Jaynotes | Vol. 47 No. 1 | Fall/Winter 2020

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THE MAGAZINE OF JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL OF NEW ORLEANS

VOL. 47, NO. 1 | FALL / WINTER 2020

Fr. John Brown, S.J., 31st President | Michael Coney ’63 | Two Pandemics, Two Stories | Sharon S. Hewlett†


THE PROFILE OF A JESUIT GRADUATE JAYNOTES | FALL / WINTER 2020 JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL President Fr. John Brown, S.J. Director of Institutional Advancement Thomas Bagwill II Director of Alumni Michael Prados ’83 Director of Communications Christian Bautista ’06 Executive Development / PAG & POA Coordinator Krista Roeling Creative Coordinator Brittany Donnes Communications & Alumni Assistant Myles Kuss ’16 Volunteer & Events Coordinator Maura Owers Assistant to the President for Mission Jeremy Reuther ’01 Major Gifts Coordinator Jamie Roy STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

Christian Bautista Brittany Donnes Myles Kuss

ON THE COVER: IN PERSONA CHRISTI Jesuit president Fr. John Brown, S.J., consecrates the Blessed Host at Jesuit’s annual Mass of the Holy Spirit. To ensure that this tradition took place in spite of COVID restrictions, five Jesuit priests celebrated 16 Masses over two days.

Every year at Investiture, Jesuit students carry forward banners emblazoned with five characteristics from the Profile of a Jesuit Graduate at the Time of Graduation. The final banner carries the school’s motto: Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam.


FEATURES 2 Fr. John Brown, S.J. Appointed as Jesuit’s 31st President

6 Principal's Corner

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Q+A with Peter Kernion ’90

8 Supreme Commitment to Faith & Family

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Michael Coney ’63

16 Alumnus of the Year John F. Ryan III ’70

26 COVID-19 Timeline A Year Like No Other

32 Thanksgiving Gift Delivered to Jesuit 34 Annus Mirabilis

Two Pandemics, Two Stories of Jesuit High

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47 Jesuit Remembers Sharon S. Hewlett†

54 Report of the President Fiscal Year 2019-2020

IN THE NEWS 30 Thanksgiving Drive

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40 Celebration Gala & Auction

44 Where Y’at 46 In Memoriam 50 Bib List Fall/Winter 2020 Vol. 47, No. 1 Jaynotes is published twice a year by the Jesuit High School Office of Institutional Advancement. HOW TO REACH US Jesuit High School 4133 Banks Street New Orleans, LA 70119 Email: jesuitnews@jesuitnola.org

Where Y’at articles and photographs may be submitted online at jesuitnola.org/where-yat.

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JOHN BROW N , S . J .

Appointed as Jesuit’s 31st President BY JEREMY REUTHER ’ 01

T

here is a nursery freshness to stories that begin with the warmly familiar “Once upon a time….” This year all stories begin rather with the hauntingly familiar words “In these uncertain times….” And if your capacity for rhetorical shock has not yet exceeded its limits during these months, let’s begin this story just one step further: In these apocalyptic times, Jesuit’s board of directors has announced that Fr. John Brown, S.J., would serve as the school’s 31st president. The announcement in September made permanent the post Fr. Brown had been fulfilling on an interim basis since January 2020. Fr. Brown begins in a time that is apocalyptic not in the sense that the year’s uncertain events might lead to the complete and final destruction of the world (as tempted as we might be to feel that way). Etymologically, apocalyptic (apo- ‘un-’ + kaluptien ‘to cover’) times are ones in which there is an uncovering, a revelation. The name of the Book of Revelation itself, called The Apocalypse of St. John in times gone by, shades the word apocalypse with the supernatural: the things uncovered are divine realities, whose presence amid the here and now shines forth to the glory of God. And like all apocalyptic literature, the signs of the times in this story point strangely to events that occurred at the beginning. In February of 1849, just over a year after the Jesuits’ school was founded in the last month of 1847, classes opened at what was then called the “Société Catholicque d’éducation religieuse et littéraire.”1 February 1 was a delayed start date due to the spread of yellow fever, an epidemic’s whose death toll that year in New Orleans reached 769. It takes little

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ABOUT THE PRESIDENT imagination to see the parallels to 2020, whose COVID-19 death toll in Orleans Parish was just north of 650. This commonality strangely builds confidence: we have seen this before. Jesuit was literally founded handling a pandemic. The heroism of those early Jesuits tending to yellow plague victims is indeed apocalypse, God’s grace shining forth in the midst of suffering; the countless sacrifices endured by faculty and staff today to bring out the best in students manifests that same apocalyptic grandeur. 1 But acting heroically amid the delayed starts and special precautions is not the only way that this year has shared obstacles with the one in which classes began on Baronne Street. In September of 1848, the school’s founder, Fr. Jean Baptiste Maisonnabe, S.J., himself fell

Conception, whose artistic detail is unrivaled for its theological and symbolic richness, Fr. Cambiaso also built his celestial observatory behind the lofty dome on the roof of the church. This image of Fr. Cambiaso peering out into the heavens is itself apocalyptic. It reveals the profound paradigm of Jesuit education: “from this lofty outlook, he would peer at the suns, planets, and world systems whirling in the shores of infinity around him, and reverence the Incomprehensible Being that had traced their mighty orbits.” He could see divine reality shine forth in the wonders of the sky. Perhaps Professor Michael Cupero had this heavenward gaze of Fr. Cambiaso in mind writing the Alma Mater’s cry of wonder, “skyward stream thy blue and white.” Known also for his proficiency in

Like Cambiaso, Fr. Brown draws from a broad skillset as an artist and theologian – among many other talents – to advance Jesuit’s mission. He recently taught the school’s first graphic design class, was a staple for years in the theology department and campus ministry, and even filled in briefly in Jesuit’s Spanish department. But if you asked him, he might say that his best assignment had him on the sidelines coaching football way back as a scholastic at Jesuit High School in Tampa. In each of these endeavors, varied though they may be, Fr. Brown has given from what he has to the good of souls, laboring in each role ad majorem Dei gloriam, “for the greater glory of God.” In other words, apocalypse, translated into the language of Ignatian spirituality, is “finding God in all things.” This means finding

“A PANDEMIC SHINES A LIGHT ON THINGS YOU ARE NOT DOING WELL, BUT IT ALSO GIVES ALL THE TALENT WE HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHINE. EVERYONE HERE KNOWS THAT WE ARE ABOUT

MORE THAN JUST PILING UP KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS. OUR FOCUS REMAINS GROUNDING ALL

KNOWLEDGE IN WISDOM AND FORMING THESE YOUNG MEN IN FREEDOM. - fr. john brown, s.j. victim to yellow fever. He was a man “prudent and endowed with unusual administrative ability.” He had visited “several Jesuit institutions in the North to familiarize himself with American customs and American methods of college administration.” But, as capable and prepared as he was, he did not live to see the opening of the school whose charter he had secured. The school of the Jesuits’ mission in New Orleans had to “pivot”— this year’s most familiar concept. And pivot it did to architect and astronomer Fr. John Cambiaso, S.J. Credited with designing the Jesuit Church of the Immaculate

the natural sciences, mathematics, literature, philosophy, and theology, Fr. Cambiaso gave to the school from what he had. He was an exemplar of the integrated approach to knowledge in which all the academic disciplines fit together to the glory of God. In this way, he loved the school as St. Ignatius himself describes in the Spiritual Exercises as a mutual sharing of goods: “the lover gives and shares with the beloved what he possesses, or something of that which he has or is able to give; and vice versa, the beloved shares with the lover.”2 Just as in 1849, Jesuit today is carried forward by new leadership.

God, and helping students find God, on the field, in art class, through Spanish. And instead of picturing Fr. Brown in a roof-top observatory at the Jesuit Church, he can better be situated contemplating the incomprehensible God looking at the stars shining above a school bus camp at the Brown family rice and crawfish farm in Eunice, LA. Jesuit’s old “highway” bus avoided the scrap yard by being towed to the farm and outfitted by Fr. Brown with bare living necessities, including an altar to say Mass. This ideal setting for a Jesuit’s annual eight-day retreat might fittingly be called “apocalypse in a rice patch.”

1 Catholic Society for the Diffusion of Religious and Literary Education.” Most people know the original school on Baronne Street by the name “The College of the Immaculate Conception,” but it wasn’t until after the solemn definition of the dogma in 1854 that the church and college were officially dedicated to the Blessed Mother under that title. 2 This is the second note at the beginning the meditation called Contemplatio ad Amorem (the Contemplation to Attain the Love of God), a meditation in the Fourth Week toward the end of the retreat. JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

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ABOUT THE PRESIDENT Looking back on his home life in Eunice, Fr. Brown reflected, “Coming from a big family, I learned a lot about cooperation, both with family members and with nature. Growing up on a farm, I learned how to depend on God’s providence. When I look to relax now, I usually find myself building something with my hands. What you might call bluecollar pursuits have informed my understanding of God and the world. One of the reasons why it is so easy for me to find God in the poor is that I have been around humble people my whole life.” This is one reason why Fr. Brown has found a home at Jesuit New Orleans, the school whose tuition is lowest among traditional Jesuit high schools in the country. Zeal for keeping Jesuit affordable made him an easy fit in his previous assignment as Jesuit’s major gift officer, rallying support for Jesuit’s Minds & Hearts Enlightened campaign and annual giving efforts. That job is proving useful to Fr. Brown now as president, since he was able to become close with thousands of people committed to Jesuit’s mission. Even his early school life was marked with strange signs of things to come. “I did not graduate from Jesuit,” Fr. Brown admits, “but what it means to be a Blue Jay was a profound part of my education.” Fr. Brown’s grammar school, St. Edmund’s in Eunice, LA, had adopted the Blue Jay mascot, so he remembers being encouraged by the image of the fighting Jayson in his early years. Local legend has it that the Marionite Sisters of the Holy Cross who ran the school inherited athletic uniforms (and thus the mascot) from the Jesuits in New Orleans. The educational charism of the nuns, combined with the fighting Blue Jay, sowed the seeds that would eventually flower in his life as Jesuit priest and educator. But it was his later high school experience that taught him even more profoundly about what it means to be a Blue Jay. Working a summer 4 | JAYNOTES | FALL / WINTER 2020

job at the Louisiana Lions Camp for children with special needs, he met many Jesuit New Orleans Blue Jays who were doing their junior service project at the camp in Leesville, LA. “I didn’t want to like those guys,” Fr. Brown remembers. Since it was basically the first time for

Brown to leave the family farm, the last thing he wanted was a group of athletic, confident guys from the big city making it harder for him to impress the female counselors. “But I found that I couldn’t help but like them,” Brown added. “I couldn’t help but respect them. They worked hard, they worked smart, and they were genuinely friendly. My 17-year-old self would never have been able to put it into words, but I knew there was something special going on at Jesuit New Orleans. There was just something special going on there.” Later when Fr. Brown began thinking about becoming a priest, the name of the Jesuits had such a powerful draw because of that intangible mystique shining through the lives of those young Blue Jays he had befriended in Leesville. And as providence would have it, preserving Jesuit’s reputation for excellence, bringing out the best of what God has given to all students as men of faith and men for others, is exactly the task God has given to Fr. Brown now as

Jesuit’s president. He characterizes his task as follows: “All of the things that we do at Jesuit have to be seen as part of a greater whole of forming young men to be able to handle what they will encounter afterwards. This means that each student program is not seen as an end in itself but builds a foundation that is timeless and unwavering in its ability to serve God in all things. Every uniform rule, every book assigned, every math tournament we participate in, every song we sing at Mass needs to be taken seriously as formative of these young men for the glory of God.” Fr. Brown hopes that even prospective students adopt some form of this vision when thinking about their choice of high school: “Many sixth and seventh graders make the mistake of asking themselves, ‘What high school will be the most fun for the next few years of my life?’ The real question ought to be, ‘What kind of man do I want to be?’ Only then can they pick the school that is going to get them there, and I’m convinced that prospective students will know that Jesuit is the best place to make that happen once they get to know us.” At the beginning of his presidency, much of Fr. Brown’s attention is certainly focused on COVID-19, making the decisions necessary to keep students on campus. But for him, the future is brighter than ever. The capital campaign projects are setting up the school up for its 100-year anniversary at Carrollton and Banks. His artist’s eye for aesthetics will give attention to the details that make the campus really shine, garnishing all the hard work that has gone into construction. Fr. Brown is also a known quantity among faculty and staff, a group of which he could not be prouder. “A pandemic shines a light on things you are not doing well, but it also gives all the talent we have an opportunity to shine. Everyone here knows that


MISSION IN THE CURRICULUM we are about more than just piling up knowledge and skills. Our focus remains grounding all knowledge in wisdom and forming these young men in freedom.” One would struggle in the teaching and learning landscape today to find a greater expression of

educational apocalypse, of indeed finding God in all things. For a school whose Catholic identity is unquestionable, whose commitment to service and community remains undimmed, one can’t help but see that the mission

Truth, Beauty,

& Goodness

in the Classroom Assistant to the President for Mission, Jeremy Reuther ’01, presents a Powerpoint presentation to the Jesuit faculty.

S

ince 2016, Jesuit High School has been engaged in a process of inspecting and refining its curriculum. This process began alongside Jesuit’s re-accreditation by AdvancedEd (now Cognia). Three years ago, the school started its adoption of the Understanding by Design framework, a tool designed to align lesson planning with high levels goals such as those set forth in the school’s mission statement. For Jesuit schools, an emphasis on curricular alignment and on setting aspirational goals is nothing new. Since the days of Ignatius himself, Ignatian schools have endeavored to combine rhetorical and technical excellence with ethical and spiritual virtue. In the Ratio Studiorium, a 1599 foundational document that laid out a plan for Jesuit schools, sixteenthcentury Jesuits emphasized the importance of this intersection. Jesuit New Orleans alumnus of the Class of 1970 and Institute of Jesuit Sources professor Fr. Claude Pavur, S.J., conceives of it this way:

“In the Jesuit philosophy of education, learning and spirituality were united. Mastering curricular content was itself insufficient, even less than half of what the Society was aiming for in its schools. It insisted on the concept of joining letters and morals… in which perfection of learning, maturity of character, the enlightenment of the spirit, and religious commitment were combined.” For Jesuit High School today, this centuries-old pursuit manifests as a relentless focus on mission. For the 2020-21 academic year, Jesuit has concentrated on ensuring the school’s mission is evidenced throughout its curriculum. To this end, the faculty has committed time to considering the transcendentals: truth, beauty, and goodness. Teachers have asked themselves: Does this math lesson inspire a student to recognize the geometric beauty in a particularly elegant equation? Can exploring the rise of Polish labor unions and the fall of the USSR explicate general principals of good and evil? Is there some abiding

established on Baronne Street, carried out even through the obstacles presented in those early years, is in good hands as Jesuit looks to the future. Skyward stream thy blue and white, even still. 

truth embedded in Walker Percy’s New Orleans novel The Moviegoer? In addition to looking at mission in the curriculum in terms of the transcendentals, newly named Assistant to the President for Mission Jeremy Reuther ’01 also points out five descriptors of a mission-driven Jesuit teacher. A mission-driven teacher— 1

Expresses and develops a Catholic vision of the world

2

Permeates faith and wisdom through pedagogy and curricular content

3

Recognizes that each person has an eternal destiny and is created in the image of God

4

Witnesses to others a life lived in relationship with Jesus Christ

5

Contributes to a spirituality of communion

For Jesuit High School, missiondriven teaching is not value-neutral. The goal of a Jesuit education is not merely to provide skills in a vacuum, but instead to help students build the intellectual and moral frameworks necessary to become men of “conscience, competence, and compassion.” This duality goes to the heart of the ongoing evolution of Jesuit’s curriculum. The work of improving the school’s curriculum is not a merely technocratic endeavor; rather, it is a way to ensure that each lesson, activity, assessment, and academic experience is an opportunity for Blue Jays to discover and become the men that God made them to be.  JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

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P R I N C I P A L' S C O R N E R

with

PETER KERNION ’90 Principal of Jesuit High School

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P R I N C I P A L' S C O R N E R How have the hard-working faculty at Jesuit made this difficult year more manageable for you and the school?

Principal Peter Kernion ’90 has been at the helm of Jesuit New Orleans for 8 years and has handled the challenging and peaceful times with resolve, confidence, and diligence. Going into the 2020-2021 school year, we decided to sit down with him to see how he and Jesuit were handling the unprecedented circumstances. We quickly found that, while the times are objectively different, his mission remains the same: foster an environment that forms men of faith and men for others.

Certainly, this has been a tough year for all of our students and their families, but our teachers have gone above and beyond and have done an exceptional job during this time. This has been a stressful and uneasy school year as teachers have had to change learning models and adapt to new ways of teaching their students while continuing to uphold and promote the mission of Jesuit High School. I am very thankful for all of the flexibility and hard work of our faculty members this year. Were there any extra positions appointed to combat this difficult

safely. Ultimately, for the good of our students, it is important for us to continue the most important ministry of teaching and learning and the advancement of the mission of Jesuit High School. Through your observations, how did the students handle the hybrid and athome learning models?

In the face of all of these changes, including the cut-back in student activities, the reduced numbers of students at events, and the cancellation of so many events that add to student life and school spirit, our students have been understanding and have worked through this and even excelled in ways that have made all of us proud of these Blue Jays.

time?

As student activities were forced to be dialed back this school year, Matt Orillion ’98 has been very helpful with taking on the role of COVID-19 Director. I know this is not what he expected to spend so much time dealing with this school year, but we are thankful for all of his work in this area. How has the parental response been during this year in particular?

Overall, parents have been understanding and supportive throughout this process. As we made safe in-person learning a priority, many parents expressed their support even through the unfortunate contact tracing that took place throughout the school year.

If you could go back, what advice would you give yourself at the beginning of the pandemic?

I think the advice I would have given myself is to be patient as we continue to look for ways to return to some sort of normalcy here at school. What has become obviously clear as we move through this pandemic is that we cannot expect teaching and learning, student life, and other activities to be the same as they have been. Hybrid schedules, split lunch periods, and the large number of student activities that have been postponed, cancelled, or re-imagined have taught us this. That being said, we will continue to look for ways to successfully fulfill our mission as we work through these difficult and unusual times.

You have been principal for 8 years.

While these circumstances have

Specifically, how has this year been

been difficult, how does the Jesuit

different?

educational system keep weathering

Since March of 2020, life at Jesuit High School has certainly changed drastically and has presented us with many challenges. This school year has been dominated by COVID-19 and the constantly changing guidelines and mandates that require a number of new hurdles to clear in order to continue to have students on campus

the storm?

It is my hope that we are not far off from the time when we can get back to some “normal” activities and events that will engage our students in ways that are more conducive to learning as they continue to grow as men of faith and men for others. 

