The Lausanner - Heading for the future

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ENGLISH

WINTER 2020/SPRING 2021 - N° 6

NI CE   TO   MEE T   YO U

HEADING FOR THE FUTURE Déborah Heintze on the esplanade of the new museum hub Page 50

A CITY OF INNOVATION

Culture, work, architecture, research, business… Surprises in every sector Page 40

LAUSANNE: A TALE OF THREE BRIDGES Page 6

Feature: a closer look at ingenuity in Lausanne with six young local entrepreneurs

NIKE FALLS FOR A LAUSANNE LOCAL Page 34

EXPLORING THE CITY CENTRE Page 52


olympic.org/museum #olympicmuseum Quai d’Ouchy 1 – 1006 Lausanne


NI CE   TO   MEE T   YOU EDITORIAL

Lausanne: a crossroads of ideas

On 24 September 1907, at 5 p.m., on the corner of Lausanne’s Rue du Pont and Rue Centrale, the crowds were thick for the grand opening of the canton’s first department store. Its name: L’Innovation. It was a fitting name for a city that, over the decades, would go on to produce one innovative idea after another. One hundred and thirteen years later, life in the Vaud capital still revolves around innovation – be it technical, social, urban or cultural. It is the city’s driving force, as well as our feature piece for this edition (p.40). The Innovation Park at EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) has also been a key growth driver since it was founded back in 1991. In fact, tech companies’ share in the region’s GDP has almost doubled over the past 20 years. Investment in this sector is critical: as the “Vaud Innove” study recently noted, the prosperity enjoyed in the canton is built on the back of innovation. Lausanne’s considerable appeal is also due in no small part to the number of internationally-acclaimed universities and specialist schools – such as the Hospitality Management School (EHL), where a new incubator is preparing to welcome its first specialist start-ups (p. 42), and the cantonal university of art and design (ECAL), which is considered to be one of the best in the world. It actually counts designer Philippe Cuendet as one of its alumni, who has just been named Concept Director for Jordan over in the States. He gave an interview to The Lausanner before he left (p. 34). Lausanne has never stopped daring to dream: it was the first city in Switzerland to build a skyscraper (the Bel-Air tower) back in 1931, and still the only one in the country to have a metro system. The technical and architectural feats of the Rolex Learning Center, the extraordinary Plateforme 10 museum hub next to the station, and the magnificent renovation work undertaken on the Lausanne Opera – which celebrates its 150th birthday in 2021 (p. 28) – are yet further testament to its boldness. Taking our eyes off the road ahead for a moment, a glance in the rearview mirror reminds us how the city, built across three hills, chose to help bring people together with the construction of its iconic bridges (p. 6). Lausanne is a city that pulses with innovation, where entrepreneurs from all around the world meet, and where ideas are born. It is endlessly being reinvented to ensure it stays a pleasant place to live, keeping pace with evolving climate concerns. There’s no doubt about it: Lausanne is in motion. Always. 1


ARCHIVES This photo, taken in Lausanne in 1935, shows the front of Vaud’s first department store, L’Innovation, which opened in 1907.

IMPRESSUM The Lausanner, a tourist welcome and information magazine about life in Lausanne

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Writing: Trinidad Barleycorn, Carole Extermann, Erik Freudenreich, Blandine Guignier, Tiago Pires

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© Photos Lausanne Tourisme – LT/Laurent Kaczor (p. 59, 60, 61, 63, 67, 68, 71, 73, 77, 80) – LT/diapo.ch (p. 59, 60, 65, 67, 68, 71, 72, 80) – P. Waterton (p.  60, 61, 65, 76) – Christoph Schuerpf (p. 61) – Catherine Leutenegger Photography (p. 61) – Étienne Malapert (p. 65) – Sarah Jacquemet (p. 68) – LT/Julien Dorol (p. 69, 79) - F. Beaud-Cedotec (p. 71)

With the support of

Editorial Manager: Trinidad Barleycorn, Large Network Production: Nathalie Roux

Photography: Anonyme, coll. Musée historique Lausanne (p. 2, 52) – Swisssneaks (p.  5) – Sébastien Closuit (p. 6, 9) – Bibliothèque nationale suisse (p. 7 ) – www.diapo.ch/Régis Colombo (p. 10) – LT/Hugues Siegenthaler (p.  11) – Carole Alkabes – Ville de Lausanne (p. 11) – Qwstion (p. 14) – DR (p. 15, 45–49) – Gabriel Cunha (p. 15) – Anne–Laure Lechat (p. 16) – 24heures/Patrick Martin (p. 16) – Trinidad Barleycorn (p. 17, 21) – Galerie Alice Pauli (p.  18) – Étienne Malapert (p. 19) – Kevin Seisdedos/CAL (p. 22) – LT/ Laurent Kaczor (p. 22) – Lausanne Palace (p. 23) – François Wavre/Lundi13 (p. 24, 25) – Shutterstock (p. 26, 27) – SRG SSR (p. 26) – Laurent Gillieron /Keystone (p. 26) – Alamy Stock Photo (p. 27) – MovieStillsDB – Adrien Barakat (p. 28) – Josef Wittlich, Frau mit Plastik, entre 1964 et 1975, gouache et verni doré sur carton, 90 x 62,5 cm photo: AN – Collection de l’Art Brut, Lausanne (p. 29) – Simon Fowler (p.  29) – Dominik Gehl (p. 32) – Maxime Genoud (p. 32, 33) – Cécile Gretsch/ Saentys (p. 29, 30) – DIY (www.diy.li) (p. 34, 35, 37, 38) – Tonatiuh Ambrosetti (p. 36) – Aurélien Barrelet/Large Network (p. 40–51) – Thomas Aljoscha (p.  42) – Nicolas Schopfer (p. 50) – Gaston de Jongh, coll. du Musée historique Lausanne, tous droits réservés (p. 53) – Rémy Gindroz (p. 53) – Hippolyte Chappuis, coll. du Musée historique Lausanne, tous droits réservés (p. 54)

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CONTENTS

WINTER 2020/SPRING 2021 - N° 6

TALK OF THE TOWN Lausanne as told by its bridges

INTERVIEW Swiss designer Philippe Cuendet joins the Nike team in Portland

Page 6

Page 34

LAUSANNE IN MOTION Top new spots Page 14

Gifts for giving… and for getting Page 17

A tribute to the career of Alice Pauli Page 18

Diving in with Arianna Schiona, who looks after the fish at Aquatis Page 24

A CITY ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF INNOVATION Here in Lausanne, creative genius is everywhere you look. We learn more about innovation in the city and six young start-ups. Page 40

OUT AND ABOUT Exploring the city centre Page 52

NOT TO BE MISSED Iconic Lausanne locations Page 58

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THE BRIDGES THAT OPENED LAUSANNE TO THE WORLD Back in the 19th century, three bold new structures reshaped Lausanne and the way people moved around it. We take a tour of the city’s bridges, and the culture that surrounds them. By Erik Freudenreich

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TA L K O F T H E T OW N

Just imagine: you’ve done your holiday shopping in Place Saint-François and Rue de Bourg, and you're off to enjoy a fondue at Le Vieux-Lausanne. It might seem like a pleasant stroll today, but this would have been a formidable obstacle course until the beginning of the 20th century, when the last of the three bridges that shape the city appeared. Lausanne is built across three hills separated by the valleys of the rivers Flon and Louve,

making it a particularly steep and craggy city. “The bridges became more and more necessary as the city’s economic activity continued to grow,” explains Gilbert Coutaz, a former archivist for the canton of Vaud. And so, in the 1830s, engineer Adrien Pichard (1790-1841) designed an ambitious new road layout. “Pichard had the ingenious idea of designing a comprehensive system consisting of not only roads, but bridges and tunnels too. His town planning project also aimed to bring Lausanne in line with the times.” Work started with the construction of the GrandPont. This was completed in 1844, giving the city a real

Born in Lausanne in 1790, engineer Adrien Pichard designed a new road layout to clear traffic from the narrow city streets and make it easier to get from hill to hill. His roads, bridges and tunnels work their way around the medieval city, forming the “Pichard Belt”. The visionary mastermind passed away in 1841, three years before the first of his three bridges, the Grand-Pont, opened to the public.

boost. “Building this bridge was not just a question of architecture or mobility. It also represented the city opening up, at a time when making Lausanne a powerful economic hub was high on the agenda.” On either side of the GrandPont are two more of the Vaud capital’s iconic buildings. One is the five-star Lausanne Palace hotel, dating back to 1915 (see p.23). According to Coutaz, “in a way, this building represents the height of the era’s hotel craze. It also played a big part in the rise in medical tourism to Lausanne.” The other structure is Switzerland’s first skyscraper, the Bel-Air Tower, built in 1931 by architect Alphonse Laverrière. →


TA L K O F T H E T OW N

“We can’t ignore the extent to which the private sector contributed to Lausanne’s expansion.” Gilbert Coutaz, former archivist for the canton of Vaud

DEBATE AT EVERY LEVEL A number of complications meant that the two other bridges designed by Pichard would have to wait a little longer to become a reality. “The projects naturally sparked much debate between political powers, and between city and cantonal officials, not least because of the costs involved.” As a result, it was nearly six decades before work could begin on Pont Chauderon. When it was complete, the second bridge marked the city’s new western fringe. Lausanne, though, continued to grow, with the bridge now serving as an excellent viewpoint across the new outskirts. In the other direction, the road leads back into the city centre via the iconic Esplanade de

1835

Local engineer Adrien Pichard advised the creation of a road network around the medieval city.

Montbenon, with its panoramic views across the south of the city and Lake Geneva. The brasserie in the nearby casino also enjoys quite the reputation. To the east of the Flon Valley, the Pont Charles-Bessières was officially opened in 1910, and is named after the philanthropist that donated 500,000 Swiss francs to its construction. “We can’t ignore the extent to which the private sector contributed to Lausanne’s expansion,” says Coutaz. “The Bessières and Mercier families, and the surgeon and major landowner César Roux, all became very wealthy here. They were quick to give back – and generously, too.” Nowadays, the roads approaching the bridge are buzzing with shops, restaurants, and popular bars (see p.11). THREE LIVELY BRIDGES Thanks to the advanced technology used during their construction, the three bridges remain in good condition even today. Many neighbouring businesses are particularly fond of them – like Sébastien Dubugnon, for example, who runs the Les Grandes Roches terrace.

1839

Construction began on the GrandPont, which would open in 1844.

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Tucked away under the western arch of the Pont Bessières, this café and restaurant offers customers an oasis of peace in the heart of the Cité during the summer months. “Turning this disused space into a warm and welcoming environment was definitely a challenge at first,” Dubugnon tells us. But, inspired by similar experiences in Zurich, the terrace opened in 2007 and fast became a favourite spot for both locals and passing tourists. Last year, the café fell victim to a large fire. The owners, however, weren’t ready for their adventure to end, and took advantage of the blow to switch things up a bit: a range of plants are now scattered across the terrace, with the bridge’s architectural features providing an impressive backdrop. A similar approach was taken to another patch of wasteland – this time under the Grand-Pont – by Thierry Wegmüller and his business partners, who created a venue that draws in crowds all-year round. Christened Les Arches, it celebrated its tenth birthday last September. “The place is now a bona fide barometer for life in Lausanne, both during the day and after dark.” →

1904

Work started on the Pont Chauderon, and was completed the following year.


L A V I L L E E N PA R L E

Grand-Pont - 175 METRES

The Grand-Pont was built between 1839 and 1844, and was initially made up of two superimposed series of archways. Nowadays, the 19 upper arches are one of the bridge’s stand-out features. “A vaulted walkway slices through the supports down on Rue Central, in an arrangement not dissimilar to the Pont du Gard,” says Cyril Gerbino, the head of art at the Lausanne Road and Transport Department.

The Grand-Pont is also a key part of the city’s identity, offering iconic views of Lausanne Cathedral to the north, and Jura to the west. That’s not all: the range of cultural and gastronomic experiences in the area are a big draw, too. The concerts staged at the Lausanne Opera and Salle Métropole make both venues worth a visit. After the show, head to Les Brasseurs to sample a beer from the wide range brewed on site. Café Romand and La Bavaria are two more popular local spots. To end the evening on the dance floor, D! Club, Darling, and the White Club will have you twisting the night away.

The bridge’s uniform stonework is made from hammer-dressed stone blocks from Meillerie (France). The floor, or the weight-bearing section, was enlarged on two separate occasions: once in 1892, and again in 1933, following an increase in traffic and to provide pedestrians with wider pavements. “The current iron railings were designed by the architects Bezencenet & Girardet

1908

Engineer Édouard Chavannes oversaw the start of work on the Pont Bessières, which would open in 1910.

during the 1892 expansion. They combine gothicinspired bars with decorative foliage-covered panels, setting the pace for passers-by.” The bridge will be closed for several months as of January 2022 for cleaning work to be carried out.

1994

Major renovation work is being undertaken on the Grand-Pont.

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2004

The Pont Saint-Martin metro bridge was built under the Pont Bessières, 5 metres above ground level.


TA L K O F T H E T OW N

“The place is now a bona fide barometer for life in Lausanne, both during the day and after dark.” Thierry Wegmüller, co-founder of the Les Arches bar under the Grand-Pont

FESTIVALS AND LEISURE SPOTS Bars aren’t the only thing you’ll find under the bridges: there are concert venues too, like Le Romandie. This temple of rock on the Lausanne nightlife scene has lived under the Grand-Pont since 2004, but has had to close for the bridge to be cleaned and is currently looking for a new home. The Lausanne bridges also play their own part in livening up the city’s cultural calendar. Every year for the past three years, the Festival de la Cité has taken over the Pont Bessières with a somewhat unusual set-up, placing tiered wooden seating on one side, a bar on the other, and a stage slightly further along.

“The idea was to make the city part of the show, as well as giving concert-goers the chance to reclaim a public space that is nothing more than a thoroughfare the rest of the year,” explains Festival Director, Myriam Kridi. The colossal structures are also used to showcase a number of other cultural activities. During the annual Prix de Lausanne international ballet competitions, for example, giant photographs are displayed on the Grand-Pont in January and February to introduce the young dancers who will be taking part, transforming the bridge into a gateway for bringing art to the masses. ■ 10


TA L K O F T H E T OW N

Pont Chauderon - 250 METRES This bridge was built between 1904 and 1905 using the Melan system of concrete-coated steel girders. “Key features of this structure include the stone piers that support its six spans, the monumental pylons, and its Art Nouveau-inspired lamps and railings,” Gerbino says. The Pont Chauderon has also been listed on the Swiss Inventory of Cultural Property of National and Regional Significance and the Cantonal Inventory since 1974. It has been regularly inspected and cleaned over the years, with the last major work taking place back in 1990.

