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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Bd 10.COMmuniqué Back to School Also this issue... It seems like only yesterday when we were contemplating how we would • Attend a rules interpretation spend the offseason, and now, here we are just a few weeks shy of the bemeeting ginning of a new season of high school basketball. Kids have gone • Rules changes for 2012-13 • Summer officials’ camp roundup back to school, as have those of • Summer basketball -- a highlight you who teach or are school adreel in the making ministrators. School basketball • News and Notes schedules are being compiled by • President’s Message the CIAC so that they can be put in the hands of our Commissioner • Commissioner’s Commentary • The Doctor is In: You are what you to make assignments for the seaeat, Part 2 son. IAABO has been busy pre• Spotlight on the New Haven paring and disseminating educaAlternative League tional materials for officials and Member Profile: Lou Brockett • arming board interpreters with that and more to take back to their • Ask the Interpreter: Myths & Misunderstandings respective memberships. And, Click any headline to go to the hopefully, you’ve been busy, article keeping yourself in top physical shape through a constant fitness program and officiating during the off season. That said, it’s time for all of us to go back to school, as it were, to prepare ourselves physically and mentally for the new season to which we all eagerly look forward. It’s also a good time to go back to school with regard to rules knowledge and rule changes. (cont. on p. 2)

Game fees for 2012-13 up slightly over last season Adjust your spreadsheets and however else you keep track of game fees earned and paid during the season. The CIAC has announced the new schedule of fees for officiating basketball in Connecticut for 2012-13, and they are as follows: Regular season: Varsity: $89.76 Sub-varsity: $58.21 CIAC state tournament Playdown, qualifying and quarter final rounds: $100.12 Semifinal: $107.43 Final: $124.93 In case you were wondering, here is how our basketball officiating fees are calculated. There is a formula which uses, as a benchmark, (cont. on p. 3) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Back to School ... (cont. from p.1) And it is most certainly the time to go back to school with regard to staying on top of and implementing the procedures you must follow with regard to providing our Commissioner and Secretary with the information they need from you, such as your up-to-date contact information, availability, blocks, and all other information that will facilitate a smooth process for scheduling and assigning games. To that end, we are including some informational tidbits and features to help you do all of the above. Buddy outlines in his Commissioner’s Commentary what he needs you to do to enable him to do his job and make sure all schools’ games are properly covered with the appropriate officials for those games. Our Interpreter, Jeffrey Smith, has some extremely useful information that he presented at the IAABO fall meeting which you will find valuable in your preparation for the season. We have posted the rule changes elsewhere in this newsletter, but without commentary. That commentary will come at a later date as we draw closer to the start of the season. Dr. Dan Davis once again favors us with information and dispels some misinformation coming from recently released medical studies about some of the more common foods and beverages we all consume, so that you can adjust your intake accordingly and stay healthy throughout the season. We also report on some officials who went to school (if not back to school) at the camp run cooperatively by us and our colleagues from the other boards in the state. The clock is ticking. The calendar pages are turning. The new season will be upon you before you know it. So go back to school on those elements of your game that you need to work on and improve to be a better official this season than you were last season. We can all improve. Let’s do it.

Go back to school -- Attend a rules interpretation meeting The first meeting of our new season is the mandatory Rules Interpretation session, which will take place on Sunday, November 11th at Lyman Hall High School in Wallingford. The operative word is “mandatory.” You must attend a rules interpretation meeting before the season begins. If you have a schedule conflict and cannot make our rules meeting on November 11th, you can attend any other CT board’s rules interpretation meeting and get full credit. Our colleagues across the state have scheduled their sessions as follows, in chronological order: Board 6: Wednesday, October 17th, 7 PM at East Catholic High School, Manchester Board 7: Wednesday, October 24th, 7 PM at the Fairview Farm Golf Course, Harwinton Board 9: Thursday, October 25th, 7:30 PM, at Bunnell High School, Stratford Board 8: Wednesday, November 7th, 7 PM at St. Bernard’s High School, Uncasville NOTE: Our Board 10 rules meeting is the last one on the calendar of all the boards in the state. There are no “make-up” meetings. Please mark your calendar accordingly.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Rule changes for 2012-13

Game fees for 2012-13 up slightly over last season ... (cont. from p. 1) the average percentage of pay increases for public school teachers across Connecticut. That percentage increase is then applied to the sport with the highest officiating fees – ice hockey. The dollar value of that increase for ice hockey is then added to the fees for all sports to create the new fees. Hopefully, we never officiate basketball or any sport just for the money. However, we also don’t work for free, and game fees for a full season can add up to a nice piece of additional income by the end of the season. Even though pay increases have been very small, any increase during such difficult economic times is appreciated. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Has your contact information changed? If your address, phone number(s) and/or email address have changed from last season, you MUST update your information in Arbiter. You can do so by logging in at www.arbitersports.com and clicking on the “PROFILE” tab near the top of the screen. Read carefully all the information on your Profile page and make whatever changes are necessary. NOTE: BE SURE TO HIT THE “SAVE” BUTTON BEFORE YOU EXIT THE PAGE AND QUIT ARBITER. Otherwise, your changes will not be saved. SPECIAL NOTE: Updating Arbiter is not enough. You must also send any changes in address, phone number and email address to our Board 10 Secretary, Hank Luzzi. The reason? The Board 10 membership database is not linked in any way to Arbiter, and therefore, our database will not automatically be updated just because you made your changes on Arbiter.

Happy 90th birthday, IAABO It was back in 1923 that the International Association of Approved Basketball Officials (IAABO) came into existence. It’s purpose then and now was to educate, train and develop officials, promote the welfare of the game of basketball and maintain the highest standards of basketball officiating. As members of IAABO Board 10, we have all benefitted immensely – personally and professionally -- from belonging to this venerable organization. The best way we can give back what we’ve gotten out of it is to pursue the goals of the organization to become the best trained, most physically fit, and most capable officials we can be and provide the best possible service to the schools whose games we cover. Congratulations to IAABO, its leaders and the entire membership.