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A LU M N I FE AT U R E

Supreme Commitment to Faith & Family The remarkable story behind the story of Amy Coney Barrett's appointment to the Supreme Court of the United States

A

BY CHRISTIAN BAUTISTA ’06

s Blue Jays eagerly streamed into unairconditioned halls for the start of school in the fall of 1962, there was no denying that change was in the air. In the first few weeks of the school year, 8 | JAYNOTES | FALL / WINTER 2020

President John F. Kennedy declared that “we choose to go to the moon,” the Cuban missile crisis threatened to heat up the Cold War, and The Jetsons premiered on ABC. Amidst the shifting of these

(above) Mike Coney's ’63 family gathers to celebrate his 70th birthday. (opposite, clockwise) Michael Coney’s senior photo; Coney and fellow alter servers in the Chapel of The North American Martyrs; Coney at Grand Coteau during his time in the novitiate.

sociocultural tectonic plates, a young Michael Coney walked into Homeroom 4B his senior year at Jesuit High School without an inkling that his life would one day be changed by another, less well-remembered political event: the recent appointment of Byron White to the Supreme Court of the United States. Some 58 years later—after White would be replaced by Ruth Bader Ginsberg—Coney’s firstborn daughter, Amy Coney Barrett, would ascend to that very seat


MICHAEL CONEY ’63 divorced, I didn’t get the chance to do a lot of extracurriculars because I had to work. I worked on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at a hardware store—South Claiborne Hardware right at Claiborne and Napoleon.” He did manage to make time to join the track team and participate in Sodality. His later years at Jesuit were especially marked by personal crises. “My parents divorced, and my mother died when I was at work one day—all within those five years. Being around the Jesuits helped me to put all those things in perspective. It helped me to consider, ‘What is life really all about? What’s the real meaning of life? What really matters in life?’ It helped me to form my own vision of what I wanted to get out of life.” This spiritual and intellectual foundation that formed in response to grappling with these questions would become a critical part of Coney’s professional and personal life. Through his high school years, Coney’s Jesuit education had prepared him to search for the Holy Spirit acting in the world, alive even in life’s most profound struggles. in the highest court in the land. This story, to be sure, is one of neither chance nor fate; rather, this is the story of the 58 intervening years during which radical commitments to faith and family made room for Providence to act in the world. DEAR BLUE JAY

Michael Coney began his tenure as a Jesuit student after attending St. Agnes School on Jefferson Highway. “I took the entrance test with one of my cousins,” recalls Coney. “I came home a few weeks later, and my mom told me: here’s the letter! Dear Blue Jay!” Though he recalls being coerced into taking the test by his mother and even unsure as a 13-year-old about the decision to accept his admission

offer, he ultimately heeded her advice: “It was the absolute right decision. I didn’t look back after that. It was absolutely wonderful.” Coney remembers upper-level math classes with Richard Tonry, and he reminisces about reading a different book every week in one of his English classes taught by John Rice. He also looks back on Ernest Jacques, S.J., as a significant influence on him as a student. “I learned how to think. I learned how to judge. I learned how to test my own skills, and I learned to have confidence in myself,” he reflects. Outside the classroom, a number of home-life circumstances substantially contributed to Coney’s high school experience. “Because my parents were

THE NOVITIATE

After graduation, Coney was so inspired by his interaction with the Society of Jesus that he elected to enter the Jesuit novitiate, which, despite his decision to leave a yearand-a-half later—before taking his vows—went on to inform the rest of his life. His discernment process was influenced by his encounters with Jesuits during his high school years, but two pastoral acts by members of the order stuck out in his memory. The first was the unconditional acceptance that his recently divorced mother received from the Jesuits at Immaculate Conception Church on Baronne Street, where he was an altar server. Coney remembers that though she was estranged from her own

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A LU M N I FE AT U R E

HOMEROOOM 4B In decades past, Jesuit yearbooks were funded, in part, by “sponsorships” from homerooms. Pictured above are Blue Jays from the Class of 1963 in Michael Coney’s senior homeroom, 4B. Coney himself is standing, 4th from the left in the back row. 10 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0


MICHAEL CONEY ’63

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A LU M N I FE AT U R E

Mike Coney with his wife, Linda, and their seven children.

parish because of her divorce, “she used to go to Mass on Baronne Street almost every lunchtime. She would go to confession to the priests there who encouraged her to continue receiving the sacraments. It was a tremendous load off her shoulders at the time.” While the Jesuits would have been seen as breaking step with common practice at the time, neither orthodoxy nor dogma has ever indicated that divorced parishioners should be refused access to the sacraments. The second was a more dramatic act of ministry by the Jesuits upon his mother’s death. Because she was a divorcee, her parish priest was not present at her wake, but the Jesuits showed up in droves: “All of the Jesuits were there. That was like, 12 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

‘wow,’” Coney whispers breathlessly, thinking back to the impressive occasion. The priests and scholastics who showed up for his family that day left an indelible mark on the 17-year-old Blue Jay. Together with his experiences in the novitiate, the compassion shown to him by the Jesuits in his time of need made a lasting impact on his character. Perhaps at first implicitly but later explicitly, he began to recognize the Spirit as the Paraclete—the Comforter, the Consoler—who animated the choices and actions of the Jesuits who ministered to him and his family. As he left the novitiate for the outside world, he carried with him a growing commitment to living out

God’s plan for him in his personal and professional life. A NEW FAMILY BEGINS

Coney subsequently moved on to the University of New Orleans, where he studied History and met his wife, Linda Vath, a Dominican High School graduate who majored in French and English at UNO. They were married as Michael began law school at Loyola University of New Orleans, and Linda began teaching in a local high school including then all-male East Jefferson High School. “I had no idea it was a bad idea to get married a week before your final exams in the first year of law school,” Michael muses, laughing. “In fact, I think I cut the last week of classes before exams for our honeymoon.”


MICHAEL CONEY ’63 Linda remembers being told by a doctor that he expected the couple would be unable to conceive a child, and that they should, “Go home and pray.” Pray they did, and soon thereafter, their first daughter, Amy, was born in January of Michael’s last year at Loyola. Until that point, Linda’s teaching career had supported the couple, but they would then resort to Michael’s part-time job and any hours of work Linda could manage to make ends meet for the last semester of Michael’s law degree. “I started work the day after law school graduation, but from January to May we lived hand to mouth,” Michael says severely. This period during which the Coneys were a young couple exiting graduate school with a new child might seem

remained open to God working in her life, and it is now undeniable that her role as a mother is built, in large part, upon her training and experience as an educator. Their growing family would soon benefit immensely from the clarity and equanimity Linda brought to the table as an experienced classroom teacher. GROWING IN NUMBER & IN FAITH

As the Coneys turned to faith in each other and faith in God to get them through their early months as parents, Michael began clerking for Judge James Comiskey of the Jesuit Class of 1945. He would go on to complete a master's degree in law at Louisiana State University, where he and Linda became connected to the charismatic Catholic community.

balancing nine personalities under a single roof: “It starts when they’re little. We always worked on their relationships with each other. We had six girls—jealousy was sometimes a big thing. Their relationships were sometimes strained like any kids’, but whenever they were at odds about something, we made them tell the story, apologize, and ask for forgiveness. Always. It just had to happen, every time. It was an established pattern, not necessarily something they understood or agreed with, but it became a habit.” Family dinners were sacrosanct, and throughout the year, family events such as vacations took precedence over everything else. Michael remembers a time when his son, Michael Coney ’04,

THIS STORY, TO BE SURE, IS ONE OF NEITHER CHANCE NOR FATE; RATHER, THIS IS THE STORY OF THE 58 INTERVENING YEARS DURING WHICH RADICAL COMMITMENTS TO FAITH AND FAMILY MADE ROOM FOR PROVIDENCE TO ACT IN THE WORLD. daunting, but both Michael and Linda recall no hesitations. “We just put our faith in each other and in the Lord,” Michael remembers confidently, emboldened after his previous experiences with God acting in his life as a young man. “We were completely open to having children from the time we were married. I figured, ‘If I have to, I’ll just go to night school.’” Linda adds, “We both wanted children. We just agreed. We didn’t even need to talk about it that much: we simply thought the same way.” Linda’s conviction masked a complicated reality. As was common social propriety in the area in the 1960s, she was virtually forced out of her teaching career when she became pregnant with Amy. Even as she endured this regressive norm, she

Within a couple of years, Amy would no longer be an only-child—and, soon thereafter, far from it. She would, in fact, become the oldest of seven children. Though Michael is one of three siblings, Linda, as one of six children and the 25th grandchild on her father’s side, was more than prepared to have a large family. “It’s fantastic—” Michael comments as Linda follows up with, “It’s fun. You have to work at relationships with them, but when they get old enough to keep up their own relationships with each other, it’s really nice.” As their children grew up, the Coneys emphasized structure, discipline, responsibility, but, above all, unconditional love and a commitment to God. Linda relates the experience of

earned a coveted spot on a playground baseball all-star team with mandatory games and practices that interfered with one such vacation. The Coneys didn’t think twice about offering to forfeit the spot on the team’s roster, but the understanding coach relented in recognition of the importance of their family time. The Coneys talk about their children as individuals, each of whom needed and need an authentic, special relationship with them as parents. As Linda describes it, “We would always tell them, ‘We’ll never treat you all the same.’ We would do the best we could according to what each one needed.” “If you’re not intentional about it, kids can just kind of grow up without being formed,” says Linda. Michael adds, “We would talk about our children and set specific formational

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A LU M N I FE AT U R E goals for each of them.” The Coneys grew in faith not only through their experiences of coming to know God through their children but through an unexpected sacrament: Holy Orders. Michael and Linda discerned a vocation to the diaconate—the Coneys describe it as a shared calling—that came after he was baptized in the spirit in the charismatic renewal. After this retreat, Michael gained an unquenchable desire to consume spiritual texts and content. At the time, they had two children, but during and after the discernment process, they had five more. Today, parishioners at St. Catherine of Siena Parish know him affectionately as Deacon Mike. Their adult children now reside in Indiana, South Carolina, Washington State, and New Orleans, but, as a family, they are as close as ever. Mike explains, “We decided it was worth investing our time and our money to help our children to maintain their relationships with one another. For instance, we’ve been doing a family vacation for many years for which we’ve said, ‘We’ll pay for the place, you get yourself there.’” His children have followed in his footsteps, learning to create a robust familysupport structure. “We’ve set up a sort of family fund. For those of our children who have become more established in their lives, we let them know they can contribute to that to help each other out to make things like family vacations happen. It’s the family taking care of the family.” Michael’s trying high school family circumstances, his formational experiences with the Jesuits, and his experiences with God leading him through challenging times as a young man would come to fruition in Michael’s roles as a deacon, a father, and a lawyer. He could clearly see the Holy Spirit moving in every aspect of his life. When offered a major promotion to move to Houston for Shell, his employer at the time, his diaconate commitments and 14 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

seven children led him to resign his position after extended prayer. Shell, however, responded by rehiring him and keeping him assigned to New Orleans. This series of events meant that Michael’s youngest child and only son, Michael, would one day go on to attend Jesuit himself, learning not only many of the same lessons as his father but also lessons alongside his father: Both Linda and I were always very active outside of our home, and, when I look back at it, it’s kind of stunning how the Lord provided for us. Our children weren’t any worse for it, and, in fact, I know that they were better for it. At Michael’s rehearsal dinner, he spoke about how moved he was by going with me to do pro bono work with kids at juvenile court: bringing them Christmas presents, seeing the conditions that some of them lived in, going with me to bring communion to someone, or being with the sick. He was really moved. I didn’t even realize at the time, but I wanted him to see that there was another aspect to life, and he really did see it. The same events also meant that the Coneys’ six girls would be able to attend Linda’s alma mater, Dominican High School, where Amy would receive an education that would—as Michael’s own Jesuit education once did—serve as a foundation of something great. THE SUPREME COURT

“Amy was a voracious reader since the time she was little,” Linda says, smiling. “She would read like 60 books in the summer.” Michael jumps in, “She had glimmers of her current sharpness as a kid”—Linda interjects endearingly with, “she gets that from Mike”— “and she has honed all of that in her law practice and her teaching. She really is a crackerjack thinker.” Mary Favalora, a longtime counsellor at Jesuit High School and

(above, top to bottom) Amy Coney Barrett as a St. Catherine and Dominican student.

Amy’s classmate at Dominican, recalls, “Amy was an excellent student, and she was full of school spirit.” Favalora continues, “Our class benefitted greatly from her leadership, creativity and hard work. She was someone who was very approachable and kind to everyone. To see her reach such incredible heights—not only as a loving wife and mother, successful attorney, and law professor, but now as a Supreme Court Justice—is amazing.” While there have been countless words written about Honorable Amy Coney Barrett’s ascent to the Supreme Court of the United States, few of them have highlighted the Providential connection from her father as an eager Jesuit senior in 1962 to her lifetime appointment as the newest Supreme Court justice. Fewer


MICHAEL CONEY ’63

of them still have pointed out that the Coneys are perhaps just as proud of their children for coming together to support Amy over the past six months as they are for her lofty achievement itself. Linda describes their perspective, saying, “I was just very proud of her siblings for supporting her in the way that they did. I was proud of her and all of her family. I felt very loved by the Lord.” Michael picks up, “I’m glad that Amy’s getting to use her talents. We’re really very proud of her, but I was even more moved by them supporting each other. It shows that they have their heads on straight. Thinking of our life raising seven children all of whom we’re so proud of, I see how wonderfully blessed we’ve been by the Lord.” He anchors her accomplishments in faith and family, emphasizing, “I was moved because even though there’s a lot of prestige in her job, all of it is, in some sense, a passing thing.

It’s another job. But it’s really more important to understand what your life is all about. It’s more important to understand where you’re going and what you want to do with your life and your family.” Linda adds, “She didn’t take the job for any glamor that might come with it. That was even a deterrent. She took it because she and her husband prayed about it separately and then together and that it was what God wanted them to do.” “It’s strange to realize that she’ll soon have opinions that will be the law of the land,” laughs Michael knowingly. “It has helped me to realize that all of our political leaders put their pants on one leg at a time like I do. They’re people like you and me, and that’s just a job they’re doing or a service they’re performing.” The young Blue Jay who hesitantly put on his khaki uniform—one leg at a time—in 1959 could have never known that his experiences in those

halls would have made this story possible, but as a grandfather of 32 grandchildren, Michael looks back and says, “I think about it now and see how good the Lord has been to me and my family.” Confident that God will continue to provide through the best and worst of times, he is just as excited about the next chapter in the story: his grandson, Jesuit freshman Joseph Edwards, now walks the very same halls. “I’ve always looked up to him, and he’s always been a role model for me—he’s a big reason that I decided to come to Jesuit,” Joseph says of his grandfather. Recognizing Jesuit as a thread that connects his own story to his grandfather’s, he reflects, “I know that I still have so much to learn about my faith and about myself, and I know that my experiences at Jesuit are leading me down that path of becoming a man of faith like him.” 

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Swinging for the Fences Alumnus of the Year John Ryan ’70

J

ohn F. Ryan III ’70 believes that

his Jesuit education helped make him the man he is today. He explains, “When challenged, either in the classroom or on the athletic field, you have to make a decision—whether you are going to buckle down and win, or fall behind and play catch up.” Ryan has been buckling down ever since his days as a Jesuit student and athlete. In announcing Ryan as Jesuit’s 2020 Alumnus of the Year, Jesuit president Fr. John Brown, S.J., said, “John Ryan typifies what it means to be a great Blue Jay. Although he lives 350 miles west of here, you’ll see him at Jesuit ball games, funerals, and festivals. He doesn’t brag, except about his children and grandchildren. He’s got story after story about his teachers and the lessons they taught him. Most of all, he swings for the fences and supports those around him 16 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

who do the same, with a heart that inspires.” While a student at Jesuit, Ryan was a stand-out football and baseball player. Fifty years later, he is still remembered for pitching 30⅓ consecutive scoreless innings and for striking out 18 in a game and 118 for the season. After playing baseball at Tulane on a full scholarship, he moved to Houston to work for Alexander Industries. In time he purchased both the Houston branch of the company, renamed Alexander / Ryan Marine & Safety, and the New Orleans branch and then acquired Marine Services & Supply. He eventually sold the company but worked under contract as CEO / president until retiring two years ago. Ryan was named the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year for Oil and Gas Sector and was appointed

to the U.S. Coast Guard National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee, serving as chairman for 12 years. He also served as president of the Marine Services Association of Texas and the U.S. Marine Safety Association. He is a generous sponsor of the Texas Oilman’s Charity Invitational Fishing Tournament and supports numerous charities including the MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Houston Food Bank, the Star of Hope Mission, Special Olympics, and Citizens for Animal Protection. Although COVID-19 restrictions prevented Jesuit from hosting the usual Alumni Homecoming Mass and Reception, the school was able to honor Ryan with a scaled-down event in September. At the end of Mass in the Chapel of the North American Martyrs with family, friends, and some classmates, Ryan received the


ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR

(opposite page) John Ryan III ’70 and family in the Chapel of the American Martyrs. (top row, left to right) Ryan's wife, Janet, pins on his corsage before Mass; Ryan joined the past Alumni of the Year at a dinner in his honor. (middle row, left to right) Ryan's sons, Jason and John, bring up the gifts during the Alumnus of the Year Mass; Ryan pitching for Tulane baseball; Ryan's senior yearbook picture; Ryan playing football for Jesuit (bottom row, left to right). Class of ’70 members Laurie Oertling, Jerry Conrad, and Arthur Folse lead the procession; Ryan, center, poses with his Jesuit classmates from 1970

F. Edward Hebert Award from Fr. Brown. In his acceptance speech, Ryan spoke of his humble upbringing and his early days at Jesuit, reflecting on how we never know how the people we meet in our first year will turn out and how they will affect our lives. He went on to give numerous examples of how Blue Jays, many of whom he didn’t even know at Jesuit, have assisted and supported him throughout his personal and professional careers. He said, “They all became fellow

Blue Jays—part of a group that you could call on for help and advice. Because you went through the same challenges, training, and preparation we all went through.” Ryan also thanked his wife, Janet, for her love and support over the past 44 years of marriage and expressed his pride in his sons and grandchildren. He concluded with, “This school helped to mold each of us to be the men we are today. It taught us about being challenged, it taught us about never quitting, it taught us about

traditions, it taught us to be men of faith and men for others. Jesuit High School has guided its graduates to be men who make this world a better place. Go Blue Jays, and God bless Jesuit High School. Thank you.” Following Mass, Ryan, his family, and a few friends enjoyed a meal and reception in St. Ignatius Hall. You can view John Ryan’s acceptance speech on the Jesuit website or YouTube channel, or use the QR code above. 

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F LY I N G W I T H T H E J AY S

Swim Team Takes Solid Second in State

A

n outstanding fall 2020 season for the Jesuit swim team came as the result of planning, resilience, and hard work, but, as much as anything, the season’s success might be attributed to sheer force of will on the part of Jesuit’s swimmers and coaches. In a season that longtime Jesuit head coach Bret Hanemann ’85 claimed “surpassed even the 2005 ‘Katrina season’” in logistical complexity, Jesuit swimmers adapted to a new split practice schedule, challenging COVID restrictions, and relocated meets. The season capped off with a state runnerup performance by the team at the annual LHSAA State Meet. “All of our dual meets were held at country club pools—one meet didn’t have starting blocks,” reported Hanemann. “None of it mattered: the boys just wanted to compete.” The season kicked off with the team’s 38th consecutive District Champion title earned at Cypress Lakes Country Club in Destrehan. The October city championships were moved across the lake to Franco’s Health Club and Spa, where Jesuit swimmers picked up the team’s 38th consecutive Metro Champion title as well. With the team finally finding its footing, two assistant coaches suddenly tested positive for COVID-19 only two days before the LHSAA State Meet in Shreveport. “Thankfully,” said Hanemann, “due to a one-coach-on-deck policy at practices,” no students had been exposed to either of those coaches. The team went on to earn a laudable state runner-up title just days later.

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(above) Senior Phillip Endom pulls water during the 200 individual medley. (right) Junior Nicholas Nobile gets ready to jump off the starting block. (below) Seniors Phillip Endom and Andrew McNeil share an aquatic high-five.

“Every member of this team had personal-best times at state,” said Hanemann. “They swam with class and heart.” TCU-signee senior Phillip Endom was named swimmer of the meet after winning the 200 individual medley and the 100 backstroke. Endom, alongside sophomore Joseph Capo and junior Egan Trahant, earned All-Metro honors in recognition of outstanding performance throughout the 2020 season. Also of note, the ranks of the 2020-21 Blue Jay swim team included two student-athletes who went above

and beyond both inside and outside the pool: senior captain Andrew McNeil and junior Nicholas Nobile both earned perfect ACT scores. Reflecting on the end of the season, Hanemann commented, “I am proud of every one of my boys, and I am happy that this incredibly dedicated team was able to compete in spite of the challenging and constantlychanging circumstances.” 


The 2020 State Runner-up XC Champions—Coach Rudy Horvath ’86, Stephen Peterman, Morgan Hebert, Jack Wallace, Lucas Sampedro, Patrick Dowd, Michael Vocke, Jack DesRoches, & assistant coach Cullen Doody ’08

Jack DesRoches

Jesuit XC Runs to Victory as State Runners-Up

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raining through a long and grueling season marred by the looming pandemic, the Jesuit cross country team showed remarkable persistence and has a lot to for which to be proud. In October, when Hurricane Zeta added an extra hurdle to the District 9-5A championship, the Jays were up for the challenge. Leaving Zeta in their dust, they did not disappoint with six out of seven runners finishing in the top ten and claiming the district title. Jesuit won with an almost perfect score of 18 points, finishing ahead of city rivals Holy Cross (54 points) and Brother Martin (78 points). Leading Jesuit to victory was break-out runner sophomore Jack DesRoches, who took home a first-place finish with a spectacular time of 16:00, followed closely by senior Jack Wallace, who placed second with a time of 16:02. The top five was rounded off by junior Morgan Hebert and freshmen Lucas

Sampedro

and Michael Vocke. At the following LHSAA Region 3-5A depth-building precursor to the state finale on Nov. 6, Jesuit landed a third-place finish with a score of 70 points trailing Brother Martin (35) and Holy Cross (57). The flock of Jays was led by 6th-place finisher senior Stephen Peterman with a time of 16:30 and 10th-place finisher sophomore Patrick Dowd, who PR'ed with a time of 16:35. Also scoring for Jesuit were seniors Donovan Musser and Chris Dehart and freshman Patrick Garvey. On Nov. 17, the Jays continued their streak of success at the Division 5A State Championships in Natchitoches as the state runner-up with an impressive 66 points. Catholic of Baton Rouge claimed the title with a score of 44 points. DesRoches led the Jays again with a season-best time of 15:39, and Wallace was not far behind with a time of 15:50. The pair placed 4th

and 6th, respectively. The rest of the Jesuit squad also performed well. Sampedro finished 13th with a time of 16:01, Peterman finished 21st with a time of 16:19, Hebert finished 23rd with a time of 16:20, Vocke finished 30th with a time of 16:37, and Dowd finished 47th with a time of 16:53 to round out the Jays. With an incredible season and a state runner-up finish under their belts, it comes as no surprise that The Times-Picayune / New Orleans Advocate named five members of the Jesuit Cross Country team to the 2020 All-Metro Cross Country Team. Honored for their strong performances throughout the season were DesRoches, Hebert, Sampedro, Vocke, and Wallace. The Advocate also named Coach Rudy Horvath ’86 “Boys Coach of the Year.” The Blue Jay runners hope to continue their success this spring in the upcoming track season. 

