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Bd 10.COMmuniqué TECHNICAL-ities Depending on one’s point of view, the technical foul is either the most under-used or over-used item in our basketball officials’ toolbox. Either way, when an official assesses a technical foul to a player or coach, the impact on the game can be significant and the reaction is, more often than not, highly emotional. For that very reason, some officials may be reluctant to issue a technical even when it is fully warranted by rule or by the game situation and actions of the participants. Other officials may be at the other end of the spectrum, seemingly a bit trigger-happy. Ideally, there’s a happy medium, but suffice it to say that it’s a huge gray area and there would appear to be as many different approaches to the use of the technical foul as there are individual officials. On one hand, the rules mandate that a technical foul be issued for specific situations and actions – such as dunking during pre-game warm-ups (when the officials are on the court), too many players on the court, making a roster/number or scorebook change after the 10-minutes-before-game-time deadline, or causing a delay of game after an initial warning for delay has been issued, and so forth. It is imperative that you know the rules and issue a technical when it is indeed mandated (cont. on p. 2)

Also this issue... • Update from the State • New Rules for 2013-24 • Officials vs. Cancer • Changing of the Guard in West Haven • News & Notes • President’s Message • Commissioner’s Commentary • The Doctor is In: Back Pain • Inside the Coaching Box with Dave Magarity, West Point • Special Feature: Technical Foul Usage • Knowledge Bank • Technical foul usage survey • Ask the Interpreter Click any headline to go to

Mentor/Mentee program returns for 2013-14 Under the supervision of Mike Scanlon, (pictured at right) our new Better Officiating Committee chairman – and with the assistance of the entire committee -- the Board 10 Mentor/Mentee program is being re-instituted after a several-year hiatus. “We have some gifted officials on Board 10 who have volunteered their!time and services to work with some of the sub-varsity officials to help them improve their skills,” said Mike. “I am happy with the choices the committee made and wish we could have taken everyone who applied, but in our first year we are starting small. !The program worked before and, with the help of the observers, it should work again. As chair, I am excited to start.” Here are the mentors and mentees for the 2013-14 season: Mentors: Mike Blake, Brad Chernovetz, Mike Gambardella, Steve Kirck II, Cheryl McCarthy Chiari, Ed Preiss, Ric Raffone, Judy Ruthko, Mike Scanlon, Dan Scavone, Dan Tammaro, Ray Vanacore, George VanValkenburg. Mentees: Lee Altieri, Brett Bradanini, Dwayne Carson, Gary Duquette, Ben Fan, Ed Finnegan, Kyle King, Phil Kobus, Todd Miller, Michaelangelo Palmieri, Joe Pascuzzo, Tracy Pelella, Rick Shultz, Ken Theodos.

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TECHNICAL-ities ... (cont. from p.1) by rule and know how to proceed from there. On the other hand, there are situations that depend entirely on the judgment of the official as to whether a player or coach has “crossed the line” in terms of language or conduct. Each official has a line in the sand. How long should an official “take it” from a player or coach? When have you “heard enough?” These are difficult decisions. So, we’re devoting a portion of this issue of the newsletter to the technical foul. We surveyed a select group of our veteran officials to get their opinions based on their considerable game experience as how best to utilize the technical. We have asked our Interpreter, Jeffrey Smith, to weigh in on this issue in general along with citing some specific examples to help us. You’ll also enjoy some of the anecdotes involving a few well known college coaches and some of the technical fouls they received, as reported by USA Today. We hope you will find this information useful as you prepare for the upcoming 2013-14 high school basketball season. There’s plenty of other valuable information in this issue, including a summary of the rule and editorial changes for this season and, as always, some insights from Dr. Dan Davis on dealing with physical ailments that many of you have experienced or may experience in the future. And, we have a bit of a surprise for you as our “Inside the Coaching Box” interview features a college coach whom some of you may know, rather than a high school coach. Read on and enjoy.

Update from the State Will Connecticut enact an assault bill that protects sports officials? As you may know, there have been previous attempts to get the Connecticut State legislature to pass a law that specifies a crime and/or enhanced penalty for assaulting or threatening a sports official. The last attempt died in the Judiciary Committee as the head of the committee did not favor passing such a law, claiming that there are already enough “protected classes” covered by laws that are currently on the books. The CIAC Officials’ Association, its member boards and individual officials, feel differently. One of the advocates within the State legislature for an assault bill to protect sports officials is State Representative Paul Davis from the 117th assembly district encompassing Milford, Orange and West Haven. He spoke at the CIAC Officials’ Association Advisory Committee meeting on Thursday, October 17th to bring the association up to date and to Assault bi! supporters CT State Representatives talk about trying to get an assault bill for the Paul Davis (le#) and David Labriola protection of sports officials passed in the next legislative session which is coming up in February, 2014. He and State Representative David Labriola from the 131st assembly district representing Naugatuck, Oxford and Southbury, will be heading up that effort. (cont. on p. 3) !