Pont Bessières - 160 METRES

The bridge isn’t the only piece of interesting architecture in the area: there’s the Galfetti Tower, too, which was built between 1987 and 1993 by Ticino-born architect Aurelio Galfetti. Culture vultures should pencil in a visit to the Collection de l’Art Brut museum, the Swiss Film Archive, and the Zinéma independent cinema. If you’re getting peckish, the neighbourhood is also home to a wide range of eateries, like Au Canard Pékinois, Isshin Sushi, and the Brasserie de Montbenon. It has plenty of livelier spots, too, with La Movida, Chauderon 18 and many more.

Points of interest in the area include the impressive Gothic-inspired Lausanne Cathedral, and the Lausanne History Museum. There are quirky spots to be found at either end of the bridge too, such as the restaurant Au Couscous, where customers will sometimes find vouchers for free merguez sausages left underneath the doormat in the entrance. While below, you’ll find Luigia, an Italian restaurant that now occupies the former Atlantic cinema and offers diners the chance to enjoy incredible theatrical surroundings as they eat. The road leads on to popular bars like Happy Days, Étoile Blanche and the Café Saint Pierre, forming a triangle of lively bonhomie. In the opposite direction, at the end of the bridge, visitors can immerse themselves in the life of the city by visiting the Cathedral and enjoying a post-tour fondue at the Café de l’Evêché.

The Pont Bessières was built between 1908 and 1910, with engineer Edouard Chavannes overseeing operations. The structure comprises two stone arches (one at either end) and one steel arch, with a floor made of reinforced concrete. It also features 11-metre-high obelisks in the style of Louis XVI. “The original iron railings were replaced with a better, brighter aluminium rail in 1972,” says Gerbino. Deep cleaning in 2003 led to the edges of the bridge having to be demolished and replaced, as well as the railings they supported. Major work was also carried out between 2004 and 2007, when openings were made in the two abutments to allow the Pont Saint-Martin to be built directly underneath. This new bridge supports the M2 metro line between the Riponne-Maurice Béjart and Bessières stations, with the latter hollowed straight out of the eastern end of the bridge above.

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THREE BRIDGES AND A CITY

ISSHIN SUSHI

Fusion food featuring a selection of Asian specialities.

AV .

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Place Chauderon 30 1003 Lausanne isshinsushi.ch

RE ND XA LE

The works of art that crisscross the centre of Lausanne are the ideal starting point for gourmet or cultural explorations. Selection.

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Visit

Restauration

250m 10-15m

1904-1905 PONT CHAUDERON

AV. JUL ES-G ONI N

PARC DE LA LÉGENDE

An ideal spot for daydreams, surrounded by a display of 18 bronze sculptures. Avenue Jules-Gonin 1003 Lausanne

DID YOU KNOW?

One bridge, many names From Pont Neuf to Pont de Pépinet and Pont Pichard (after its engineer), the Grand-Pont was known by many names before it was christened once and for all.

BLACKBIRD DOWNTOWN DINER

A relaxed feel and attentive service in a roomy, neo-vintage space.

sain

Route de Bel-Air 1 1003 Lausanne downtowndiner.ch lausanne gare cff

Medieval-inspired turrets Initial plans for the Pont Bessières included the construction of neomedieval turrets at either end. The idea was eventually abandoned due to cost. 12


TA L K O F T H E T OW N

500,000

The amount in francs (equivalent to 2.4 million francs today) that Lausanne banker and jeweller Charles Bessières left for the construction of his eponymous bridge.

LAUSANNE HISTORY MUSEUM

The perfect place to see how the city has evolved over almost two millennia. Place de la Cathédrale 4 1005 Lausanne lausanne.ch

160m 23m SAINT-FRANÇOIS CHURCH Protestant church that regularly hosts classical music concerts and recitals.

1908-1910 PONT BESSIÈRES

Place Saint-François 1003 Lausanne

BLEU LÉZARD

Bistro with an eclectic menu and far-reaching reputation. 1839-1844 GRAND-PONT

Rue Enning 10 1003 Lausanne bleu-lezard.ch AV .

175m 13m

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Aurélien Barrelet/Large Network

place

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LAUSANNE IN MOTION The minimalist décor at Qwstion on Rue du Tunnel.

IN SEARCH OF THE PERFECT BACKPACK

Whether striking or subtle, there’s a rucksack out there for everyone. Here’s our pick of three top spots for finding the one for you. The streets of Lausanne are a treasure trove of great clothing stores, and rucksacks in particular. Whether you’re looking for one made from sustainable materials or HGV tarps, there’s a design out there in every shape and colour imaginable. At Atelier Sonja T., the backpacks and shopping bags are all limited editions, made from paper and materials that are either sourced locally or recycled. This tiny sewing studio came to the Sous-Gare neighbourhood back in 1999, when it won in the Textiles category of the Swiss Design Awards.

Over at Qwstion, meanwhile, it’s a whole other story. The Zurich brand made its minimalist home on Rue du Tunnel in 2018, and offers up a selection of timelessly stylish bags. In addition to its own collection, the store also stocks accessories from other labels, such as Lausanne designer Laboratoire and Zurich jeweller Kinsfolk. As if that’s not enough, Qwstion also works closely with local fashion designers from ECAL (Lausanne’s university of art and design). Meanwhile, the backpacks by Swiss trendsetter Freitag remain a staple in any sustainable wardrobe. They’re made from old HGV tarpaulins, and are available in a rainbow of 14

colours from the Zurich-based company’s store on Rue Neuve just off Place de la Riponne. Whether you’re looking for a commute-friendly laptop bag or something roomy enough for a getaway, the Swiss brand makes practicality their number-one priority.

Atelier Sonja T. Rue du Simplon 9, Lausanne ateliersonjat.ch Qwstion Store Rue du Tunnel 7, Lausanne qwstion.com Freitag Store Rue Neuve 6, Lausanne freitag.ch


L AU S A N N E I N M OT I O N | TO P NE W SP OT S

After a three-year hiatus, the legendary Lausanne café and restaurant Le Montelly reopened its doors with a fresh new look in May 2020.

VAUD CUISINE

Le Montelly – located in the neighbourhood of the same name – celebrates classic Vaud cooking, with vegetarian dishes and platters also on the menu.

The iconic Le Montelly café and restaurant has treated itself to a makeover, with bright green benches, restored woodwork and a bigger bar, putting its traditional features squarely in the spotlight – like the hand-operated serving hatch that still connects the dining room to the kitchen upstairs. In terms of the food,

Le Montelly Chemin de Montelly 1, Lausanne lemontelly.ch

THE BOOK BAR

Once past its bookshop exterior, Le Vestibule becomes a bar, and a tale of absinthe, gin, and beers galore. The first of its kind in Lausanne and with a prime position opposite the Cathedral, the atmosphere here is inspired by the clandestine speakeasies of the Prohibition era in the US, with dark wooden benches, exposed beams, and shelves stacked with books. The menu also features artisanal syrups, dried fruits and platters of locally sourced meat and cheese. Le Vestibule Rue Cité-Devant 4, Lausanne le-vestibule.ch

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L AU S A N N E I N M OT I O N | TO P NE W SP OT S

A CHANCE TO GET CREATIVE

With its tropical vibes and the exotic birds filling the tiled walls, newcomer to the Lausanne restaurant circuit Sardine is clearly no shrinking violet. With Alexis Le Tadic, the youngest Michelin-starred chef in France at the helm, the menu is a minimalist affair of four starters, mains and desserts. A selection of over forty different gins rounds off the Sardine experience, where the only similarity to an actual sardine is its desire to be “unpretentious, accessible, and a chance to get creative”. Sardine Rue de la Barre 5, Lausanne sardinelausanne.ch

PUTTING FISH FIRST

At The Fish Club on the vertiginous Rue du PetitChêne, customers will find over 500 different types of fresh, frozen and preserved seafood on offer. With food to take away (like the famous Lobster Roll), dishes to cook at home and a catering service, the new fishmonger’s selection changes every day depending on what the boats bring in. You’ll also find local produce on the shelves, like smoked salmon from the Fumoir de Chailly-surMontreux smokehouse. The Fish Club Rue du Petit-Chêne 3, Lausanne fishclublausanne.com 16


L AU S A N N E I N M OTI O N | S TREE T INTERVIE W

GIFTS FOR GIVING… AND FOR GETTING Need some inspiration for your Christmas shopping? Four Lausanne locals have shared their top spots for finding the perfect present.

Denise Bamert, 53, French teacher for foreigners

Patrick Hagen, 55, branch manager at Krüger + Cie SA

“I’ve been coming to La Bricotine about once a month for the past five or six years – sometimes it’s for someone else, and sometimes it’s for a gift to me from me. I’ve bought four incredible chairs for my dining room here, but I generally tend to buy just bits and pieces. The jewellery here is my favourite. I also like their makeup. Everything is good quality and eco-friendly, and several of the brands they stock support development projects. That’s really important to me.”

“My best buy at Curiosity was a lamp in the shape of the Matterhorn. I just fell in love with it! I’ve also got a painting, a sculpture and some glasses from there – I’m a big fan of tableware. I’ve been shopping there for 3 years and I’m always amazed by the incredible stuff the owner manages to find. There’s always something new in, and there are all sorts of bits and pieces that make the perfect presents. Ideal for Christmas shopping!”

La Bricotine Boulevard de Grancy 28, Lausanne labricotine.business.site

Curiosity Rue du Grand-Chêne 8, Lausanne curiosity-store.ch

Mélanie Turin, 43, industrial designer “I’ve been coming to De la Suite dans les Idées two or three times a month since it opened 9 years ago. Whether it’s for the kids, or other friends or family, there’s always a gift that needs buying – and it doesn’t matter what age they are, I know I’ll find something for them here. Every time I go, I end up buying something unexpected, like quirky laces for my trainers, a bag, crockery, or maybe some jewellery. The owner stocks things you just don’t find anywhere else. She could really give the boutiques in Paris a run for their money!” De la Suite dans les Idées Rue Madeleine 14, Lausanne delasuitedanslesidees.ch

Carole Clair, 44, doctor “I’ve been shopping at Particules since their first shop opened almost 15 years ago. I love the idea of supporting small local businesses. It’s my three daughters’ favourite shop now, too. We come here around four or five times a year for birthday and Christmas presents, and we always buy a few extra bits, like a pretty pink watering can or toast tongs. They’re not essential, but they bring us a lot of joy.” Particules en Suspension Rue Etraz 2 and Place Grand St-Jean 2, Lausanne - particules.ch

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L AU S A N N E I N M O T I O N | H I S TO RY

Alice Pauli in her gallery in 2017, standing in front of Vide Vibration  IV by French artist Fabienne Verdier.

A TRIBUTE TO ALICE PAULI

A book tracing the Lausanne-based gallery owner’s life and love for art.

Pauli began organising artistic events with her husband, Pierre, and opened her first art gallery on the Avenue de Rumine in 1962. She would go on to set up a second in the Flon neighbourhood in 1990 with the French painter and engraver Pierre Soulages.

“To be picture-passers, messengers between human creation and the audience.” That has been the aim at the legendary Galerie Alice Pauli since 1962, where its twofold objective of celebrating a special kind of artistic heritage and showcasing new Swiss and European talent makes it stand out from the crowd. Now, almost 60 years after the gallery first opened, a book shedding new light on its wealth of exhibitions has been published, telling the story of the adopted Lausanner’s career: Alice Pauli, Une galerie 1962-2020.

A DETAILED MONOGRAPH All in all, Pauli has hosted over 400 exhibitions with renowned creators such as Soulages and Italian sculptor Giuseppe Penone. This retrospective even opens with a photo of Penone’s Luce e Ombra, highlighting Lausanne’s important role in Pauli’s life. The sculpture, a staggering 14.5 metres tall, currently sits in the main lobby of the city’s Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts (MCBA).

A PASSION FOUND LATE IN LIFE Born in 1922 (her age has long remained a mystery), in Moutier, Bern, Alice Pauli had no exposure to art while she was growing up, and it was only during an apprenticeship with a watchmaker that her passion became apparent. As she rose through the ranks, she started travelling abroad. She visited museums, particularly tapestry exhibitions. It all clicked into place.

Galerie Alice Pauli Rue du Port-Franc 9, Lausanne galeriealicepauli.ch

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L AU S A N N E I N M O T I O N | H I S TO RY

THE MEMORIAL TO LAUSANNE’S DONKEY LABOURERS The fountain in Ouchy honours the animals that once carried stone slabs from the lake to the city centre.

“In memory of the Ouchy Academy”. So reads the inscription on the modest fountain of three bronze donkeys dipping their heads for a drink just opposite the CGN (Compagnie Générale de Navigation), landing stage. The sculpture, created by Édouard Marcel Sandoz, dates back to 1937 and pays tribute to the animals that played such an important part in the construction of Lausanne.

BOOK ALICE PAULI, UNE GALERIE 1962-2020, by Pierre Starobinski and Françoise Muller, 264 pages, pub. Genoud, 2019. CHF 39.–

ALICE PAULI UNE GALERIE 1962 - 2020

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In the early 19th century, many teams of donkeys were used to transport stone and building materials from the shores of the lake up to the city. To reach the centre of Lausanne, the animals used to take a steep and stony path, which would later become the Avenue d’Ouchy. The story goes that locals used to mock them as they passed, crying, “Look! Here comes the Ouchy Academy!”

Gifted to the Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts by Alice Pauli, Giuseppe Penone’s magnificent Luce e ombra takes pride of place in the lobby.

When the Lausanne-Ouchy funicular railway line opened in June 1877, the donkeys were no longer needed. But their mark remains on the city, with lazy students still subject to the same jeers today: “You’ll end up at the Ouchy Academy!”

ALICE PAULI UNE GALERIE 1962 - 2020 18.09.19 17:00

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MY I.N.O.X

CREATE YOUR VERY OWN PERSONAL I.N.O.X. WATCH Victorinox Store Lausanne, Rue de Bourg 43 20

FROM THE MAKERS OF THE ORIGINAL SWISS ARMY KNIFEâ„¢ ESTABLISHED 1884


L A U S A N N E I N M O T I O N | AT T H E M A R K E T

POLICE OFFICER TURNED MUSHROOM MAN In each edition, The Lausanner introduces you to a different stall at the Lausanne market. This autumn, we caught up with Fabrice Pavid, 39, who runs Janine Champignons, a mushroom company based in the small Vaud town of Puidoux. The business is named after its founder, and Fabrice’s grandmother, Janine Jaunin. Interview by Trinidad Barleycorn

How long has Janine Champignons had a stall at the market in Lausanne? Fabrice Pavid: My maternal grandmother Janine Jaunin got one there in the late Sixties. We’ve been going to Place de la Riponne all year round ever since, apart from in January when there just aren’t enough mushrooms for it.

