a while, or ever?

Reservoir Dogs Everything you love about Quinton Tarantino is here: gratuitous violence, cool suits, grandmas with guns and a plot line that skips a r o u n d and leaves you panting. When I first rented this movie, the woman behind the c o u n t e r just smiled and said, “The ear scene.” If you haven’t seen it, that doesn’t mean a thing to you, but you’ll know when you get there. A bank heist gone wrong leaves a slew of angry, pressured, suspicious gangsters left to pick up the pieces and try to make it through the day alive. They have just one other goal: catch the undercover cop who sold them out.

Howl’s Moving Castle Romance? Check. Action? Check. Giant walking castle powered by a fire demon? Double-check. Oscar-winning director Hayao Miyazaki paints vibrant, powerful images that quickly move you into a world

where magic and technology have been combined in a time of war. Country landscapes and quaint villages are torn apart by air raids in this socially aware and emotionally engaging film. The story follows Sophie, a humble girl working in a hat shop who wants nothing but to do her duty for her family, until she is cursed by a powerful witch. Enter Howl, a wizard of frightening powers who also is cursed. If that isn’t enough for you, did I mention Howl is voiced by Christian Bale? Yeah, that guy, the Batman.

Gone With the Wind Forget anything you thought you knew about cool. Rhett Butler is a cross between Tony Stark and Judah Ben Hur. This movie makes the Lord of the Rings seem short, but you don’t have time to get bored because somebody gets married to Scarlett O’Hara and, subsequently, dies every ten minutes. The lines dividing sex, money and power are blurred, and you can feel Sherman’s army bearing down on Atlanta while everything falls apart around Scarlett. When you have the time, grab a few cups of coffee and a blanket and get ready for a ride, but be careful, falling off can be deadly.

A River Runs Through It Robert Redford captures everything that is beautiful about the American west in this poignant film. The script is narrated by the mildmannered Norman Maclean, who w a t c h e s his brother Paul, played by Brad Pitt, live a life as big as the

rivers that cuts through the Montana mountains. Not a whole lot of action happens in the 123 minutes, but you can’t take your eyes off the screen. No word can describe it better than beautiful, and if you do watch it, don’t forget to breathe because everything you see from the first frame to the last is breathtaking.

It’s Always Fair Weather No, this is not a Michael Moore film about how the planet is falling apart. Three war buddies whose d i v e r g ing postwar lives pull them apart make a pact to meet again at a bar ten years later. When they r e t u r n , they find the times have changed them and they don’t get along quite the same way. So it may not be the most engaging plot, but watching a classy (and sexy) Cyd Charisse dance alongside Gene Kelly will leave you wondering how on earth that just happened. Who doesn’t want to watch three drunk GIs tap with trashcan lids on their feet? And if you thought that tap dancing on roller skates while careening across the streets of New York was impossible, think again.

The Exorcism of Emily Rose This 2005 gem of a horror movie is fortunately missing something that most horror films have these days: small discolored children croaking odd sounds or appearing out of nowhere. That’s right, this isn’t your run of the mill horror movie with random spooky phrases written on the walls in drippy red paint. There’s also some-

thing that shows up during this movie that you probably missed during The Grudge, The Ring, and White Noise: a coherent plot. On the scary scale I’d say it register around a seven out of ten. It’s not as scary as the first Exorcist, but then again, what is? Trust me, this one is best watched in numbers, and I promise you’ve never been so scared of your clock reading 3:00 a.m.

Equilibrium This 2002 action flick featuring Christian Bale, Taye Diggs, and Sean Bean brings back memories of The Matrix, only this time Neo has two fully automatic pistols and a brain. Set in the near, post-WWIII future, the world has turned to Prozium, a drug that removes all emotion and feeling from humans. The resulting violence-free world is protected by the Grammaton Clerics, elite fighters who constantly hunt the resistance to destroy the last vestiges of emotion-causing art, music, and literature. So what happens when the best Cleric skips his dose and suddenly starts to feel? If I told you, you wouldn’t believe me. So trust me on this one, drop what you’re doing and go see it for yourself. I know it may be frightening, but trying a movie without Spielberg, Michael Bay or Lucas stamped on the front could be good for you. This is just the tip of the iceberg, but it’s a good beginning. So next time you want to impress your friends with your eclectic movie knowledge or maybe you’re just in the mood for something new, try one of these forgotten favorites. I promise, you’ll like what you see.