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A Season of Tough Football & Memorable Plays

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ootball is often called a game of inches, a game that is decided by one play that could change the tide. The 2020-21 Jesuit Blue Jays (5-5) always had this thought in the forefront of their minds as each player approached his job with diligence and severity. This successful mind-set translated to huge wins against rival Holy Cross and offensive juggernaut Hahnville. With other impressive victories against Helen Cox and Shaw, the Jesuit squad found themselves as the No. 9 seed and traveled to St. Paul’s for a rainy playoff matchup. The Blue Jays dominated as soon as they got off bus and delivered an impressive win for those fans who made the trip to the Northshore. Senior Luke Besh caught three touchdowns and propelled the Blue and White to a second-round matchup with undefeated rival and No. 1 seeded Brother Martin. In one of the premier games of the Catholic League season, the Jays showed no fear in their first matchup against the Crusaders and found themselves up 42-38 with time running down. The Crusaders got the ball back for one last drive and scored with 14 seconds left to take a hard-fought victory at Hoss Memtsas Stadium by a score of 45-42. The playoff date produced another exciting matchup in Tad Gormley 20 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

Stadium, this time with Brother Martin grabbing an early 14-0 lead. Instead of conceding defeat, the Blue Jays remembered one thing: all it takes is one inch. Senior Hayden Morris found his opportunity and returned a fumble for a touchdown to swing the momentum early in the second quarter. After that, Jesuit started to find ways to compete and led by 10 with under 10 minutes left in the game. While Brother Martin ended up winning a nail-bitter 36-34, Jesuit never quit and produced a season full of highlights and top-notch football. Senior receiver Max Milano and senior quarterback Luke LaForge broke a record that stood for 66 years: longest receiving completion in school history. The previous record in 1954 featured an 88-yard completion from Billy Ladner ’56 to Ritchie Petitbon ’55. Milano and LaForge set the new record by a yard on Milano’s 89yard touchdown reception against Hahnville. Another receiver also found his way into the record books. Due to his tremendous season, Besh is now tied for the 9th most touchdowns in a regular season with 17 touchdowns this fall. In addition to Besh, receivers Milano, senior Presten Berggren, and sophomore Jace Larsen caught touchdowns and contributed to the

Senior Luke Besh climbs the ladder for the catch. (left) The Jesuit offense prepares before the big game.

explosive offense. The two-quarterback system also paid off for the Jays as senior LaForge and junior Jack Larriviere both shined throughout the tough campaign. Both completed 70 passes for the year with LaForge finishing with 1,238 yards and 17 passing touchdowns, and Larriviere amassing 942 yard in the air with 15 total touchdowns. The defense also brought the pressure all season long. Senior Max Jubenville led the team in tackles with 117, and junior Dennis Dougherty joined the century club with 101 tackles. Senior defensive end Luke Carlton never backed down and constantly found himself in the opposing team’s backfield with a pressure or a sack. “Each and every player on this team gave it his all in every practice and every game,” coach Scott Bairnsfather said. “I could not have asked for a better group of seniors, underclassmen, and coaches to handle the challenges of the 2020 football season and could not be prouder of them for their efforts.” Coach said it best: this team had heart, and it showed on the field. Jesuit has much to be proud of and a young core that will carry on the tradition of class and excellence in 2021. 


F LY I N G W I T H T H E J AY S

Two Student Athletes to Continue Careers in College

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wo Blue Jays will be taking their talents to the collegiate level. In November, seniors Phillip Endom and Collin Loupe signed their commitments in St. Ignatius Hall. “To be at this point where you are today,” Jesuit athletic director Dave Moreau said during the signing ceremony, “certain things have to be in place: God-given talent and skills; sound guidance and tutelage from your parents, family, coaches, and teachers; drive, effort, and competitiveness; and a teachable spirit in developing not only skills but a set of standards and values. Be grateful for the opportunity that has been presented to you.”

PHILLIP ENDOM

COLLIN LOUPE

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY SWIMMING

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS BASEBALL

Endom will be moving to Fort Worth, Texas, to swim for Texas Christian University. Swimming head coach Bret Hanemann ’85 praised Endom's achievements in and out of the pool. “Phillip has been dedicated since day one,” Hanemann said. “If I had 40 kids like him, I could coach well into my 80s. I could not be prouder and cannot wait to see what he does at TCU.”

Loupe will be staying closer to home to chase his dream. He will transition from being a Blue Jay to a Privateer at the University of New Orleans. Baseball head coach Kenneth Goodlett is looking forward to having Loupe for one more spring and knows how hard he has worked throughout his career. “Collin never misses a practice or an opportunity to work on his game, and it shows in his play,” coach Goodlett said. “In his junior year, Collin had the second highest batting average on the team and led the Jays in stolen bases. We are looking forward to his senior year as he will contribute greatly to our program.” 

SAVE * THE DATE

jesuit golf

classic

FRIDAY | APRIL 9 bayou oaks city park PRESENTED BY

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

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IN THE NEWS

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VIV

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newspaper has been filled with teacher features, think pieces, event coverage, athletic breakdowns, and more. The paper has branched out into promoting a student-driven startup, The Breadwinner’s Bakery, while also providing glimpses into Blue Jay student life with coverage of lunchtime ping-pong matches. The newspaper will still feature a traditional quarterly print edition, though the print version of the newspaper has received a facelift as well. With a new masthead and a new look, the print edition now sports an updated aesthetic, and the newspaper

staff has focused on making the print edition of the newspaper more student-accessible and backpackfriendly. Confident in his writers and editors, Fine comments, “I am so excited about the upcoming school year and the future of the newspaper. We have a great, young staff that is passionate about writing and covering all things Jesuit.” 

T

he Blue Jay newspaper has documented Jesuit student life for at least a century. Print editions of the paper have covered events ranging from pep rallies to world wars, and editors and contributors of The Blue Jay have often gone on to become renowned writers, journalists, and critics. For the first time in the history of the storied periodical, the publication has gone beyond the printed word, and, under the leadership of Fr. Sean Salai, S.J., and junior editor in chief Michael-Paul Fine, many newspaper articles are now published digitally on Jesuit’s website. “In a sense, the newspaper has entered a new generation,” reports Fine. “With the new digital platform being updated regularly, The Blue Jay newspaper will be able to connect current Jesuit students with alumni and the entire Jesuit community.” The digital edition of the newspaper means that student articles now drop throughout the school year rather than at the end of academic quarters or semesters. So far this school year, the digital

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(above, left to right) The Blue Jay newspaper staff—Austin Hebert, Patrick Dowd, Michael-Paul Fine, Luc Carriere, Louis Bercaw, and Fr. Sean Salai, S.J.


IN THE NEWS Bottom row (from left): Jackson Cheramie, Christopher Ciaccio, Michael Daly Middle row: Aiden Devine, Andrew McNeil (perfect ACT), Kohlmann Moore, Connor Myers Top row: Ian Reily, Garrison Trahant (perfect ACT), Marcelo Torres (perfect ACT), Jackson Wallace, and William Zinsel

National Merit Semifinalists of 2020

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he twelve National Merit Semifinalists from Jesuit in the prestigious National Merit Scholarship Program represent approximately five percent of the 233 Louisiana high school honorees. This year’s Jesuit

semifinalists posted scores ranging from 212 to 223 on the PSAT/ NMSQT®, which is used as the initial screen in the annual competition underwritten by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC). Since the inception of the program in

1956, there have been 1,579 Blue Jays to achieve that level of excellence. The faculty, administration, and staff of Jesuit High School congratulate these twelve National Merit Semifinalists for their significant academic achievement. 

Four More Join the 36'ers ACT Club

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ontinuing Jesuit's legacy of academic excellence, three students from the Class of 2021 and one student from

the Class of 2022 rose to the challenge of attaining the top ACT composite score of 36. This brings Jesuits count of top score receivers to 26 since 2013.

Below are the four Blue Jays who received news of their achievement in 2020. 

ANDREW MCNEIL

MARCELO TORRES

GARRISON TRAHANT

NICHOLAS NOBILE

Class of 2021

Class of 2021

Class of 2021

Class of 2022

Son of Adam & Colette McNeil

Son of Manuel & Kem Torres

Son of Richard & Amy Trahant

Son of Michael & Nicol Nobile

Attended Christian Brothers School

Attended St. Martin’s Episcopal School

Co-curriculars Swimming

Co-curriculars Robotics, National Honor Society, Model UN, Fencing, Mu Alpha Theta, Study Skills Tutor, & Choir

Attended St. Angela Merici School & Stuart Hall School for Boys

Attended St. Charles Borromeo School & Christian Brothers School

Co-curricular Quiz Bowl & Robotics

Co-curriculars Swimming, Mu Alpha Theta, Sodality, & District Rally

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F A C U LT Y U P D AT E S

Jesuit Welcomes 21 Faculty and Staff Members ith every new school year comes the addition of new and talented educators at Jesuit High School. This year, Jesuit welcomed 21 new faculty and staff to Carrollton & Banks. Starting in the English department, Jesuit welcomes five new members to its faculty. Kenneth Lota ’06 returns to his alma mater, bringing with him a bachelor’s degree in English from Tulane University, a master’s degree in English from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of North Carolina, 24 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

Chapel Hill. Mark Babin ’01 also returns to Carrollton and Banks, having earned a B.F.A in creative writing from Louisiana State University and a M.F.A in creative writing from the University of New Orleans. Previously, Babin taught at the University of New Orleans, Louise S. McGehee, and Delgado, and he has been a director of operations/ communications associate for a New Orleans venture capital subsidiary. Joshua Bourgeois ’13 holds a B.A.S. and an M.A. in curriculum and instruction. Bourgeois previously taught at Mount Carmel Academy. Mr. Nick Courtney, S.J., who is currently in Jesuit formation, taught at Strake Jesuit in Houston in the past. Lastly, Ethan Gilberti ’16 earned a B.A. in art history and English

literature from LSU. Two new members join the guidance department. Robin Rhodes holds a B.S. from Vanderbilt University and a M.S. in counseling from Loyola University New Orleans. She previously owned a private counseling practice, served as a school counselor at Mount Carmel Academy, worked as a counselor at a mental health rehabilitation agency, and taught elementary education. Cameron Eckholdt ’09 brings with him a B.S. in psychology from LSU and an M.S. in mental health counseling from Loyola University of New Orleans. Nicholas Nguyen, who has a B.S. in psychology from University of New Orleans and a M.A. in school counseling from University of Holy Cross, is the new Health and Wellness counselor. Jeffrey Reuther ’99 returns


F A C U LT Y U P D AT E S

(group shot, top row, left to right) Ethan Gilberti’16, Joshua Bourgeois ’13, Nicholas Nguyen, Cameron Eckholdt ’09, Jon Orillion ’01, Mark Babin ’01, Kyler Pisciotta ’16, Fr. Sean Salai, S.J., Jeffrey Reuther ’99, Roger Bacon ’10, Herbert Spurlock III ’14, (bottom row, left to right) Paolo Taffaro, Joshua Brumfield. Rebecca Campos, Robin Rhodes, Kendall Gibson, James Linn IV ’06, & Kenneth Lota ’06 (left, clockwise) Matthew Firmin ’10, Fr. Stephen Kramer, S.J., & Nick Courtney, S.J.

to teach chemistry after being an engineer and project manager in the oil and gas industry. Matthew Firmin ’10 rejoins the science department and assists the wrestling program after previously serving in the Alumni Service Corps for the 2014-2015 school year. Jesuit priest Fr. Sean Salai, S.J., joins the theology staff and moderates the school newspaper. Fr. Stephen Kramer, S.J., teaches senior theology and is an assistant coach on the wrestling team. Joshua Brumfield obtained a B.S. in computer science from Tulane, an M.A. in theology from Our Lady of Holy Cross College, and a Ph.D. in theology from Catholic University of America. He previously taught math and theology at Shaw and theology at the University of Holy Cross. Roger Bacon ’10 studied politics and theology at Catholic

University of America and earned his M.A. in theological studies from Boston College. He comes from the Northshore, where he taught theology for four years at St. Paul’s. Lastly, Paolo Taffaro is teaching freshmen theology. He has a B.A. in philosophy and liberal arts. The Spanish department adds three new members including one alumnus. Rebecca Campos, a native of Mexico, has a B.A. in communications from Spring Hill. Herbert Spurlock III ’14 earned his B.A. in Spanish and Portuguese from Tulane University. Kendall Gibson graduated from Florida State University with a B.A. and M.A. in Spanish and taught at LSU and Wichita State for a combined nine years. Kyler Pisciotta ’16 graduated from the University of Mississippi with a

B.S. in forensic chemistry. He teaches fine arts and assists with the wrestling program. James Linn IV ’06 joins the social studies faculty. Previously he was a curator at the National WWII Museum in New Orleans. Jon Orillion ’01, who also teaches social studies, received his B.A. in history from Holy Cross College. Orillion spent six years as a teacher and head wrestling coach in the Catholic League and was an assistant coach at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa, for three years. 

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PAGE TITLE

COVID-19 TIMELINE

JAN. 21, 2020

MAR. 20, 2020

Fr. John Brown, S.J., is named Interim President.

Mayor Cantrell places the city of New Orleans under a "stay-at- home" mandate, telling residents to leave the house only for essentials such as medicine or food.

MAR. 9-11, 2020

MAR. 14-17,2020

MAR. 9 The first case in Louisiana is confirmed.

MAR. 14 Louisiana reports first COVID-19 death.

MAR. 10 NO Archdiocese suspends receiving from the chalice during Communion.

MAR. 16 Gov. Edwards closes bars, theaters, and restaurants.

MAR. 11 Mayor Latoya Cantrell cancels St. Patrick's Day events. MAR. 11 The World Health Organization (WHO) declares COVID-19 a pandemic.

APR. 7-10

MAR. 16 Mayor Cantrell closes malls and gyms.

APR. 7 Fr. Brown virtually addresses the Class of 2020.

MAR. 17 NO Archdiocese cancels all public Masses, confessions, and other gatherings.

APR. 10 Jesuit hosts a virtual Nine Churches Walk.

APR. 10 Jesuit offers drive-up confessions.

NOVEMBER 17, 2019 The first case of a novel coronavirus was discovered in China's Hubei Province. The disease causes attacks the lungs and rapid onset of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

DEC

JAN

FEB

MARCH

A YEAR LIKE NO OTHER From Zoom meetings to drivethrough confessionals, the events of 2020 were exceptional the world over. This timeline lays out some of the major global, national, and local moments of the year.

EVENT KEY WORLD LOUISIANA NEW ORLEANS JESUIT HIGH

FEB. 11-29, 2020

MAR. 13, 2020

MAR. 22-30,2020

FEB. 11 The WHO names the SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) virus COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019).

The Jesuit Back-to-Banks Bazaar is postponed.

MAR. 22 Gov. Edwards issues a stay-at-home order to begin March 23 at 5 p.m.

FEB. 29 The first United States COVID-19 death is confirmed.

NO Archdiocese dispenses Catholics from attending Mass. Louisiana prohibits public gatherings of more than 250 people and ramps up testing. President Trump declares a national emergency.

MAR. 30 Gov. Edwards extends the closure of all Louisiana public schools and the ban on large gatherings until April 30 as the number of COVID-19 cases in the state continues to grow.

PHASE

DEC. 31, 2019 - JAN. 20, 2020

MAR. 18, 2020

DEC. 31 The World Health Organization (WHO) becomes aware of the novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China.

Jesuit begins the fourth quarter with online classes.

JAN. 20 The first case of COVID-19 in the United States is confirmed in Washington state.

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MAY 21-29, 2020

OCT. 2

MAY 21 The Class of 2020 Commencement is postponed.

COVID-19 outbreak occurs at the White House.

MAY 29 Jesuit hosts a virtual alumni rosary.

JULY 25 - AUG.13, 2020

MAY 1-6, 2020

JUNE 27, 2020

MAY 1 Jesuit honors its seniors with a drive-through jambalaya lunch.

Jesuit holds its Bazaar Auction virtually.

MAY 6 Jesuit provides meals to local gig workers at its Meals for Mid-City event.

APRIL

Jesuit holds a modified Fishing Rodeo, its first in-person event since the COVID-19 restrictions.

MAY

JUNE

JUL. 25 Jesuit confers diplomas to the Class of 2020 at rescheduled Baccalaureate Mass. AUG. 11 Students return to campus for socially distanced Registration Day. AUG. 13 Jesuit begins the new school year with hybrid learning.

JULY -AUG

SEPT

NOV. 24 - DEC. 14, 2020 NOV. 24 Gov. Edwards announces that Louisiana will move back into modified Phase 2 of reopening. DEC. 14 Ochsner Health System in New Orleans begins administering the first doses of a COVID-19 vaccine to healthcare workers.

OCT

NOV-DEC

APR. 13, 2020

JUNE 5, 2020

JULY 11, 2020

OCT. 12-28, 2020

Gov. Edwards closes public schools for the remainder of the academic year.

Gov. Edwards announces that Louisiana will move into Phase 2 for the White House's guidelines of reopening.

Gov. Edwards issues statewide mask mandate.

OCT. 12 Jesuit returns to full in-person classes. OCT. 28 Fr. John Brown, S.J., is named the 31st President of Jesuit High School.

MAY 15, 2020

SEPT. 10

Gov. Edwards lifts the stayat -home order allowing businesses to re-open under Phase 1.

Gov. Edwards announces that Louisiana will move into Phase 3 for the White House's guidelines of reopening.

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27


STUDENT PERSPECTIVE

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Pandemic Through the Eyes of Students ith COVID-19 affecting the world, new and returning Blue Jays were creating their own stories and trying to make the best of a situation that required maturity and faith. Many students are continuing to move forward with positivity in spite of the negative effects of the pandemic. “Of course, I cannot wait to get back to school,” said sophomore class president Dalton Haydel, who was himself quarantined at one time. “I just have a feeling that all this is happening for a reason, preparing us for a situation to come.” A sodalist and Pro-Life Club member, Haydel credits club moderators and faculty for being accommodating. The newly elected student council executive board continues to instill school spirit when, at first glance, enthusiasm seems hard to come by. “Christmas week was just a breath of fresh air,” Haydel said about the various activities that occurred just before Christmas break. “Online and hybrid learning were certainly difficult, but Jesuit still tries to instill its mission, in whatever way that may be.” From cheering on their favorite team in the “gizzard” student section 28 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

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to sharing the same lunch period, students reminisce about countless touchstones of student life that used to be taken for granted. Prefreshmen through seniors know that times are difficult, but the return of Blue Jay spirit is what keeps hopes high, even if some underclassman have not experienced its full potential. “While this is the only normal that I know,” prefreshman president Aidan Wang said, “my big brother has mentioned the ‘before times.’ I’m already enjoying my time so far, so I cannot wait to see what the future might look like. “Like for most people here, the hybrid learning was an adjustment, but being fully back at school, even with restrictions, has been formational and enjoyable. You have to find faith where you are and take it from there.” “Taking it from there” will look different to everyone, but it usually starts with the sense of camaraderie whenever someone walks through those doors at Carrollton & Banks, even when the times seem out of order. “It’s that feeling of everyone being a family that makes getting through the pandemic a lot easier,” junior class president and band member MichaelPaul Fine said. “It makes the seven hours feel like much more than school. You actually look forward to it.” In a year when students can feel so apart, faculty continue to bring everyone closer together. “They have been so

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accommodating through the whole situation,” Haydel said. “I can only imagine how tough it is to manage a personal life and teach during a normal year, not to mention under these extraordinary circumstances.” Through the conscious effort of the Jesuit community, these students find that abnormal times do not have to equal unsatisfying times. “Blue Jay Spirit is very much alive,” Fine said. “While I look forward to packed-in sporting events, cheering can still be heard even now, and the mission of Jesuit can still be seen each and every day.” Even with all this continued support, there will always be challenges. “Staying at home with just my family was definitely a different experience,” senior track and field member Daniel Douglass said. “But, at the same time, it taught me valuable lessons of appreciation for what Jesuit offers and how essential a strong family life truly is.” There may be two lunch periods and masks throughout the halls, but students have shown the ability to weather all storms by not looking at what is on the surface but by instead digging deeper to find where the true Blue Jay Spirit lies. Each student is on his own different path of blue and white, but they all share one goal: becoming a man of faith and a man for others. “Turning to God is truly the way to get through any hardship or success,” Haydel said. “Jesus has a plan for all of us, and these days are a part of it.” 