What does a typical day look like for you? In the mornings I’m at the warehouse or at markets around the region. Then I head out to start foraging. My grandfather told us where the best spots for mushrooms are in the Jura-Nord Vaudois area, so we don’t have to search miles of ground. Either they’re there, or they aren’t. They’ll only grow in very specific conditions, which is why we still haven’t managed to farm them ourselves yet. That’s the magic of wild mushrooms: they’re untameable.

When did you take over the family business? My brothers, cousins and I were already helping Janine out at the markets when we were teenagers. When she died at the end of 1998, my mum, Francine Pavid, and my aunt, Chantal Buchs, took over. Then I quit my job as a police officer in 2008 and followed in their footsteps. We kept the name – Janine – to keep my grandmother’s legacy alive. We buy and sell cultivated mushrooms, and forage for wild mushrooms every day. We also supply some of the region’s top restaurants. My mum, aunt and great-uncle still do the picking, and my paternal grandmother, who is 85 years old, still comes to market with us. Family is everything to us: we’re always together. Even my kids, who are 2 and 8, already love going mushroom picking!

Are they checked before they go out for sale? Yes, my mum and my aunt are our official inhouse inspectors. They check everything. How much are they? They range from CHF 12/kilo for button mushrooms to CHF 98/kilo for earlyseason morels, which are quite rare.

What types of mushroom do you sell? Our top products are chanterelles and ceps. We pick them ourselves, but we import some too. If all we did was work with wild Swiss produce, our season would be very short. We try to be as eco-friendly as we can by sourcing them as locally as possible: either in France, or Portugal. That being said, all our cultivated mushrooms – blue foot mushrooms, button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, king oyster mushrooms and golden oyster mushrooms – are Swiss. Most of them are grown in Bex and Aigle by Stadler Champidistribution SA.

What kinds of mushroom do you eat most often? Morels and ceps. But not every day! I like to cook them simply, so the mushrooms stay the star of the show. I brown them in butter with a shallot, and some salt and pepper. I might add a bit of cream at the end, but that’s all. At the market Place de la Riponne, Lausanne Wednesdays and Saturdays from 07:00 → 13:00, February to December. 21


L AUSAN N E I N MOTION | IN PIC TURES

ON THE HUNT FOR URBAN ART There’s a new guide in town, listing a selection of artwork across Lausanne city centre and towards the lake. In the city’s gardens, squares and streets, and even on the walls of its buildings, there’s all kinds of artwork to be found. The Art in the City guide has devised two routes, each showcasing several installations. One tours the city, and the other approaches the lake, with a stroll around each taking roughly two hours to complete. In Place de la Louve and the surrounding area, seven free-flowing, lightly foaming fountains represent the passing of time. Further out, on a footbridge overlooking Rue du Flon, the statue of a man with a horse’s head holds a rose and watches the flood of passers-by, whilst a snail hitches a ride on his foot! Not far from there, a fox-lady sits lost in thought, a suitcase by her side, as if she were waiting for something. The horse-man, perhaps? As you head towards the lake, there are a myriad more treasures to admire, with Angel Duarte’s Ouverture au monde sculpture in the Ouchy district a particular highlight, as is Clelia Bettua’s monumental yet delicate Éole weathervane.

Christened Unplugged, this piece by Vincent Kohler represents the Flon district, which pulses to the beat of its nightclubs and music schools.

Zaric’s Homcheval sculpture has had its elbows propped on a guardrail in the Rôtillon district since 2013, a rose clasped in its hand. LAUSANNE’S BEST PICKS

CHECK OUT A SELECTION OF LAUSANNE’S ARTWORK IN THE ART IN THE CITY GUIDE  lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/ art-in-the-city

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L AU S A N N E I N M O T I O N | H I S TO RY

LAUSANNE PALACE: MEMORIES OF FAMOUS FACES

This five-star hotel has hosted a number of prestigious visitors over the years, including the likes of Coco Chanel and Bill Clinton. The majestic columns and red-draped balconies of the Lausanne Palace, a popular meeting place for inhabitants, add a regal presence to the heart of the Vaud capital. With its unmistakeable Belle Epoque style, this Lausanne landmark opened in 1915, and is in fact two buildings merged together, including the Hôtel Beau-Site built among the vineyards back in 1851.

Just like these two guests in the hotel lobby, the Lausanne Palace has a timeless elegance.

From the start, the hotel’s guests included a number of aristocratic families, financial magnates and politicians. It was even used as a venue for peace negotiations. It was right here, among others, that heads of state met to reach the Treaty of Lausanne (1923) in a bid to bring peace to the Middle East and mark the borders of modern-day Turkey.

conference. Then, one hour before his arrival, his bodyguard called to let me know that he would be coming to the Lausanne Palace after all. We had to clear a whole floor in a matter of hours, but he loved it here so much that he nearly missed the start of his conference.”

BILL CLINTON’S FLYING VISIT After World War II, the Lausanne Palace resumed its original purpose, with Coco Chanel calling the hotel home during her “exile” from Paris. It is said that she rarely left her room (except to visit the Beau-Rivage Palace down by the lake) as she was so busy enjoying the view, “the likes of which I’ve never seen anywhere else”. One of the hotel’s suites is named in her memory.

LUXURY AND GOURMET FOOD The hotel belongs to the Sandoz group, which also owns the Beau-Rivage Palace and Château d’Ouchy. It has 140 rooms, including around thirty junior suites and suites, five restaurants, and a spa. In September, following chef Edgard Bovier’s retirement, French chef and 2017 finalist on the French TV series “Top Chef” Franck Pelux took over the gastronomic restaurant, now renamed La Table du Lausanne Palace, along with his partner and winner of the 2019 Michelin Prize in hospitality and service, Sarah Benahmed.

She’s not the only celebrity to have come and admired the view: Jackie Kennedy-Onassis, the Polish pianist Arthur Rubinstein, Princess Grace of Monaco and more recently The Rolling Stones have all been guests of the hotel. Not forgetting the former U.S. President Bill Clinton, who came in May 2012 for a conference at IMD Business School. “The visit had been scheduled for a week,” remembers public relations manager Ulrike Kuechle Oguey, “but it was cancelled the day before the

Lausanne Palace Rue du Grand-Chêne 7-9, Lausanne lausanne-palace.ch

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L AUSA N N E BOUG E | NOUVELLES ADRESSES

“FISH NEVER TAKE HOLIDAYS” 24


L AUSAN N E I N MOTION | IN THE WINGS

Arianna Schiona looks after the fish at Aquatis, the largest freshwater aquarium in Europe. We catch up with her between dives.

– I do three or four dives a day to keep an eye on them, sometimes more. Every morning, I head straight to the engine room to make sure that the filters and pumps are all in good working order and everything is leak-free. Then I go and check the quarantine area, where fish stay for all sorts of reasons: we keep new arrivals there for a while, as well as any that are still too small to swim with the big fish. After that, we go and look in on the exhibition tanks. Once all the checks are finished, we clean the glass and start preparing food.

Interview by Erik Freudenreich

So it’s not that easy a job... No – contrary to what people might think, it’s not just diving and feeding the fish. There’s a lot of preventive work to do, to make sure they stay healthy, and every day there are all sorts of technical and cleaning tasks to complete. You really have to love this job if you’re going to do it, because fish never go on holiday or take the weekend off.

At Aquatis, you’ll find over 10,000 fish from almost 200 different species, as well as all sorts of reptiles including crocodiles and a Komodo dragon. That’s not all, either: a number of furry friends also call the 3,500 sq. m complex home. Visitors of all ages will love the fun displays, and they’re likely to learn something new, too. To keep everything swimming along nicely though, Arianna Schiona says there’s always something to do behind the scenes. She’s been working as an aquaria coordinator here at the AquariumVivarium in the city’s heights since 2017.

What do the animals living at Aquatis eat? The carnivores and herbivores have different diets, and we try to vary them as much as possible. Some types of ray have a meat-based diet, for example, so in addition to dry food they’ll get mussels, shrimp or small octopus, as well as vitamins, spirulina and probiotics. The aim is to give them varied meals that contain all the nutrition they need.

How did you end up specialising in aquariology? Arianna Schiona : I took environmentrelated subjects like botany and biology back when I was a student, as well as chemistry and physics. After I finished my undergraduate degree, I got the chance to go and do an internship at the Livorno Aquarium in Italy. I was already interested in anything to do with fish and the sea, but there I got to discover a whole new fascinating world. That experience was what made me specialise in this field.

What is your favourite species? I love rays – visitors can find ours in our Amazon tanks. They’re fascinating creatures. One of them has started showing us he’s hungry by getting up on a rock and spewing out a jet of water – he can spray it up to three metres! He got me wet when I was standing next to his tank a few days ago, all because he thought it was lunchtime (Laughs).

What does a typical workday look like for you? Much of it is spent checking that everything is as it should be, including in the tanks

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L AUSAN N E I N MOTION | GA ZET TE

LAUSANNE’S CELEBRITY GUESTS From Coco Chanel to David Bowie and writer Georges Simenon, Lausanne has had its fair share of well-known residents – but many famous faces have also left their mark on the city in passing. Here are a few of them.

Celine Dion debuted Where Does My Heart Beat Now during the 1989 Eurovision Song Contest at the Palais de Beaulieu. It would go on to be her first hit in English.

CELINE DION On 6 May 1989, Europe’s eyes were fixed on the Palais de Beaulieu in Lausanne, where the 34th Eurovision Song Contest was taking place. The famous event was being hosted here thanks to Quebec-born singer Celine Dion, aged 21 at the time, who had represented Switzerland the year before – and won – with Ne Partez

Pas Sans Moi when she was still relatively unknown. It was the country’s second victory, after Lys Assia won the first contest ever, held in Lugano all the way back in 1956. Having been crowned the winner the year before, Dion headed back to Vaud in May 1989 for the opening ceremony,

which was watched on TV by 600 million viewers and hosted by former Miss Switzerland Lolita Morena and TV journalist Jacques Deschenaux. She debuted her new song, Where Does My Heart Beat Now that evening, which would go on to launch her into the US charts.

KING JUAN CARLOS OF SPAIN On 13 May 2011, Lausanne was honoured to welcome Juan Carlos I, who was still King of Spain at the time, during his first state visit to Switzerland in 32 years. On the agenda was a trip to the Hermitage Foundation, a meeting with the local Spanish community, and a meal prepared by Michelinstarred chef Guy Ravet. The monarch made no secret of his fondness for Lausanne: he lived here as a child and often visited his exiled grandmother, Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg, at 24 Avenue de l’Elysée until her death in 1969.

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L AUSAN N E I N MOTION | GA ZET TE

ROBERT LASARDO There was a surprise in store at Ethno Tattoo, 31 Rue Centrale on 17 January 2015, when the villain of countless films and TV series decided to sign copies of his autobiography there. Robert LaSardo, who was in Lausanne scouting out locations for “Parlor” – in which he plays a tattoo artist – chose the shop himself as a venue for him to meet with his fans. The movie ended up being filmed in Lithuania, but the American actor, who is currently part of the cast of K-Town The Series, also made the most of his long stay here to do some sightseeing.

KEANU REEVES

ISABELLE HUPPERT AND JACQUES DUTRONC These two French stars came to Lausanne in March 2000, and stayed for a whole seven weeks. They were playing a couple in Claude Chabrol’s 48th film, Merci pour le Chocolat (also known as Nightcap), which was filmed at various locations around the city including the Château d’Ouchy, the quays, City Hall, a house on Chemin du Languedoc, and the old Cine Qua Non cinema. The house the onscreen couple shared in the film was none other than David Bowie’s former home: the Château du Signal, up in the heights of the city in Sauvabelin. 27

The Canadian actor could often be spotted in Lausanne between 2004 and 2007 when he came to be closer to his sister, Kim, who was being treated for leukaemia at Lausanne University Hospital. Reeves used to stay at the Beau-Rivage Palace and spend time at the Lausanne Palace, and was even looking to get an apartment here at one point. He would wander around the city without his bodyguard, and chatted with passers-by in Ouchy and at a city-centre florist. Kim recovered and now lives in Rome, where the star often travels to see her.


L AUSA N N E BOUG E | NOUVELLES ADRESSES

LAUSANNE OPERA CELEBRATES 150TH ANNIVERSARY Ever since the Lausanne Opera was renovated in 2012, the 22-metre-high stage tower that adjoins the historic building – a glittering jewel in lush green surroundings – really does take centre stage. The luxury of it all is befitting of the institution, which will celebrate its 150th anniversary in 2021. venue’s visibility abroad. But it was Renée Auphan, who was the director here from 1983 to 1995, who turned it into a real opera house.”

It’s not just the surroundings that are top-quality, either – the productions staged there have often led to it shining on the international stage. Proof of this came in 2008, with a triumphant tour of Carmen, under current director Eric Vigié, in Japan: the number-one market in the world for lyrical art.

Under her guidance, opera featured on the calendar all season long, and in-house productions were staged with the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra and Sinfonietta. “Then in 2001, her successor Dominique Meyer – who is now director of La Scala Opera – signed Lausanne up to the European Broadcasting Union’s Euroradio network, putting the company firmly on the map of top opera houses.”

Over the years, the opera house has also excelled at discovering fresh new talent: “We regularly hire young singers from abroad who explode onto the international scene two or three years later,” Vigié tells us happily. However, for over a century, opera played a relatively small part in the programme here, which instead was based largely on theatrical productions: “Before being renamed the Opera in 1987, the building was actually known as the Municipal Theatre,” explains Jean-Pierre Pastori, a historian and author of Opéra de Lausanne, une aventure théâtrale. In the Fifties, the creation of the Italian Opera Festival and the Lausanne International Festival had already increased the

Gala concerts to celebrate the 150th anniversary will take place on 26 and 28 March 2021, hosted by Rossy de Palma. Find out what’s on this season at opera-lausanne.ch Opéra de Lausanne Avenue du Théâtre 12, Lausanne

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L AUSAN N E I N MOTION | GA ZET TE

FREE ART, FRAMED

Breaking with convention, challenging the rules, and questioning the status quo – all in the name of creativity. That is the essence of Art Brut. So is it even possible to fit it into a framework – either literally by carving out a space for it, or figuratively by setting limits? That’s the burning question explored in the new exhibition at the Collection de l’Art Brut, L’Art Brut s’encadre, which will be on display from 11 December until 25 April 2021. Collection de l’Art Brut Avenue des Bergières 11, Lausanne

AN OFFICIAL LAUSANNE BEER The city of Lausanne will soon be enjoying its very own, 100% local beer. Four breweries (the Brasserie du Château, Brasserie de l’Improbable, Brasserie du Lance-Pierre and Dogzilla) are in the running to make it, and the lucky winner will be selected early next year by three independent panels. The ’Bière de Lausanne’ – the brainchild of Levatura SA, who sourced the brewer’s yeast from Sauvabelin – will be available to sample by spring.