2012-13 Food Drive Students at the host school for our Sunday morning board 10 meetings – Lyman Hall High School – are conducting a food drive under the banner: “Feeding the Community.” We ask all of you to do your part to support this effort. Please bring canned goods and/or non-perishable food items (such as cereals, crackers, etc.) when you come to the Board 10 rules interpretation meeting on Sunday, November 11th. Keep in mind that there are plenty of people who are less well off than most of us. According to the Connecticut Food Bank, one in seven households in Connecticut are struggling and unable to afford to put food on the table. The actual number may even be higher as people are often reluctant to seek assistance. Let’s do our part and help by bringing food items to the meeting on 11/11.

Member-to-Member Mart When it absolutely, positively has to get there today! Call on XL Courier Service for same day service. Rush deliveries. Delivery confirmation. Competitive prices. Contact: Tim Brown (203) 314-2535 xlcourier@aol.com !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Summer Officials’ Camp round-up One of the great resources available to all of us is the combined experience and expertise of our veteran and highly accomplished officials – and equally important, their willingness to share their knowledge with newer officials who wish to improve their game. Accordingly, a collaboration among boards resulted in the 2012 CT IAABO Officials’ camp held on August 4th and 5th at the Beckerman Center on the campus of the University of New Haven in West Haven, CT. The camp was held in conjunction with the UNH high school girls’ team camp. Officials with 5 years or less experience were eligible to attend, and 42 such officials did including ten from our board. Veteran officials from Boards 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 served as observers and instructors. Our own Jeffrey Smith, Ray Vanacore, Mark Federico and Steve Kirck II were among them. Board 6’s Peter Palermino and Charlene Shepard were the camp’s co-directors and were ably assisted by numerous colleagues. The camp was quite robust with a full weekend schedule of games which the campers officiated under the watchful eyes of their instructors. Every attendee’s game was recorded on video and available on YouTube for each attendee to view. All attendees received classroom instruction, verbal critiques and commentary immediately after each of their games, plus written comments from their observers. How valuable and useful was the camp? The best evidence comes from the recollections of the attendees. We talked to a few of the Board 10 officials who took part in the camp. 3rd year official Ed Finnegan: “Attending the IAABO Summer Camp at UNH in August was my first camp experience and it was much more than I ever expected. We got to pick our instructors’ brains. Even Buddy and Hank stopped by to see us. They did not just instruct but they shared their experiences in refereeing and in the camps that they have attended. When attending a camp you have to go with an open mind and a willingness to accept constructive criticism because the instructors will point out every little thing that you do wrong. After all, you are being taught by the best so that you can become your best. Every weakness that you learn about your game will help you become a better official, and it is not the big things but the little things that make a big difference in how you call a game. Personally I learned to close down as the trail and work the arc to improve my view of the play. I also learned to slow down and stop while making a call and get deeper below the baseline to improve vision of the play. I also learned to become more definite in the calls that I make, and sell them.” (continued on p. 7)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Summer Officials’ Camp round-up ... (cont. from p. 6) 2nd year official Bill Bodin: “The most beneficial part of the camp for me was the immediate feedback when I got off the court or during dead balls and breaks in the action on the court. The nice thing was, you’d get that feedback right away and then be able to apply it immediately in the next game. It was a great day and I look forward to doing the camp again next year.” 3rd year official Rich Schultz: “First off it was a great experience in regards to meeting all the various boards interpreters and fellow referees from other boards. The day was long but well worth it. We were able to get feedback at halftime from our evaluator and at the conclusion of our games. Also at the end of the day we were given our written evaluations noting what we should improve on and what our strengths are. Feedback like this is great, because after all, if you are doing something incorrectly and no one points it out to you, then you are unaware of your mistakes and you don’t know what to eliminate or improve on. All in all it was well worth the time and effort that I spent at the camp. I look forward to doing it again.”

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

Notre Dame High School of West Haven is accepting applications for the class of 2017.   Transfer students welcome. There will be an open house on Sunday, October 14th. Admission tests are on Saturday, October 20th and Saturday, November 3rd. For more information, email Admissions Director Lino Izzo '00 at admissions@notredamehs.com or call 203-933-1673 or visit http://www.notredamehs.com. You can also visit Notre Dame's online home to view games and other school events at www.gogreenknights.com. 

Beautiful Vermont vacation rental home This well-appointed all-season house is located in Wilmington, VT. The house has four bedrooms, a washer and dryer, and an all glass frontal A-Frame. Price negotiable for Board 10 members. Contact Mike Scanlon: (203) 415-4185.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Summer basketball – a highlight reel in the making

The 2012 Hartford Pro-Am Summer League and the Osgood Shootout once again attracted top talent from the region and beyond, including pros and former college standouts. The ProAm, played at the Classical Magnet School in Hartford, featured players such as Ryan Gomes, Kemba Walker, Dale Saunders, Keith Cothran, AJ Price and others. The Osgood, played at New Britain High School, showcased the talents of Kemba Walker, Jerome Dyson, Ryan Gomes, Roosevelt Lee, Monte Ulmer, Julian Allen and many more. The high level of play also required a high level of officiating and Board 10’s Jeffrey Smith, Steve Cain and Cheryl McCarthy-Chiari were among the officials who provided it. At the ProAm, Cheryl worked a Final Four game, while !

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Jeffrey and Steve worked a Championship game. At the Osgood, Cheryl joined these two in working the boys high school final which was televised on CPTV. They also worked the men’s final which went to double overtime. You can see highlights of both events on YouTube. Here are the links: For the Hartford Pro-Am: http://youtu.be/yjXim8Zeei0. For the Osgood Shootout: http://youtu.be/2X3SCLcDioI.


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

Free 10-Day membership for all IAABO Board 10 Members

GET THE BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE Main Entrance Tickets carries tickets for all major sporting events, music concerts and theatrical productions and over 80,000 events worldwide. IAABO officials type in " IABBO" in the promo code at checkout and receive 10% off the ticket price! Main Entrance specializes in New England area events. For more information, or to search upcoming events and purchase tickets, click on: MainEntranceTickets.com Todd Pinchuk, owner, Main Entrance Tickets, LLC PAGE 11


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

NEWS & NOTES Benefit golf tournaments a big hit A memorial golf tournament held in honor of the late Doug Chernovetz was a success in every sense. The tournament attracted 120 players, including a good number from Board 10, and raised $3700 for a scholarship in Doug’s name. The tournament was held on June 16th at the Ranch Golf Club in Southwick, MA. Mark Grumoli and his group won the tournament, but in reality the winners are the future recipients of the scholarship that resulted from this event. This was the first in what will be an annual tournament. Mark your 2013 calendars accordingly when you get the date for next year’s event. The Chernovetz family thanks all participants and, in particular the Board 10 members who entered and played… ... The 2nd Annual Becker College Golf Tournament fundraiser took place on September 16th at the Leicester Country Club in Leicester, MA and was highly successful in raising money to support the Becker Blackhawks baseball program. Todd Tompkins, Jr., son of Todd senior, was one of the event’s primary organizers. The younger Todd is a senior at Becker College and an outstanding baseball player. Last season, he was named to !