C A PI TA L C A M PA I G N

Construction Update

T

he late Fr. Raymond Fitzgerald, S.J. ’76, once observed, “Jesuit High School is the school where we're constantly improving but nothing ever changes.” The Minds & Hearts Enlightened campaign, the five-year effort to transform the campus at Carrollton & Banks, is a shining example of that belief. The work of four Jesuit presidents —Frs. Fitzgerald, Anthony McGinn ’66, Christopher Fronk, and John Brown, Jesuit’s current president— permeates the campus and, more importantly, positively impacts the work of those who study and teach at Carrollton & Banks. Projects already completed include the renovation of almost every classroom; renovation of the gymnasium, now known as the Gayle & Tom Benson Arena; and construction of the Stuart Brothers Bridge, which connects athletic facilities on the river side of Banks Street to the 1926 wing across the street.

Scheduled to be completed by summer 2021 is the new, fourstory administration building. This building, located at the entrance to the courtyard, will house all the public components of school, making the campus safer and freeing up space elsewhere for expanded and enhanced student activities. Inside the new building will be the Blue Jay Shop and Volunteer Office. Admissions, advancement (alumni, communications, and development), athletic administration, finance, mission, and presidential offices will also have a new home. The first floor of the new structure will feature Heritage Hall, a combination meeting/ reception space that will be filled with historical documents and memorabilia integral to the school’s founding and development. Exterior bricking of the new structure, imitating the silhouette of the Chapel of the North American Martyrs on the Palmyra side of campus, will match that of the original 1926 wing. Renovation

(above, right) The new administrative building continues to show progress in the mid-afternoon sun. (above, left) Ryan Gootee General Contractors is making quick progress in this rare look into the new building.

on the 1926 wing will begin next fall. The redesign will include additional space for student publications, campus ministry, community service, student council, and Sodality (Jesuit’s faith formation organization). Equally important to the aforementioned physical additions and improvements, benefactors have added $5 million to Jesuit’s endowment, the primary source for tuition assistance. Bricks recognizing Minds & Hearts Enlightened campaign benefactors will be installed in Traditions Courtyard and at the entrance of the new administration building in 2021. “Jesuit is blessed to have the support of so many who are backing this transformational effort to prepare our campus for today’s Blue Jays,” said Fr. Brown, “and the generations of students who will follow them on their journey to becoming men of faith and men for others.” 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

29


THANKSGIVING DRIVE

Challenging the

STATUS

QUO Thanksgiving Drive Assists Local Community

Juniors Luke Wills and Daniel Matthews carry in groceries to their homerooms eager to make Thanksgiving baskets for delivery.

At the annual Thanksgiving Prayer Service, Community Service Director Kevin Murphy ’00 addressed the seniors in the chapel (and the rest of the student body via livestream to their homerooms) about the importance of the Thanksgiving Drive. This year Jesuit students and alumni fed 535 families throughout the New Orleans area. Here are Murphy’s words to the Jesuit community.

E

very year around the first week of November, I head out across campus to hunt for a faculty member to give this talk at the Thanksgiving Drive prayer service. Over the past seven years, I’ve chosen well, because we’ve heard some really excellent speeches – from Mr. Powers, Mr. Grau, Coach Moran, Mrs. de Boisblanc, Fr. Kramer, and others – all of whom, in their own voices, captured what today is about. This November, though, in the midst of this very challenging and stressful school year, I didn’t have it in me to ask a co-worker to give this speech. If you haven’t noticed, your teachers, my colleagues, have a lot on their plates these days, and I couldn’t bring myself

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to add to someone’s already very long to-do list. So this year, I guess it’s my turn to offer up a few thoughts on the Thanksgiving Drive. As Mr. Hayes, Mr. Prados, and Mrs. Swan could all tell you, since they each ran Jesuit’s service program once upon a time, making the Thanksgiving Drive happen requires a lot of busy work – opening hundreds of letters, sorting them by zip code, alphabetizing them by last name, and entering a bunch of information into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. This is precisely the kind of work I was eager to leave behind when I left the traditional office world eight years ago to become a teacher. But in the case of the Thanksgiving Drive, I’ve actually

come to enjoy hunkering down in my office with a big stack of letters and opening up Excel, because it lays the groundwork for what Jesuit’s beloved former president and my old teacher, Fr. Raymond Fitzgerald, called one of the most important days of our school year. Today is so important because it gives us, the Jesuit community, a chance to acknowledge some really basic, fundamental truths, things that we’d do well to keep in the forefront of our minds all year round. First, the Thanksgiving Drive is an acknowledgement that we are grateful for the circumstances we learn and work under here at Jesuit. Much more than that, though, the


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Drive is an acknowledgement that we live in a community and that our community is a much better place for all of us to live when we lend each other a hand. Today is also our way of acknowledging that, in many ways, we live lives of abundance, sometimes excessive, unnecessary abundance, and that as Catholics we are called to share our resources with those struggling to meet their most basic needs. Today is also about making clear that as Christians we care about and love our neighbor – not just our actual neighbors, or just our families, or just our friends. But we care about folks we don’t even know, especially if they are struggling. And, finally, today is a way for us to acknowledge that the status quo, the way things are right now – massive income inequality and tens of thousands of people living in poverty right here in our own

city, a bad situation that has been made worse by the pandemic – this status quo doesn’t sit right with our conscience, and as Catholics, as Jesuit Blue Jays, as Men for Others, we feel compelled to do what we can to make this situation better. That is what today is about. In just a few moments, the Jesuit community will fan out across New Orleans to provide Thanksgiving meals to 535 families. On the one hand, this is a big number, something we should be proud of. As many of you know from delivering baskets in past years, these baskets mean a lot to the families receiving them. They’re a form of concrete financial assistance, and they help make Thanksgiving Day easier and more joyful for a whole lot of people. On the other hand, though, the Thanksgiving Drive provides just a drop in the bucket compared to the actual need in our community.

These meals aren’t going to solve the problem of poverty in New Orleans, and they aren’t going to transform someone’s life. What these baskets are, though, is an affirmation on our part that we’re serious about putting our Catholic faith into action and getting to work building the Kingdom of God right here at home. Thank you to everyone who helped make this day happen. Happy Thanksgiving and God Bless.  (clockwise from top) 1. Malcom Schwarzenbach ’83 delivers turkey the night before the Thanksgiving Drive 2. Fr. John Brown, S.J., Marc Robért ’04, Miguel Medina, and Peter Kernion ’90 3. Community Service Director Kevin Murphy ’00 4. (left to right) Evans Wise, William Cook, Caleb Lee, Nathan Lee, Matthew Firmin ’10, Daniel Ralph, and Chris Jennings ’78 5. Students sort and organize groceries into delivery baskets 6. Class of 2020 alumni—Connor Quaglino, Dylan Sellars, Stewart Talbot, and Dominic Stoner

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

31


THANKSGIVING DRIVE

Thanksgiving Gift Delivered to Jesuit A Beautifully Beaded Jayson

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he week before Thanksgiving, Jesuit welcomed a special guest with a special gift. Brenda Foucher-Slater has been receiving Thanksgiving baskets from Jesuit for many years. She has also been creating beaded artwork for Mardi Gras Indian suits for over twenty years. Every year when Jesuit students arrive at her house on the day before Thanksgiving, she and her daughter show them the progress they are making on this year’s suits. Students are always amazed by the colorful designs and impressed by the detailed beadwork, while receiving a first-hand lesson about an illustrious New Orleans tradition. Additionally, Brenda has appreciated the friendliness and generosity of the students, who spend time visiting and praying with her family. To show her appreciation, she decided to make a beaded representation of Jesuit’s mascot, Jayson, as a gift to the students of Jesuit High School.

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Last year at Thanksgiving, she gave the visiting students a blank canvas and asked that they return it with a drawing of Jayson. Fr. John Brown, S.J., sketched Jayson based on the original Walt Kelly image, and two young alumni, Gus Bongiovanni ’19 and Connor Quaglino ’20, who had both delivered Thanksgiving baskets to her in previous years, accompanied their former homeroom teacher, alumni director Michael Prados ’83, to her home with the canvas. After spending more than two months carefully sewing on beads and sequins, Brenda journeyed to Jesuit from her home near the Jackson Barracks to deliver her gift. She was treated to a tour of the school and an opportunity to meet many of the teachers and students who annually provide Thanksgiving meals to families throughout the community. Brenda says that she is especially appreciative of the food baskets because they not only provide a bountiful Thanksgiving meal but also contain enough food to feed her family for about three weeks. Brenda also let it slip that this year her birthday was on Thanksgiving Day, so when a group of young alumni from the Class of 2018 delivered her basket the following week, they also brought a specially decorated birthday cake, generously

provided by Marc Robért III ’04 of Robért Fresh Market, where Jesuit students shop before making their deliveries on the day before Thanksgiving. And, of course, they sang Happy Birthday after presenting the cake to Brenda. This story reminds us that the Thanksgiving Drive isn’t just about dropping off food and leaving. Students and teachers regularly spend time getting to know the families that they provide for, and many teachers return to the same homes year after year and even stay in touch with the families through the year. The Thanksgiving Drive is about relationships formed between the Jesuit community and its neighbors throughout the city. Just as Brenda and the many families aided by the drive are thankful to Jesuit, the school community also appreciates the friendships developed with them and especially this gift that will be displayed prominently at the school to be admired for years to come.  (above, left to right) Brenda FoucherSlater presents the beaded Jayson to Jesuit President Fr. John Brown, S.J., and Alumni Director Michael Prados ’83 in front of the original 1954 Walt Kelly drawing of Jayson.; Alumni from the Class of 2018 gather in the Alumni Office before delivering groceries and a birthday cake to Foucher-Slater.


THANKSGIVING DRIVE

It took over two months for Brenda Foucher-Slater to sew each bead and sequin onto the canvas to create Jayson.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

33


ANNUS MIR ABILIS

Two Pandemics, Two Stories of Jesuit High

BY MATIAS GRAU ’68

Sorry, young man. You’ll have to wait for the next streetcar. This flu has us limiting passengers, and this car is full.” Getting home from school suddenly had gotten a lot more difficult for the Jesuit High student standing on Canal St. on this Friday in October of 1918. By Monday, the problem had evaporated as city officials shut down all schools in New Orleans as one way of curtailing the spread of the Spanish Flu that eventually would rob the city of 1% of its citizens. Other closures would follow— theaters, movie houses, dance halls, funerals, weddings, and athletic contests were all shut down. Suddenly the city had become quiet. And the night darkness resulting from the extinguishing of the street lamps to discourage gatherings seemed appropriate for a community enveloped by contagion and death. The city’s spirit, its joie de vivre, was being snuffed out. At the same time, a group of Jesuit students were themselves striving to give life to a new type of spirit, a spirit of community, a spirit specific to their school, their Jesuit school. Eddie Hebert, Gernon Brown, Blair Lancaster, and others, juniors at the time, were endeavoring to rally their classmates in support of each other. They lived out something greater than themselves: an allegiance to their God to be developing young men who were active participants in the unfolding beauty of God’s creation on Earth. One vehicle for developing this spirit was the still-evolving sport of football. On the one hand, the game

called for eleven players working together toward one goal, indeed great practice for other goals to come in life. On the other hand, it was an opportunity for support of the other, not oneself, in a common goal of school success. Yes, this was the formation of a “rah, rah, rah” type of spirit. But it was also the formation of a communal spirit of common endeavor for the betterment of self and others, a spirit that would see the establishment of such institutions as the Thanksgiving Drive and student retreats. The flu took this opportunity away. New Orleans’s premiere chronicler of the city’s prep sports history, Ron Brocato, tells us in his March 2020 article in the Clarion Herald that the epidemic all but wiped out the initial season of an organized football league in 1918. School resumed in November, and only twelve prep games were played, Jesuit vs. Warren Easton being one of them. (Easton won 6-0.) While this formation piece was cruelly taken from the Blue “J’s” in 1918, perhaps it only enhanced the resolve of the student leaders for a greater spirit in 1919. And perhaps their witness of the events of the city, the leadership of city officials to care for their citizens (though like today not always popular), and the outpouring of assistance from common citizens helped shape their

view of that school spirit as something quite more than cheering at games. They witnessed nuns from Charity Hospital caring around the clock for sick soldiers at Jackson Barracks. This act “relieved a chaotic condition that had become desperate,” wrote Fr. Jonathan J. Donovan, S.J., the chaplain at Jackson, in an official commendation to the nuns. They witnessed charitable and civic organizations and individuals quickly establish additional emergency facilities, provide medications, prepare and deliver meals, and afford needed services to the stricken. Did this have an impact on young freshman C. Ellis Henican, who would go on to play a major role in the desegregation of the Archdiocese of New Orleans? Was an even younger Leon Sarpy ’24 so inspired to embrace civic responsibility as a way of life and career leading to his election as president of Louisiana’s Bar Association? Impacted by the Spanish Flu and all of its ramifications, how many students of the Jesuit High of 1918-19 adjusted the trajectory of their careers toward a care for others? And what about today’s students of Jesuit High? What impact will the coronavirus pandemic of 2020-21 have on them? Will they, too, witness heroic actions of men and women giving of themselves for others? Will their witnessing of chaplain Fr. Kevin Dyer’s providing spiritual nourishment to COVID-19 patients at University Medical Center inspire them to embrace service to others as an integral part of their lives? Continuity of mission of the sons of Jesuit High School throughout its history is one of the school’s great abiding traits. No one would want to commemorate the centennial of the Spanish Flu by literally living it again. But in being presented with that very reality today’s students need only look to the past for affirmation and inspiration as they live out their mission to be men of faith and men for others. 


EVENING OF REFLECTION

Suffering

& Hope

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gnatian spirituality is a major emphasis of study at any Jesuit school, and two events that delved into this importance were the Evenings of Reflection. The first reflection night, held in September, started with a Mass celebrated by president Fr. John Brown, S.J., who then turned over the reins to Fr. Stephen Kramer, S.J., to lead the reflection. Fr. Kramer began his oration by speaking about suffering during a pandemic and where to find hope in a time when all else seems lost. Kramer, who brought his usual exuberance to the pulpit, shared multiple anecdotes of suffering and redemption. He told a true story of two women who never backed down from their faith. The two women, Maryam and Marzieh, were both Iranian prisoners arrested for converting to Christianity. The judge for their trial, knowing the punishment was death, gave them a way out: deny the Lord. Without hesitation both women continually professed, “Jesus Christ is Lord.” The judge did not have a choice, so he put them back in prison. Despite their captivity, these two righteous women were able to sneak letters out to their local church, and several made the news. The letters depicted two women who were scared not of the suffering but of the fact that people would see their suffering and lose faith. Due to the circulation, they were let free to keep spreading their message of faith and hope even during a time of suffering. “It’s a beautiful story,” Fr. Kramer said, “a beautiful story of facing our own deaths and suffering for Christ.” He went on to describe an alcoholic

Jesuit priest. He always ate alone in the dining hall in New York, had no ministry, and had no church. When he passed away, the Jesuits organized a small funeral in their chapel but were surprised to find over 2,000 people standing outside in the cold waiting to get in. These people told stories of a man who organized one of the first Alcohol Anonymous groups in New York—a man who, for the past decade, had gone into bars to save alcoholics from themselves, a man who found purpose from helping others like himself. Through those experiences, he found sobriety by finally giving control over to God and asking for mercy. Both of these stories shared a theme: life is suffering, but not all hope is lost. “There is an answer to this suffering,” Fr. Kramer said. “It is Christ. He is our redemption.” On December 8, Jesuit celebrated the Feast of the Immaculate Conception at the Chapel of the North American Martyrs followed by a reflection by school chaplain Fr. Kevin Dyer, S.J., on Living and Dying During a Time of Pandemic. While brilliantly intertwining the gospel story of Lazarus, Fr. Dyer

described multiple anecdotes from how Br. William Dardis, S.J. ’58 was the heart and soul of the entire Jesuit community to Dyer’s time assisting at University Medical Center, where he prayed and spent time with the sick. “When I was asked if I wanted to lead a night of reflection,” Fr. Dyer said, “my mind went to one topic: death and life. And this year began with the death of Br. Dardis.” “One of the first rooms that I walked into at the hospital was one of the most intense,” Fr. Dyer said. “The man just broke down, and I was taken aback. As soon as I finished praying with him, I stepped out and said, ‘If they are all going to be like that, I do not know if I’ll make it.’ Holy cow, what a privilege it was to be among the sick.” After meeting so many different people throughout the process, he found that the faith was immensely strong from patient to patient and that hope brought them to a comforting place before God. Even in times of hardship and suffering, Jesus is there transforming that situation. “We should always keep our death before our eyes,” Fr. Dyer said, “not as an exercise, but just as a reality that this life is short. We only get one, do the best with it.” 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

35


PHILELECTIC SOCIETY

“Comparison is the thief of joy!” BY KATE ARTHURS

The Phils' fall production of The Tempest

PHILELECTIC SOCIETY, DIRECTOR

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know I shed a lot of tears for our Phils: tears for their lost moments, tears over all the hard work, tears at the sight of my office filled with kilts and tartans that would go unworn from our cancelled spring 2020 production of Brigadoon. Two weeks into quarantine I recognized that many Phils were in pain, alone at home with parents who were working, scared of the virus for their own health and for their families, facing this great existential crisis: who are you if you're a performer with no audience? With no end in sight, I reached out to our creative team. We knew our students needed opportunities to interact with each other, to grow in their art, and to express themselves. That's when our daily Zoom activities commenced. Our “new normal” included Monday Meetings, J-Troupe Tuesday, Wednesday Workshops, Theatre Thursdays, and Phun Phridays. All Phils were welcomed to attend: “none required, stay inspired.” It gave many of them something to look forward to each day. We were all improvising—as we still are now. Our first Wednesday workshop featured Tony-nominee Caitlin Kinnunen, who reminded us of this wonderful quote from President Roosevelt: “Comparison is the thief of joy!” That has become my mantra. We spoke to actors, singers, directors, techs, producers, dancers, playwrights, and film and sound editors. We even previewed top secret stuff for the new The Walking Dead spinoff. Our guests, 36 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

many of whom are Phils and Blue Jay alumni, joined us from New York, Los Angeles, Austin, Kenner, Mississippi, Chicago, Seattle, and Germany. It was extraordinary. Theatre Thursdays found us cold-reading one-act plays and produced our streamed production of Ten Ways to Survive Life in Quarantine, for which actors costumed and propped their own scenes using stuff they had at home. On what would've been opening night of Brigadoon, Fr. David Paternostro, S.J., gave a Mass for us on Zoom from our Holy Name Chapel. We kept these activities up all the way through June, ending with our lovely “Picnic Banquet” in the courtyard, where we bid a fond farewell to a dozen seniors and our beloved Fr. Paternostro as he headed to St. Louis for his Ph.D. When we returned to campus for the new school year with the hybrid schedule, our daily Zoom activities resumed. As the world opened a bit more, only J-Troupe and our fall production rehearsals continued on Zoom, and by November we were on campus for rehearsals—but in masks and physically distanced. We chose to perform and record our production of The Tempest for everyone to stream. We realized that setting it during a hurricane in NOLA was a great concept, and it had lots of opportunities for creativity and local flavor. We hope that we've honored the fifteenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the memory and experiences of all those affected by hurricanes in our region. We have been trying to focus on

blessings rather than dwelling on missed opportunities. We have been able to pursue our passions and work on our craft with our fellow actors and crew over the quarantine and beyond. We have continued to celebrate our Phils Masses with Fr. Paternostro, live-streamed from a chapel at St. Louis University. We have rejoiced that Ten Ways to Survive Life in Quarantine resulted in a generous donation to Second Harvest. We have supported out-of-work artists and actors. We have employed our own alumni who are furloughed or had to return home to New Orleans to continue their college studies online. This is not “normal.” And things may get worse before they get better. But I really believe our kids are resilient and that they are learning so much about empathy and the importance of our relationship to others. They have learned that “being bored is okay” and that there are blessings in solitude. They have learned the inestimable value of our mental and physical well-being as human beings. They have learned that time is a gift and that allocating it can be a great challenge and responsibility. They are learning about justice, equality, dignity, and sacrifice. I believe they learn the most when they see adults around them exemplifying how to show courage and handle heartache while showing respect and love toward each other. If we only dwell on what could have been, comparing what is now to what was supposed to be, we may miss the blessings around us. 