RENAUD CAPUÇON TO CONDUCT LAUSANNE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

French violinist Renaud Capuçon will be taking over as Artistic Director of the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra in September 2021. The founder of the Aix-en-Provence Easter Festival is no stranger to Switzerland: he masterminded the creation of Lausanne Soloists – an ensemble of students from the Lausanne University of Music where he teaches – in 2017, as well as the Les Sommets Musicaux de Gstaad festival. 29

LAUSANNE EXPRESS

The Béjart Ballet Lausanne is the proud owner of a new space at its home on Chemin du Presbytère. It’s called Plan_B, and it gives the company room to share its creative process, shows, and excerpts with 110 audience members. In place of the 45th Athletissima event, which was cancelled due to COVID, a pole-vaulting competition named City Event was held in Flon on 2 September. Swedish competitor Armand Duplantis broke his own outdoor record and the meet record with a jump of 6m07. In the women’s event, his fellow Swede Angelica Bengtsson won with a height of 4m72, whilst Swiss competitor Angelica Moser came 3rd with the bar set at 4m64. After their 4-0 victory against FC Stade Lausanne Ouchy on 30  July, FC LausanneSport ended the Swiss football season at the top of the Challenge League, and were promoted to the Super League. The unusual Villa Cosandey, on Chemin Beau-Site, built on stilts back in 1955 by the architect Jacques Felber for the first president of EPFL, Maurice Cosandey, has been listed as a historical monument alongside the likes of the Lausanne Cathedral and the Fontaine de la Justice in Place de la Palud.


L A U S A N N E I N M O T I O N | E X PAT

AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNALIST IN THE OLYMPIC CAPITAL

Coralie Febvre has moved to Lausanne as a sports correspondent for international news agency Agence France Presse. She gives us her first impressions. Interview by Carole Extermann

High up on Lausanne station’s main building, “Lausanne Capital Olympique” is emblazoned in glowing letters beneath the famous Olympic rings. According to a study published in 2013, the title – which was bestowed upon the city in 1994 – is a point of pride for 70% of the Swiss population. And well-deserved it is too: international sport has become a cornerstone of the Vaud capital,

where it has created no less than 2,150 jobs.

In fact, Lausanne is home to the most headquarters of international sports federations and organisations in the world (including the governing bodies for gymnastics, fencing and snooker, as well as the International Committee of Sports for the Deaf), all of which feed off the city’s sporting synergy. In addition to a warm welcome, the city also offers top-quality facilities like the MSI, or Maison du Sport International (the ’Home of International Sport’), which opened its doors in 2006. This building sits next door to the Olympic Museum and the new offices

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of the International Olympic Committee, putting further weight behind the regional capital’s sporting status. Around thirty organisations have their premises located there, as well as businesses working in sports such as Agence France Presse (AFP), where French journalist Coralie Febvre works. What do you do at the MSI? Coralie Febvre : I write articles about international sport, mainly in French, for international media outlets – they can be anything from interviews and profiles to pieces on results, as well as stories from the public domain like the recent FIFA trial. It’s a really interesting area to work in because it’s so wide-ranging : it touches on


L A U S A N N E I N M O T I O N | E X PAT

economic, legal, political and diplomatic issues, too. I love sports, so I find it all fascinating. As a woman, has carving out a spot for yourself in what is a fairly masculine environment been difficult? I haven’t gone unnoticed in stadium press conference rooms, that’s for sure ! But I’ve never met with any resistance – quite the opposite, in fact. In my previous role in Berlin, where I used to cover politics and economics, most of my colleagues were male. So I’m used to it, and it hasn’t been an issue. Why did you choose to come and work in Lausanne? The job mobility at AFP is always time-limited, and after

five years in Lyon and six in Berlin, I had to apply for a new role. I wanted to work as a sports correspondent, and Lausanne stood out as the perfect place for me to do that – but when I started having a look around on Google Earth in the middle of lockdown to get an idea of the area, what actually struck me was how photogenic the place is. What did you expect of Lausanne? I didn’t know much about Switzerland at all, and even less about Lausanne. For me, it brought back memories of the Olympics. I’ve loved the Olympic Games since I was little, and I’m so excited about getting to cover them

HER TOP SPOTS

PA N O R A M A

What has surprised you since arriving in Lausanne? The light here is absolutely extraordinary. One of my hobbies is drawing and painting, and I find the clearness and movement of the sky particularly remarkable. In the mornings, the mountains appear almost translucent – amazing for playing around with watercolours.

LANGUEDOC HILL

“I love it when you come across unexpected views of Lake Geneva. Not many people know about this one. You’d never think that you’d be able to find such a beautiful view and all these vineyards practically in the middle of a city.”

CAR-FREE AREAS

“Cycling around Lausanne is so lovely, once you know the roads well enough to avoid the steepest hills. One of the routes I take is along the Chemin des Plaines, just behind where I work. The surroundings here come as quite a surprise: just behind the head offices of big businesses and major sporting federations, there are all these little allotments to admire.”

HERMITAGE PARK

“One of the special things about Lausanne is that you can choose how high you want to go for views across the city. I recommend the ones from here: the park is home to the Hermitage Foundation, where you’ll find some incredible exhibitions, and yet you still get the feeling you’re completely surrounded by nature, even as you look down and see the Cathedral below.”

Chemin du Languedoc, Lausanne

Chemin des Plaines, Lausanne LOISIRS

Avenue Louis-Vulliemin, Lausanne PA RC

in Tokyo, Beijing, and Paris. When it comes to day-to-day life, I love the mountains and being out on the water, so it’s difficult for me to imagine a better city to live in.

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L AUSAN N E I N MOTION

EXPLORE LAUSANNE THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

Experience the city like a real Lausannois, even if you’re just passing through. Since this summer, the Lausanner community lets you do just that at www.thelausanner.ch Ten residents from diverse backgrounds share their personal insider tips, advice and stories. Who are they? We invite you to meet two of them, Dominik Gehl, 46, and Chloé Laugier, 32.

with its curved roof, a technical marvel, and its immense bay windows overlooking the lake. What is an ideal Saturday like for you? In the morning, I go jogging through the city. That’s how I find new buildings. Then I go back and photograph them. Sometimes with my wife and children, because they’re all into photography. Otherwise, we go on an excursion, a hike or a cultural visit. We go to the Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts, Hermitage Foundation and The Olympic Museum for each new exhibition. And we love to eat at the restaurant at the Hermitage, L’esquisse, or at Eat Me for their amazing Electric Sashimiviche.

Interviews by Trinidad Barleycorn

DOMINIK GEHL, THE ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY BUFF Dominik, tell us about yourself. A dad with two kids, age 10 and 14, a traveller, a photography lover, especially architectural photography, and I work as a database programmer. I’m German, lived in Quebec for 20 years, where my wife is from. Four years ago, we had a dream of living in Europe. And I found a job in Lausanne.

Aula des Cèdres, by architect Jean Tschumi, photographed by Dominik Gehl.

Why did you become a Lausanner? Before, I only did travel photography. The architectural diversity in Lausanne, where old buildings and modern masterpieces, such as the Rolex Learning Center, stand side by side. That’s when I got interested in architectural photography. I wanted to share this new passion.

Do you think you’ll stay in Lausanne? Yes, because we love the lifestyle, the array of cultural activities, the fact that the kids can walk to school, living close to other Swiss and European cities, and the sunsets on the lake. Will we retire here? It’s too early to say. But for now, we’re not looking to leave.

Your first article is entitled “Photographic exploration at nightfall”. Why did you choose that? I’m fascinated with sunsets in Lausanne. They’re always different and explain much of why I fell in love with this city. Some places completely change with the light, like the Galfetti Tower, in Chauderon, or the Aquatis aquarium, which glows with the colours of the sun at the end of the day. The Aula des Cèdres also puts on a magic show at dusk,

Eat Me, Rue Pépinet 3, Lausanne eat-me.ch

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Fondation de l’Hermitage, Route du Signal 2, Lausanne fondation-hermitage.ch


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restaurants and bars have a concept that is beautifully decorated, such as the café/bookshop Coffee Page, on Rue du Midi. And there are lots of shops with genuine character, like KéTaLa. What is an ideal Saturday in Lausanne like for you? It has to begin with breakfast at Atelier des Gourmands, Bread Store, Café des Avenues or Délices du Théâtre! I love children’s literature, so we can spend hours at the children’s library on Avenue d’Echallens or in bookshops. And we love seeing plays for children at the Petit Théâtre. Do you think you’ll still be in Lausanne in 10 years’ time? Absolutely! Or not far, such as in Pully or Lutry. The only thing that we miss here is our family. But they often come to visit, especially my sister, who now shares my passion for Lausanne and our fondue, which we buy from Duttweiler at the market. We can’t get enough.

CHLOÉ LAUGIER, THE BUBBLY FAMILY DESIGNER Chloé, tell us about yourself. I’m a smiley person who loves beautiful things. I’m married and the mother of Salomé, who’s 3, and Achille, who’s 8 months old. I’m a designer and communications officer at an architecture firm. My husband, an interior designer, and I are French. He was tired of living in Paris and wanted to live abroad. We chose Switzerland so that we wouldn’t be too far from our families. We moved 10 years ago, first to Montreux, then to Chardonne and Bulle. We’ve been living in Lausanne for six years and are literally in love with the place.

Le Petit Théâtre, Place de la Cathédrale  12, Lausanne lepetittheatre.ch

What do you like about Lausanne? It’s got the bustle of a city that I love, but without being too big. I couldn’t give my children a more beautiful place to live: a city where you never run out of things to do with all its restaurants, exhibitions and shops, but where you can also relax thanks to the lake, parks and the countryside, which is just nearby. Why did you join the Lausanners? I was extremely flattered to be asked. I saw it as making my integration official. I love Lausanne like crazy, so it’s an honour to share my favourite things about the city. How is Lausanne in line with your love for beautiful things? First in its architecture. For example, one of my favourite neighbourhoods, Georgette-Avenue des Alpes, is where you can find those gorgeous old buildings that remind me of the Haussmanian style in Paris, but with a warmer feel. Plus, most

KéTaLa, a shop on Avenue de Béthusy, offers a wide selection of tableware, lighting fixtures, gift ideas, leather goods and shoes.

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Boutique KéTaLa, Avenue de Béthusy 4, Lausanne ketala.ch


Meeting the sneaker master Philippe Cuendet and his partners were behind a limited-edition Nike Air Max 1 model in 2006.

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I NTE RVI E W

Nike has just named Lausanne designer Philippe Cuendet as their new Concept Director for Jordan. The Lausanner caught up with him to find out more. Interview by Carole Extermann

Philippe Cuendet likes his meetings to take place in Place de la Riponne. The welcoming pop-up terrace at La Grenette makes him feel like he’s in Berlin, one of his favourite cities. The Lausanne-born graphic designer has recently found himself heading much further from home: he has just been named Concept Director for Jordan in Portland, Oregon. Cuendet studied at the Lausanne University of Art and Design (ECAL), and opened his graphic design agency, //DIY, just a year after graduating in 2001, together with his business partners Laurence Jaccottet and Ivan Liechti. The Lausanne team was soon noticed by Nike and, after collaborating with them several times, the brand behind the Swoosh tasked //DIY with designing a limited-edition Nike Air Max 1. In doing so, the firm put their mark on the first pair of sneakers auctioned off at Christie’s in 2006, sold for between 800 and 1,800 francs. With experience in both the practical and technical aspects of the industry, Cuendet considers himself 35

to be somewhat of an all-rounder. In 2013, he founded Armes, a brand for which he designs not only clothing and music, but also candles and even videos. On the dawn of his American adventure, we caught up with the artist for whom design is an all-embracing, multisensory experience. How did your passion for design come about? Philippe Cuendet : I grew up in a family of artists. My grandfather was a graphic designer and my grandmother a photographer. My father was a photographer too, and my mother an interior designer. I soon knew that would be the way for me, too. When I was a student at ECAL, my teachers often encouraged me to specialise in industrial design. For me though, school was actually a chance to experiment with different things. The structure of the training gave me the freedom to do that. So your career began at ECAL? It did, and I’m still very fond of it there now – I’ve actually even been able to host talks there. Like during the “Sneaker Collab” at the Museum of Contemporary Design and Applied Arts (mudac), where I helped to curate and display everything with the Swissneaks team and Marco Costantini, the museum’s curator. I also love the quality of the exhibitions put on in the ELAC modern art gallery there. →


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Soon after you set up your graphic design agency, //DIY, Nike came calling. What got you the job? Laurence Jaccottet, Ivan Liechti and I founded //  DIY in 2001, and launched our +41 clothing line together. That project paved the way for several collaborations with Nike. We designed a booth for them for the Art Basel modern art fair, and also created a bespoke pair of trainers for Roger Federer’s birthday. Then they asked us to come up with a visual for the Air Max 360 launch. These were the first trainers to have an entire midsole made out of an air bubble, so we decided to focus in on that. Our visual showed the sneaker floating on a layer of soap bubbles. Later on, I found

“For me, the appearance of things have to come from a concept, an idea, and not just a trend or aesthetic choice with no real justification behind it”

out it was a designer from Fribourg who designed them: Martin Lotti. It makes me laugh to think that he’s the one in Portland who just hired me.

What will you be doing for the brand over in the States? I’ll be their Concept Director, so I’ll be responsible for Jordan’s brand image. The Americans sum the job up in a single line: “you create the blood of the brand”. You could also say you’re “creating the brand’s identity”. It’s got as much to do with the trainers as it has the clothes that go with them, or even the interior design of outlets and marketing. It’s exactly what I’m interested in: coming up with concepts. For me, the appearance of things have to come from a concept, an idea, and not just a trend or aesthetic choice with no real justification behind it. It is substance that determines style. I’ve worked with the brand on many occasions and it’s a huge company, so I’m really excited to see behind the scenes. A glimpse of the Sneaker Collab exhibition at mudac in late 2019-early 2020. The display was part of the Lausanne en Jeux! programme for the Lausanne 2020 Youth Olympic Games.


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An installation designed for Nike at Art Basel.