E-mail Vickery at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu


SUMMIT SCHEDULE

Sunday, September 21, 2008

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Summit 2008 Schedule Sunday

en?, Sonny Guild, Adams Center Faculty Commons, Classroom. The Justice Imperative, Robert L. Foster, Mabee Business Building Room 115.

7 p.m. - Theme Lecture “Righteousness of God Revealed through Faith and for Faith”, Leroy Garrett; worship by George Pendergrass, Moody Coliseum

Garret

We are What We Think!, Becky Holton, Mabee Business Building Room 117.

A Dialogue with the Christian Chronicle, Lynn A. McMillon, Biblical Studies Building, Room 114.

Communication- The Foundation of Effective Leadership, Taylor A. McKenzie, Biblical Business Building Room 103.

A Missional Response to Social Justice and Poverty, Tanya Brice, Biblical Studies Building Room 115.

Women’s Violence in Global Politics, Caron E. Gentry, Biblical Studies Building Room 112.

Kingdom Life Remixed, John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117.

8:45 p.m. - Late Night

What Language May I Borrow?, Ron Highfield, Biblical Studies Building Room 113.

Gospel and Culture Coffee House: “Church 2.0: Preaching, Teaching, and Worship for the Mobile Generation,”
Kyle Dickson and Stephen Johnson,
Brown Library’s Learning Commons

Inside the Youth Minister’s Studio with Brian McLaren, Robert Oglesby Jr., Biblical Studies Building Room 114. Fighting for Justice, Brandon James Smith, Biblical Studies Building Room 115.

Monday

How Visual Media Saved My Life, Rob Thomas, Biblical Studies Building Room 117.

8:30 a.m. - Classes

Show Us How You Do It, Edward J. Robinson, Biblical Studies Building Room 120.

R&R of Ministry and Missions, Steve Allison and Jeff Holland, Adams Center Faculty Commons, Classroom. Sexy Sacrifices: Have We Laid Our Children on the Altar of Commercial Culture?, Jennifer Shewmaker and Stephanie Talley, Mabee Business Building Room 115. Stone and Campbell Wander the Groves of Academe: Restoration Principles and University Education, Chris Willerton and ACU students, Mabee Business Building Room 117. Nurturing Your Body to Feed Your Mind and Spirit, Joe D. Bell, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. Putting Ears on our Hearts, Jacqueline King, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. Transcendant Leadership, Margaret J. Weber, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. Iglesias De Christo, Jorge Daniel Garcia and Patricia Hernandez, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. Second Life? What Happened to My First One?, David W. Fraze, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. A Missional Response to Social Justice and Poverty, Tanya Brice and Darrell Jordan, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Kingdom Life Remixed, John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. Campus Evangelism, Campus Revival and Spiritual Awakening, Jim R. Bevis, Biblical Studies Building Room 120. Risen from the Ashes, Shirley D. Straker, Biblical Studies Building Room 122. Adoption: Real-Life Adoption Experiences Remind Us We are all God’s Adopted Children, Kelly Vaughn, Biblical Studies Building Room 126. Let My People Go, Bert Reynolds, Biblical Studies Building Room 127.

Spiritual CPR for a Dying Nation, Dan Cooke, Biblical Studies Building Room 127.

Building Room 200. Will the Real God Please Stand Up? The Search for Justice in the Old Testament, Mark Hamilton Biblical Studies Building Room 100. Borrowed Creativity, Ginger Morby, WPAC, Fulks Theatre.