PHILELECTIC SOCIETY J-TROUPE TUESDAY

THEATRE THURSDAY

Reading of “My Little Titus Andronicus” by Don Zolidis

SAVE * THE DATE

Jesuit Mothers’ Luncheon April 20, 2021

O N E . B I D PA L . N E T/ J E S U I T M O T H E R S L U N C H E O N

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

37


B LU E J AY B A N D

Michael Melancon & Bradley Eschmann

Marking Time —But Looking Forward In the face of unprecedented challenges, optimism for the future

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or generations of Jesuit students, the Blue Jay Band has dependably served as a cornerstone of school spirit, and decades of athletic and school events have been marked by the band “trumpeting valor’s cry”. For band members themselves, though, there has perhaps always existed a parallel reality, with membership in the band conferring not merely nostalgia or Blue Jay spirit but also a sense of camaraderie and brotherhood built on shared exalted experiences. These experiences are many and diverse— the sting of sweat dripping into tired eyes at band camp, the rush of an end-of-season performance, the exhilaration of performing around the country and world alongside best friends—but to thousands of Blue

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Jays, they are as tangible as the school’s concrete pastel stairwells and as encompassing the courtyard’s iconic red bricks. This year, for the first time in more than twenty years, the band was unable to travel to Nicholls State University for band camp. A much-anticipated Disney trip was cancelled after months of planning and re-planning. The impact extends beyond large-scale events: there have been no bus rides to and from events, rehearsals have hardly been able to take place, and indoor performances are out of the question. What does it mean to carry on the band’s legacy when those touchstones are suddenly stripped away? “It was pretty scary in a way for me as a senior not knowing if we’d be able to have football games or other performances,” says trumpet player Dominic Senentz, whose brothers Daniel ’12 and David ’15 also played in the band. “We weren’t able to even rehearse until the last week of the first quarter of school—right before our first halftime performance. It was really exciting for me because I got to put together the formation for that halftime, and it was the first time I even got to see the full list of the new

students who would be in band this year.” Without band camp, Senentz notes that new bandsmen were unable to make a normal entrance into the band’s culture and expectations but that by the end of the season, many of them had risen to the occasion. “There were a few new students who really stepped up. For one of our halftime shows, Nicco Organno, prefreshman, had to be in a spot that everyone else really depended on for that show—and he did a great job. We also had a freshman, Mark Johnson, who we moved up to first trumpet (the higher and sometimes more challenging part), and he really stepped up, too.” For his part, band director Joe Caluda ’79 has taken an insistently positive tone, seizing every opportunity for students to find some normality. Student-arranged music entertained fans at halftime in lieu of a competition field show, a livestreamed Christmas set replaced the Christmas concert, and the marching band appeared in the Krewe of Bacchus’s virtual parade. Juniors Aidan Schwartz and Matthew Vuong earned spots amongst the top 10 soloists in the state and dozens of Blue Jay bandsmen auditioned


B LU E J AY B A N D Dominic Senentz

Michael Nair & Jonah McCaffery

virtually for LMEA honor bands. Without downplaying these hard-won victories, Caluda has set his ambitions on the upcoming Germany trip that would mark the 20th anniversary of the JesuitClavius exchange program. Every other summer, Jesuit band students and their family members travel to Europe, where they are hosted by Clavius Gynmasium families in a transatlantic exchange program. On opposite years, German students then make the trip to New Orleans, where they don khaki to become temporary Blue Jays. Wade Trosclair ’07, band alumnus and mainstay of the Jesuit social studies department, explained in a 2018 Jaynotes article: What now has become Jesuit’s longestrunning international program began in 1999 when band director Joe Caluda traveled through Germany on a professional development trip. One stop on that tour was Bamberg, a charming town in the hills of northern Bavaria that still looks much like it did in the eighteenth century…. There, he met Rudy Schmitt, the principal of Clavius Gymnasium—a co-ed secondary school of about 1,200 students—who

proposed the idea that Clavius and Jesuit establish a musical and cultural exchange. Trosclair describes the program as an eye-opening, pivotal experience for band students, many of whose academic and professional lives have later been significantly influenced by their experience with the exchange program. What began as an experiment has blossomed into a robust global education opportunity for Jesuit students. By the numbers, over 50 joint performances have occurred as part of the exchange; three trinational concerts have been held featuring

the Jesuit Jazz Band, the Clavius Gynmasium Big Band, and the Bedford Brass Ensemble; and more than 900 Blue Jay parents and more than 1,000 German and American students have taken part in the exchange. Senentz, who would be making the trip for the fifth time this upcoming summer, is also hopeful that the trip will be able to happen; however, his optimism does not end there. “In spite of everything that happened this year, so many upperclassmen and underclassmen have stepped up,” he reiterates. “For the rest of this year and for the future, I know that there are good things to come.”  JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

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CE LE B R AT I O N S P O N S O R S

Jesuit T hanks its Generous Benefactors TWELVE POINT BUCK

EASTERN WILD TURKEY

PRESENTING SPONSOR

AMERICAN ALLIGATOR

MALLARD DUCK

CAPITAL ONE BANK RYAN GOOTEE GENERAL CONTRACTORS LOUPE PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO CINDY & ROB WOODERSON

JACK DARDIS & MASON COUVILLON DARDIS COUVILLON & ASSOC. BANNER CHEVROLET & BANNER FORD JENNIFER & DENNIS LAUSCHA REGIONS

RED SNAPPER AGUILLARD ACCOUNTING, LLC DONALD & CHERIE ALBRO ALEXANDRIA NEUROSURGICAL CLINIC JOHN B. APPEL JR. ‘86 & JEAN NEWMAN AUDI NEW ORLEANS MR. & MRS. KEVIN AVIN THE STUART HALL SCHOOL FOR BOYS KATE & ETIENNE BALART BALFOUR NEW ORLEANS MICHAEL & KATHRYN BEATTY BILLY & MAGGIE BOASBERG DR. & MRS. DAVID BROUSSARD THOMAS & SHERRI BROWN DR. & MRS. ROSS M. CASCIO TIFFANY & PEDRO CAZABON ALICE & TONY CIBILICH JASON & MICHELLE COMBOY COMMUNITY OXYGEN SERVICES RALPH & PATRICIA COX DR. & MRS. DEGAN J. DANSEREAU THE DUGAN LAW FIRM DURR HEAVY CONSTRUCTION EAST JEFFERSON EMERGENCY PHYSICIANS

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EDWARD & GISELLE EASTLACK JAY ECKHOLDT DRS. LUIS & ANDREA ESPINOZA MR. & MRS. KIRBY FALCON JEANIE FAVRET MARC & EMILY FRISCHHERTZ ROY & MANDI FRISCHHERTZ CRESCENT COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION EUGENIE & BILLY GIBBENS MEREDITH & TODD GOLEMI MR. & MRS. DOUGLAS GRIFFIN ‘89 GOLDA & MICHAEL HARTMAN AMY & JASON HAMIDE JESSICA & ROBBIE HUGHES HYUNDAI OF METAIRIE ALISON & MARK JAMES MARK & PAULA JEANNSONNE ALICIA & DAVID JOINT KARL & KYLE KEHOE TROY & ARLEA KELLER VINSON & WENDY KNIGHT

ANGELEA & DAVE KRONLAGE GREG & YVETTE LACOUR CLIFTON & ELIZABETH LEBLANC MR. & MRS. JOSEPH MANNINO, II MARRS BUILDING SUPPLY DRS. STEPHEN & REBECCA METZINGER AESTHETIC SURGICAL ASSOCIATES DR. & MRS. WILLIAM NEWMAN NOLA PORT AGENTS, INC. KELLY & JUANITA PARENTON MICHAEL & MARGARET PELITERE STEPHEN & KATIE PERRIEN MR. & MRS. JOHN RYAN SALUTARE DEUM FOUNDATION LYN & DAVID SCAFFIDI DR. & MRS. CHUCK SCHIBLER BILLY SOLITARIO FINE ART DRS. ANN & GREG TILTON DR. & MRS. JOSEPH F. UDDO, JR. ERIC & MONIQUE VOCKE MICHAEL WALDO MARK & CAROLINE WEGMANN MR. & MRS. DAVID M. WHITSELL


CE LE B R AT I O N S P O N S O R S

IN-KIND DONORS

ACME OYSTER HOUSE ACROPOLIS CUISINE AMERICAN LUXURY LIMOUSINES ANDREA'S RESTAURANT AVO BALFOUR NEW ORLEANS BAYOU OAKS AT CITY PARK BEATRIZ BALL COLLECTION BEAU CHENE COUNTRY CLUB BENT'S RV BEVOLO GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHTS BHARRIS ART BONFOLK SOCKS BRG HOSPITALITY CAJUN ENCOUNTERS TOUR COMPANY CENTRAL CITY BBQ CHAIS DELACHAISE CHAP'S PARTY RENTALS CHATEAU GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB CHEFS AARON BURGAU, BRIAN LANDRY, PAT WHITE, & DAVID WHITMORE CHEF JACQUES & PAIGE SALEUN CLANCY'S RESTAURANT COASTAL CUBES & OFFICE FURNITURE COPELAND'S OF NEW ORLEANS, L.L.C. COPPER MILL GOLF COURSE COPPER VINE CRESCENT BELT MANUFACTURERS CRESCENT CITY LANDSCAPING CRESCENT CITY VETERINARY HOSPITAL DEANIE'S SEAFOOD DIAMONDHEAD GOLF COURSE DOLCE BOUTIQUE DR. BOB FOLK ART STUDIO & GALLERY DRAGO'S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT EMILY AND ANGEL'S GIFTS ETRE COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY & LASER CENTER FISHER & SONS JEWELERS FRAMES, INC. FRENCH QUARTER GUEST HOUSE BOUTIQUE HOTEL FRIEND & COMPANY

FURNISH GALATOIRE'S RESTAURANT GOODWOOD NOLA GRUNDMANN'S ATHLETIC CO. HAASE'S HARLEY DAVIDSON HAYDEL'S BAKERY HELM PAINT & DECORATING HICKHAM DERMATOLOGY & MED SPA HILTON NEW ORLEANS AIRPORT HILTON NEW ORLEANS RIVERSIDE HOLLY LYNN STUDIO HOUMAS HOUSE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH INTERCONTINENTAL NEW ORLEANS IRON HORSE CLOTHIER JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL MOTHERS ROSARY GROUP JEWELLRY FOR IMPOMEA JOE GAMBINO'S BAKERY JOHN'S TUXEDOS JONAH R. MOORE, DDS JUDY AT THE RINK KATIE MALONE SALON KELLY BATES DESIGNS, LLC KENDRA SCOTT KEVYN PARENTON WINTERS KREWE L BOUTIQUE AT LEXUS NEW ORLEANS LAKEVIEW VETERINARY HOSPITAL LANDRY VINEYARDS LANGENSTEIN'S SUPERMARKET LD DESIGNS LITTLE MISS MUFFIN LOFT 18 LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS LOUPE PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO LUCA FALCONE CUSTOM CLOTHIERS METAIRIE COUNTRY CLUB METAIRIE SMALL ANIMAL HOSPITAL MIMI'S LASER ALTERNATIVES MONEY HILL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB MOSCA'S RESTAURANT MR. & MRS. BERNARD PEREZ MR. & MRS. KIRBY FALCON MR. & MRS. MARK JAMES MR. & MRS. ROB WOODERSON MR. & MRS. RONALD MONTALBANO MR. ALEX DEMYAN MR. DAVID WILLIAMS MR. JOHNNY GIAVOTELLA MR. LLOYD FRISCHHERTZ MR. TOM MOORE MRS. DANIELLE TOWNSEND MRS. TAHONAS CURLEY MS. EMILY HATTIER MURPHY ORTHODONTICS NEAT WINES NEW ORLEANS JAZZ AND HERITAGE FOUNDATION

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS NEW ORLEANS STEAMBOAT COMPANY/ GRAYLINE TOURS NEW ORLEANS NINA'S ART & DESIGN NOLA BEAUX TIES NOLA COUTURE NOLA EVENTS AND TAILGATES NOLA KIDSGROUND NOLA MOTORSPORTS PARK NORRIS GAGNET PHOTOGRAPHY OAK OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART OMNI ROYAL ORLEANS HOTEL OSTER GOLF HOMES PATIO DRUGS PERLIS PERRET'S ARMY & OUTDOOR STORES PIPPEN LANE PLUSH APPEAL, LLC/ THE MARDI GRAS SPOT PURA VIDA ADVENTURES RENDON INN RICCOBONO'S PEPPERMILL RISTORANTE FILIPPO RIVER PARISH DISPOSAL, LLC RIVERS SPENCER INTERIOR ROBERT FRESH MARKET ROYAL STREET FINE ART RUTH'S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE RYAN GOOTEE GENERAL CONTRACTORS, LLC SARAH OTT, INC. SCAFFIDI ORTHODONTICS SCHWARTZ DENTAL GROUP SCOTT LEVY SELECTIONS SEAN WEISS, MD SECOND SERVE TENNIS CENTER SOFAS & CHAIRS, INC. SOMETHING NEW AND PRETTY SOSUSU BOUTIQUE SUPERIOR GRILL SUPREME EXERCISE TEAM GLEASON THE AUDUBON GROUP AT MORGAN STANLEY THE CAJUN TURNER THE COURT OF TWO SISTERS THE GALLERY SALON & SPA THE MONOGRAM ROOM THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM THE PORCH & PATIO THE RED M STUDIO TITO'S VODKA TORINO LEATHER COMPANY TOTAL WINE TREP'S TURKEY AND THE WOLF VALS VILLAGE INN WINDSOR COURT HOTEL YAT YARN

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

41


Alumni Class Captains’ Meeting

A

lumni class captains from 1951 through 2016 met with school leaders in the grandstand at John Ryan Stadium in September. Captains head their class leadership teams and are the link between the school and their respective classes. They are responsible for communication between the school and their classmates, organizing reunions

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and other class events, assisting with the Alumni Giving Drive, and promoting spirit and unity among their classmates. Class captains meet as a group twice per year. Alumni interested in joining their class leadership team should contact their class captain or alumni@jesuitnola.org. More information about each class can be found on the individual alumni class pages on the website. 

(clockwise from top) Fr. John Brown, S.J., addresses the alumni class captains and thanks them for their time and dedication; The class captains space out at John Ryan Stadium in accordance with social distance rules; Shelby Johnson ’06 mans the grill; Dooty Patron ’51 and Ralph Cox’ 64 catch up; Young alums Joseph Dupre ’16 and Earl Johnson ’13 chat between talks ; Class of 2006 chefs Christian Bautista, James Linn, and Shelby Johnson


A lu m n i

CLASS

Reunion

1951

MAY 29

Schedule

1956

MAY 22-23

1961

MAY 28-29

1966

SEPT. 17-18

1971

SEPT. 17-18

1976

JUNE 4-5

1981

JUNE 18-19

1986

MAY 7-8

1991

JUNE 25-26

1996

SEPT. 17-18

2001

JUNE 11-12

2006

JUNE 4-5

2011

MAY 7-8

2016

JUNE 12

SAVE * THE DATE Register for reunions via your class page at jesuitnola.org/class-reunions. Registration will be communicated six weeks prior to each event. * 2020 reunions are being rescheduled. Check the Jesuit website for details as they become available. *

DATE

SEPT. 18 ALUMNI HOMECOMING MASS & COCKTAIL PARTY JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

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Where Y'at?!

’86

’87

ALUMNI: TELL US WHERE Y’AT! Submit online at jesuitnola.org/where-yat. JOHN HUMMEL & SCOTT TONGUIS

1960s James McClellan ’65 retired in

2020 after 33 years teaching at Georgia Tech, where he was the John and Marilu McCarty Chair Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His career in academia included a Ph.D. at Rice University and seven-year stint as a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He and his wife of 51 years, Carolyn Monjure, have two children and five grandchildren.

1970s Gilbert Ganucheau, Jr. ’77 was

ordained to the permanent diaconate for the Archdiocese of New Orleans in June of 2018. He recently completed a master’s degree in Pastoral Leadership from Notre Dame Seminary. He serves as Chief Legal Officer for Slidell Memorial Hospital. He and his wife, Sheila, have four children and twelve grandchildren. They are expecting their thirteenth grandchild in November. Terry Cassreino ’79 was named

a Special Recognition Broadcast Journalism Adviser for 2020 by Journalism Education Association based at Kansas State University. Cassreino has led the journalism/ student media program at St. Joseph Catholic School in Madison, MS, since 2012. He entered the teaching ranks in 2011 after more than 30 years in the newspaper business in Mississippi as a political 44 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

reporter, a syndicated columnist, and a newsroom editor. He, his wife Pam, and their two children live in Madison.

1980s John Lasseigne ’82 moved to

Ottawa, Canada's capital city, in September. He continues working as an immigration attorney with EY Law LLP, a law firm affiliated with Ernst & Young in Canada. Patrick Dugan ’84 retired from 30

years of active and reserve service as a U.S. Army colonel when he completed his command of the U.S. AFRICOM Joint Reserve Intelligence Group. He participated in military operations ranging from Operation Desert Shield/Storm through Operation Enduring Freedom-Horn of Africa. Pat and his wife of 29 years, Laurie, live in the Princeton, NJ, area where he is a global marketing director for Integra Lifesciences. John Zollinger ’85 was promoted to

Senior Vice President and Director of Commercial Banking at Home Bank. He has been with Home Bank for 10 years and in banking for 30 years. This new position makes him responsible for all commercial banking activities at Home Bank covering six markets: Acadiana, New Orleans, the Northshore, Baton Rouge, Southwest Louisiana, and Western Mississippi.

# John Hummel ’86 is in his 20th year flying 757's and 767's for UPS.

His routes include both domestic and international theaters. He recently finished an Atlantic crossing from Germany with fellow alumnus and former soccer teammate Scott Tonguis ’87.

1990s Christian Weiler ’97 has been

confirmed by the U.S. Senate for a 15-year term on the U.S. Tax Court in Washington, D.C. The Tax Court provides a national forum to quickly resolve disputes between taxpayers and the Internal Revenue Service. Only 19 judges from across the United States serve on the court. Weiler is believed to be the first person from Louisiana to hold such a post.

2000s Patrick Viviano ’04 completed

his internal medicine residency at Brooklyn Hospital, NY, where he worked as a first responder during the COVID-19 crisis. He has accepted a position as a hospitalist at Kingman Regional Medical Center in Kingman, AZ.

# Travis Andrews ’05 recently published his first book, Because He’s Jeff Goldblum, a biography. Andrews is a features writer for the Washington Post, where he covers Internet and pop culture.

# Joseph “JB” Testa ’05 was promoted to lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy in September. He is the


W H E R E Y 'AT ? ’05

TRAVIS ANDREWS

’05

JOSEPH “JB” TESTA

Test Officer for the USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205) which is being built in San Diego, CA.

(daughter of Kevin Heigle ’69) in May 2021.

Justin Martineau ’07 moved to

magna cum laude from Howard University in 2017 with a degree in computer engineering. Immediately after graduation, he began working with Boeing in California. He is also working on his master’s degree in cyber security at USC.

central New Jersey in August and began work for the Brothers of the Christian Schools District of Eastern North America office. In his new role, Associate Director of Mission and Ministry, he has primary responsibility for lay formation, association, and Young Lasallians. Graham Williams ’08 recently joined

the law firm of Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC, in New Orleans. An experienced commercial litigator, Williams is excited to join a new team of tech-forward and entrepreneurial attorneys. Eric Drewes ’09 recently started working for Troy Mathews ’08 State

Farm Insurance Agency.

2010s Jacob Moore ’11 graduated with his

doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas in Austin in May 2020. Matt Felger ’13 is excited to

announce his completion of the Bauer Professional MBA Program at the University of Houston. Balancing a 48-hour course-load over a 24-month period while maintaining a fulltime position was a challenging but very rewarding experience. He is also getting married to Julie Heigle

Ernest “Trey” Legier III ’13 graduated

Nicholas Simon ’13 earned his J.D.

from the University of Virginia School of Law. He joined Liskow & Lewis as a litigator in the firm’s New Orleans office. Jonathan Legier ’15 graduated magna

cum laude from Howard University in 2019 with a biology pre-med major and a chemistry minor. Immediately after graduation, he obtained a nationwide paramedic certification and worked as an emergency medical technician in the Maryland/D.C. area. Legier recently moved back to New Orleans while completing the application process for medical school. He has plans to start medical school in the fall of 2021. Francis Plough ’15 accepted a

position as a project engineer with HITT Contracting Inc. in Atlanta. Nicholas Legier ’17 is a mechanical

engineering senior at Howard University. He secured an internship with HNTB (a national engineering company) during the summer of 2019. He will graduate in May 2021. 