Martin Lotti has really made a name for himself over in America now. Do you think there’s just something about Swiss designers? Design-wise, the Swiss are known for the care we take over things, and our attention to detail during every step of the process. This makes the finish on the things we create particularly perfect. I also think we have a real need for excellence, driven perhaps by an inferiority complex. I get the impression that in Switzerland, products usually need to be flawless before they get launched. I also see similarities with Japanese design. Japan is one of my favourite places – I eat at Uchitomi, a Japanese food store and restaurant in the city centre, almost every day: it’s practically become my work canteen. I actually used to dream of going over to work there, and I was lucky enough for that

to become a reality for three months when I worked with Shiseido, a luxury products and cosmetics brand. I created the visual identity for their WASO skincare range there. What advice would you give to young designers? Be a doer, and take time to mull ideas over. That might seem contradictory, but I think it’s important to be proactive in bringing your project to life – it shows you what works, and what would be worth improving. Leave any brainwaves that don’t seem immediately relevant to one side. I’ve often put ideas aside when a project’s got me stumped, and gone back to them later on while working on something else. More than once, I’ve been surprised to discover that two things that seemed completely unrelated have more in common than I thought. Another piece of advice is not to limit yourself. → 37


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For me, design is an all-embracing experience. When I was setting up Armes, I consciously decided not to limit my creations to any one area. For clothing, I also thought it was important to step away from the fashion calendar, and bring out pieces as and when they were ready. One of the highlights of working with Armes for me was helping develop a perfume designed by Parisian nose Barnabé Fillion. A collaboration with Lausanne-based chocolatier Blondel, one of the city’s top brands, also led to the creation of chocolate sneakers. I love finding the points where design and the senses converge.

A collaboration with Lausanne-based chocolatier Blondel led to the creation of chocolate sneakers.

What is the difference between sneakers and trainers? Collectors and fans of this kind of shoe usually call them sneakers, but there’s no real difference. You sometimes hear people talk about the sneaker phenomenon, where they went from streetwear to a luxury item. Sneakers have had a spot on the catwalk and in top fashion brands’ collections for several years now, and these brands are keen to collaborate with sports shoe labels. The lines between streetwear and haute couture have blurred, and the arrival of new artistic directors, such as Kanye West’s right-hand man Virgil Abloh at Louis Vuitton and Matthew Williams at Givenchy, are proof of that.

If you had to choose the most visually inspiring spot in Lausanne, what would it be? I love going to the Rolex Learning Center at EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology). It’s just a treasure trove of good design work. It’s also Japanese. Back when I was starting out, the graphic designer David Rust asked me to work with him on the EPFL annual report, so I got the chance to see the whole site. That was a particularly memorable experience. The aesthetics of all the ultra-technical facilities were quite remarkable. ■

PHILIPPE’S TOP SPOTS LE CAFÉ DES PHILOSOPHES

“The Geneva Bottle Brothers team have taken over this legendary Lausanne address, and it is a success. I think it’s the best restaurant in the city for good bistro food. The menu is always changing, and I especially like their subtle use of technique.”

MARUTCHA

“This little Japanese tearoom is so simple and welcoming. It’s just down from the Lausanne Conservatoire. If you’re a fan of a good matcha, which is a delicious traditional green tea drink, then it’s a must.”

Place Pépinet 1, Lausanne R E S TAU R A N T

Rue de la Grotte 4, Lausanne TEA ROOM

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INOVIL réunit les parkings Riponne, Rôtillon et Valentin.

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LAUSANNE

A CITY OF INNOVATION

The Vaud capital has made a name for itself as a hotbed of creativity, inspiring an abundance of ideas in the tech, social and cultural sectors. We take a look at a few of them. Dossier compiled by Tiago Pires

With a thriving economic structure, cuttingedge technology, an imaginative approach to adding value to its heritage and more, Lausanne has shown itself to be an innovative city in multiple fields. The Vaud capital has proven its creative credentials more than once: one of the very first PCs in the world was made here at EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) back in 1974, and local company Logitech brought the first computer mouse to the market nine years later. Inventiveness does seem to come naturally in Lausanne. Between 2012 and 2019, start-ups in the region – in sectors as diverse as drones, medical data, the environment and fintech – generated a total of over two billion Swiss francs. 40


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Similarly, EPFL and its Innovation Park (see interview on p. 50) have become a hive of talented activity, and the birthplace of next-generation technology. The same can be said of hospitality, with the Hospitality Management School (EHL) having made a name for itself as one of the most rigorous and enterprising in the world (see interview on p. 42). The capacity for innovation shown by IMD Business School and ECAL (Lausanne’s university of art and design) have also gained them international recognition within their respective fields.

comfort, and creative urban design.” It follows, therefore, that the city’s architecture plays a big part in its identity, both with recent developments such as Olympic House (see interview on p. 47) and the value it places on its architectural heritage – including its former bus shelters, or ’aubettes’ (see interview on p.  46). Even something as simple as a museum tour has been given an innovative new look in Lausanne (see interview on p. 44). In this feature, we’ll be talking to some of the city’s major players, like its young entrepreneurs, to see what they think of its creativity and dynamic energy.

“The economy in Lausanne is clearly extremely dynamic,” says Managing Director at Swiss Food & Nutrition Valley, Fathi Derder, “but innovation is also about quality of life, 41


Lausanne: fuelling the future of hospitality

Up in the heights of the city, a new Innovation Village is taking shape. Its director, Winnaretta Zina Singer, tells us more.


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Just a few minutes outside of Lausanne on the edge of the forest, the historic hamlet of Chalet-à-Gobet will soon be home to a brand-new innovation village of startups specialising in food and hospitality. This initiative is the brainchild of the city’s Hospitality Management School (EHL), which is regarded as one of the best in the world. Project director Winnaretta Zina Singer gives us a tour. So what is the “Innovation Village” project? Winnaretta Zina Singer: We want to promote new ventures within the food and hospitality industries. These two industries need to be encouraged to start thinking more innovatively – particularly hospitality, which still has a very traditional way of doing things. We’re hoping for most of our support to come from the world-leading EHL community – made up of 3,400 students and 30,000 alumni – whilst remaining open to collaborations with outside partners. Why do we need to encourage innovation in hospitality? It’s a very particular and traditional industry, where progress takes time. As we’ve seen during the health crisis, operators in this sector are right in the firing line, and finding themselves directly impacted by measures taken in response to COVID-19. As an industry leader, EHL is often asked to come up with solutions. And how might the “Innovation Village” help you do that? We’ll be using the Auberge du Chalet-à-Gobet as a testing ground for a number of innovative projects.

We started working on this back in 2018 with five start-ups from our existing business incubator. Now, we have nearly twenty businesses using the site, such as PrivateDeal, an online rate negotiator for hotels; Mixfit, an online health business that designs personalised nutrition plans with an automatic drinks dispenser; and Beelong, which has developed an indicator for measuring the environmental impact of dishes served in catering outlets. How did you become the head of innovation at EHL? I oversaw strategic partnerships with the large firms working in the EPFL Innovation Park for six years. During that time, the ecosystem I worked in involved a combination of research, start-ups, and big businesses. Also, since I’m an EHL alumna, I seized the opportunity to drive the school – and particularly its upcoming “Innovation Village” – onwards and upwards. Generally speaking, how does Lausanne promote innovation? It’s driven by a combination of three factors. First, there’s particularly strong momentum and support measures in place in Lausanne, and across the canton of Vaud. Young entrepreneurs here can benefit from financial and administrative help that can be crucial in the early days of starting a new business. Next, the ecosystem, and the accessibility of large companies makes it easier for people to share knowledge, and help each other out. Lastly, the academic structure in place provides even more tools to help bring ideas to life. 43

Does Lausanne specialise in any particular areas? Focusing on just one field would be a mistake, particularly since the city is a leader in technology for all kinds of things: sport, the trust economy (relating to areas such as blockchain and cybersecurity - Ed.), food, and even finance. We have everything we need here to create cutting-edge local companies, in what is actually quite a small area.

“We have everything we need here to create cutting-edge local companies, in what is actually quite a small area.” On a personal level, where in Lausanne do you find particularly inspiring? Ignoring EHL for the moment, I think the “Under One Roof” building at EPFL is amazing. It proves that art and digitisation can work together. The Olympic Museum is also a fascinating piece of architecture even now, creating a wonderful harmony between the vast spaces and the sporting knowledge within.


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SHOWCASING LAUSANNE’S CREATIVITY

From culture to work, architecture, research, business and more, Lausanne is a hotbed of innovation everywhere you look. We give a rundown of places to go, and talk to six individuals who are dreaming up the world of tomorrow. ART IN A DIGITAL AGE

CULTURE

With the health crisis taking its toll, museums in Lausanne have gone digital even faster than expected, as can be seen with the brand-new “Quartier des Arts” not far from the station. Finding themselves unable to accommodate visitors in the usual way, the Plateforme 10 museum hub developed all-new solutions for accessing the collections of the Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts (MCBA), the Museum of Contemporary Design and Applied Arts (mudac), and the Musée de l’Élysée photography museum. The LCD (Lumina, Chroma, Data) project offers a way of browsing the pieces at the Musée de l’Élysée and mudac, and goes above and beyond conventional searches using key words, dates and authors by also colour-coding the museums’ collections. Unlike traditional audio guides, the Narrative Focus concept uses eye movements to offer a kind of non-linear narration. Lastly, the Interactive Replicas tactile device lets users get up close and personal with pieces by handling miniature 3D prints. This adjusts on-screen images of the digitised pieces, showing every single angle for detailed views of shape and texture. Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts – Plateforme 10 Place de la Gare 16, Lausanne mcba.ch plateforme10.ch

* The mudac and the Musée de l’Élysée are currently closed as they prepare for their move to Plateforme 10. Their reopening is scheduled for 2022.

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1 Evelina Georgieva Co-founder of Pryv

PRIVACY MANAGEMENT What does Pryv do? We’ve created a software provider that ensures companies comply with legislation on collecting and using personal data, helping them manage customer privacy more effectively. Dealing with consent, data formatting and compliance

is tough, so our software connects to companies’ applications, then processes the data and stores it wherever the client wants. Which of the city’s industries do you think are most innovative? Innovation is everywhere you look in Lausanne: there are smart ticket offices in culture and entertainment venues, digital health centres, housing innovation projects and so much more... If any industry-related innovation existed that we didn’t have set up here in Vaud, I’d be surprised!

Where do you get your inspiration? The entire region inspires me – whether I’m walking through the streets, looking at the lake, or just sitting in a café! I’m particularly fond of The Olympic Museum and the Royal Savoy Hotel – their location and their architecture make them special. The Olympic Museum Quai d’Ouchy 1, Lausanne olympic.org/museum Royal Savoy Hotel Avenue d’Ouchy 40, Lausanne royalsavoy.ch/en

INNOVATION IN CO-WORKING

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With table tennis, bright murals and sometimes even slides, co-working spaces in Lausanne are working smarter not harder, offering fun facilities to get people’s collective creative juices flowing. Lausanne currently has about a dozen of these spots. Favoured by start-ups and freelancers, they are great places for young entrepreneurs to share ideas and drive innovation. From Gotham Lausanne and Impact Hub (also an incubator) to P9 and more, quirky new sources of inspiration are thriving, and underpinning the city’s creative energy. Gotham Lausanne Avenue d’Ouchy 4 et Rue du Port-Franc 22, Lausanne gothamco.com

Impact Hub Lausanne Rue du Jura 11, Lausanne lausanne.impacthub.net P9 Coworking Rue Pichard 9, Lausanne coworking-lausanne-p9.ch 45


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HERITAGE 2 Maxime Droux Co-founder of Talent.com SIMPLIFYING JOB SEEKING What does Talent.com do? We’re basically “Google for jobs”: we bring small ads together on one page, like a vertical search engine for work. It’s the same as what Booking.com does for hotels, and Skyscanner for flights. Our technology means we can automatically identify jobs posted online and add them to our platform. Users then get redirected to the original listing. Why did you set up here in Lausanne? We decided to base our European headquarters here because it’s an incredible talent pool, and an extremely dynamic city. It’s also got quite a central location, not just in Switzerland but in Europe as a whole. The closeness with other companies means the city is bursting with fresh ideas, too.

BUS SHELTERS GIVEN A SECOND LEASE OF LIFE

Another example of Lausanne’s resourcefulness is the quirky way it adds value to heritage. The city’s ’aubettes’, forerunners of the modern bus shelter and built a whole century ago, are testament to this. They fell out of use as urban transport networks developed, but twenty or so of the small roadside structures have now been given a second lease of life. Take the Kiosque Saint-François, for example, which has become a Parisian-style bistro, or its counterpart at the foot of the Parc de Milan hill, Le Montriond, now a champion of local ingredients and the perfect place for a quick snack. City officials have launched calls for tender to keep them alive, and preserve the area’s architectural history in the process.

What are your favourite spots? Étoile Blanche is a great bar for post-work drinks, but my favourite place of all is Lavaux. The amazing heritage there has helped us both impress and retain clients, and we’re proud to be able to promote this area of Vaud. Étoile Blanche Avenue du TribunalFédéral 1, Lausanne etoileblanche.ch

Kiosque Saint-François Place Saint-François 13, Lausanne kiosque-stfrancois.ch Le Montriond Avenue Edouard Dapples 25, Lausanne lemontriond.ch 46


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ARCHITECTURE

A SHOWCASE FOR ARCHITECTS

Lausanne is home to a wide variety of original architecture. The Cathedral, Bel-Air Tower, Rolex Learning Center and the Vaudoise Assurances headquarters – designed by Swiss architect Jean Tschumi – are all testament to the city’s creative talent. And let’s not forget Olympic House, which opened in 2019 and has won two Architizer A+ awards for its innovative approach to sustainability and the Olympic ring-inspired central stairway: this light oak skylight is the backbone of the entire building. Rolex Learning Center Campus l’EPFL, Lausanne epfl.ch Olympic House Route de Vidy 9, Lausanne olympic.org

3 Ketevani Zaridze Co-founder of Logmind COMPUTER MONITORING What does Logmind do? It develops artificial intelligence to help IT teams and developers analyse computer logs. Our tool lets users monitor IT systems in real time, and warns them if it detects any unusual activity.

How has the city helped your business grow? We’ve got funding from local authorities through a number of different support programmes, and they’ve also helped us contact companies that might want to work with us, or offer us advice. This accessibility offers real added value for budding young businesses like Logmind, and you don’t often find it anywhere else. Why did you choose to base yourselves in Renens, on the outskirts of Lausanne? There are lots of other start-ups based at the MassChallenge incubator, and it’s got real energy. We like catching up with the other teams and 47

colleagues from other companies in the corridors, or heading to the local bar, La Nébuleuse, to chat, share tips and knowledge, and have some fun. MassChallenge Switzerland Chemin du Closel 5, 1020 Renens masschallenge.org La Nébuleuse Chemin du Closel 5, 1020 Renens lanebuleuse.ch


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EPFL: KNOWLEDGE FACTORY

RESEARCH

Many businesses in this part of Switzerland spent their early days in and around EPFL and its Innovation Park. It became a federal school in 1969, with the new structure offering increased initiatives for scientific research and economy-transferable applications, as well as opening the doors to life sciences. Patent applications skyrocketed between 1995 and 2004 (256) and 2005 to 2018 (756). Over in the Innovation Park, meanwhile, there are over 2,300 entrepreneurs working in over 150 start-ups and the Research and Development departments of 25 major companies. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Route Cantonale, Lausanne epfl.ch/en

4 Patrick Thévoz Co-founder of Flyability DRONE DESIGN What does Flyability do? Since 2014, we’ve been designing drones for inspecting and exploring inside spaces that would be dangerous for humans.