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the D-II baseball All New England Team as well as to the Worcester All Area All Stars. He earned All-NECC honors and received Division Three Capital academic All-District honors. His .492 batting average was the nation’s highest. He ranked second nationally with his .607 on-base percentage and fifth nationally with a .806 slugging percentage. He is also a star in the classroom with a 3.54 GPA.

Raucci Tapped by Tap-off Club for their Hall of Fame The honors continue to roll in for the venerable Tommy Raucci. Tommy will be inducted into the New Haven Tap-off Club Hall of Fame at the club’s awards dinner on November 13th at Amarante’s in Morris Cove. This special recognition comes on the heels of Tommy’s winning the Don “Red” Lomme Award given out by the Connecticut State Board for his service to our board and to the game of basketball. Tommy Raucci officiated for 41 years including 19 years at the college D-I and D-II levels. He joined Board 10 back in 1966 and made the state high school tournament list for 40 of his 41 years on the court. Tickets are limited. If you are interested, contact Hank Luzzi at hluzzi@comcast.net.

How to succeed in business – by really trying For the first time in the 40 year history of the Diagnostics Marketing Professionals Association DxMA, they have elected a president to serve a second term, and that president is our own Robert Speziale. (continued on p. 13)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 12) The election was held at the association’s annual meeting in Chicago in early September. Robert is shown here with the association’s immediate past president, Brian Durkin… … We’re happy to report that Anne Matlock has a new position. She was recently hired as a senior dental hygienist at Yale New Haven Hospital. Anne works with dental residents, patients, and public health partnerships… … We learn from Carl Highsmith that his daughter, Alexis, (who is also a Board 10 official) has been named the new Deputy Director of New Haven Legal Services. She will leave her position as a staff attorney at Hartford Legal Services after 5 years where she specialized in employment and education law. She earned her undergraduate degree from Duke University and her law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School. More happy news about Alexis is included elsewhere in this issue’s “News & Notes”.

Family members making Board 10 members proud Albertus Magnus College Assistant Director of Athletics and Sports Information Director Kristen DeCarli was voted the 2012 Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC) Sports Information Director of the Year. Kristen happens to be the daughter of Rich Altieri. PAGE 13

OCTOBER 2012 After working at UCONN as an Athletic Communications Assistant, Kristen was hired by Albertus Magnus. This was in July of 2011. She first revamped athletic communications operations for the Falcons' 14-sport athletic program, including developing a much-improved web site as well as enhancing the school’s brand identity and logo. For more information, visit: http://athletics.albertus.edu/information/generalre leases/SID_DeCarli… … Proud grandfather, Ron DeNuzzo is proud for a number of reasons – the most recent of which is that his granddaughter, Ava Loughlin, performed as a member of the cast of the Whitney Players production of “Hairspray” this past August. Ava was part of the children’s ensemble and performed on stage with great spirit and confidence. The show was produced and directed by Cindy Simell-Devoe, Ken Devoe’s much better half. The show’s four performances played to sold-out audiences at the Hamden High Theater. Theater goers, including Ron, commented that this production was as good if not better than anything they’d seen on Broadway, including the original Broadway production of “Hairspray.” A great time was had by all – including budding musical theater star Ava… … Another star in her own right in pageant competitions is Mikayla Raffone, daughter of Ric Raffone, Jr. Mikayla won the National American Miss Connecticut Pre-Teen on August 3rd in Danvers, MA. She competed in the 10-13 year old age group. She was the smallest and youngest in the entire division. She competed against 51 girls from all over the state. Mikayla also won best (continued on p. 14)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 13) Thank-you note, was 1st runner up in Casual model, won the spokesmodel category, was 3rd runner up in photogenic, and first runner-up in the actress category. Mikayla will next compete and represent Connecticut in the national pageant during Thanksgiving week in Hollywood.

Wedding bells are ringing As promised, more happy news about Alexis Highsmith. On August 25th, Alexis married Ken Smith who, by the way, also happens to be a Board 10 official. Ken passed the new candidate test last season. Now, if by chance the two are assigned to work the same game, might that be the second husband and wife officiating crew in Board 10 history? Stay tuned… … Other nuptials in the news: Rich Ogurick was the proud father of the bride. His daughter, Meghan Ogurick, was married to Brian Webb on June 16th at St. Mary’s Church in New Haven. A reception followed at the Pine Orchard Yacht & Country Club in Branford. They honeymooned in St. Lucia. Both bride and groom are from Cheshire, and that’s where they just purchased their first home. Meghan is an elementary school teacher in Meriden. Brian works for Praxair, and he is also a volunteer fire!

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OCTOBER 2012 fighter. In addition, Brian is a football official as a member of the New Haven Board of Football Officials. Those of you who also officiate football may be working with Brian this season.