A LIFE-LONG LOVE OF JESUIT Riley Conroy ’14 was promoted to

assistant coach for the Southeastern Louisiana men's basketball team. He is in his second season with the program after serving as the team's director of recruiting during the 2019-20 season. He reports the following: “One of my family members was Pat Conroy, the best-selling author who spoke at Jesuit years ago. Pat was so moved by his experience at Jesuit that when I moved to New Orleans about to enter into my freshman year of high school, he called my father. Pat knew that it was time for me to decide which school to attend, and he told my father that there is no decision to be made or debate to be had: He WILL go to Jesuit. “After Pat passed away in 2016, his wife has kept the house relatively the same. Pat was often wearing a hat, so when my family recently visited Pat's family home, my father noticed that only one hat was on the coat rack: a Jesuit hat, the hat he received after a speaking engagement at Jesuit. My brother, Hunt, who graduated from Jesuit in 2017, immediately took out his phone and sent me the picture below. Nobody was surprised because we all knew how much Pat respected and admired Jesuit High School.”

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL |

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IN MEMORIAM

“Paul and Harry were not always on the same page. I liken their relationship to that of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson: sometimes rivals, sometimes close friends, but always dedicated to the Republic—passionate about the Republic. Paul and Harry were both passionate about God’s kingdom and about this school.”

JESUIT REMEMBERS PAST PRESIDENT, 1974-1979

Fr. Paul W. Schott, S.J. (1923-2020)

O

Fr. Paul W. Schott, S.J., of Grand Coteau, Louisiana, died November 26, 2020, at 97.

n Thanksgiving Day, former Jesuit president Fr. Paul Schott, S.J. ’40, passed away in Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Having served as a Jesuit for 70 years, as a priest for 60 years, and as president of Jesuit from 1974 to 1979, Fr. Schott left an indelible mark on the life and culture of Jesuit High School. A memorial Mass was celebrated in the Chapel of the North American Martyrs on December 10, 2020, and though COVID restrictions limited the number of people who were able

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to attend in person, hundreds of viewers watched the Mass virtually via livestream. The Mass was celebrated by former Jesuit President Fr. Anthony McGinn ’66, S.J., and concelebrated by Fr. John Brown, S.J. Fr. McGinn emphasized the importance of Fr. Schott’s time at Jesuit saying, “He is one of the five most important people in the 20th century at Jesuit. Jesuit would not be what it is today without Paul Schott.” Fr. McGinn characterized Fr. Schott’s biggest high-level change to the school culture as his decision to more directly and fully involve families in the educational process, “making them a part of the school experience.” “Paul Schott had a dedication, a competence, and a persistence that made him so effective,” said Fr. McGinn speaking more generally about Fr. Schott’s leadership and administrative capacities. He further explained that Fr. Schott’s effectiveness was, in part, due to his willingness to bring on board Fr. Harry Tompson, S.J. ’54 as principal.

Though the two Jesuits had different personalities and though Fr. Tompson would serve in a more public-facing role, the decision was, in Fr. McGinn’s words, “a mark of his self-sacrifice and his self-abnegation. He didn’t have to do that. He brought him in because he realized that, together, they were going to turn the school around. And he was absolutely right.” Their teamwork generated many of the traditions and structures that have become taken for granted. Fr. McGinn continued: “He was a man who dedicated himself to God’s work, and he did not necessarily want all the credit himself. He was a great man, he knew what needed to be done, and even though it meant that someone else was getting the credit, he allowed that to happen.” “By himself, he would have been able to turn around Jesuit High School, but with the aid of Harry Tompson, he made it great. And it was his choice that made it great.” Reminding us to be thankful for the influence that Fr. Schott had on the school and on those around him, Fr. McGinn concluded, “Let us thank Almighty God for the great gift that Paul Schott was to the school, to his family, and to his friends. Thank God for making Paul Schott who he was.” 


IN MEMORIAM

JESUIT REMEMBERS PROLIFIC EDUCATOR, 1998-2020

Sharon S. Hewlett (1953-2020)

D

Sharon S. Hewlett, of Metairie, Louisiana, died December 22, 2020, at 67.

ays after the end of the first semester of the 202021 academic year, Sharon Hewlett suddenly passed away. Mrs. Hewlett served as a teacher, leader, and mentor at Jesuit High School for 22 years. Though she served as the department chair of the Computer Studies Department for 17 of those years, she also taught Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, Geometry, Computer Literacy, Computer Applications, and Computer Science I and II. Hewlett began her time at Jesuit in 1998, and, during her tenure at

Carrollton & Banks—and particularly while she was Information Technology Director—she helped steer the school through some of our society’s greatest technology shifts, guiding Jesuit into the 21st Century. She was wellknown for her patient willingness to assist students and faculty alike with technology problems of any scale. Outside of conducting the dayto-day, often-thankless maintenance that makes each school day possible, Hewlett touched countless aspects of school life from various iterations of the school’s website to the Robotics Club. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Hewlett took the lead on handling Jesuit’s federal grants, overseeing the replacement of all items lost to flooding. This put her in charge of ordering everything from power tools to a tractor in addition to her normal logistical responsibilities of managing over 500 computers, all of the school’s cameras, and classroom audio-visual equipment. At her funeral Mass in the Chapel of the North American Martyrs, celebrant Fr. Anthony McGinn, S.J. ’66, said, “All of the many roles that Sharon played were, indeed, gifts

from God to us who experienced her. I especially remembered her generosity in taking care of any problem quickly. She had not only a pleasant response, but always a laugh or a smile. She, as a devout person, realized that all of her gifts came from God; so we thank God for giving her the gifts and we thank her for living her life accordingly.” The mother of Patrick Hewlett ’02 , Michelle Hewlett Sanchez, and Linda Hewlett, Hewlett gave countless hours beyond the normal workday to Jesuit as a parent and as a volunteer. Her brother, William Steen, was a member of Jesuit’s Class of 1968. She and her husband Ray Hewlett were longtime and dedicated volunteers at many major Jesuit events including the annual Celebration Gala & Auction and Blue Jay Bazaar. Her daughters said that “when we were young, she made us say our prayers every night. She taught us to say the rosary.” Her family described her as “a loving wife, mother, and grandmother” who “could only be described as selfless in every facet of her life.” 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

47


In Memoriam JUNE. 1, 2020 – NOV. 30, 2020

ALUMNI… (by class year) Benigno A. Martinez, Jr.’35 Kenneth P. White ’42 Carl R. Von Meysenbug ’44 James A. Meyers ’47 Andrew L. Hamlin ’48 Joseph J. DeSalvo, Jr. ’50 Maurice L. Maspero ’51 John P. Mitchell, Jr. ’51 Ronald J. Lauland ’52 George A. Lara ’53 Natchez J. Morice ’54 Joseph J. Besselman, Jr. ’55 Wallace H. Paletou ’59 William J. Flatley, Sr. ’59 Robert P. Rogér ’60 Richard W. Hare ’60 Milton L. Spiehler ’60 Patrick A. Sabadie ’63 William C. Satterlee ’63 Rob F. Logan ’63 James M. Johnston ’71 Francis A. Manale, Jr. ’72 Lloyd E. Lind ’85 Anthony C. Cucchiara ’13 Andre R. Navarre ’17

FRIENDS… (by name) Marilyn A. Beauford (former staff) Octavio Gutierrez (former staff) Joseph P. Haydel (former faculty) Milton L. Vavasseur, Jr. (former faculty)

WIFE OF… Edmond J. Bendernagel, Jr. ’52 Allen I. Boudreaux ’38 L. Wallace Bowers ’83 James. J. Buddendorff ’52 John E. Burns, Jr. 55† Erwin A. Caswell ’52 Robert J. Comeaux, Jr. ’85 William V. Condon ’48† Hartman C. Daniel ’41† Jean Paul de la Houssaye ’60 Thompson Mack Deitz IV ’66 Bernard A. DeSantis ’77 Michael Q. Eagan, Sr. ’63 Ronald J. Jefferson ’59 Raphael J. Kuchler, Sr. ’57 Joseph Landrieu ’44† Constant G. Marquer ’48† John J. Mulligan III ’45

John N. Oglesby ’43† Joseph P. Palermo, Jr. ’47 † Randolph J. Pistorius, Sr. ’65 Martin G. Power ’44 Milton J. Retif ’51 Clarence G. Reuther, Jr. ’40† Steven T. Richard ’74

FATHER OF… James M. ’04, Michael N. ’09 & Christopher D. Arrubarrena ’11 Alexander K. Assaf ’06 Arthur J. ’80, Bradley G. ’84 & Gregory D. Brewester ’88 Maximo V. ’19 & Santiago Cambias ’17 Christopher T. Castro ’84 Mark D. Cavallino ’92 Anthony J. Centanni, Jr. ’72 Albert A. Demarest III ’91 Thomas E. ’89 & Douglas F. Eastman ’91 Lucas H. Ehrensing, Jr. ’96 James J. FitzSimons III ’05 David M. ’79 & Bryon J. Hatrel ’84 Eric M. ’04 & Robert A. Johns ’06 C. Edward ’62 & Philip Joubert ’66 Ryan T. Kambur ’01 Charles E. ’70, Barry L. ’72 & Edmund G. LaCour ’76 Marc J. LaPointe '73 James E. Lawson III ’11 Rev. Clyde J., S.J. ’63, Richard T. ’65†, Steven J. ’67, Mark A. ’68†, & Robert A. Leblanc ’69 William G. ’76 & Milton Legrand ’78 Brandon S. Long ’95 Stephen J. Mannino, ’87 Benigno A. Martinez III ’72† George M., Jr. ’03 & Cooper W. McGregor ’06 Robert G. Memory ’96 Ryan K. Nagim ’97 Thomas B. Noto ’74 Joseph G. Prechter, Jr. ’06 Brian C. Quartano ’73 Arthur S. Sigur III ’81

48 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 8

Eugene K. ’80 & Charles G. Simon ’87 Andrew R. Songy ’90 Gene Tarzetti, Jr. ’79 Bradley A. Waguespack ’72 Christopher G. Watermeier ’89

MOTHER OF … F. Turner ’95 & William S. Beauford ’98 John E. Bendernagel ’80 Roger W. Boneno ’87 Allen I. Boudreaux, Jr. ’67 Daniel P. Bourgeois ’88 Kenneth A. ’77, James J. Jr. ’79, & Christian C. Buddendorff ’87 John E. Burns III ’79 Brent E. Cleggett ’87 Robert J. III, ’15 & Luke J. Comeaux ’20 John Culicchia ’83 Val J. Dauterive III ’86 T. Michael ’97 & Kevin N. Deitz ’01 Bernard A. III ’01 & Joseph C. DeSantis ’04 Michael Geerken ’67 L. Blake Gehbauer ’87 David C. Gibbons, Jr. ’87 Samuel O. ’18 & Reece Guillory ’20 Patrick T. Hewlett ’02 Dawn Richard ’71, James P. ’77, & John P. Hunter ’84 Eugene A.’66 & Michael E. Katz ’71 Edward L. III ’04 & Michael L. Levert ’08 Keith J. Luminais, Sr. ’76 Joshua M. Lyons ’87 Robert J. Martin ’78 Donald J., Jr. ’83 & Mark M. Miester ’86 Kevin J. Mulligan ’76 Thomas G. Nuttli, Sr. ’77 Joseph P. Palermo III ’79 Richard L. ’68 & Ronald D. Reinhardt ’73 Milton J., Jr. & Kenneth J. Retif ’76 Clarence G. Reuther III ’78 Paul M. ’81 & Cliff D. Robicheaux ’85

Nicholas J. Viviano ’72 Joseph D. Wright ’89

BROTHER OF … Brandon L. Benedetto ’10 Joseph E. ’10 & Charles A. Bowling ’10 Richard J. Daschbach ’54 J. Paul ’60 & J.D. Demarest ’67 Douglas E. Johns ’77 Hilaire D. Lanaux ’45 Sylvester ’51† & John Lopiccolo ’56 Howard H. McGregor, Jr. ’61† Anthony R. ’62 & Francis W. Messina ’55 Roland J. Mestayer, Jr. ’49† Thomas J. Pennison, Sr. ’64 Etienne R. Sabate ’94 Arthur O. ’36†, Bernard J. ’37†, Patrick ’47†, & Matthew J. Schott ’53, Robert A. Vaccaro, Sr. ’72 Victor W. Viosca ’57 Joseph Vonder Haar, Sr. 46† Ralph N. Watermeier, Jr. ’61 Rev. William Welsh ’69

SISTER OF … John W. III ’79 & Allan D. Hite ’81 Wallace Landry ’69 Daniel J. Lorentz ’75 Edward S., Jr. ’76 & Richard G. Rapier ’80 William T. Steen ’68 Albin J. Tauzier, Jr. 47†

SON OF … James E. Lawson, Sr. ’38 Howard H. McGregor, Sr. ’35† Roland J. Mestayer, Sr. 1915† Albert E. Richard, Jr. ’40 Robert S. Sabate ’48† Joseph A. Vella ’28† Ralph N. Watermeier, Sr. ’30† William T. Welsh ’38 †

DAUGHTER OF … John W. Hite, Jr. ’51 Edward S. Rapier ’45 Thomas B. Steen ’43†


IN MEMORIAM GRANDFATHER OF… Michael L. Ballero ’07 Hugh W. Breckenridge ’04 Alexander J. ’14, William P. ’16, Jackson G. ’19, & Nicholas J. Brewster ’19 Brian J. Burvant ’14 Andrew D. Cavallino ’25 Ronald J. ’83 & Craig L. Drez ’91 August J. Hansen ’17 Tyler M. ’13, Evan P. ’17, & Davis J. Hatrel ’18 Hunter F. Jones ’25 Jason E. Joubert ’91 Joseph C. LaCour ’08 Owen J. III ’86, Gregory S. ’88, Stephen M. ’90, & Jeffrey B. LaCour ’94 Mark J. LaCour ’97 Keith J. LaCour ’97 Richard T. ’87, Allan C. ’03, Mark E. ’03, George T. ’16, & Clyde P. LeBlanc ’19 Christopher W. ’05 & Stephen C. Legrand ’07

JESUIT REMEMBERS DEDICATED STAFFER

MARILYN BEAUFORD (1953-2020) After beginning her career in the athletic department at LSU, Marilyn Beauford arrived at Jesuit in 1992 to serve as secretary to the president. With parents

Trey J. ’99 & Benjamin Malbrough ’08 Ryan O’Malley ’05 Michael A. ’06, Andrew S. ’09, & James O. Puente ’12 Brenner A. Rauch ’18 Dylan Richard ’11 Nicholas D. ’13, Michael J. ’15, & William E. Simon ’18 William D. Songy ’24 Cliff R. Stromeyer ’93 Ty A. Tarzetti ’16 Alex J. ’04 & Evan A. Waguespack ’08 Alexander G. Watermeier ’18 Conrad S. Williams ’01

James D. ’01, Daniel J. ’02, Travis J. ’05, John S. ’10, & Brian A. Barbera ’11 John G. Bendernagel ’19 Allen I. Boudreaux III ’93 Kevin J. ’04 & David J. Bray ’07 Jonathan P. ’09 &

Adam J. Coote ’12 Matthew T. Daniel ’06 Randall K. ’90 & David P. Reinhardt ’96† Dustin Dillmann ’09 Jason P. Finegan ’16 Peter S. Flores ’09 Christopher ’95 & David Geerken ’99 David C. Gibbons III (current student) Glenn P. Gillen, Jr. ’20 William '09 & Mason Helt ’12 Jeffrey D. ’97 & Jordan D. Huck ’00 Nicholas M. ’08, Michael M. ’08, Bradley T. ’11, & Corey M. James ’13 Patrick ’02, Daniel H. ’04, & Michael J. Johnson ’07 Malcolm ’91 & John Jurisich ’97 William T. Kallenborn ’11 Kenneth E. Krizan III ’16 John P. ’08 & Randolph G. Laborde ’10

Leo Labourdette III ’05 Curtis ’08 & Trevor Lew ’13 Keith J., Jr. ’98 & Rene J. Luminais ’84 Christopher M. Mire ’18 Stephen Montelepre ’08 Thomas G., Jr. ’09, & John N. Nuttli ’18 Chad M.’97 & Corey E. Penedo ’02 James A. Rabalais III ’86 Ryan J. ’04, Brandon J. ’05, Jordan B. ’11, Cole S. ’16, & Ridge A. Retif ’19 Mark P. Reuther ’09 Sean M. Robicheaux ’07 George A. Rowley ’04 Sean R. Siebenkittel ’03 Mark ’06 & Ben Sketchler ’12 Evan Thomas ’09 Paul A. ’99, Michael J. ’01, Patrick J. ’04, & John C. Viviano ’06 West W. Warren, Jr. ’19

eager to get involved in the growing number of events on campus, Marilyn was asked to move into the position of volunteer coordinator. It was in this position that she spent most of her 24 years at Jesuit High School. Many new Blue Jay parents first met Marilyn when they purchased uniform patches for their sons. She invited them to get involved in events and activities such as Celebration, the Blue Jay Bazaar, the Alma Mater Awards, the Jesuit Mothers’ Luncheon, and the Boutique. Marilyn enjoyed getting to know the many volunteers throughout the years who spent countless hours in her office preparing for these events, and she developed many lasting friendships. She loved and appreciated the

volunteers, often referring to them as “my ladies.” And when students graduated, she encouraged parents of alumni to stay involved at Jesuit High School. Marilyn was passionate about her own volunteer work with the American Legion Auxiliary Post 267 in Metairie. In addition, she was a talented seamstress who enjoyed crafting and the creative arts. She delighted in bestowing home-sewn pillows, scarves, and handcrafted jewelry as Christmas and shower gifts. Marilyn also sewed countless blankets and bibs for the grandchildren and children of volunteers, faculty, and staff. On one occasion of which she was especially proud, she received a thankyou note from a young girl after using her in-office

sewing kit to perform emergency surgery on the little girl’s beloved doll. After her retirement from Jesuit High School, Marilyn was surprised in 2017 with an honorary Alma Mater Award at Southern Yacht Club. Liz Creel, mother of Cal ’11, Zac ’13, Henry ’15, and Benji ’16, said, “When Marilyn retired, she left behind a volunteer program which was rich in tradition and efficiently organized. She was so dedicated to her job that she often checked in to make sure things were running smoothly. We will be forever indebted to Marilyn for encouraging generations of volunteers to not only become involved but stay involved with Jesuit.” Marilyn passed away on December 21, 2020. 

GRANDMOTHER OF…

IN MEMORIAM

CONTACT

Alumni who live outside the New Orleans metro region are especially encouraged to send information about deceased loved ones.

Send information and corrections to memoriam@jesuitnola.org or (504) 483-3947.


BIB LIST

SAVE * THE DATE

JE

I SU

GH SCH T HI OO L

Info and images for the Bib List may be sent to www.jesuitnola.org/ bib-list.

FI

SH

ING ROD

EO New parents receive a pink or blue Jayson bib for their new arrival.

JESUIT FISHING RODEO SATURDAY | JUNE 19 john ryan stadium

50 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0


JUNE 1, 2020 – NOV. 30, 2020

Jesuit Congratulates ... Alison and Paul Grossimon '91 on

Katherine and Rickey Landry, Jr. '01

Emilie and Philip Moseley '06 on the

the birth of their son, Levi Gerald Grossimon, Feb. 3, 2020. Levi is the grandson of L.A. Grossimon '56.

on the birth of their daughter, Lucy Landry, April 1, 2020.

birth of their son, Hartwell Fernandes Moseley, July 19, 2020.

Tara and August Berner III '92 on the

Lauren and Kris Martinez '02 on

Lauren and Robert Barrios '07 on

the birth of their son, Duke Kelly Martinez, May 3, 2020.

the birth of their son, John Robert Barrios, Aug. 28, 2018, and their daughter, Charlotte Ann Barrios, July 29, 2020.

birth of their son, Claude Alphonse Berner, Feb. 20, 2020. Claude is the grandson of August Berner, Jr. '60.

Dottie and Eric Curole '03 on the

Shelley & Sean Mount '93 on the

birth of their son, Luke John Curole, Oct. 1, 2020.

birth of their son, Hayes Patrick Mount, Nov. 24, 2020.

Mary and Eli Abad '04 on the birth of

Kelly and Carl Servat III '93 on the

their son, Elijah James Abad, June 7, 2020.

birth of their son, Carl Joseph Servat IV, Feb. 21, 2020.