What does Lausanne mean to you? We started out life at EPFL, so we owe everything to this part of the world. We’ve been able to grow our business here, recruit our first employees, and, most importantly, benefit from the quality of life on offer in Lausanne – that has definitely been a factor in our growth. Lausanne also offers a lot of cutting-edge expertise on drones, so staying here was an obvious choice. What are your favourite spots in Lausanne? Every start-up has its own story, and ours began in Place du Nord, just behind the Château Saint-Maire. Our local bar was 48

La Bossette, which we used as our informal HQ. There was the Flon neighbourhood too, where the diversity really widened our outlook. We also love taking clients to the Auberge de l’Abbaye de Montheron to introduce them to local produce. La Bossette Place du Nord 4, Lausanne bossette.ch Auberge de l’Abbaye de Montheron Route de l’Abbaye 2, 1053 Montheron montheron.ch


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BUSINESS 5 Olga Dubey Co-founder of AgroSustain FOOD PRESERVATION What does AgroSustain do? With the solution we developed at the EPFL Innovation Park, we are increasing the shelf life of fruit and vegetables using a biological compound that prevents the growth of pathogenic fungi. With a spray, we can prolong the life of treated foodstuffs from anywhere between four to seven days. In terms of innovation, what are the benefits of being in Lausanne? The city and the people that live here are incredibly open-minded, and always enthusiastic about new ideas. What’s more, the universities here have close ties to experts in every field, which makes it much easier to build a wide network and approach potential clients.

PACKAGING-FREE STORES ON THE UP

In light of growing environmental awareness, Lausanne locals are now looking to change the way they shop. As a result, the city has seen an increase in eco-friendly initiatives, and especially in stores selling packaging-free food. Saveurs en Vrac is one such place not far from Place de la Riponne. It’s gone a step further, too, selling household products like organic deodorant and soaps. Promoting the local economy and protecting the environment are top of the list at La Brouette, meanwhile, with grains, fruit juice, oil, and fresh fruit and veg on offer, as well as meat sourced directly from farmers and a cheese counter. Saveurs en vrac Rue Pré-du-Marché 6, Lausanne saveursenvrac.ch

Where do you get your inspiration? The Innovation Park still has a special place in my heart, because that’s where I started AgroSustain. Château d’Ouchy still amazes me, and the incredible views from there show just how beautiful Lausanne really is. The Sous-Gare district too, with its friendly little shops and Plateforme 10 not far away.

La Brouette Avenue d’Echallens 79, Lausanne labrouette.ch

Hotel Château d’Ouchy Place du Port, Lausanne chateaudouchy.ch 49


6 Déborah Heintze Co-founder of Lunaphore, a start-up specialising in the detection of cancerous cells.

A CITY OF YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS As a Swiss innovation hub, Lausanne has been the birthplace of many a start-up, particularly in the health industry. They are the successors of Logitech, the Lausanne company that developed the first computer mouse. Every year, the EPFL campus (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) sees a mass of young entrepreneurs launch themselves into the world of business. Around

twenty start-ups are founded there each year by former students. While in the city centre, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and the city’s other universities also play their part in coaxing out new talent. Business in the robotics and cybersecurity industries is particularly booming, as is the case for medical technology (giving the region its Silicon Valleyinspired moniker, “Health Valley”). Lausanne and 50

the surrounding area have been a hub for innovation in Switzerland for several years, ahead of Zurich and its famous ETH (École polytechnique fédérale de Zurich): during the last decade, the venture capital invested in Vaud start-ups has been double that received by young, Zurich-based businesses. This enthusiasm has given motivated entrepreneurs like Déborah Heintze


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the chance to turn their scientific skill into commercial success. Her medical diagnostics company, Lunaphore, is one of the top innovative businesses around today. Since it was founded in 2014, it has received numerous awards, and tens of millions of francs from investors. According to Heintze, “Lausanne has an excellent combination of growth drivers: it’s a small region, so there’s less competition here than in some other major cities abroad, and there are plenty of opportunities for visibility too.”

What role did Lausanne play in Lunaphore being founded? Déborah Heintze: We received a huge amount of support right from the start. That’s the same for every young business here. Lausanne and the canton of Vaud have actually set up a lot of systems for bringing technology out of the labs and onto the market. There are also plenty of competitions that increase the visibility of budding young businesses.

We were quite naive, which meant we ended up developing both the business and the technology very fast. Weekends and holidays just passed us by. We learnt a lot as we went though, particularly about the business side of things, and we’ve thankfully got a bit more balance back in our lives now.

How did you become an entrepreneur? Neither I nor my business partners had any experience of starting a company.

DÉBORAH’S TOP SPOTS PARKS

“I find the parks to be hugely inspirational – like the Mon-Repos Park, with its lush greenery and stunning views. The Signal and the Hermitage Park offer some breathtaking views of the area, too. I’ve also got a soft spot for the shores of Lake Geneva – Vidy especially, with its sports grounds and friendly feel.”

LE MERAKI

“This is a cute new place just above La Riponne. It’s friendly, and the Mediterranean and Greek-inspired food is delicious. There’s even a little nook upstairs where customers can play games.”

BRASSERIE DE MONBENON

“The combination of the view, the building, and the location is amazing, and the dining room is nice and big. There’s a gorgeous terrace to enjoy in the summer – the menu, which is always full of new and exciting things, tastes even nicer out there.”

N AT U R E Place de la Riponne 10, Lausanne R E S TAU R A N T

Allée Ernest-Ansermet 3, Lausanne R E S TAU R A N T

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EXPLORING LAUSANNE CITY CENTRE

At the turn of the 20th century, impressive new buildings started to spring up in the Vaud capital. At the centre of these radical changes was the Place Saint-François.

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CHAMBORD TO LAUSANNE The building that set the tone for the square’s new look sits at number 15. “To begin with, Lausanne’s residents were horrified by the construction of the Hôtel des Postes  ,  which was built over the former Franciscan convent surrounding the medieval church back in 1896,” says architectural historian Catherine Schmutz Nicod. “Its size was one issue, and the architect was another: Switzerland had brought in young Eugène Jost to design it, at the time completely unknown.” Jost drew his inspiration from French Renaissance and Renaissance Revival buildings, with the new post office featuring lion head sculptures and immense chimney stacks to hide the old telegraph antennae. A student at the Beaux-Arts de Paris, it was

By Blandine Guignier

Lausanne locals come to Place Saint-François to do their shopping, change buses or buy a coffee to go, but few of them take the time to actually look around them. Yet this square was where Lausanne made its first forays into the modern world. It saw the arrival of the city’s trams at the end of the 19th century, the construction of an immense post and telegraph office, and even the grand opening of one of Lausanne’s first department stores. 52


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clear he’d paid a visit to either the Château de Chambord or the French capital’s Hôtel de Ville.

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Dating back to 1903, the Banque Cantonale Vaudoise next door also has a decidedly olde-worlde style, as do both the other banks in the square. The Société de Banque Suisse (at number 16) opened its doors back in 1923, and the Union de Banques Suisses (at number 1) in 1924, with both inspired by neoclassical style. “With their great big classical columns, they exude the sense of power and gravitas so typical of these places,” says Nicod.

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If you’re in the area, a quick detour to the Maison Mercier   is a must. The reinforced concrete structure towers eleven floors above the city. Built in 1900 by businessman and captain of industry Jean-Jacques Mercier, his office there afforded him a view of all his warehouses along the Flon down below. The tower’s predominantly neogothicand Renaissance-inspired style is clear from the outside, but it is only when you step into the lobby (located at 8 Rue du Grand-Chêne) that the true luxury of the place becomes apparent. From the faux marble décor and the concierge lodge, to the floor and the stairway, everything is period.

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“C’EST BONNARD” Heading back to Place Saint-François and onto Rue de Bourg is a chance to admire the Bonnard stores at number 10, now Bongénie . The main frontage dates back to 1914 and features elements of the German “vertikalismus” style also seen at Lausanne train station. The other façade, at the start of Rue de Bourg, was built in 1904, and is more Art Nouveau in design. The interlaced flowers and former owners’ whiplash-lettered initials are reminiscent of the splendour of the big Parisian stores described by Emile Zola in his novel Au bonheur des dames ("The Ladies' Paradise"). Everything the middle-class ladies of Lausanne once shopped here for is still listed for all b to read today, including silk, fabrics, lingerie and more. c The store and its remarkable clientele are undoubtedly at Ru e the root of the popular Vaud de Bourg expression “c’est bonnard” (meaning “it’s great”).   → z A quick visit to the coffee

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characterised Lausanne buildings of the era. On the Rue de Bourg side you’ll find elements of Art Nouveau and Baroque Revival architecture, like chubby-cheeked cherubs and garlands of foliage. Towards the Avenue Benjamin-Constant, however, the style is “verticalist”, with references to trade, science and industry. What hits you here is the extent to which this central European city was a crossroads, both for the continent and for a diverse range of architectural trends.

shop on the second floor is a chance to see the building’s original wrought-iron stairway, as well as its stunning view of the square. The Kiosque Saint-François in the middle of the square is a great place for a tea break, too. With its fabulous canopy and period clock, you can’t miss it.

THE UNSMILING SIDE We turn back on ourselves to Rue Saint-François, then take a right onto Rue du Rôtillon. “The Place Saint-François was a place of power in Lausanne, and Rue de Bourg its chic high street and shopping quarter, but the tiny Rôtillon Quarter was the unsmiling side of the city,” says Nicod, who grew up in Lausanne. “Located below those opulent neighbourhoods and with little natural light, the quarter had to deal with all sorts of pollution caused by the factories in the Flon district. The housing there was pretty squalid.” Up until late in the 20th century, the area had a reputation among the well-to-do families of Lausanne as being a bad neighbourhood. Having since had a facelift, and with bright façades scattered through the streets, it’s now home to several cafés, stores, and even a small museum, The Shoe Museum (10 Rue du Rotillon). Run by archaeologists, it traces the history of shoes through the centuries.

As you head back up Rue de Bourg and see the stores lining either side, including the historic Blondel chocolate shop dating from 1891, it’s hard to believe the bustling high street has ever been anything but. In fact, it was once home to the city’s aristocratic families. “These 17th- and 18th-century homes often had a main section overlooking the road, and a second set of buildings behind,” Nicod says. “These two spaces were linked by an inner courtyard. You can still recognise these homes today from their carved stone fronts, cornices, and simple railings.” This typical Protestant austerity can also be seen in the COS store (8 Rue de Bourg), which retained the period inner courtyard and elements of the old living quarters during extensive renovation work back in 2016.

If you career even further down the steep slope to Rue Centrale, you’ll come across the P’tit Central café (at number 9) and Byblos (2 Rue Cheneau-de-Bourg), a restaurant serving tapas, pizzas and burgers in surroundings straight out of the 1950s. Before heading back to our starting point via the Portes Saint-François shopping centre (which now occupies the former Union de Banques Suisses building), there’s still time for a quick glance at Lausanne’s very first department store. Formerly called L’Innovation, and known today as Globus, it was built in 1912 and extended in 1938. The part built in 1912, at 5 Rue du Pont, includes elements of “verticalism”, and was designed by the same architect that created the Galeries Saint-François. ■

THE CROSSROADS OF EUROPE Further along Rue de Bourg, the Galeries Saint-François (1909) are also worth a look. Testament to Lausanne’s commercial development, the arcade still has many of its original features, such as store doors, windows, stairwells and lights. The original Art Nouveau style, more Germanic than Parisian, is still palpable, with the décor much more influenced by geometric shapes than natural forms. The entrances at either end of the passage are a fabulous example of the eclecticism that 54


La Côte Vully Chablais Lavaux Calamin Dézaley Bonvillars Côtes de l’Orbe

Réservez maintenant votre dégustation: mescavesouvertes.ch

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REPERTOIRE

THE ADDRESSES IN THIS EDITION

BARS, CAFES & RESTAURANTS 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Auberge de l’Abbaye de Montheron Route de l’Abbaye 2 1053 Montheron

Blackbird Downtown Diner Route de Bel-Air 1 1003 Lausanne Bleu Lézard Rue Enning 10 1003 Lausanne

Brasserie de Montbenon Allée Ernest-Ansermet 3 1003 Lausanne

Eat Me Restaurant & Cocktail Lounge Rue Pépinet 3 1003 Lausanne Étoile Blanche Avenue du Tribunal-Fédéral 1 1005 Lausanne

Isshin Sushi Place Chauderon 30 1003 Lausanne

Kiosque Saint-François Place Saint-François 13 1003 Lausanne La Bossette Place du Nord 4 1005 Lausanne

10 La Nébuleuse Chemin du Closel 5 1020 Renens 11

12 13 14 15 16 17

Le Café des Philosophes Place Pépinet 1 1003 Lausanne Le Meraki Place de la Riponne 10 1005 Lausanne

Le Montelly Chemin de Montelly 1 1007 Lausanne

Le Montriond Avenue Edouard Dapples 25 1006 Lausanne

Le Vestibule Rue Cité-Devant 4 1005 Lausanne Marutcha Rue de la Grotte 4 1003 Lausanne

Sardine Rue de la Barre 5 1003 Lausanne

SHOPPING

18 Atelier Sonja T. Rue du Simplon 9 1006 Lausanne 19 Curiosity Rue du Grand-Chêne 8 1003 Lausanne 20 De la Suite dans les Idées Rue Madeleine 14 1003 Lausanne Freitag Store 21 Rue Neuve 6 1003 Lausanne 22 KéTaLa Avenue de Béthusy 4 1005 Lausanne 23 La Bricotine Boulevard de Grancy 28 1006 Lausanne 24 La Brouette Avenue d’Echallens 79 1004 Lausanne Particules en Suspension 25 Rue Etraz 2 1003 Lausanne

26 27

28 29

Particules en Suspension Place Grand-Saint-Jean 2 1003 Lausanne Qwstion Store Rue du Tunnel 7 1005 Lausanne

Saveurs en vrac Rue Pré-du-Marché 6 1004 Lausanne

The Fish Club Rue du Petit-Chêne 3 1003 Lausanne

HOTELS

30 Château d’Ouchy Place du Port 1006 Lausanne Lausanne Palace 31 Rue du Grand-Chêne 7-9 1002 Lausanne 32 Royal Savoy Avenue d’Ouchy 40 1006 Lausanne