Climb every mountain – or at least one Here’s an innovative way to get in shape for the basketball season: Climb a mountain. That’s what Jack LaRocca did this summer. This wasn’t just any mountain. It was Mt. Washington, the second tallest peak east of the Mississippi. Jack and his wife, Rebecca, began their climb at 9:30 in the morning, and some five hours later, they reached the summit 6,288 feet above sea level. Mt. Washington is no ordinary mountain. World record winds have been recorded of 213 MPH. It has been known to snow in August at the summit, and the mountain has claimed 147 lives. So, Jack and Rebecca packed plenty of foul weather gear. The climb began uneventfully, but soon turned into a rapid climb over rough terrain. They reached a midway point, had a light snack, rested and began the second phase of their climb. It was rough going over jagged rock overlooking a huge ravine which in the winter turns into a skier’s delight. About 400 yards from the summit, the climb grew extreme, with no distinct trail and with an accent that was nearly vertical. Each step grew increasingly difficult as the air thinned out and the steps were more challenging. What made the climb even more challenging was that the temperatures rarely changed. It was 80 degrees at the base when they started, and as the day wore on, the temperatures increased. It was an unheard of 84 degrees on the trail, and (continued on p. 15)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 14) there was no shelter on the last portion of the climb. After climbing the last few feet on all fours, they reached the summit, and enjoyed, in Jack’s words, “one of the greatest moments anyone could ever experience.” Officials needed for the 2012 Special Olympics Division Tournament on October 20th Officials are needed for the Special Olympics Division Tournament on Saturday, October 20, 2012 at the Floyd Little Athletic Center (The New Haven Field House). Games start at 8 AM. The last games of the day start at 4 PM. There will be 8 games on each of the four courts at the Fieldhouse, so we need a lot of officials. If you can volunteer to officiate at the games, please contact: Cheryl Chiari – chechi402@aol.com. Cell: 203 464-8611. Also note: The State Special Olympics games will take place Saturday and Sunday, November 17 and 18, 2012 at Quinnipiac University and we will need even more officials. Please volunteer. We need you, and you will enjoy an unforgettable experience.

And, finally – a new officials’ camp opens Our Mike Scanlon is opening a new camp – the New England College Officials Camp. Mike will run the camp along with Larry Last, the ECAC supervisor of men’s basketball officials. Their first session is October 14th at Endicott College in Beverly, MA. Their new website is: www.necollegeofficiating.com. The site is under development. If you want more information about the camp, contact Mike Scanlon directly at: coachref199@sbcglobal.net.

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OCTOBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

President’s Message: “What we can learn from The Replacements.” -- Ken Devoe Until the start of the 2012 NFL season, I only thought of “The Replacements” as the highly forgettable Keanu Reeves-Gene Hackman movie of the same name about substitutes hired to play football during a players’ strike. Now of course, “The Replacements” refers to the officials hired by the NFL to work during the lockout of the regular officials, in what turned out to be a debacle. My intention is not to criticize the replacement officials but rather to extract some lessons from what transpired that are useful to us and to all officials in any sport at any level. The replacement officials were put in an absolute no-win situation. They were tasked with officiating football played at a level of speed, athleticism and complexity that was light years beyond anything they had ever experienced. They were forced to do a job for which, by experience and training, they were simply not qualified – through no fault of their own. It’s analogous to asking our new candidates to officiate the CIAC state tournament finals. It was inevitable that they would make incorrect calls. But to heap criticism on them for that is unfair. Let’s be honest. In any sport, calls are missed, kicked, or blown by even the best officials in the business. Anyone claiming to have called a perfect game is disingenuous. The most you can do is Photo !om NFL.com get the calls right as often as humanly possible and if you miscall a play, hope that your mistake doesn’t change the outcome of the game. Until the final play of the Seahawks-Packers game in Week-3, no game outcome had been altered by a replacement official’s incorrect call. When the regular officials were hired back for Week-4, it didn’t take long for the very same fans who booed the replacements to boo the regulars – particularly in the PackersSaints game when Saints’ return man, Darren Sproles, appeared to fumble while being tackled, but was ruled by a veteran official to be down by contact, even though TV replays clearly showed the ball coming out of the returner’s hands before he hit the ground. The Packers had no challenges left so the play was not reviewed and could not be overturned. Fortunately, for the crew, the call did not end up changing the game’s outcome, as the Saints missed a go-ahead field goal attempt later on. (cont. on p. 17)

Commissioner’s Commentary: "Processes and procedures to follow before the season starts” -- John “Bud” Chernovetz When it comes to one of my primary duties – game assignments – there is a method to the madness, so to speak, from my end. However, in order to make that method work effectively, there is also a process which requires your participation and cooperation. I can’t do what I do successfully for everyone unless everyone follows the process and takes the actions that must be taken before the season. Here are the highlights of what I need you to do. UPDATE YOUR INFORMATION ON ARBITER AND ENSURE ITS ACCURACY If your phone number(s) or email address has changed between the end of last season and now, you have to make these changes on your Arbiter Profile page. The instructions for (cont. on p. 17)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

President’s Message: “What we can learn from The Replacements” ... (cont. from p.16)

My point is: Let’s take missed calls out of the equation and see what we can learn from the experience (and inexperience) of the replacement NFL officials. 1) RULE KNOWLEDGE IS PARAMOUNT: The most legitimate complaint among knowledgeable NFL observers about the replacement officials was their lack of knowledge of NFL rules. The preseason and first three weeks of the regular season were rife with gaffes resulting from that lack of knowledge – such as spotting the ball on the wrong yard line after a penalty, or in one game, awarding a team (the 49ers) not one but two extra timeouts to which they were not entitled and granting them not one but two challenges to which they were also not entitled. Here’s the lesson – and I am by far not the first and only person to say this: You can’t enforce a rule you don’t know. In a basketball game, how can you correctly rule on any given play whether the contact that occurred was illegal (a foul) or legal (incidental) if you don’t know the rulebook definitions of illegal and incidental contact? How can you correctly rule a block/charge play if you don’t know what constitutes a legal guarding position and how to establish it, and then maintain it? Whatever the sport or level, there is no excuse for an official to not know the rules. If you don’t, you’re flying blind. Knowing the rules won’t guarantee that you will be a good official. But not knowing the rules will guarantee that you will not be a good one. The time to go back to school on the rules and this year’s rule changes is now -- well before your first scrimmage and certainly before your first regular season game of the year. 2) CONFIDENCE and CONTROL are crucial: One legitimate complaint about the replacement NFL officials was their lack of confidence – understandable, given their inexperience. The result was often a lack of control, allowing post-whistle jostling and other conduct to occur with alarming regularity – all because the replacements were not confident enough to call personal fouls early to put a stop to it. The players pushed the envelope whenever they could to see what they could get away with, and they got away with a lot. As an official, if you let a game get out of control, problems will escalate. You have various “weapons” at your disposal – your whistle and voice, plus the technical foul and flagrant foul. You must keenly and constantly observe what’s happening on the court, especially during dead balls and you must – repeat, must – diffuse potential problem situations between opponents. Take charge. Don’t dictate play, but don’t let things get out of hand. You can do that, regardless of the level of game you’re officiating. You’ll get better at it with more experience. (continued on p. 18) Commissioner’s Commentary: “Processes and procedures to follow before the season starts” ... (cont. from p.16)