9:45 a.m. - Classes Growing Global Christians, Joyce Hardin, Adams Center Faculty Commons Classroom. Christian Activism, Floyd Rose, Mabee Business Building Room 115. Discipleship and Discipline Within the Academy, B. Cole Bennett and Tracy M. Shilcutt, Mabee Business Building Room 117. Nothing Can Separate Us: God’s Love for the Same-Sex Struggler, Sally Gary, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. More than Dinner at Our Place, Charme Robarts, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. Living, Loving and Leading From the Heart, Lee Ann Nutt, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. The Marriage-Friendly Place, Beverly Ross, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. Strokes from a Backlit Keyboard, Houston Heflin, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. Growing Old in Christ: Blessings and Challenges of Ministry to the Aging, Jack Holland, Biblical Studies Building Room 115.

Romans Proverbial Roots, Glenn Pemberton, Biblical Studies Building Room 128.

Kingdom Life Remixed Panel, Facilitator: Kent Smith and Panelists: Jared Looney and John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117.

Covenant Righteousness in Romans, Thomas H. Olbricht, Biblical Studies Building Room 129.

Walking with the Spirit: The Transitions of K.C. Moser, Bobby Valentine, Biblical Studies Building Room 120.

Leadership and Church Growth, Ian Fair, Biblical Studies Building Room 130.

Worship for the Deaf, Hollis Maynard, Biblical Studies Building Room 122.

Five Theological Turnings, Part 1, Brian D. McLaren, Biblical Studies

Table Scraps, Geoffrey Broderick,

Biblical Studies Building Room 126. Olive Trees and Cyborgs, Jennifer J. Thweatt-Bates, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. God of the Margins, Jessica Reese Goudeau, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. How to Win the War Against Drug Abuse, Kinwood H. DeVore, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. Pulling Together Without Coming Apart: A Panel on Elder-Minister Relationships, Dean Bryce, Malcolm Coco, Eddie Sharp and Jay Spencer, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. Five Theological Turnings, Brian D. McLaren, Biblical Studies Building Room 200.

11 a.m. - Theme Speaker God Shows No Favoritism, David Fleer, worship by Come As You Are, Moody Coliseum.

When Peace Breaks Out, Joey Cope, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. Emerging Elders, Ron Clark, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. Transcending Racism, Douglas A. Foster, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. Conquest: Finding Your Place in God’s Mission, Scott Sager, Biblical Studies Building Room 200.

7 p.m - Theme Speaker God’s Righteousness for Sinners, Kevin Murray, worship by Ryan Porche, Moody Coliseum.

1:30 p.m. - Highlight Classes What’s New About the “New Atheism”?, Rubel Shelly, Biblical Studies Building Room 200. Lifestyles of the Rich and Amos, Rick Atchley, Biblical Studies Building Room 100. Relationship 101: Eight Things Every Lover Needs to Say, Jeff Walling, Teague Special Events Center.

3 p.m. - Featured Guest Reaching Christians for Christ, Brian D. McLaren, Moody Coliseum.

4 p.m. - Classes Children of Hell or Children of Heav-

Campus Evangelism, Campus Revival and Spiritual Awakening, Jim R. Bevis, Biblical Studies Building Room 120. Risen Above the Ashes, Shirley D. Straker, Biblical Studies Building Room 122. Adoption: Real-Life Adoption Experiences Remind Us We are All God’s Adopted Children, Kelly Vaughn, Biblical Studies Building Room 126. Let My People Go, Bert Reynolds, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. Romans Proverbial Roots, Glenn Permberon, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. Covenant Righteousness in Romans, Thomas H. Olbricht, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. Leadership and Church Growth, Ian Fair, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. Will the Real God Please Stand Up? The Search for Social Justice in the Old Testament, Mark Hamilton, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. Matthew Sleeth’s Dialogue with Ecology Students, J. Matthew Sleeth, Bibical Studies Building, Room 200

9:45 a.m. - Classes How Long Can You Tread Water? Larry Henderson, Adams Center Faculty Commons, Classroom. Reflections on Youth Ministry, Robert Oglesby Jr., Brown Library, Mabee Library Auditorium. Christian Activism, Floyd Rose, Mabee Business Building Room 115.