MUSEUMS/GALLERY 33

34 35 36 37 38

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Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Route Cantonale 1015 Lausanne 50 MassChallenge Switzerland Chemin du Closel 5 1020 Renens 49

MONUMENTS, PARKS, WALKS 51

52 53

Fondation de l’Hermitage Route du Signal 2 1018 Lausanne

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Le Musée Olympique Quai d’Ouchy 1 1006 Lausanne

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Collection de l’Art Brut Avenue des Bergières 11 1004 Lausanne

Galerie Alice Pauli Rue du Port-Franc 9 1003 Lausanne

Musée cantonal des BeauxArts – Plateforme 10 Place de la Gare 16 1003 Lausanne

Musée Historique Lausanne Place de la Cathédrale 4 1005 Lausanne

PERFORMING ARTS

Le Petit Théâtre Place de la Cathédrale 12 1005 Lausanne 44 Opéra de Lausanne Avenue du Théâtre 12 1002 Lausanne 43

COWORKING

Gotham Lausanne Rue du Port-Franc 22 1003 Lausanne Gotham Lausanne Avenue d’Ouchy 4 1006 Lausanne

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Impact Hub Lausanne Rue du Jura 11 1004 Lausanne P9 Coworking Rue Pichard 9 1003 Lausanne

INCUBATOR/SCHOOL

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40 Aula des Cèdres Avenue de Cour 33 1007 Lausanne 41 Maison Olympique Route de Vidy 9 1007 Lausanne 42 Rolex Learning Center Campus EPFL 1015 Lausanne

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Aquatis Aquarium-Vivarium Route de Berne 144 1010 Lausanne

ARCHITECTURE

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Chemin des Plaines Chemin des Plaines 1007 Lausanne

Colline du Languedoc Chemin du Languedoc 1007 Lausanne Église Saint-François Place Saint-François 1003 Lausanne

Monument aux ânes bâtisseurs Quai Jean-Pascal Delamuraz 1006 Lausanne Parc de la Légende Avenue Jules-Gonin 1003 Lausanne

Parc de l’Hermitage Avenue Louis-Vuilliemin 1018 Lausanne Parc Mon-Repos Avenue de Mon-Repos 1005 Lausanne

Signal de Sauvabelin Sentier du Signal 1018 Lausanne

Vidy 1007 Lausanne

TRANSPORTATION Gare Lausanne-CFF Place de la Gare 1003 Lausanne

Transports publics lausannois (tl) m1 Metro m2 Metro

DISTRICTS TOWN CENTRE/RÔTILLON/FLON CITÉ – MON-REPOS TRAIN STATION – OUCHY SAUVABELIN PULLY


UNMISSABLE PLACES

The essentials on www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/highlights

Live music


U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

DISTRICTS

CITÉ/MON-REPOS It is around the Cité hill, sculpted by the Flon and Louve rivers, that the medieval town grew. Its cobble-stoned pedestrian streets as well as its monuments bear witness to this. Then, as soon as you cross the Bessières Bridge, the scenery changes completely. The Caroline district possesses a shopping mall, many bars, restaurants and boutiques. A bit further to the east, the Mon-Repos Park offers a green and tranquil haven, interrupted from time to time by the twittering of birds in its aviary.

PLACES YOU MUST VISIT

LAUSANNE CATHEDRAL

The Cathedral, considered one of the most beautiful Gothic buildings in Switzerland, was consecrated in 1275. Don’t miss the rose window, the painted portal, the 13th century choir stalls, the ancient and modern stained glass windows and the great organs. The bravest will admire the panoramic view from the belfry (entrance fee) after climbing the 224 stairs. Open tours of the Cathedral and free guided tours during the summer.

MUSÉE HISTORIQUE LAUSANNE

Within the walls of the Old Bishop’s Palace, this Lausanne historical museum speaks of the town’s rich past and features a famous model that offers an exceptional view of the 17th century Cité. Temporary exhibitions, inspired by the research conducted on its collections, explore the thousand years of this heritage. A novel approach to the town’s history: smart multimedia!

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mudac This space is devoted to contemporary design and applied arts. Visits here are an intense and surprising journey through time and space, with antique Egyptian and Asian art sitting side by side with the latest creations from modern designers. Mudac is currently closed as it prepares for its move to the Plateforme 10 arts district. Until it reopens in June 2022, it will be bringing visitors a series of “Rendez-Vous” to enjoy. You can find the calendar of events at mudac.ch.


U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

ESCALIERS DU MARCHÉ A direct but abrupt route between the Cathedral and the town centre, this wooden stairway first mentioned during the 13th century exists in its present form since the beginning of the 18th century:

MON-REPOS PARK

Open to the public, it’s one of the most popular parks for Lausanne inhabitants of all ages, with its huge lawns, aviaries of exotic birds, playgrounds and ephemeral sculptures.

roofed and winding, with a very steep cobbled street running alongside. An integral part of Lausanne’s popular iconography, it is lined on the west with a picturesque row of boutiques and cafés.

Stroll down its various alleys to catch a glimpse of an orangery as well as a neoGothic tower overlooking a cave and a waterfall.

PLACES YOU MUST VISIT

DISTRICT

TOWN CENTRE This is where the city’s energy is most animated both by day and night. From ancient buildings to trendy new districts, tread the cobblestones and broad avenues to make the most of shopping amongst major brands and local designers. It’s also the axis of nightlife with concert halls and an opera, plus bars and clubs that will keep you awake until the early hours of the morning.

PLACE SAINT-FRANÇOIS & CHURCH

Lausanne’s residents like to meet up in this central square dominated by a mediaeval church that has become a hub for music and dialogue with contemporary art in all its guises. The square welcomes every Wednesday and Saturday morning the famous market stands of Lausanne. 60


U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

In the intertwining lanes of one of Lausanne’s oldest neighbourhoods that was recently renovated, works of art, a Titeuf fresco, small, original shops and bohemian cafés now attract the trendy crowds. One of the trendy new neighbourhoods in Lausanne, the Rôtillon feels like a corner of Italy in the heart of the town.

PLACE DE LA PALUD

A polychrome statue, symbolising justice, stands imposingly on the Renaissance fountain in the centre of this pedestrian square, where the Town Hall is also located. Opposite, tourists and children wait, every hour on the hour from 9 am to 7 pm, for the ballet of animated figures to the sound of the carillon.

PALAIS DE RUMINE

FLON DISTRICT

MONTBENON ESPLANADE

COLLECTION DE L’ART BRUT

RÔTILLON NEIGHBOURHOOD

It’s the town’s architectural success: this district of former warehouses that begins at the Place de l’Europe was rehabilitated as a living area with a wide array of restaurants, bars, clubs, boutiques, cinemas and exhibition spaces. A must is to enjoy a drink on one of the rooftop terraces.

Making the most of one of the town’s most beautiful openings on Lake Geneva and the Alps, you can lounge on the lawns in front of the District Court or enjoy a meal on a terrace. If it’s raining, you might like to visit the Swiss Film Archive in the Casino de Montbenon.

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Erected at the end of the 19th century on the Place de la Riponne, this Italianatestyle building houses a host of treasures in its various museums of science, such as the largest naturalised great white shark.

The town created this museum, unique in the world, in 1976 in exchange for the legacy of 5,000 works of outsider art belonging to artist Jean Dubuffet. Located opposite the Beaulieu Palace, this institution today owns over 70,000 works, 700 of which are displayed permanently, and exports its exhibitions all over the world.


ROMANTIC GETAWAY!

SIT BACK AND ENJOY A ROMANTIC BREAK WITH YOUR CHOSEN ONE

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U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

DISTRICTS

TRAIN STATION/OUCHY The neighbourhoods located between the Ouchy quays, by the lakeside, and the Lausanne train station are perfect for a revitalising stroll. They unveil several green oases, elegant Belle Époque dwellings bordering broad avenues and two internationally renowned museums. Since 2008, the rubber-tired m2 metro has replaced the “Ficelle” (the “String”), which was, in 1877, one of the first metropolitan railways in the world.

PLACES YOU MUST VISIT

CRÊT DE MONTRIOND & PLACE DE MILAN

DENANTOU PARK

Initially privately held, until opened to the public in 1928, this park was laid out during the 19th century in the English fashion by a banker. Allow your children to caper about in the wild meadows surrounded by copses, flower bed displays and statues, or to play with the water from the pond. Since 2007, a Thai pavilion with a golden roof adorns this green area; it was given to the town by His Majesty the late King of Thailand in gratitude for the years he spent in Lausanne between 1933 and 1951.

Inaugurated at the end of the 19th century, this square’s vast lawns, football fields, playgrounds, fountain and shady alley draw in families in all seasons. Reach the Crêt de Montriond by a winding path to discover a 360° panorama of the Lavaux vineyards, Lake Geneva and the Alps. A little corner of paradise, the Botanical Gardens boast a stunning array of almost 4,000 alpine, medicinal, tropical and carnivorous plants (free entry).

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PERMANENT COLLECTION The collection Free entrance

TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS Maurice Denis. Amour Matières en lumière. Sculptures from Rodin to Jeff Koons 12.2 - 16.5.2021 Jean Otth. Les espaces de projection Jardin d’Hiver # 1 : Comment peut-on être (du village d’à côté) persan (martien) ? 18.6 - 12.9.2021 ESPACE PROJET Unique and multiple. Recent works of the BCV art collection 12.3 - 23.5.2021 Sandrine Pelletier : 8th Buchet Prize 18.6 - 5.9.2021 Free entrance

ESPACE FOCUS René Baumeister. California Dreaming 12.2 - 9.5.2021 Christian Boltanski. Reliques et monuments 1985-1996 4.6 - 5.9.2021 Free entrance

mcba.ch 64


U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

ÉLYSÉE MUSEUM & GARDENS

OLYMPIC MUSEUM & PARK

This thirty-year-old museum is one of the top specialist photography museums around. It enjoys an international reputation thanks to the quality and originality of it Lausanne-based exhibitions, which get sent all over the world, not to mention the dozen comprehensive collections and archives on subjects including Charlie Chaplin, Nicolas Bouvier and Ella Maillart. The Musée de l’Elysée is currently closed as it prepares for its move to the Plateforme 10 arts district. While we wait for it to reopen, you can stay up to date with all the museum’s news at elysee.letemps.ch.

Unique in the world, the Olympic Museum forms Lausanne’s main cultural attraction. Each of its three levels is dedicated to a particular aspect of modern Olympism, largely featuring new interactive communication media. You may need several visits to explore everything. In any case, a pause at the Tom Café is welcome, with its terrace on the uppermost floor that offers a splendid view of Lake Geneva and the Alps. In the park, admire the collection of sculptures and test your speed on a proper running track. Strolling through the landscaped terraces, you’ll reach the monument on the shores of the lake.

CRUISES ON A BELLE ÉPOQUE BOAT

CANTONAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS (MUSEE CANTONAL DES BEAUX-ARTS – MCBA)

It’s impossible to leave Lausanne without having sailed on Lake Geneva aboard one of the Compagnie Générale de Navigation’s vessels. In addition to crossing the lake to the French shore, its Belle Époque fleet – the largest in the world – takes you on board for a gourmet cruise.

It is one of the oldest Swiss museums dedicated exclusively to art. Since 2019, MCBA has been located just a stone’s throw from the station, on the PLATFORM 10 site. A selection of 200 works from the collection of more than 10,000 works can be admired over two floors, in this building considered architecturally exceptional. It is designed to provide its visitors with new original spaces: a restaurant, a bookstore boutique, an auditorium and a library.

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Lakeview Hôtel

LE RIVAGE

At the heart of passion!

For your moments of business or pleasure, let yourself be surprised. Only 10 minutes from the center of Lausanne Photos & Emotions

Look at our Instagram profile @lavauxtravelhotel

We are certified « Fait Maison » and « Vaud-Œnotourisme »

Think Smart, Reserve Direct: www.rivagelutry.ch 1095 Lutry-Lavaux UNESCO | 0041 21 796 72 72 66


U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

DISTRICTS

VIDY/UNIVERSITIES The western part of Lausanne is dominated by the university campus that includes the University and the Federal Institute of Technology. A location close to the lakeside loved by the 26,000 students who can take part in a broad array of nautical sports.

PLACES YOU MUST VISIT

BELLERIVE SWIMMING POOL & MINI GOLF This outdoor swimming pool is equipped with large pools, up to 10-metre diving boards and fun paddling pools for children. Would you rather chill out? Lounge on the large lawns or on the (supervised) beach with direct access to the lake. Restaurants and refreshment stalls on the spot. Next to the pool, the Bellerive crazy golf is an invitation to playful relaxation ideal for families or friends.

PARC LOUIS-BOURGET & PLAGE DE VIDY Between shoreline forest and meadows, the Louis-Bourget Park is a nature reserve that hosts a bird sanctuary, a pond bordered with fireflies, a fitness trail and a large playground. It’s also an ideal destination for hot summer evenings: come and use the barbecues and grills set on the lawns before enjoying a game of football or relaxing on Vidy beach! You’ll also meet many walkers strolling on the pleasant path that runs along the lakeside.

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U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

OLYMPIC HOUSE With its shape inspired by the movement of an athlete, Olympic House is one of the most sustainable buildings in the world. Designed to reflect the IOC’s overarching mission to make the world a better place through sport, it brings together the entire staff of the IOC – that is 500 employees – under one roof. (Closed to the public.)

ROMAN MUSEUM & GALLO-ROMAN RUINS

The Lausanne-Vidy Roman Museum offers a presentation of the Gallo-Roman Lousonna (Lausanne), as well as various temporary exhibitions. In a bucolic setting that blends greenery, a body of water and ruins, don’t miss the walk around the remains of the Lousonna vicus (village) dating from 15 BC, one of the largest in Switzerland. This archaeological park was redesigned in 2019.

ESPACE DES INVENTIONS Are your children budding scientists? The Invention Space is a place for them! Housed in a strange building with a concave roof dating from the National Exhibition, its vocation is to arouse young people’s interest in science and technique thanks to interactive and entertaining exhibitions that are regularly renewed.

UNIVERSITY CAMPUS & ROLEX LEARNING CENTER

The university campus includes the Lausanne Federal Institute of Technology and Lausanne University, the first buildings of which were erected in the 1970s. Since then, the site has rapidly expanded and integrated buildings, the architecture of which is admired beyond Swiss borders. It’s the case of the Rolex Learning Center’s gentle undulations, created by the Japanese architecture firm SANAA, that serves as a place of learning, meeting and exchanges, and includes a library housing more than 500,000 volumes.