for doing so are elsewhere in this issue of the newsletter. I can only go by what is in Arbiter, so please make sure your information is correct. MAKE SURE HANK HAS THE SAME UPDATES AND CHANGES TO YOUR INFORMATION THAT YOU PUT INTO ARBITER. Arbiter does not link to or update the Board 10 database. HAVE A PHONE NUMBER AT WHICH I CAN REACH YOU AT ANY TIME Whether you list on Arbiter a home phone, work phone or cell phone number – or any combination of the three – be sure to indicate which number is the one I should call first. To make that notation, go on Arbiter, click on PROFILE, and then on your “Update my information” page, click on “PHONES”. That takes you to the page where you enter or edit your phone numbers. In the “NOTE” box, write “Call this number first” next the number you select as your primary phone number. In most cases this would and should be your cell phone number. (continued on p. 18) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

President’s Message: “What we can learn from The Replacements” ... (cont. from p. 17)

So, while I don’t totally forgive the errors of the NFL replacement officials, I empathize with the impossible situation into with they were placed. Let’s learn from their misadventures and put what we learn to good use during this and every season. Commissioner’s Commentary: “Processes and procedures to follow before the season starts” ... (cont. from p.17)

Make sure your cell phone is in working order and is ON at all times. If I can’t reach you, I can’t notify you of a last-minute schedule change or a new game add-on that you need to know about – in which case I will have to call someone else and give that person the game which should have been yours. Also, make sure your voicemail is in working order and that your mailbox is not full. If I need to leave you a message and can’t, that’s not good for you or me. IF YOU CANNOT WORK THIS SEASON OR WISH NOT TO, NOTIFY ME ASAP If I don’t hear otherwise, I assume that you plan to work games this season. I am going on that assumption and will provide you with a schedule. If, after the fact, you return the schedule, I will have to reassign that entire schedule on Arbiter – which is time consuming and should not have to happen. Plus, it is a fine-able offense. SEND ME ALL YOUR BLOCKS My “rule” for this is simple: If you have not blocked a particular day and time frame, I have to assume that you are available then. So, if I need you, I will assign you to a game on that day and time, and you must take the game. The deadline for submitting blocks is October 15th. After that you will be fined for games you turn back. Of course, unforeseen emergencies can happen. There also may be a day when you find out that you have to work later than usual or planned. I understand. All I ask is that you call me immediately upon knowing of either situation so that I can assign your game to someone else who is available. Do not email me. Call my cell, which by the way, is also always ON. INFORM ME OF SCHOOL CONFLICTS If you cannot officiate at any particular school – for example, if you have a son or daughter who plays for that school, or you work for that school – send me that information. Be sure to include the reason why you cannot work games at that school. PUT YOUR PHOTO INTO ARBITER This requirement is in place for several reasons. It will help me get to know our newer officials. It will help athletic directors identify who is working their games and they will be better able to recognize and greet the officials when they arrive at the site. That’s important. Speaking as a former A.D., I can tell you that it is a relief to know that the assigned officials are in the building and on time. It is also helpful to your partners if they have not worked with you before. If you do not know how to upload your photo into Arbiter or if you need any assistance in doing so, call or email Ken Devoe and he will help you. As you read this I am probably already assigning games or very close to doing so. I need your cooperation to make this process run smoothly for the benefit of everyone. Thanks for your help. Let’s have a great season!!!!

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

THE DOCTOR IS IN Board 10’s Dr. Dan Davis discusses injury prevention and treatment, as well as general health and fitness, to help keep you on the court.

“You Are What You Eat – Part 2 Eggs, Coffee and Chocolate: Good or Bad for you?” Earlier this year, three new studies were released regarding the health risks and/or benefits of items that most people consume regularly: Eggs, coffee, and chocolate. Some of the findings in these studies raised more than a few eyebrows among the medical and nutrition communities. Plus, every so often we read about studies that contradict previous studies as to whether a certain food or beverage is or is not good for us, making it very confusing for the average person to decide what he or she should or should not consume. Consequently, we asked our resident medical expert, Dr. Dan Davis, about these newest studies.

Q: Many studies have shown that over-consumption of egg yolks can lead to cardiovascular disease. But the recent study released by Dr. David Spence from the Stroke Prevention and Atherosclerosis Research Center at Western University in Canada, which has caused an uproar and whose methodology has been challenged, concludes that eating egg yolks carries a health risk comparable to smoking cigarettes. What should we know about this study? A: The study was meant to grab the most attention. The methodology involved was indeed flawed. The study did not factor in other items people usually consume when eating eggs – such as bacon, ham or sausage which are all high in calories, fat and cholesterol -- not to mention omelets with cheese that have a lot of cholesterol and cling to arterial walls. Q: Even so, does egg consumption pose a health risk? A: If you eat as many as 3 eggs a day, you significantly increase your bad cholesterol and !

PAGE 19

have greater risk of clogged arteries and heart disease. On the other hand, consuming just 2 or 3 eggs a week probably will not harm you. Q: What about other foods that people eat that are made with eggs? How risky are they? A: That’s an excellent point. Soufflés have high egg content. Cake mixes usually call for eggs to be added. Angel food cake, however, is made with egg whites only, so it is healthier. If you’re a fan of Chinese food, you should know that fried rice is loaded with egg yolks. Alfredo sauce has a lot of egg yolk content. So does mayonnaise. Think of how many ways you consume mayonnaisse, whether added to sandwiches, mixed into salad dressings and so forth. Q: What is your recommendation then with regard to eggs? A: Many studies have shown that moderation in consumption of anything is good. Plus, remember that everyone’s physical make-up is different. Some people may be genetically prone to being able to break down cholesterol more than others can and (cont. on p. 20)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN The Doctor is In: You are what you eat Pt. 2... (cont. from p. 19)

could consume more egg yolks without consequence. Others may be naturally more at risk for potential cardiovascular disease, regardless of diet. If you are high risk, you probably should avoid eggs altogether. You need to know where you stand on the “risk line”, as it were, and you should have your cholesterol measured and monitored and that can and should be part of a regular physical exam. Q: An article on WebMD.com cites “a growing body of research showing that coffee drinkers, compared to non-coffee-drinkers, are less likely to have Type-2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia, and have fewer cases of certain cancers, heart problems and strokes.” What is your take on the heatlh benefits and risks of coffee? A: Coffee is a primary source of caffeine, and studies have shown that, in moderation, caffeine can be beneficial. It increases your energy levels and heart rate. When your heart feels good, you feel less sluggish and tired. You are more focused and can think more clearly. Which is one of the selling points of energy drinks, such as 5-Hour Energy, which have become so popular. But there are downsides to energy drink consumption which we covered in the November-December 2011 issue of this newsletter. You can find that issue in the archives at our web site: www.iaabo10.org. Again, moderation is key. Overconsumption of coffee – 6 to 7 cups a day or more – is not good