Bonnie and Stephen Colomb '04 on

Julie and George Beck '94 on the

the birth of their son, William John Colomb, June 5, 2020.

birth of their daughter, Lola Ruth Beck, March 23, 2020.

Christine and Tucker Couvillon '04

Jessica and Bryan Hansen '96 on

on the birth of their daughter, Blayne Marie Couvillon, Sept. 6, 2019.

the birth of their son, Cooper Louis Hansen, Aug. 23, 2020.

Jill and Ryan Finney '04 on the birth

Niki and Paul Jackson '99 on the

birth of their son, Theodore Stamatis Jackson, Aug. 26, 2020. Ashley and Todd Neelis '99 on the

birth of their sons, Caswell George Neelis, Dec. 19, 2018, and Quinn McGilvray Neelis, Aug. 17, 2020. They are the great-grandsons of Erwin Caswell, Jr. '52. Libby and James Fein '00 on the birth

Stephanie and Ian Hoerner '07 on

Jessica and Michael Johnson '07

on the birth of their daughter, Isabel Marie Johnson, March 30, 2020. Isabel is the granddaughter of Patrick Johnson, Jr. '73. Annemarie and Stephen Collura '08 on the birth of their son, Martin

Gerard Collura, Nov. 16, 2020.

of their son, Luke Patrick Finney, Jan. 27, 2020. Luke is the grandson of Timothy Finney '77.

Katelyn and John Sileo III '08 on the

Kara and Gene Settoon '04 on the birth of their daughter, Shea Christine Settoon, Dec. 11, 2019.

Eileen and Christopher Reuter '09

Kelsey and James FitzSimons III '05

on the birth of their son, James Joseph FitzSimons IV, Aug. 3, 2020.

birth of their son, John David Sileo, IV, Oct. 18, 2020. on the birth of their son, Nicholas Paul Reuter, April 10, 2020. Nicholas is the grandson of Bryan Reuter '81 and the great-grandson of Wilfred Prados '48. Jennifer and Kenneth Taylor '09 on

Kaity and John Potts III '05 on the

of their son, Miles Gregory Fein, March 7, 2020.

birth of their son, Marlow John Potts, Oct. 21, 2020.

Alison and Christopher Palermo '00

Sarah and Joseph Testa '05 on the

on the birth of their daughter, Celeste Catherine Palermo, Sept. 9, 2020.

the birth of their son, Thomas Kolbe Hoerner, Oct. 13, 2020. Thomas is the grandson of David Hoerner '74.

the birth of their daughter, Amelia Marie Taylor, March 17, 2020. 

birth of their daughter, Liliana May Testa, Aug. 23, 2020.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

51


AC C

S GO'S EAFOO A R

Q

C TRAL IT Y BB N E

D

SE

OYSTER HOU E M

ONE.BIDPAL.NET/JESUITBAZAAR

D

SATURDAY MARCH 20, 2021

JOHN RYAN STADIUM

12 PM - 3 PM Meals must be pre-purchased from the bazaar website, and a virtual auction will take place online.

SAVE * THE DATE

presented by


Alumni Giving Drive Changes

I

n rough seas and calmer waters, Jesuit High School has been able to count on the unstinting support of its graduates. Likewise, in good times and bad, the world has been able to count on Jesuit educated men to lead with generosity and compassion. This year’s Alumni Giving Drive, which launched in September, is a magnificent example of that reliability and generosity. In these times of challenge, Jesuit’s commitment to keeping tuition

affordable takes on even greater importance. With an appreciation for that and with input from alumni leaders spanning seven decades, this year’s Alumni Giving Drive looked unlike any before it. The 2020-21 AGD featured not only an expanded leadership team to enhance personal connection but also a shortened asking period to maintain momentum. In addition, calls to classmates took place in homes of alumni instead of at Carrollton & Banks.

Anyone interested in making a donation may still do so at www. jesuitnola.org/agd or by calling the office of institutional advancement at 504 483-3841. The 2020-21 AGD concludes on May 31. Thank you for helping us to create opportunities that are forming men of faith and men for others. 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

53


2020 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT

FISCAL YEAR 2019-2020 (JULY 1, 2019 - JUNE 30, 2020)

Jesuit’s fiscal year mirrors its academic year. The following pages chronicle philanthropy from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, referred to as fiscal year 2020 (last year). Fiscal year 2021 (the current fiscal year), which includes donations made between July 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021, will be summarized in the next spring/summer edition of Jaynotes.

54 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0


FINANCIAL SUMMARY | (JULY 1, 2019–JUNE 30, 2020) FY ’20 STATEMENT OF OPERATING ACTIVITIES* OPERATING REVENUE

ENDOWMENT DONATIONS FY 2020

Tuition Less Financial Aid

$12,759,000 (1,034,000)

Total Operating Revenue

$11,725,000

$742,599

FY 2019

$947,292

FY 2018

$1,352,203

OPERATING EXPENSES

Instructional & Student Services General & Administrative Facility Operations & Capital Improvements

$10,277,000 3,110,000 3,645,000

Total Operating Expense

$17,032,000

Deficit from Operations

$(5,307,000)

$0

$0.5M

$1M

$1.5M

TUITION FY 2020

$ 9,750

FY 2019

ADDITIONAL REVENUE

Donations Historic Tax Credit Income Scholarship Investment Income Unrestricted Investment Income Blue Jay Bazaar/Celebration Other Income

$2,645,000 357,000 1,500,000 539,000 181,000 24,000

Total Additional Revenue

$5,246,000 $61,000

OVERALL DEFICIT

*The Statement of Operating Activities does not include activity associated with the Minds & Hearts Enlightened capital campaign. Campaign income is restricted by donors for the intended purposes and not available for general operations. Those donations are, however, included in giving summaries and donor honor roll.

TOTAL AMOUNT OF AID & COURTESIES $1.25M

$1,159,575

$1,103,921

AID

$750K $500K

FY 2018

$9,150

$0

$2K

$4K

$1,023,677

$979,653

$6K

$8K

$10K

STUDENTS RECEIVING AID FY 2020

154

FY 2019

183

FY 2018

174

0

50

100

150

200

250

20

25

COURTESIES

FY 2020

11

FY 2019

17

$948,060 FY 2018

$250K $0

$9,450

COURTESIES*

$1,033,860

$1M

$2M

$135,898

$124,268

$85,800

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

19

$0

5

10

15

*Courtesies include sons of faculty and staff members.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

55


FISCAL YEAR 2020 GIVING BY CONTRIBUTORS

TOTAL DONATIONS

5% 8%

<1%

$0

$2M

$4M

$6M

$8M

$10M

$9,251,306

FY 2020

3,894

14% $ 6,879,992

FY 2019

73%

4,225

$ 6,333,773

FY 2018

Alumni Parents* Parents of Alumni Friends Foundations

2,826 542 294 208 15

Total

3,885

BY DOLLARS

3% 10%

11% 11%

4,785

0

2K

4K

DONORS

8K

10K

CELEBRATION GALA AND AUCTION & BLUE JAY BAZAAR NET INCOME Celebration, Jesuit’s Gala and Auction, which was chaired by Wanda Montalbano and Cindy Wooderson, was held on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019, at the New Orleans Marriott. The Blue Jay Bazaar was held virtually on Saturday, June 27, 2020, and was chaired by Missy Martin, Amy Burke, and Jaime Falcon.  $300K

65%

$254,160

$276,302

$120,299

$254,160 $126,193

$250K

$200K

$181,267 $120,299

$150K

Alumni $6,033,342 Friends 1,034,078 Foundations 1,026,748 Parents* 881,770 Parents of Alumni 272,889 Total

6K

TOTAL

$9,248,827

* For the purpose of these charts and to avoid double counting, alumni who are parents of current Jesuit students or parents of alumni are counted as alumni only. 56 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

$124,766 $100K

$128,162 $50K

$147,246 $128,162 $56,501*

$0

FY 2018 CELEBRATION

FY 2019

FY 2020

BLUE JAY BAZAAR

* Excludes proceeds from the in-person event and the Grand Raffle, which were canceled due to COVID restrictions


CLASS ANALYSIS grad year

donors

living alumni

grads

percent donating

donation amount

grad year

donors

living alumni

grads

percent donating

1934

0

3

160

0%

$

1935

0

4

114

0%

1936

1

9

113

11%

1937

1

11

169

1938

1

8

1939

1

1940

0

1975

42

149

158

28%

$

42,030

$

0

1976

60

193

204

31%

$

229,429

$

473

1977

30

160

168

19%

$

28,297

9%

$

20

1978

36

184

196

20%

$

22,541

181

13%

$

50

1979

50

230

240

22%

$

50,663

11

125

9%

$

25,000

1980

42

211

227

20%

$

70,088

0

14

138

0%

$

0

1981

34

200

207

17%

$

44,323

1941

1

14

147

7%

$

5,000

1982

44

216

223

20%

$

102,135

1942

1

20

164

5%

$

20

1983

75

233

241

32%

$

176,466

1943

5

24

160

21%

$

9,942

1984

43

211

218

20%

$

68,923

1944

4

23

139

17%

$

1,040

1985

52

220

234

24%

$

125,748

1945

5

21

139

24%

$

875

1986

61

212

219

29%

$

45,409

1946

11

35

138

31%

$

5,275

1987

49

234

241

21%

$

196,111

1947

13

47

165

28%

$

6,200

1988

51

235

243

22%

$

172,108

1948

9

45

151

20%

$

17,625

1989

42

239

249

18%

$

64,027

1949

8

26

94

31%

$

5,955

1990

31

205

211

15%

$

147,814

1950

23

59

160

39%

$

4,348

1991

64

211

218

30%

$

69,533

1951

27

70

168

39%

$

16,311

1992

65

228

233

29%

$

86,632

1952

16

68

159

24%

$

7,206

1993

48

231

237

21%

$

82,875

1953

33

77

168

43%

$ 2,034,296

1994

55

223

230

25%

$

53,338

1954

29

73

163

40%

$

26,971

1995

65

261

263

25%

$

72,060

1955

40

107

183

37%

$

20,426

1996

54

231

239

23%

$

43,788

1956

53

88

150

60%

$

60,386

1997

52

277

281

19%

$

33,356

1957

45

99

152

45%

$

125,928

1998

46

234

237

20%

$

40,860

1958

48

119

187

40%

$

20,795

1999

34

277

281

12%

$

16,841

1959

49

107

171

46%

$

48,390

2000

37

264

270

14%

$

21,699

1960

60

158

226

38%

$

51,006

2001

40

250

253

16%

$

16,037

1961

42

154

225

27%

$

30,196

2002

21

256

258

8%

$

17,384

1962

57

142

181

40%

$

36,279

2003

48

287

288

17%

$

16,830

1963

71

171

210

42%

$

112,364

2004

35

278

280

13%

$

37,174

1964

48

171

213

28%

$

89,322

2005

31

266

266

12%

$

10,564

1965

45

175

222

26%

$

204,546

2006

25

260

260

10%

$

6,078

1966

65

160

191

41%

$

64,725

2007

12

273

274

4%

$

4,728

1967

47

130

163

36%

$

27,203

2008

18

273

273

7%

$

2,160

1968

59

150

172

39%

$

56,306

2009

21

244

245

9%

$

2,311

1969

53

160

195

33%

$

96,341

2010

9

258

259

3%

$

1,660

1970

52

136

162

38%

$

263,964

2011

18

260

264

7%

$

1,590

1971

33

155

178

21%

$

29,294

2012

44

262

262

17%

$

4,912

1972

36

155

182

23%

$

44,355

2013

25

255

255

10%

$

2,350

1973

40

152

164

26%

$

83,579

2014

31

260

260

12%

$

2,666

1974

37

148

158

25%

$

64,472

2015

18

275

275

7%

$

3,353

TOTAL

2,826

13,217

16,738

21%

$ 6,033,342

Class Analysis Note: The classes of 2016–2020 were not invited to participate in AGD and, therefore, are not included in the Class Analysis. Giving numbers in the Class Analysis reflect total giving by alumni. For analysis specific to the AGD,

donation amount

please see the following page.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

57


ALUMNI GIVING

TOP 10 CLASSES BY PERCENT grad year

donors

percent donating

’56

53

60% $

’59

49

’57

TOP 10 CLASSES BY AMOUNT grad year

donors

grad year

donors

60,386

’53

33

43% $ 2,034,296

’83

75

32%

$ 176,466

46% $

48,390

’70

52

38% $

263,964

’63

71

42%

$ 112,364

45

45% $

125,928

’76

60

31% $

229,429

’92

65

29%

$

86,632

’53

33

43% $ 2,034,296

’65

45

26% $

204,546

’95

65

25%

$

72,060

’63

71

42% $

112,364

’87

49

21% $

196,111

’66

65

41%

$

64,725

’66

65

41% $

64,725

’83

75

32% $

176,466

’91

64

30%

$

69,533

’62

57

40% $

36,279

’88

51

22% $

172,108

’86

61

29%

$

45,409

’54

29

40% $

26,971

’90

31

15% $

147,814

’76

60

31%

$ 229,429

’58

48

40% $

20,795

’74

41

29% $

142,001

’60

60

38%

$

51,006

’68

59

39% $

56,306

’57

45

45% $

125,928

’68

59

39%

$

56,306

donation amount

percent donating

donation amount

TOP 10 CLASSES BY NUMBER percent donating

donation amount

ALUMNI GIVING DRIVE Jesuit remains a leader among high schools across the country in alumni support. The primary vehicle for alumni giving is the Alumni Giving Drive (AGD). Donations to AGD and its companion drives (PAG for parents and POA for parents of alumni) are essential to the financial health of the school and help to keep Jesuit affordable, accessible, and thriving.

AGD donations keep Jesuit tuition affordable for all families, a goal separate from the financial aid that is supplied by proceeds from the endowment. Jesuit thanks 2019–20 AGD chairman Arthur “Dooty” Patron ‘51 for his outstanding job leading this important campaign. 

AGD RESULTS

DONORS

AVG. GIFT

AMOUNT DONATED

FY 2020

2,296

$466

$1,069,433

FY 2019 FY 2018

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2,831 3,203

$455 $441

$1,286,878 $1,411,506


PARENT GIVING GIVING BY PARENTS Jesuit’s Parents’ Annual Giving Drive, also known as PAG, is as important today as it was when it began in the early 1970s. For 17 consecutive years, parents have donated more than $1 million to offset operating expenses. Through this partnership, Jesuit is able to keep tuition at an affordable level for as many families. Jesuit’s tuition remains one of the lowest among parochial and private schools in the New Orleans area and is, by far, the lowest among traditional Jesuit schools nationwide. Jesuit thanks 2019–20 PAG chairman Jeremy Mancheski ’90, his 17 grade-level chairs, and 300 plus captains who made the 2019–20 drive one of the most successful in school history. 

GIVING BY PARENTS OF ALUMNI Another area of annual support comes from Jesuit’s parents of alumni (POA). Current parents who are not alumni transition into the parents of alumni group after their sons graduate. Many parents of alumni remain connected to Jesuit long after their sons graduate from Carrollton & Banks, participating in events such as Celebration, the Jesuit Mothers’ Luncheon, Blue Jay Bazaar, and Evenings of Reflection. In fiscal year 2020, parents of alumni donated $43,986. 

PAG RESULTS

DONORS

AVG. GIFT

AMOUNT DONATED

FY 2019

831

$1,426

$1,184,672

FY 2018 FY 2017

869 934

$1,406 $1,286

$1,221,875 $1,201,088

2019–20 PAG LEADERSHIP Chairman Mike Varisco ’83 Seniors

Freshmen

Walt Bond ’85 Bo Laborde ’84 Tony Toups ’81

René Alvarez ’83 Tom Barnett John Carbo ’90 Kent Finger ’83

Juniors Patrick Huete ’84 Michael Johnson ’88 Jeremy Mancheski ’90 Sophomores John Chamberlain Roger May ’84 Pat Morris ’90

Pre-Freshmen Mason Couvillon ’92 David Joint ’93 Chris Mann ’90 Jessica Waguespack

POA RESULTS

DONORS

AVG. GIFT

AMOUNT DONATED

FY 2019

187

$367

$68,643

FY 2018 FY 2017

264 253

$410 $372

$108,111 $94,062

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL | NEW ORLEANS |

59


Scholarships Scholarship donations become part of Jesuit’s endowment, which funds financial aid for deserving and qualifying families. All fully endowed scholarships at Jesuit High School are listed in this report. Existing partial scholarships are listed if they are active and have reached 25% of their fully endowed amount.

The amount to fully endow a Full Education Fund (FEF) is $250,000. The annual income from an FEF equals the amount of a full-cost tuition (tuition and gap).

To learn more about establishing scholarships at Jesuit, contact Tom Bagwill, Jesuit’s director of institutional advancement, at (504) 483-3841 or bagwill@jesuitnola.org. 

The amount of a fully endowed scholarship is $75,000. The annual income from this scholarship funds the average financial aid grant.

Fully Endowed Full Education Funds Gayle & Tom Benson Charitable Foundation Full Education Fund The Jason ‘04 & Warren ‘74 Bourgeois Families Full Education Fund Ambrose Patrick Gootee Full Education Fund * Hazel & William ’33 Manion Full Education Fund Michael H. McGarry ’76 & William A. McGarry, Jr. ’72 Full Education Fund

Rev. Anthony F. McGinn, S.J. Full Education Fund * Wally Pontiff, Jr. ’99 & Raymond Fitzgerald, S.J. ’76 Full Education Fund James P. Raymond, Jr. Full Education Fund Tonti Family Full Education Fund: Robert & Margaret, Robert '79, Michael '81, & John '84 Robert H. Boh ’47 Full Education Fund

*These gifts were applied to the Minds & Hearts Enlightened Capital Campaign

Fully Endowed Scholarships Capt. Nick J. Accardo, M.D. Scholarship Almar Foundation Scholarship Alumni Foundation Scholarship Rev. Thomas E. Barberito, S.J. Scholarship Frank & Josephine Gallo Barreca Scholarship Eugene H. & Paul M. Barrios Scholarship John A “Jack” Belsom ‘51 Scholarship Rev. Edgar J. Bernard , S.J. Scholarship Joseph V. Bologna Scholarship Henry F. Bonura, Jr. Scholarship Linda & Frank Bordelon ‘59 Scholarship Bruce J. Borrello ‘50 Scholarship Rev. Claude P. Boudreaux, S.J. Scholarship Shawn Bowles Scholarship James & Kay Brandau Scholarship Clendon J. Butera Scholarship James L. and Carolyn B. Butler Scholarship

60 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

Andrew P. Caneza ‘43 Operation Upgrade Scholarship Aguste Capdeville Foundation Scholarship Nicholas E. Caruso Scholarship George J. Cassard III ‘56 Family Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Childress, Sr. ‘35 Scholarship Salvadore J. Christiana ‘52 Scholarship #1 Class of 1938 Scholarship Class of 1945 Scholarship Class of 1956 Scholarship Class of 1959 Scholarship Class of 1963 Scholarship Class of 1966 Scholarship Class of 1968 Scholarship Class of 1969 Scholarship Class of 1970 Gold Star Scholarship Class of 1976 (Parents Of Fr. Fitzgerald) Scholarship

Class of 1990 Scholarship Wallie & Jules L. Coco ‘69 Scholarship Bob and Loretta Coleman Memorial Scholarship Philip R. & Mary C. Collins Scholarship Linda Vath & Michael E. Coney ‘63 Scholarship Robert J. Conrad, Jr. Scholarship Sissy & René A. Curry, Jr. ‘56 Scholarship Thomas D. Daley Scholarship Dr. & Mrs. William J. Dardis ‘25 Scholarship Br. William J. Dardis, S.J. ‘58 Scholarship Emma Jaquet Disimone Scholarship Malcolm S. Disimone Scholarship Duplantier Family Scholarship Hon. Adrian G. Duplantier ‘45 Scholarship F. Robert Duplantier - Boys Hope Scholarship Gwendolyn B. & Ralph D. Dwyer, Jr. Scholarship