Murray

Tuesday 8:30 a.m. - Classes

Fleer

Conformed to the Image of His Son, Steven Carrizal, Biblical Studies Building Room 113.

R&R of Ministry and Missions, Steve Allison and Jeff Holland, Adams Center Faculty Commons, Classroom. No Passport Needed, Casey McCollum and Steve Sargent, Brown Library, Mabee Library Auditorium. Sexy Sacrifices: Have We Laid our Children on the Altar of Commercial Culture?, Jennifer Shewmaker, Mabee Business Building Room 115. Stone and Campbelle Wander the Groves of Academe: Restoration Principles and University Education, Chris Willerton, Mabee Business Building Room 117. Already but Not Yet, Edward Fudge, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. Who are These People? Laborers Alongside the Local Church, Linda A. King, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. Transcendent Leadership, Margaret J. Weber, Biblical Studies Building Room 112.

Discipleship and Discipline within the Academy, B. Cole Bennett and Tracy M Shilcutt, Mabee Business Building Room 117. Nothing Can Separate Us: God’s Love for the Same-Sex Struggler, Sally Gary, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. Christian Finances - An Oxymoron?, Scott K. Stegall, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. Living, Loving and Leading from the Heart, Lee Ann Nutt, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. A Law Unto Themselves, Kenny Jones, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. At Work in the Fields of the Lord: Being a Chaplain to a Secular University, Robert M. Randolph, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. Growing Old in Christ: Blessing and Challenges of Ministry to the Aging, Jack Holland, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Kingdom Life Remixed Panel, Facilitator: Kent Smith and Panelists: Jared Looney and John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. Walking with the Spirit: The Transitions of K.C. Moser, Bobby Valentine, Biblical Studies Building Room 120.


SUMMIT SCHEDULE

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Content for Bible Classes for the Deaf, Larry Prince, Biblical Studies Building Room 122. Missionary Care, Dorris M. Schulz, Biblical Studies Building Room 126. Olive Trees and Cyborgs, Jennifer J. Thweatt-Bates, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. Tenacious Hospitality: Welcoming the Unwelcomed, MaLesa Breeding, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. How to Win the War Against Drug Abuse, Kinwood H. DeVore, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. Pulling Together without Coming Apart, Dean Bryce, Malcolm Coco, Eddie Sharp and Jay Spencer, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. “But I was Just Preaching!”: Proclaiming Justice and Hope from the Old Testament, Mark Hamilton, Stephen Johnson and Tim Sensing, Biblical Studies Building Room 100. Borrowed Creativity, Ginger Morby, WPAC, Fulks Theatre.

11 a.m. - Theme Speaker Sin Condemned in Christ Jesus, James Thompson, worship by Come As You Are, Moody Coliseum.

Thompson

1:30 p.m. - Special Classes Why Seeing is Believing, Rubel Shelly, Biblical Studies Building Room 200. Lifestyles of the Rich and Amos, Rick Atchley, Biblical Studies Building Room 100. Relationship 101: Eight Things Every Lover Needs to Say, Jeff Walling, Teague Special Events Center.

3 p.m. - Featured Guest “Serve God, Save the Planet: A Christian Call to Action”, J. Matthew Sleeth, Moody Coliseum.

4 p.m. - Classes Children of Hell or Children of Heaven? Capturing the Mind, Sonny Guild, Adams Center Faculty Commons. (Part 2 of 2) The Justice Imperative: The Justice of God and the Just Community in Romans, Robert L. Foster, Mabee Business Building Room 115. (Part 2 of 2) We are What We Think! How Do I Jump Tracks and Get to a Different train of Thought?, Becky Holton, Mabee Business Building Room 117. (Part 2 of 2) Communication - The Foundation of Effective Leadership: A Leader’s Communicative Approach to Conflict, Taylor A. McKenzie, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. (Part 2 of 2) Would the Apostle Paul Use the Internet? Missions in a Wired