PAGE 20

OCTOBER 2012 for you. The same is true of other sources of caffeine such as black tea. Q: Doesn’t coffee also contain antioxidants, and aren’t those good for you? A: Yes, coffee beans contain antioxidants, which are good because they help remove free radicals from your system, and free radicals can cause cancer. But, coffee is not a primary source of antioxidants. In fact, it’s not even in the top 20. You can get significantly more antioxidants from blueberries and pomegranates and drinks made from acai berries. And by the way, if you think you are helping yourself by drinking de-caf to reduce your caffeine intake, the fact is that coffee beans are washed to remove caffeine, but that same process also washes out antioxidants. Q: What are your coffee recommendations? A: Moderation is the key recommendation. But also keep in mind that caffeine is not the only issue. Those of you who like to go to Starbucks or get the fancier coffees Dunkin’ Donuts has to offer should note that when you’re putting things like whipped cream and other flavorings in your lattes, you’re adding considerable amounts of calories, sugar and cholesterol, none of which you want in your body. Q: The other study that gained some recent notoriety is the one that says chocolate reduces the risk of stroke? Is that possible? A: This is a very interesting study, actually. One key point: We’re talking about dark chocolate. Regular milk chocolate does not reduce risk of stroke. But dark chocolate has many more antioxidants, and in fact is among the top 10 sources of antioxidants. This does not mean that it’s a good idea to consume huge amounts of (cont. on p. 21)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN The Doctor is In: You are what you eat Pt. 2... (cont. from p. 20)

dark chocolate. Chocolate bars made with dark chocolate also contain sugar. If you ate unsweetened dark chocolate it would be too bitter to consume. So a key point of information to look for is: What is the dark chocolate content in relation to sugar content? Generally, bars with less than 65% dark chocolate have too much

OCTOBER 2012 sugar and should probably be avoided. Given the results of studies like the one we’re talking about here, companies that make M&M’s, Reese’s, and Kit Kat bars are also making them with dark chocolate. Lindt has an excellent bar with 85% dark chocolate content. So, enjoy your dark chocolate – but in moderation of course. Got a health and fitness question for Dr. Dan? Email it by clicking here: Ask Dr. Dan

FROM THE LIGHTER SIDE

For a humorous look at the life of a basketball referee, check out Kevin Sparrock’s “Fouls & Violations” web site: www.foulsandviolations.net

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Spotlight on a great alternative for area high schoolers -The Alternative Small School Basketball League If you’ve ever officiated games for the New Haven Alternative Small School Basketball League, you know a few things. One, it’s a challenge. Two, it’s a very good workout. Three, it’s a chance to work on your officiating skills and mechanics. Four, and most important, the league provides an opportunity for students at schools throughout the area that don’t have high school basketball programs – and for students who, for whatever reason, could not play for schools that did have a varsity program. It’s an opportunity for them to play ball, to engage in a beneficial physical activity, to develop a sense of camaraderie and teamwork, and, to stay out of trouble and harm’s way. The man who founded and still runs the league is John Vigliotti. If you have worked the league but don’t know his name, certainly you recognize his smiling face and quick wit as well as his firm control over the behavior of the players. John Vigliotti is currently the Principal/Coordinator of the Physical Education Department of the New Haven Public School System. He oversees the daily support of the physical education teachers in New Haven and helps them support the kids and integrate the phys-ed curriculum into the rest of the overall curricula. His duties are many and varied – as well as time consuming – so it’s a wonder he has time to run the league year after year. Let’s just say that he makes the time. John is a life-long New Havener, a gym rat and a basketball junkie. All Photo by NH Register’s of which has served him well in helping serve New Haven’s students Melanie Stengel and teachers. He coached basketball for 32 years at the high school and college levels. He was an assistant coach for the North Haven boys from 1976 to 1979 and then for the Lee High girls in the early to mid 1980s. From 1985 to 1997, John was an assistant women’s basketball coach at Southern CT State University. In 1997 he took a similar position at Quinnipiac University and coached there for 10 years. Until then, Q.U. hired assistant coaches as part-timers. But that year they decided that coaching would be a full time position, and it was something John couldn’t do on that basis. But the fire and passion were still there, and so he needed something to fill the void. In 2006-07, he organized spring round robin tournaments on a once-a-week basis. Then, he got the idea to start an alternative basketball league for youngsters who don’t play on a high school basketball team or who go to a school that has no basketball program per se. “It gives kids who might never be part of an athletic team to go out and play for fun and not worry about getting cut,” John said. The first year – 2008 – the league had 7 teams. Last year there were 9 teams, and this past season 8 teams. Each team plays the other teams twice, followed by a single-elimination tournament. Upwards of 125 players participate in the league. Most of the players attend magnet schools or charter schools. The teams that played in the spring of 2012 included: High School in the Community, New Horizons, Cooperative High School, Sound School, Metropolitan Business School, New Haven Academy, Riverside Academy, Common Ground and Engineering & Science Magnet School. The kids come from all walks of life and socio-economic backgrounds. While the league consists mostly of boys, there are some girls playing on the teams, too. John says that he gets kids from the inner city as well as the suburbs – kids who might or might not be that skilled. It gives kids (cont. on p. 23) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