SCHOLARSHIPS J. Michael Early Scholarship Hugh Mccloskey Evans Scholarship Fran & John Faherty ‘53 Scholarship Guy G. Faulstich ‘67 Scholarship Frank L. Faust & Ruth Reuter Faust Scholarship Ruth U. Fertel Scholarship The Fr. Raymond Fitzgerald, S.J. Student Scholarship James E. Fitzmorris, Jr. ‘39 Scholarship James E. Fitzmorris, Sr. Scholarship Norris V. Fitzmorris ‘50 Scholarship St. Marc J. Flotte Scholarship C.L. Ford ‘43 & Don Ford ‘47 Scholarship Forshag Family Scholarship Edmund Fortier Scholarship Michael J. Galvin Family Scholarship Adam C. Gambel ‘34 Scholarship Robert A. Generes ‘41 Scholarship Rev. Jean Marie Germain Scholarship Gerard J. Gillen Scholarship R. Jerry Glas Scholarship Marjorie & Raymond Goodspeed ‘35 Scholarship William E Greve ‘37 Scholarship Haddad Family Scholarship Stephen S. Hall ‘75 Scholarship Harlan Family Scholarship Maurice F. Hatrel, Jr.’43 Scholarship Heard Family Scholarship Christian Blaine Hebert Scholarship Andrew E. Hillery Scholarship Robert E. Hogan Scholarship Louise Mcquirk & Samuel Hottinger Scholarship Elizabeth G. & Murray G. Hurd Scholarship Linda & Luis Ingles Family Scholarship David F. Jaubert ‘75 Scholarship Albert P. Keller Family Scholarship Nellie Flynn Kingsmill Scholarship Connie & Thomas Kitchen ‘65 Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. William B. Kitchen, Sr. Boys Hope Scholarship Louis F. Knop, Jr. Scholarship Olivia Schaefer Knop Scholarship Alden J. Laborde Scholarship Dr. Wallace J. Landry, Jr. & Clare B. Landry Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Licciardi, Sr. Scholarship Norma & John K. Long ‘49 Scholarship Louisiana Liaison Group Scholarship Lisa & Richard Maia ’72 Scholarship Gladys & J. Ashton Majeau Scholarship

Ulisse Marinoni Nolan Family Scholarship Richard H. Marshall Scholarship Logan J. Martin ‘84 Scholarship Marie C. & Benigno A. Martinez Scholarship Maud Blossman McCarron Scholarship Charles J. & Laurene Wu McClain Scholarship Charles “Sonny” McEvoy ‘90 Scholarship E. Thomas McEvoy, Jr. Scholarship Fund Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. McGarry ‘76 Scholarship Rev. Anthony McGinn, S.J. ‘66 Scholarship (Donated By The Class of 1985) Mr. & Mrs. John M. McMahon Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. McMahon, Jr. Scholarship Mary McNeally Scholarship Joseph A. Metzler ‘33 Scholarship Robert G. Miller, M.D. Scholarship Winnie Miller Scholarship Julio M. Minsal-Ruiz, S.J. Scholarship Patrick R. Mooney ‘68 Scholarship Michael J. Moran Scholarship Rev. M. M. Mulvihill, S.J. Scholarship Robert D. Murphy, Sr. ‘43 & Robert D. Murphy, Jr. ‘69 Scholarship Murray Family Scholarship Ardell & George Nalley, Sr. Scholarship Frederick Harvey Nicaud Scholarship Dr. Robert A. Nicaud ‘57 Scholarship Richard Norris Foundation Scholarship Nunez Family Scholarship Frank S. Oser, Jr. M.D. Scholarship Our Lady Of The Immaculate Conception Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. John C. Paquette & Son Scholarship Rev. Daniel W. Partridge, S.J. Scholarship Pere’ Marquette Foundation Scholarship Mary & Vincent J. “Joe” Perez III ‘49 Scholarship Rev. A. Patrick Phillips, S.J. Scholarship Francis A. Plough Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. J. Kevin Poorman ‘69 Scholarship Jamie Porter Memorial Scholarship Ronald M. Porter, Sr. ‘45 Scholarship W.D. “Maybelle” Postell Scholarship William D. Postell Scholarship Wilfred O. Prados, Jr. Family Scholarship Francis J. Prevost Scholarship Andrew Quirk & Harry Tompson Scholarship

Emile A. Rainold III ‘56 Scholarship Stanley W. Ray Jr., Scholarship Gerrard E. Raymond Scholarship Leola B. Raymond Scholarship Grace Redding & George A. Rizzo, Sr. Scholarship Bro. Joseph Remich, S.J. Scholarship Milton ‘Mickey’ Retif Scholarship (Metro Baseball) Clarence G. Reuther, Jr. Scholarship Elmore Francis Rigamer, Sr. & Rita Mary Dazet Scholarship Robert W. Riordan, Jr. ‘54 Scholarship Rizzo Family Foundation Scholarship Raymond S. & Louise Rizzo Scholarship Stephen B. Rodi, Sr. ‘32 Scholarship Alphonsus Rodriguez, S.J. Scholarship The Maidee Daigle Rodriguez Scholarship Louie J. Roussel III Scholarship Christopher “Brent” Rozas ‘90 Scholarship Mr. & Mrs. Edward N. Ryan Scholarship James & Enell Ryder Scholarship Rev. Nicholas T. Schiro, S.J. ‘44 Scholarship Theodore & Josephine Schiro Scholarship Bernard I. Schott Scholarship Rev. Paul W. Schott, S.J. ‘40 Scholarship Owen Seiler Family Scholarship Edward W. Skinner Scholarship Michael C. Slaughter Scholarship #1 Michael C. Slaughter Scholarship #2 Bryan D. Spraberry ‘83 Scholarship Daniel J. “Rusty” Staub ‘61 Scholarship Mark A. Tessier Scholarship Mire J. “M.J.” Thomas ‘48 Scholarship Harry M. & Jeanne R. Tompson Scholarship Edwin “Eddie” Toribio Scholarship Van Geffen Foundation Scholarship Vincent Family Scholarship Gilbert J. Vincent ‘27 Scholarship Roger G. Vincent ‘33 Scholarship William S. Vincent ‘32 Family Scholarship Harry Waldo ‘45 Family Scholarship Michael J. Waldo ‘70 Scholarship A.T. Webber, Jr. & H. W. Christenberry, Jr. Scholarship Leo A. Welcker ‘45 Scholarship Michael J. Wheat Memorial Scholarship Linda Birdsall Wilson Scholarship Albert J. Winters, Sr. Scholarship Paul J. Zerangue, Jr. ‘42 Scholarship

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61


The Maisounabe Bequest Society The Maisounabe Bequest Society — formed in 1987 and named in honor of Fr. Jean Baptiste Maisounabe, S.J., the founder of Jesuit High School — recognizes living and deceased benefactors who have already provided or intend to contribute planned gifts to Jesuit High School. Such extraordinary gifts are typically made through bequests, annuities, charitable trusts, or life insurance policies. The cross symbol (†) denotes the person is deceased. With couples, if the † is placed after a first name, only that person is deceased. When the † is inserted at the end of a couple’s name, both individuals are deceased. Information about the various ways that charitable gift planning can benefit you and Jesuit is available at jesuitnola. org/planned-giving. You may also contact Tom Bagwill, director of Jesuit’s office of institutional advancement, at (504) 483-3841 or bagwill@jesuitnola.org.  Rebecca & Nick Accardo, Jr. ‘72 Janet Anderson (Robert ‘42) Phala & C. Clifton Andressen ‘65 Charles Bailey ‘31† Joy & Joseph Barreca ‘43 Earl Bellanger ‘46† Sibyl & J. Pierre† Bernard Estate of Albert R. Boelte, Jr. Joseph Bologna ‘35† Marc Bonifacic ‘92 Paul Bonitatibus Judy & Leon Bordelon ‘55 Thelma Bougere† Sheila & William Bowen ‘38† Arion Boyle ‘55 John Browne ‘48† William Cahill† Kimberly & Timothy† Cambias ‘61 Pierce Carey, Jr. ‘31† Cyrus Caruso ‘38† Nicholas Caruso ‘66† Barbara & Michael† Casteix ‘70

Stephanie & Mark Castell ‘83 Harry Charbonnet ‘36† Victor Chisesi ‘49† Salvadore Christiana ‘52 Anthony Clesi, Jr. ‘48 Carol & Alexander† Cocke, Jr. ‘50 Wallie & Jules† Coco ‘69 John Coker ‘33† Candace & Robert† Coleman, Jr. ‘63 Philip Collins ‘36† William Collins ‘77 Joann & John† Combes Alwynn Cronvich ‘36† Sissy & René Curry, Jr. ‘56 Sally & Thomas Daley ‘34† Genevieve & Michael D’Aquila ‘99 William Dardis† Edward Derbes, Jr.† Malcolm Disimone ‘42† Edward Drouet† George Dunbar†

Sally & Adrian† Duplantier ‘45 Homer Dupuy, Jr. ‘31† Louis Dutel, Jr. ‘37† Dorothy & William Eanes III ‘36† Estate of Conrad Ernst R. Erskine† Hugh Evans, Sr.† Gerald Fedoroff ‘50† Ruth Fertel† John Fischer ‘46† T. Stephen Fitzpatrick, Jr. ‘38† Scott Fleming ‘79 St. Marc Flotte ‘38† Darla & Robert Foley ‘69 Cece & Robert Funck ‘75 John Gallagher ‘86 Catherine & Frederick Gaupp ‘73 Robert Generes ‘41† Glenn Gennaro ‘66† Valda & Frederick Gisevius, Jr.† Tristan Greene ‘87 Successon of Thomas A. Greve Susan & Charles Grey, Jr. ‘62 Sue & William Hammel ‘57 Liz & Elliotte Harold, Jr. ‘56 Brenda & Ronald Hebert ‘58 John Hebert† Estate of Milton F. Hilbert, Jr. Barbara & Scott Hines ‘93 Leslie Hottinger ‘32† Julie & T. J. Semmes Hughs ‘79 Diane & Dale Hunn ‘68 Estate of George Irwin Jason Jeandron ‘97 Estate of C. Palmer & Phyllis B. Jones Estate of Will T. Jourdan John Kelly ‘63 Patricia & John Klause ‘61 Suzie & Rodney Lenfant ‘80 Succession of John K. Long Lynn & Thomas Long ‘67 Succession of Barbara Riehl Lota Peggy & Michael Lulich ‘76 J. Ashton Majeau†

Hazel Manion† (William ‘33) Lynn & Arthur Mann III ‘64 Betsy & Robert Marino ‘64 Juanita McBride Elizabeth & Stanley McDermott, Jr. ‘46† Emanuel McEvoy, Jr.† Merlin McGivney† Diane & Martin Miller II ‘62 James Moreau, Jr. ‘72 Kathryn & Arthur Parham, Jr. ‘71 Doris Pilié† Kathy & Frederick Plaeger II ‘71 Carol & Ronald† Porter ‘45 Janet & John Blake Postell ‘59 Paula & Raphael Rabalais, Jr. ‘65 Stanley Ray, Jr. ‘33† Lillian D & Paul Reising, Sr.† Beverly & Clarence Reuther, Jr. ‘40† Betty & Robert Riordan, Jr. ‘54 Stephen Rodi ‘32† Sally & Louis Roussel III ‘63 Peggy & James Ryder, Jr. ‘62 Edgar Schafer, Jr. ‘38† Susan & J. Garic Schoen ‘38† Succession of Stephen Gerald Scully Thomas Shepard, Jr. ‘38† Emmett Smith, Jr. ‘55† Florence St. Paul† Paulette & Frank Stewart, Jr. ‘53 Catherine & Durel† Talbot ‘31 Dominic Tusa ‘71 Martin Van Studdiford† Roger Vincent ‘33† Harry Waldo, Jr. ‘45† Judith† & Michael Waldo ‘70 Donna & A.T. Webber, Jr.† Margarette Webber† James & Frances Wheat† V. Wheeler III John Wilday, Jr. ‘38† Succession of Paul J. Zerangue, Jr.

Foundations Support from foundations assists Jesuit in keeping tuition affordable, providing financial aid for families in need, enhancing student programs, and improving facilities. Jesuit thanks the foundations listed below for their assistance in FY 2020.  The Azby Fund

The Kelly Family Foundation

The Gayle & Tom Benson Charitable Foundation

The Lauricella Land Company Foundation

The Ruth U. Fertel Foundation

The Libby-Dufour Foundation

The Patrick F. Taylor Foundation

The JKP Family Foundation

The J. Edgar Monroe Foundation

The Oscar J. Tolmas Charitable Trust

The Kambur Law Firm

The N.O. Hispanic Heritage Foundation

The Wilkinson Family Foundation

62 | J A Y N O T E S | F A L L / W I N T E R 2 0 2 0

The Stanley W. Ray, Jr. Philanthropic and Civic Trust The Stuart Family Foundation


In Memory of and in Honor of... Jesuit High School gratefully acknowledges the many benefactors whose contributions were given in memory of their loved ones.  Robert Anderson Jr. ‘42† Robert Armbruster ‘52† Ola Becnel† Earl Bellanger ‘46† Horace Block ‘50† Kathy Bonitatibus† Albert Bordes Jr. ‘47† Victor Bradley Jr.† Gerald Bragg ‘62† Daniel Brennan Sr.† Roy Brennan ‘69† Arthur Brewster† Gustave Callery Jr. ‘65† James Carriere ‘58† Gary Carroll ‘62† Timothy Caserta ‘56† Robert Casey ‘64† Philip Clark Jr. ‘54† Robert Clavier† Walter Cowan Jr. ‘59† Thomas Creagan ‘39† Kerri Crumb† Edmond Daigle ‘53†

William Dardis S.J. ‘58† Gaston de la Bretonne Jr. ‘51† William de Laureal Jr. ‘61† John Demarest ‘67† Lola Donelon† Henry Ecuyer Jr. ‘51† Lucas Ehrensing ‘63† Lawrence Fabacher II ‘65† Patricia Fitzgerald† Lee Foley Jr. ‘53† Ronald Fonseca ‘54† Paul Frederick† Gerald Fucich ‘50† William Furlong USA (Ret) ‘52† Christopher Gaines ‘69† Doris Gardner† George Giacobbe ‘62† Thomas Greve ‘43† Henry Griffin† Carlos Gutierrez ‘54† Ardley Hanemann Jr. ‘61† Ernest Hansen Jr. ‘51† Richard Hare ‘60†

Gerald Healy Jr. ‘50† James Hotard Sr.† John Hughes Sr. ‘63† Theodore Kirn III ‘64† Warren Kirsch ‘45† Dominic LaNasa Sr. ‘54† Keith Landry ‘85† Alfred LaPointe ‘45† Henry Lartigue Jr. ‘51† Mark LeBlanc ‘68† Hugh Marquis† M. Craig Martin ‘60† Maurice Maspero Jr. ‘51† Patrick McGinity ‘55† Robert McIntyre ‘48† Lawrence Merritt ‘87† Vincent Messina Jr. ‘54† Henry Mestayer ‘44† Eugene Miller ‘59† Wiley Mossy Jr. ‘39† Kathleen O’Donnell† Wallace Paletou ‘59† Robin Pendleton ‘80†

James Perrier ‘38† Randolph Quijano ‘63† David Reinhardt ‘96† Merlin Remmers ‘45† Phyllis Retif† Thomas Rowell Jr. ‘51† Louis Sannino† William Satterlee III ‘63† Jack Saux Jr. ‘59† Ruth Sax† William Scheffler III† George Schminke III ‘41† Philip Schoen III ‘36† Patrick Schott ‘47† Stephen Scully ‘65† Roger Shaw Jr. ‘39† E. Kelleher Simon ‘55† Noel Vargas II ‘70† Rene’ Viosca ‘61† Andrew Wiebelt ‘39† Margaret Worrel†

Matching Gifts Employee matching gift programs are important sources of income for Jesuit High School. The entities listed below have employee matching gift programs that contributed to Jesuit in FY 2020.  Albemarle Almar Foundation Ameriprise Financial Services Arthur J. Gallagher AT&T Ball Bank of America Baudier Auto Bayer Charles Schwab Chevron Coca-Cola CV Starr Delta Air Lines Entergy Services Fluor

Freeport-McMoRan Google Graham Holdings Hartford Insurance Group Hershey Home Depot IBM IBM Foundation J. W. Puckett Lincoln Financial Foundation LPL Financial Mallinckrodt Marsh & McLennan Medtronic Merrill Lynch Morgan Stanley

New York Life Insurance Northwestern Mutual Pfizer PPG Industries Sephora Shell Exploration & Production Shell Oil Synchrony Financial TEGNA Foundation Texas Instruments The Standard The Travelers Group Travelers Insurance UBS Financial Services W. W. Grainger Wells Fargo

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63


MINDS & HEARTS ENLIGHTENED CAPITAL CAMPAIGN | READY FOR THE FUTURE While Jesuit has never backed down from growing its campus or its endowment to better meet the educational needs of its students—from the construction of the Student Commons to the addition of the school’s still-cutting-edge science labs—the Minds & Hearts Enlightened Campaign is by far the school’s boldest capital undertaking in recent history. In short, the campaign is a collective resolution made by the entire Jesuit community to situate Jesuit at the educational forefront for generations to come. For thousands of Blue Jays who will one day walk the halls at Carrollton & Banks, the instructional, athletic, co-curricular, and spiritual experiences that make up a “Jesuit education” will be permanently and tangibly improved.

The campaign’s pledges currently total $30,293,063.00 with $14,294,778.00 donated as of June 30, 2020. 

MHE RESULTS

DONORS

AVG. GIFT

AMOUNT DONATED

FY 2020

1187

$5,562

$6,613,168

FY 2019 FY 2018 FY 2017

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Few places on campus have been left untouched by the campaign’s aspirational aims. Our donor’s generosity has enabled the school to transform the gym into the impressive Benson Arena. In the same building, brand new locker rooms have replaced aging training facilities. Almost every classroom on campus has been renovated, and, in between classes, students can now safely travel across Banks Street on the Stuart Brothers Bridge. In addition, benefactors have added more than $5 million to Jesuit’s endowment. Construction is well underway on the school’s new four-story administration building.

293 106 14

$13,506 $25,773 $67,994

$3,997,732 $2,731,963 $951,915


VOLUNTEERS At Jesuit High School, it is not the exclusive domain of the faculty and administration to educate its students and develop in them the competence, conscience, and compassion to enable their formation into Men of Faith and Men for Others. The Jesuit Community is fortunate and blessed to be able to rely on an extensive network of volunteers who play supportive and

pivotal leadership roles. Jesuit is grateful to its fleet of volunteers—enthusiastic and dedicated parents, alumni, and parents of alumni—for their unselfish contributions of time and talent. Jesuit is proud to recognize the many faithful volunteers who served on various boards and committees during the 2020 fiscal year. 

F Y ’ 2 0 J ESUIT LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT’S ADVISORY COUNCIL

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

chairman

chairman

Malcolm Schwarzenbach III ’83 Partner Trumpet, LLC

Brian North ’83 President & CEO Fifth District Savings Bank

Herman Abry ’82 Contractor Abry Brothers, Inc.

Edwin Mazoue, Jr. ’62 Retired City of New Orleans

Walter Baudier, Jr.† Chairman of the Board Design Engineering, Inc.

Mason Couvillon ’92 President Dardis Couvillon & Associates, LLC

Brian North ’83 President & CEO Fifth District Savings Bank

Karen DeBlieux Head of US Corporate Banking Capital One

Vonda Rice IT Business Analyst Entergy

Rev. Christopher Fronk, S.J. President Jesuit High School

James Ryder, Jr. ’62 CPA Self-employed

Kevin Heigle ’69 Attorney at Law Heigle & Associates Capital Title Agency, Inc.

Raymond “Rocky” Daigle, Jr. ’85 Partner CBD Wealth Management John Dardis ’59 Chairman of the Board Dardis Couvillon & Associates, LLC Gerald Duhon ’85 Executor Director Café Reconcile Brandon Gregoire Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) United State Marine Corp. Kevin Heigle ‘69 Attorney Heigle and Associates Patricia LeBlanc Of Counsel LeBlanc Fantaci Villio, LLC

Robert Talbot ’80 Real Estate Broker Talbot Realty Group Michael Varisco ’83 Owner ASRS, LLC Fredericka Wicker Appellate Judge 5th Circuit Court of Appeal State of Louisiana Cindy Wooderson Community Volunteer

Thomas Kitchen ’65 Retired Stewart Enterprises, Inc.

Rev. Frank Reale, S.J. Special Assistant to the President Jesuit High School Fr. Donald Saunders, S.J. Theology Teacher Jesuit High School Eric Simonson ’82 Attorney at Law/Partner Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP Gregory Tilton ’70 Cardiologist Cardiovascular Specialists, Inc.

ALUMNI STEERING COMMITTEE Daniel Augustin ’15 Tom Blum ’61 Travis Bonifacic ’94 Stephen Cazentre ’87 Jerry Conrad ’70 Chris Cox ’89 Kyle Crabtree ’12 Jack Culotta ’13 Ron Drez ’83 Rudy Horvath ’86

Chris Joseph ’08 George Moisant ’66 Claiborne Perrilliat III ’98 Mike Pfister ’76 Michael Prados ’83 Mark Rodi ’59 Graham Ryan ’04 Jeff Serpas ’00 Br. Terry Todd, S.J. ’58 Walter Zehner ’65

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