World: Exciting Opportunities in Missions Through Videoconferencing, Steve Austin, Biblical Studies Building,Room 104. (Part 1 of 2) The God-Praising and EarthCaring Community: Why should the Church Care About the Planet Anyway?, Eric Yates, Mabee Business Building Room 115. (Part 1 of 2) New Hymns, Old Problems: And You Think Music Troubles Are New!, Jack Boyd, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. (Part 1 of 2) At Work in the Fields of the Lord: Being a Chaplain to a Secular University: A Theology of Presence, Robert M. Randolph, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. (Part 2 of 2) The Violence of Love: What it Means to Be a Better Lover in Light of a Not-So-Loving World, Matthew Ryan Worthington, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Redefining Christianism: Comforting the Disturbed, Matt Wallace and Nikki Wallace, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. (Part 1 of 2) Three Decisive Dates for Churches of Christ: The Pivotal Events of 1809, 1909 and 2009, Douglas A. Foster, Biblical Studies Building Room 120.

ing Room 104. (Part 2 of 2) One Church’s Method for Embracing New Members, Doug Brown, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. My Brother Y Mi Hermano, Jorge Daniel Garcia and Patricia Hernandez, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. (Part 2 of 2) Confess and Believe Jesus Christ is the Lord (Romans 10:9): Persecution and Faith in China, Bob Fu, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. (Part 1 of 3) A Missional Response to Social Justice and Poverty, Tanya Brice, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. (Part 3 of 3) Kingdom of Life Remixed: Reenvisioning Kingdom Leadership, John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. (Part 3 of 3) Campus Evangelism, Campus Revival and Spiritual Awakening: Mobilizing Campus Ministries for Maximum Impact, Jim R. Bevis, Biblical Studies Building Room 120. (Part 3 of 3) Adoption: Real-Life Adoption Experiences Remind Us that We Are All God’s Adopted Children: Do You Believe God is Your Adoptive Father?, Kelly Vaughn, Biblical Studies Building Room 126. (Part 3 of 3)

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Defacing the Art of God, Kevin J. Youngblood, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. Confess and Believe Jesus Christ is the Lord (Romans 10:9): Persecution and Revival in China, Bob Fu, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. (Part 2 of 3) Growing Old in Christ: Blessings and Challenges of Ministry to the Aging: Aging with Grace: Growing Old for the Next Generation, Jack Holland, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. (Part 3 of 3) Kingdom Life Remixed Panel: The Conversation Continues..., Facilitator: Kent Smith, Panelists: Jared Looney and John White, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. (Part 3 of 3) Walking with the Spirit: The Transitions of K.C. Moser Dawn: Moser’s Spiritual Legacy, Bobby Valentine, Biblical Studies Building Room 120. (Part 3 of 3) Fundraising for Sam’s Place, Vernon Smith, Biblical Studies Building Room 122. Olive Trees and Cyborgs: Our Christian Identities Here and Now, Jennifer J. Thweatt-Bates, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. (Part 2 of 2)

Let My People Go: A Little Less Conversation, a Little More Action, Bert Reynolds, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. (Part 3 of 3)

Tenacious Hospitality: Welcoming the Unwelcomed: Those Children Just don’t Fit In! Include Them Anyway, MaLesa Breeding, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. (Part 2 of 2)

When Peace Breaks Out: A Righteous God Invites Reverence, Joey Cope, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. (Part 2 of 3)

Fresh Face on the Ancient Tale: Crafting Narrative Sermons They Won’t Ever Forget, Larry Mudd, Biblical Studies Building Room 128.