A great alternative for area high schoolers ... (cont. from p. 22)

who may not have had a chance to connect with other kids socially to do so and make friends. The league encourages the players to support each other, and they do. And of course it keeps them off the street and out of trouble.“We try to keep everything positive, and give everyone a chance to play,” John said. “I tell the coaches to try and play everyone equally throughout the first 75 to 80 percent of the game. At that point, the coach has the discretion to play those players who have performed the best on that given day.” He also urges our officials to let the kids play and have fun, but still keep control of the game. Nobody fouls out in this league. John credits Joe Canzanella, Supervisor of Physical Education and Athletics for the New Haven Public Schools, for his ongoing support of the league. He also greatly appreciates the assisPhoto by NH Register’s tance he has received from New Haven Superintendent of Schools, Melanie Stengel Dr. Reginald Mayo. “Even in the most difficult of economic times, Dr. Mayo finds the funds for us to keep the league going,” John said. John also credits the officials. “I enjoy working with our officials,” he said. “I realize these games are a little different from the high school norm, and the officials have done an excellent job of adjusting to the fact that the players are not always highly skilled athletes. The officials have called the games accordingly and gone about it very professionally.” And, by the way, here’s a note of interest to all our fellow officials on Board 10. Mark your calendars ahead of time. The New Haven Alternative Small School Basketball League will resume play on March 19th, 2013, after the CIAC state tournament finals have concluded, and will run through the first week of June. So, if you want to get a good workout, have fun and perform a very valuable service for a lot of very deserving youngsters, jump at the chance to work at next year’s alternative basketball league.

Member-to-Member Mart

Contact Doug Capasso, Karma Culture 585-218-0022, x201

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member Profile: Lou Brockett If you’re ever in physical distress, one guy you’d really like to have on hand is Lou Brockett. Lou has made a career out of both saving lives and training others to do the same. The business he started, A Second Chance, trains individuals in CPR and first aid, among other things. More on that later. First, a bit about Lou’s background. Lou is from North Haven. He graduated from Notre Dame High School of West Haven in 1977. He then attended Allentown College and Quinnipiac College (now Quinnipiac University) but only briefly. He decided he would get better educational opportunities and learn more about the medical field by joining the U.S. Navy, which he did in August of 1978. He went to boot camp and hospital corpsman school – both in San Diego – and later received training as a pharmacy technician in Portsmouth, Virginia. From 1978 to 1990, Lou held a number of different positions in military medicine and administration for the Navy – too numerous to detail here. In 1990 and 1991, Lou was the administrator of a surgical team deployed in Bahrain during the Desert Storm and Desert Shield operations. His duties included ensuring that the Bahraini hospital was fully prepared and equipped to handle any surgeries or other emergencies and prepare for any military personnel evacuations that might occur. If that wasn’t exciting or stressful enough, Lou was called back to the States in October of 1990 to interview for the position of superintendent of clinical operations for the White House. Yes, that White House! “Interview” might be an understatement, as the questioning lasted 14 hours. The interview was followed by four months of background checks. The good news is: He got the job. The job included taking care of the medical station on Air Force One, making sure that all the necessary supplies, equipment and medical personnel were in place to handle surgery or any other treatment of the President and his staff if need be. Lou later got promoted to the position of running medical operations for the White House, which involved working with the Secret Service, as well as the personnel on Marine One and Air Force One. Beyond that, Lou was responsible for lining up hospitals and medical personnel all over the world whenever the President was traveling so that he could be taken care of anywhere at any time. In the course of doing his job, Lou was in daily contact with the President, Vice President, and their families. Actually, Lou served two presidents: George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. Eventually, Lou left the military and embarked on a civilian career, which included serving as an EMT as well as training others in emergency services. That career path eventually led Lou to found A Second Chance, which is an American Heart Association training center. There, Lou and his colleagues train individuals in CPR and first aid including training for people who need to be certified in CPR for their jobs – for example, high school coaches. Training is also offered to companies and other organizations, as well as colleges and universities, including the dental school, pharmacy school and law school at UCONN. A Second Chance serves clients all across Connecticut as well as Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire. Asked why he got into this line of work, Lou cited a very personal event: “When I was in boot camp in 1978, my grandmother passed away. She died in my dad’s arms. He didn’t know CPR. My grandmother always told me: Whatever you start, be sure to finish. That’s why I do what I do today.” As busy as all of the above keep Lou, he does have a personal life. (cont. on p. 25) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member Profile: Lou Brockett ... (cont. from p. 24)

He and his family reside in Wallingford. His wife of 21 years, Kristyn, is a loan processor for Norcom in Newtown, Connecticut. His 19 year old daughter Alyssa is a sophomore at SCSU, studying communication disorders and speech pathology. His son, Jacob, attends Wilcox Tech and is studying to become an electrician. The youngest of the Brocketts is 4-year old McKenna. Lou Brockett is a multi-sport official: baseball, softball, football and basketball. He worked high level games in the Little League baseball and softball tournaments, including, earlier this year, the 9-10 year old boys Mid-Atlantic Championship in Cranston, R.I. and the 9-10 year old boys’ Eastern Regional. Lou was also on the crew for the 11-12 year old girls Eastern Regional softball championship, the winner of which went on to the Little League World Series. Lou coached the varsity girls basketball team at West Wood Christian Academy from 2003 until 2005. Then, after he stopped coaching, Lou joined Board 10 and became a basketball official and has been on our board ever since. Whether umpiring prestigious national baseball and softball tournaments, or working, at the age of 32, at the White House attending to the medical needs of the President of the United States, or saving lives of military personnel all over the world, those experiences have taught Lou a valuable life lesson which he has shared when addressing inner city student groups – something he does regularly. “What I learned was that even if you’re just a kid from a small town, if you put your mind and heart into whatever you want to be, you can succeed.”