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U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

DISTRICTS

SAUVABELIN/CHALET-À-GOBET North of the town, vast expanses of forest, representing 400/₀ of the municipal surface area, offer many opportunities for walks and outdoor sports activities. At an altitude of 873 m, Le Chalet-à-Gobet is the culminating point of the Lausanne urban area, 500 m above Lake Geneva. Sauvabelin’s bucolic setting, with its lake, park and tower, will delight you.

PLACES YOU MUST VISIT

AQUATIS

This innovative architectural complex, easily reached by metro, integrates the largest freshwater aquarium in Europe and the Lausanne Vivarium. Follow the discovery

trail that includes 50 tanks displaying about 20 aquatic ecosystems from across the five continents.

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(Re)discover the ancient castle ...

... recharge with a tasty treat at chillon. cafebyron.ch © Photo : Stephan Engler / LenaKa

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Ofisa S.A . Siège social de Lausanne Chemin des Charmettes 7 • Case postale 7063 CH-1002 Lausanne • Tél. +41 21 341 81 11 Fax +41 21 311 13 51 • Email. fidu@ofisa.ch Succursales à Genève et Sion

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Ofisa S.A. Lausanne Ch. des Charmettes 7 Case postale 7063 CH-1002 Lausanne Tél. +41 21 341 81 11 Fax +41 21 311 13 51

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U N M I S SA B LE PL AC E S

HERMITAGE COUNTRY ESTATE & FOUNDATION

CHALET-À-GOBET & MAUVERNAY SPORTS CENTRE

This village includes a hotel school, a ski slope, an equestrian centre as well as a golf course. Its sports centre offers running and mountainbike trails (changing showers available).

In the centre of the Hermitage Estate sits an imposing mansion built around 1850 and which today houses a famous museum of paintings. In the English-style gardens populated with majestic trees, benches invite you to contemplate a unique panorama of the old town, the lake and the mountains.

SAUVABELIN PARK & LAKE

SAUVABELIN TOWER

Created in 1888 in the heart of an oak forest, the Sauvabelin lake rapidly became a soughtafter strolling area for Lausanne people. You can rent a small boat during the summer or walk along its shores. The surrounding park is very popular with children, who discover unusual animals such as woolly pigs, grey cows, booted goats and mirror sheep.

This tower built of solid, local wood in a spirit of environmental respect is one of the many destinations for a hike above the town since 2003. Enjoy the 360° view from a height of 35 metres after climbing the 151 steps of its double spiral staircase. Free access.

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U S E F U L I N FO R M AT I O N

(RE)DISCOVER THE ADDRESSES OF

LAUSANNE TOURISME

TOURIST INFORMATION Three Tourist Office information and welcome centres are at your service at the CFF train station, the Cathedral and by the lakeside at the m2 metro “OuchyOlympique” station. You will find a host of services at your disposal there – public transport passes, maps, recommended routes and excursions from Lausanne, various brochures, lists of hotels, help and emergency services, etc. – as well as culture and leisure news. PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICES LAUSANNE TRAIN STATION Pl. de la Gare 9 CFF train station main hall September to May: every day: 9 am → 6 pm June to August: every day: 9 am → 7 pm

LAUSANNE CONVENTION BUREAU Administration Av. de Rhodanie 2 Case postale 975 CH-1001 Lausanne +41 21 613 73 73 www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/ info@lausanne-tourisme.ch

METRO M2 STATION “OUCHY-OLYMPIQUE” September to May: every day: 9 am → 6 pm June to August: every day: 9 am → 7 pm LAUSANNE CATHEDRAL April to September: Monday to Saturday: 9.30 am → 12.30 pm / 1.30 pm → 6.30 pm; Sunday: 1 pm → 5.30 pm October to March: Monday to Saturday: 9.30 am → 12.30 pm / 1.30 pm → 5 pm; Sunday: 2 pm → 5 pm www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/ tourism-offices

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TOWN OF LAUSANNE – INFO CITÉ Information point for the town of Lausanne, the “info cité” office’s mission is to inform, orient and guide Lausanne people and passing guests. Place de la Palud 2 1002 Lausanne Monday to Friday: 8 am → 5 pm +41 21 315 25 55 www.lausanne.ch/infocite infocite@lausanne.ch


U S E F U L I N FO R M AT I O N

GENERAL INFORMATION LAUSANNE IN SHORT Lausanne benefits from a privileged location in the heart of Europe. It is easily reached by train, car or boat. If you fly in, you can choose between Geneva International Airport (40 minutes away) and Zurich International Airport (2 hours 30 minutes away).

LAUSANNE, CAPITAL OF THE CANTON OF VAUD AND FOURTHLARGEST TOWN IN SWITZERLAND Lausanne sparkles with energy, by its capacity to innovate and the diversity its tourism offers. It hosts the headquarters of several multinational companies, renowned universities and research centres, dozens of international sports federations and many cultural institutions.

POPULATION Town of Lausanne Urban area Vaud Canton

146,000 inhabitants 400,000 inhabitants 806,000 inhabitants

LANGUAGE Official language

French

GEOGRAPHY Latitude Longitude

46°32’ N 06°40’ E

ALTITUDE 372 m by the lakeside 495 m in the town centre 852 m north of the town

LOCAL TIME ZONE GMT+1 (summer time +1 = March to October)

CLIMATE Average annual temperature 14°C Average summer temperature 24°C Due to the city’s wide altitude range (500 m), the climate changes according to the district as a 1°C temperature disparity is recorded for every 100 m. For example, in winter it is quite common for the upper part of the city to be snowbound for many weeks.

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“La meilleure façon de résister à la tentation, c’est d’y céder” O. Wilde

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PRACTICAL LAUSANNE

Here are useful contact details to keep at hand and make your stay easier. You have access to all the necessary information at our three information offices spread across the town.

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS

CURRENCY Swiss franc (CHF) 1 euro = 1.05 Swiss Franc (indicative rate)

112 International number for emergency calls 117 Police (crimes and theft, emergencies only) 118 Fire brigade

EXCHANGE OFFICE Lausanne train station Monday to Friday: 8 am → 6.30 pm; Saturday: 9 am → 6 pm; Sunday: 10 am → 6 pm

140 Roadside assistance service 144 Ambulance

USEFUL PHONE NUMBERS

POST OFFICES

+41 21 314 11 11 CHUV (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois)

IN THE TOWN CENTRE Pl. Saint-François 15 +41 848 888 888 Monday to Friday: 7.30 am → 6.30 pm; Saturday: 8 am → 11.30 am

+41 848 133 133 Centre for on-call doctors 1811 Directory enquiry services

AT THE TRAIN STATION Pl. de la Gare 1/Av. de la Gare 43 bis +41 848 888 888 Monday to Friday: 8 am → 6.30 pm; Saturday: 8am → 4 pm; Sunday: 4 pm → 7 pm www.poste.ch/en

162 Swiss weather forecast 163 Road traffic information

LOST PROPERTY OFFICE LAUSANNE POLICE STATION Pl. de la Riponne 10 +41 21 315 33 85 Information by telephone only in the morning Monday to Friday (except wednesday): 1 pm → 4 pm www.lausanne.ch/en

ULTRA-CONNECTED LAUSANNE The town is constantly developing hotspots providing free internet access. Currently, 10 WiFi hubs are available in the town’s main squares: Flon, Palud, Riponne, Gare, Saint-François, Montbenon, Navigation, Port, Musée Historique, Blécherette Airport.

USEFUL MOBILE APPLICATIONS Find here the applications that are useful for your stay in Lausanne. Calendar, hotels, self-service bike rentals, public transport and much more! MORE INFORMATION AT: www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/mobile-apps

MORE INFORMATION AT: www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/good-to-know

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LAUSANNE, AT THE HEART OF THE LAKE GENEVA REGION Situated in the heart of Europe, the Olympic Capital is also the ideal departure point for exploring the charming lake, mountains, countryside, vineyards and forests of the surrounding area.

MOVE IN LAUSANNE You can reach Lausanne across land, air or even water. This model town for sustainable development possesses a network of public transport that makes it ideal to set off from and explore.

A CARD THAT OFFERS YOU TRANSPORT AND DISCOUNTS!

www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/ltc

Don’t forget to ask the establishment providing your lodging for your personal Lausanne Transport Card (LTC)! You can use public transport (bus, train, metro) as you please during your whole stay (maximum 15 days) in Lausanne and its surroundings. But that’s not all! Thanks to our partners, you benefit from exceptional discounts and advantages from many museums, shops and other leisure activity providers.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT IN THE LAUSANNE REGION The “tl_live” application lets you purchase your ticket, look up itineraries and real-time schedules (in French only). FLON CUSTOMER CENTRE Pl. de l’Europe 5b +41 21 621 01 11 Monday to Friday: 7 am → 7 pm; Saturday: 9 am → 6 pm www.t-l.ch/en

MORE INFORMATION AT: www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/ lausanne-transport-card-and-more

“GRAND LAUSANNE” MOBILIS DAY PASS Full fare: CHF 9.30; reduced fare: CHF 6.90. This pass entitles you to whole-day-use of all the public transport companies belonging to the Vaud tariff community present in the Grand Lausanne perimeter (i.e. Lausanne and its immediate surroundings). Available from ticket dispensers or points of sale. For more information, see: www.mobilis-vaud.ch

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USEFUL INFORMATION CHEMINS DE FER FÉDÉRAUX (CFF) Consulting the timetables for national or international connections from or to Lausanne, preparing your trip and buying tickets to travel in Switzerland becomes child’s play with “Mobile CFF” application. CFF information – Passenger service: Pl. de la Gare 5a +41 848 44 66 88 (within Switzerland) +41 51 220 11 11 (calling from abroad) www.sbb.ch/en

GENEVA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Second in Switzerland after Zurich, Geneva Airport is a 45-minute train ride from Lausanne (five trains every hour). It benefits from a network serving 142 direct destinations, 23 of which are intercontinental. Rte. de l’Aéroport 21, Grand-Saconnex +41 900 57 15 00 (information about departures and arrivals) www.gva.ch/en

COMPAGNIE GÉNÉRALE DE NAVIGATION (CGN) From the simple lake crossing to go to France to a gourmet cruise on a Belle Époque paddle-wheel vessel, every experience on the Lake Geneva waters becomes an unforgettable memory. Av. de Rhodanie 17 +41 900 929 929 www.cgn.ch/en

LA BLÉCHERETTE LAUSANNE AIRPORT This aeronautical facility – that celebrated its hundredth year in 2016 – is located nearby Lausanne’s town centre. First flights and air-taxis. Av. du Grey 117 +41 21 646 15 51 www.lausanne-airport.ch

LEB RAILWAY Would you like to spend a day in the countryside? Embark on the Lausanne – Echallens – Bercher train that departs from the Flon. Bikes and pushchairs are welcome on board. Gare Lausanne-Chauderon +41 21 621 01 11 www.leb.ch

PUBLIBIKE – SELF-SERVICE BIKE RENTALS You will find all the information on the offers and the networks to Lausanne-Morges on the PubliBike site. +41 848 09 08 07 www.publibike.ch/en/publibike

www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/getting-around-in-lausanne

FIND ACCOMMODATION IN LAUSANNE Would you like to stay at a centrally located, low-priced establishment after enjoying Lausanne’s nightlife, or do you dream of spending the night in a 5-star hotel overlooking the lake? Do you need a comfortable room near the EPFL congress centre? How about a hotel with seminar rooms and high-tech facilities? Or do you imagine a romantic weekend in a boutique hotel? With more than 7,000 beds from 1- to 5-star superior spread over 60 or so establishments, the city of Lausanne allows all its guests to be put up in the best conditions, whether they are here on business or for leisure. MORE INFORMATION AT: www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/hotels (for hotel bookings)

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Lausanne Insider Tips

Pauline, the culinary explorer Sabine, the cultural connoisseur

Dominik, the arch-photo fan

Find out more about the Lausanners 78 and their insider tips on www.thelausanner.ch


Discover the city differently

LAUSANNE CITY PASS

To discover or rediscover the unmissable sights of Lausanne, book your City Pass which enables you to visit four of the city’s unique attractions over a two day period at a concessionary price.

Valable 2 jours

The City Pass gives you entry to the Olympic Museum, the MCBA (Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts) and the Aquatis AquariumVivarium and also allows you to climb to the top of the Cathedral belfry to enjoy a panoramic view over Lausanne. www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/lausanne-city-pass

TASTE MY SWISS CITY LAUSANNE

A journey of culinary discovery. The starter, the main course and the dessert are served in 3 different locations in the heart of the city, all recommended by local experts. Choose your culinary experience and indulge your senses! www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/activities

A TRAVEL JOURNAL FOR YOUR FAMILY VISIT TO LAUSANNE

To entertain your children while you visit the town, Lausanne Tourisme offers them a Travel Journal packed with fun and creative activities, together with colour pencils, a pencil sharpener, an eraser and a tube of glue, all in a very light pouch. Come and pick up a Travel Journal for each of your children aged five to 10 in one of our tourist information offices. www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/en/travel-journal

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SPECIAL PACKAGES AND GOOD IDEAS AT:

Information offices: Ouchy, Train station, Cathedral +41 21 613 73 73 info@lausanne-tourisme.ch

www.lausanne-tourisme.ch/activities

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ACTIVITIES FOR THOSE ON TIGHT BUDGETS A leisure offer accessible to all

TO ENSURE THAT ITS RANGE OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES REMAINS ACCESSIBLE TO ALL, THE CITY OF LAUSANNE PUTS ON VARIOUS ACTIVITIES FOR THOSE ON A MODEST BUDGET. HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES OF OUTINGS TO BE ENJOYED AS A FAMILY OR AMONG FRIENDS:

BETWEEN CHF 0 AND CHF 8.50 • AquaSplash with 5 giant flumes, Renens (between CHF 4 and CHF 8)

FREE OF CHARGE • Vidy Bowl for skaters

• Concert at Saint-François church every Saturday at 5 pm

• Climbing the Cathedral tower (from CHF 1 to CHF 5)

• Hundreds of multi-coloured birds at the Mon-Repos Park aviary

• Vidy bowling alley (between CHF 4.50 and CHF 7.50 per person)

• Free entry to most museums on the first Saturday of the month

• Flon bowling alley (between CHF 5 and CHF 8.50 per person)

• Midday concert every Wednesday from October to March at the Haute École de Musique de Lausanne

• Bellerive minigolf (free up to age 4, CHF 6 until age 16, then CHF 8) • Vidy miniature train (CHF 3 per journey)

• Mountain biking at Chalet-à-Gobet • Climbing the Sauvabelin Tower

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THE HOUSE OF SWISS WATCHES

WATCHES JEWELLERY GEMS Lausanne 1, Rue de Bourg | bucherer.com