How to Win the War Against Drug Abuse... In Your Community, Kinwood H. DeVore, Biblical Studies Building room 129. (Part 3 of 3)

Emerging Elders: Family Elders Shepherding Today’s Families, Ron Clark, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. (Part 2 of 3)

Covenant Righteousness in Romans: Obedience: Jesus Doing Right, Humankind doing Right, Thomas H. Olbricht, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. (Part 3 of 3)

Pulling Together Without Coming Apart: A Panel on Elder-Minister Relationships: Praying Together; Dean Bryce, Malcolm Coco, Eddie Sharp and Jay Spencer; Biblical Studies Building Room 130. (Part 3 of 3)

Multiculturalism and Diversity: The 21st Century Challenges for the Church: Is the Gospel Relevant to My Culture?, George Pendergrass, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. (Part 1 of 2)

Moving Beyond White Jesus: An Introduction to Black Theology, Travis Stanley and Walter L. Taylor, Biblical Studies Building Room 200. (Part 2 of 3) Conquest: Finding Your Place in God’s Mission: Stepping Out into Deep Waters, Scott Sager, Biblical Studies Building Room 126.

7 p.m. - Theme Speaker From God, Through God and To God are all Things (Romans 11:25-36), Randy Harris, Moody Coliseum, with worship led by D.J. Bulls.

Leadership and Church Growth: Developing Effective Leadership in the Context of Church Growth, Ian Fair, Biblical Studies Building Room 130. (Part 3 of 3) Deception, Sam Solomon, Biblical Studies Building Room 200. Will the Real God Please Stand Up? The Search for Justice in the Old Testament: Seeking an Everlasting Peace: Justice in the Prophets of Israel, Mark Hamilton, Biblical Studies Building Room 100. (Part 3 of 3)

9:45 a.m. - Classes Harris

Wednesday 8:30 a.m. - Classes Already But Not Yet: Spiritual Gifts, Until..., Edward Fudge, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. (Part 2 of 2) Who Are These People? Laborers Alongside the Local Church: Matters of Law, Matters of Polity: The Challenge of Para-church Organization, Linda A. King, Biblical Studies Build-

Fleer

How Long Can You Tread Water? Long Temr Challenges of Tsunami Aid, Larry Henderson, Adams Center Faculty Commons Classroom. (Part 2 of 2) Nothing Can Separate Us: God’s Love for the Same-Sex Struggler: Changing Minds, Sally Gary, Biblical Studies Building Room 103. (Part 3 of 3) Oculus Dei: Photography as Ministry, Greg Kendell-Ball, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. Picking Up a Plunger: A Glimpse into the Overflow of a Young Woman’s Heart, Kayci Ross, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. Gospel Graffiti: Reflections on

Murray

Demolition, Sam Solomon, Biblical Studies Building Room 200 (Chapel on the Hill). “But I Was Just Preaching!” Proclaiming Justice and Hope from the Old Testament: After Accusation and Guilt: Preaching the Prophets in the Contemporary Church; Mark Hamilton, Stephen Johnson and Tim Sensing; Biblical Studies Building Room 100 (Hart Auditorium). (Part 2 of 2.

11 a.m. - Theme Speaker Transformed by God (Romans 12:1-21), Eric Wilson, Moody Coliseum, with worship led by Come As You Are (ACU Students).

Holy Guidance System, Jeff Walling, Teague Special Events Center. (Part 3 of 3)

3 p.m. - Featured Guest “Sentenced to Death”, Sam Solomon, Moody Coliseum

4 p.m. - Classes New Hymns, Old Problems: Mess with My Hymns? Don’t Even Think About It?, Jack Boyd, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. (Part 2 of 2) Would the Apostle Paul Use the Internet? Missions in a Wired World: Be Plugged into All Your Mission Efforts Through Creative Internet Use, Steve Austin, Biblical Studies Building Room 104. (Part 2 of 2). The God-Praising and Earth-Caring Community: Making a Change that Makes a Difference, Eric Yates, Biblical Studies Building Room 112. (Part 2 of 2) Christian Digital Entertainment: The Call for Leadership, Brian G. Burton, Biblical Studies Building Room 113. Confess and Believe Jesus Christ is the Lord (Romans 10:9): Persecution and Mission in China, Bob Fu, Biblical Studies Building Room 114. (Part 3 of 3) Sex, Lies and Relationships, Anna Peters, Biblical Studies Building Room 115. Redefining Christianism: Disturbing the Comfortable, Matt Wallace and Nikki Wallace, Biblical Studies Building Room 117. (Part 2 of 2) Women’s Violence in Gobal Politics: Why Christians Should Care About Depictions of Women, Caron E. Gentry, Biblical Studies Building Room 120. (Part 2 of 2) Multiculturalism and Diversity: The 21st Century Challenges for the Church: We Want to Diversify, We Just Don’t Know How, George Pendergrass, Biblical Studies Building Room 127. (Part 2 of 2). When Peace Breaks Out: A Righteous God Reveals the Recipe for Peace, Joey Cope, Biblical Studies Building Room 128. (Part 3 of 3) Emerging Elders: Shepherding People in a Post-Christian Culture, Ron Clark, Biblical Studies Building Room 129. (Part 3 of 3) Newfound Awareness: An Actual Step Forward, Damon Parker and Beatriz Alem Walker, Biblical Studies Building Room 130.