Member-to-Member Mart Childcare now available in Milford We have openings for 2 children in a very safe and child friendly Milford residence in the Rivercliff area. Susan Wiggins, the care provider, has 15 years of licensed childcare experience and is certified in Infant/Toddler CPR and first aid. She is responsible, energetic, caring and reliable and offers Best-of-Care in a safe and loving environment. If you are interested and in need of childcare services, contact Susan Wiggins at (203) 572-2170.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

ASK THE INTERPRETER

With Jeffrey Smith, Board 10 Interpreter and CT State Interpreter

Myths & Misunderstandings Jeffrey Smith was one of 16 presenters at the 2012 IAABO Annual Fall Rules Interpretation Seminar in Toronto. Jeffrey was asked to talk about many of the myths and misunderstandings that have found their way into our game over the years. Accordingly, we present some of those myths and misunderstandings with Jeffrey’s commentary on each. Myth 1: A player with the ball sliding on the floor for any distance is committing a traveling violation. Myth-1 debunked: You need to know, by rule, what a player in this situation is and is not allowed to do. For example, let’s say player A1 dives for a loose ball and slides after gaining control of the ball. According to Casebook 4.44.5 Situation B: A1 may pass, shoot, start a dribble or call a timeout. Once A1 has the ball and is no longer sliding, he/she MAY NOT roll over. (Which by the way means that while A1 is still sliding, he/she CAN roll over – a play that is often incorrectly ruled as traveling.) If A1 is flat on his/her back, A1 may sit up without violating. However, if A1 is on his/her stomach after sliding, he/she MAY NOT roll over onto his/her back. Any attempt to get to the feet is traveling UNLESS A1 has started a dribble first. It is also traveling if A1 puts the ball on the floor !

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OCTOBER 2012

and then rises and is first to touch the ball. (Rule 4.44.5 B). Myth 2: “Reaching” is a foul. Myth-2 debunked: There is no such thing as a “reaching” foul. The term “reaching” does not appear in the rulebook. Yet players, coaches – and unfortunately too many officials – still refer to reaching. Often, when you call a player for illegal contact with the arm or hand, you’ll hear the coach telling his/her players: “Stop reaching.” A player can reach all he or she wants as long as there is no illegal contact, and quite often, what coaches are complaining about as reaching actually involves no contact at all and there is no foul. It is helpful for you to review the definitions of a foul (4.19), incidental contact (4.27), and legal vs. illegal contact (4.24) – in particular: “It is not legal to use hands on an opponent which in any way inhibits the freedom of movement of the opponent or acts as an aid to a player in starting or stopping” (4.24.5). Usually, what others call “reaching” involves none of that. Myth 3: “A player must be not moving (must be stationary) in order to draw a charge or player control foul.” Myth-3 debunked: Not so. In order to draw that foul, the player must have obtained an initial legal guarding position and maintained it when the contact with the opponent occurs. To obtain an initial legal guarding position, the player must have both feet touching the playing court and the front of the player’s torso must be facing the opponent. (423-2, a & b). After obtaining an initial legal guarding position, the player may have one or both feet on the playing court or may be airborne if he/she has inbounds status. The player is not required to face the opponent. The player may also do the following: Move laterally or obliquely (at an angle backwards) to maintain position (but not move toward the opponent when (cont. on p. 27)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Ask the Interpreter ... (cont. from p. 26)

contact occurs); raise hands or jump within his/her vertical plane; turn or duck to absorb the shock of imminent contact. (4-23-3, a through e). Think about this: If, in fact, a defender were required to be stationary in order to legally defend an opponent and draw a charge, the opponent could simply dribble or run at will around and past the defender. That would be a significant unfair advantage. Myth 4: “Officials should ‘let ‘em play.” Myth-4 debunked: This is another issue that officials must throw out of their mindset, and should instead “Enforce The Rules As Written!” The rules clearly define the parameters in which the game is to be played. Rules and case book knowledge give officials the information they need on how to apply the rules to many situations during any game. Myth 5: Officials should let the players decide the outcome of the game, no matter what type of illegal contact occurs during the closing seconds. Myth-5 debunked: The fact is: Players DO decide the outcome of the game based on their legal and illegal activities. It’s up to us, the officials, to make correct rulings. It is our responsibility to create and maintain an even playing field during every contest. Coaches, players and fans only care about the leftside of the ledger…WINS! Our concern is what is fair for both teams. In closing, remember that we are the “Guardians of the Game” and must stand above all to persevere and work every contest with the intestinal fortitude to make rulings in accordance with the rules and points of emphasis. Let myths remain myths. Do not let those myths become your rulings. If you have a question about rules, mechanics, or procedures, please email your question by clicking on: Ask the Interpreter.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

Visit us at www.sachemwineandspirits.com and get added to our email list.

Aunt Chilada’s, voted New Haven’s Best Mexican Restaurant, is the perfect place for food, fun, entertainment -- and parties for any occasion. Enjoy outdoor dining and a spectacular view of the Sleeping Giant. If you can’t come to us, no problem. We cater and deliver to your home or office . PLUS, enjoy 25-cent wings and $5 pitchers on Sundays while watching the NFL on any of our 10 TV’s. Eat, drink and be merry at Aunt Chilada’s. 3931 Whitney Ave., Hamden. (203) 230-4640. Charlie Hague, proprietor

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

OCTOBER 2012

Calendar Meeting Schedule for the 2012-13 season November 11, 2012 -- Mandatory Rules Interpretation Meeting December 2, 2012 December 9, 2012  --  Refresher Exam January 6, 2013 February 3, 2013 -- Annual Meeting Next issue of Bd 10.COMmuniqué: Late November or early December, 2012 NOTE: All past issues of the newsletter are now posted at our Board 10 website. Visit: www.iaabo10.org, navigate to the home page, and click on the “NEWSLETTER” tab.

Helpful Links Bd 10.COMmuniqué is an interactive, electronic document. Wherever you see text highlighted in blue, bold, underlined type, that is a hot link to either an email address or a web page. Simply click on that link to submit ideas and questions, or to get more information. Here are some helpful links: • Board 10 Website • Ask Dr. Dan • News & Notes and Story Ideas • Ask the Interpreter • CIAC Officials’ Association • ArbiterSports • Women’s Coordinating Committee • Board 10 Knowledge Bank" • IAABO • Member to Member Mart

Bd 10.COMmuniqué EDITOR IN CHIEF: Hank Luzzi hluzzi@comcast.net MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF CORRESPONDENT: Ken Devoe kendevoe@pantheon.yale.edu CO-MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Cheryl McCarthy Chiari CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Jeffrey Smith, Ray Vanacore DESIGN & LAYOUT: Ken Devoe Email story ideas, news and notes, and questions to: Ken Devoe or Hank Luzzi

All issues of Bd 10.COMmuniqué are available on-line at the Board 10 Website.

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Board 10 October New Letter