Wilson

1:30 p.m. - Highlight Classes Lifestyles of the Rich and Amos: Why Rich Religion Gets Its Way, Rick Atchley, Biblical Studies Building Room 100 (Hart Auditorium). (Part 3 of 3) Relationship 101: Eight Things Every Lover Needs to Say: Christ’s

Conquest: Finding Your Place in God’s Mission: Attacking the Big Enemy First, Scott Sager, Biblical Studies Buidling Room 200 (Chapel on the HIll). (Part 3 of 3)

7 p.m. - Theme Speaker Welcome Others as Christ (Romans 15:1-7), Chris Seidman, Moody Coliseum, with worship led by Steven Moore.


CAMPUS NEWS

Sunday, September 21, 2008

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ESL classes offered at University Church Professors to lead By Camille Vandendriessche Assistant Copy Editor

Every Wednesday evening, a group of international students meets at University Church of Christ to share dinner with church members, improve their English language skills and learn about Christianity. Dinner is served at 5:30 p.m. for church members and international students enrolled in ESL (English as a Second Language) classes. Philip Palmer, international students’ coordinator at the University Church of Christ, said about 300 people come every week. At 7 p.m., students pair up with their tutors for an hour of conversation. “The church has offered one-on-one tutoring for about nine years,” Palmer said. “It’s a good opportunity for students to have conversations in English.” Between eight and 10 students attend the event Wednesday evenings; most of them are enrolled in ESL classes at ACU. Palmer said they know a lot of

We had Americans, Chinese, Malaysians and Japanese, and also some professors. :: Sylvia Huang, social work graduate student from Jinan, China

English but they do not have many opportunities to speak the language. Tutors help students develop their conversational skills and sometimes assist them with their Bible homework, he said. Lee Penya, who is tutoring at the church for his second year, said he uses a book filled with Bible passages. “The student reads a passage with me and answers questions about it,” Penya said. “At the end, we talk about the messages of the text.” Penya, a professional translator who was born in Buenos Aires and raised in Florida, said he likes to have relaxed conversations with his student and learn about his culture. The group of tutors also includes ACU students.

At the same time as ESL conversations, a Japanese Bible study takes place in another room of the church. Nobuki Takahashi, junior Bible major from Shizuoka, Japan, has led the discussion for about a year. He said the group averages 10 people, including Japanese students, missionaries and Steven Gist, ACU international student recruiter. Takahashi said group members also meet outside of the Bible study hours to celebrate birthdays; they had a Japanese church on Saturdays in the fall of 2007 but they are not having it anymore. Also supported by University Church of Christ, the Chinese Christian Fellowship meets in the conference room of the Brown Library every

Saturday at 3 p.m. About 10 members come to the weekly meetings, including students from Hardin-Simmons and McMurry universities. Jason Huang, sophomore information systems and finance major from Hong Kong, said the goal of the group is to learn about Christ and inform Chinese students about possible American host families. Chinese Christian Fellowship co-sponsored a cultural event called Moon Festival at University Church of Christ with Beltway Church and the Office of Multicultural Enrichment on Sept. 13. The Moon Festival, also called Mid-Autumn Day, is the second biggest celebration in China, said Chinese Christian Fellowship President Sylvia Huang, social work graduate student from Jinan, China. “More than 100 people came,” Huang said. “We had Americans, Chinese, Malaysians and Japanese, and also some professors.” E-mail Vandendriessche at: cxv06a@acu.edu

Students donate blood for Gustav victims By Sondra Rodriguez Student Reporter

A blood donor loses about one pint of blood per donation, and each donation can save three lives. ACU students donated a total 75 pints of blood, providing medical help for about 300 victims of Hurricane Gustav Sept. 12 and 13 in the Teague Special Events Center. Four times that amount was expected, but David Vanderpool, organizer of the drive, said, “Seventy-five is better than zero.” Vanderpool, junior English, biblical text and pre-

med major from Nashville, Tenn., was contacted by the president of Harding University one week before the blood drive and asked to take on the project. “He told me he was trying to organize a friendly intercollegiate competition between Church of Christ universities to see who can raise the most blood for Hurricane Gustav victims,” he said. Vanderpool agreed to organize and publicize the drive. With only a week to prepare, he said more time was needed for a bigger turnout. “It was a last moment

deal; they contacted me on Friday, and it happened a week later,” he said. The Students’ Association officers helped Vanderpool with advertising; he made a Chapel announcement and placed fliers around campus. He said if students had been given more notice and the event did not take place on a Friday night and Saturday morning, the turnout would have been greater. Chris Herrington, junior architecture interior design major from Abilene, donated his blood Saturday. “It saves lives,” he said. “I feel like blood is life; so

as Jesus Christ shed blood for us, I shed my blood for others—it’s a good cause.” The next blood drive on campus will be Sept. 30 in the Campus Center’s Living Room, sponsored by the Virtuous African Heritage Sisterhood for the local Meek Blood Clinic.

E-mail Rodriguez at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu

Coffee House talks By Linda Bailey Student Reporter

The Coffee House conversations occurring nightly during Summit will provide students with a more active role than in previous Lectureships. Sunday through Tuesday’s conversations will be in the Learning Commons of the Brown Library at 8:30 p.m. Dr. Stephen Johnson, assistant professor of Bible, missions and ministry, and Dr. Kyle Dickson, associate professor of English, will lead Sunday’s interactive presentation entitled: “Church 2.0: Preaching, Teaching and Worship for the Mobile Generation.” Johnson said he and Dickson plan to speak about the whole generation of mobile learners. They will discuss how mobile technology, convergence technology and handheld mobile devices are all part of this generation’s world and culture. However, their lesson will not be in the “typical” lecture format, Johnson said. “I think Summit should be a place where people on this campus and people who come to visit our campus can sit down and have conversation about things that matter and things that make up our world and culture,” Johnson said. “This is a way to try and do that.” The discussion will include comments from Drs. Johnson and Dickson, student podcasts on the subject and the responses and comments from students at the conversation, Johnson said. “I think because much of

what we’ll do is not just presentation but conversation, students will be really interested to engage in thinking about what shapes their world,” he said. Another Coffee House conversation that is not in the “typical” lecture format is “The Golden Compass: Responding to the Book Where They Kill God” led by Dr. Shelly Sanders, assistant professor of English. Sanders plans to have a panel of students to help her discuss the controversies surrounding the book and movie The Golden Compass. They will discuss how these controversial topics should be addressed. The idea for this topic came out of a young adult literature class Sanders taught last year. A conversation started in class about what was appropriate for young adult readers, but also how people talk about books that challenge the Christian faith, Sanders said. Students who have not read The Golden Compass are still encouraged to attend the lecture. “I think students are drawn to controversy and I think it’s interesting and exciting to talk about the ways we respond to books that are controversial,” Sanders said. “Students have opinions, so I think it’s good that we have a place to foster that kind of conversation, especially when it comes to young adult literature.”

E-mail Bailey at: jmcnetwork@acu.edu


The Optimist - Sept. 21, 2008