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Update from the State ... (cont. from p. 2) The CIAC Officials Association supports their efforts. “We have put together a packet from NASO on this issue,” said the association’s Director, Joe Tonelli. “We’re going to email all officials’ boards in Connecticut and ask them if there have been any situations or incidents in which officials were threatened or physically assaulted, as well as situations that involved calling the police and averting potential harming of officials.” Joe said that Connecticut has been comparatively lucky in that there have been few, if any, such situations here. But that’s a double-edged sword. If the committee or the legislature as a whole feels there isn’t enough of a problem in the State to warrant new legislation, they will be against putting such a bill up for a vote, let alone passing it. A full court press, so to speak, to get new legislation enacted has its risks. Two previous attempts at getting an assault bill passed have failed, and if this effort fails a third time, that’s the limit and it can’t be proposed again. So any new movement in support of new legislation must succeed, or the issue is dead for all practical purposes. All high school sports officials in Connecticut are urged to contact their state legislators about this issue to get them on board. Connecticut sports officials should also find out who is on the State Judiciary Committee and contact those legislators as well. Securing Governor Malloy’s support is also critical. The fact that the Governor’s son is an ice hockey official may help our cause. Look for further communications on this topic, and if this effort goes forward, please be prepared to support that effort any way you can.

State finals return to Mohegan Sun For the sixth straight year, the CIAC state basketball tournament finals will be played at the Mohegan Sun Arena. What’s new this time around is that some of those games will take place on the Sunday of the weekend of March 22 and 23. The Saturday session will consist of 5 games and the Sunday session, 3 games. While our season is just about to begin and it’s perhaps early to be thinking about the state tournament, keep in mind that your CIAC membership card gets you into all basketball tournament games, including the finals, for free. So, hold on to your card and if you go, be prepared to present it at the Mohegan Sun box office.

Member-to-Member Mart Main Entrance Tickets carries tickets for all major sporting events, music concerts and theatrical productions and over 80,000 events worldwide. IAABO officials type in " IABBO" in the promo code at checkout and receive 10% off the ticket price! Main Entrance specializes in New England area events. For more information, or to search upcoming events and purchase tickets, click on: MainEntranceTickets.com. Todd Pinchuk, owner, Main Entrance Tickets, LLC

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Café Amici offers the finest dining – everything from amazing appetizers, savory soups and salads to timeless classics everyone will enjoy. Our menu includes only hand-selected premium quality poultry and the freshest seafood, simply and perfectly prepared as you prefer, accompanied by our traditional homemade pastas. Café Amici is also a great place to hold your special occasions – showers, rehearsal dinners, cocktail parties, and corporate events. Enjoy our expanded full service bar and dining areas. We’ll also cater your event off-premise at the site of your choice. Café Amici is open 7 days a week beginning at 4 PM daily. Special offer: Present your IAABO or CIAC card when seated and get 10% off your bill. Café Amici. 1670 Whitney Avenue, Hamden, near St. Rita’s Church. 203 848-1682. cafeamici@gmail.com. Ed Bruce, partner.

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New Rules – The changes for 2013-14 Rule changes for this season are minimal, but no matter how minimal, it’s still important to be cognizant of the changes and to plunge back into your rulebook to reeducate yourself on all the rules, procedures and protocols. Below is a summary of the rule and editorial changes for 2013-14.

(continued on p. 6)

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New Rules - The changes for 2013-14 ... (cont. from p. 5)

FROM THE LIGHTER SIDE

“New Rules” by Bill Maher Host of HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher” New Rule: Call things what they are. If your morning coffee contains crushed ice, whipped cream and caramel, it’s not coffee, it’s a milkshake. New Rule: The three most important things for a child to learn are respect, accountability, and to shut the hell up on airplanes. New Rule: The only time a man should say “I need a hug” is if he’s choking. New Rule: What gets on TV must at least be as interesting as what’s on the average security monitor at a convenience store. New Rule: My bank must stop trying to sell me identity theft protection. You know why I expect my bank to protect my money? Because it’s a bank!! From New Rules: Polite Musings form a Timid Observer and from The NEW New Rules by Bill Maher.

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Member-to-Member Mart Dear friends: You’ve always known me to be an advocate of a healthy life style. I am the Health & Wellness Clinic Director working with the Ideal Protein program at Stony Creek Internal Medicine with internist Dr. Emily Nolfo. Ideal Protein is a medically designed and professionally supervised wellness protocol dispensed only by healthcare professionals. It is a muscle-sparing, fat-targeting weight loss protocol that was created for athletes in France over 20 years ago. You will lose an average of 3-7 pounds per week without exercise. Ideal Protein has a beginning and an end where we not only take the weight off and make you healthy, we show you how to keep it off. We are located at 14 Business Park Drive, Suite B in Branford. Call to find out about the next workshop or to set up a free one-on-one consultation. Contact John Moniello: 203-453-3966 OR 203907-5614 john.ip@stonycreekim.com

When it absolutely, positively has to get there today! Call on XL Courier Service for same day service. Rush deliveries. Delivery confirmation. Competitive prices. Contact: Tim Brown (203) 314-2535 xlcourier@aol.com

Carpet Sales & Expert Installation T.R. Carpet Service Tom Raucci, owner (203) 934-7614 or (203) 494-1115. $50 off any room of carpet for Bd 10 members

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Notre Dame High School of West Haven is still accepting applications for next year's freshmen class of 2018. Â Transfer students are also welcome. For more information, visit http://www.notredamehs.com/admissions or contact Admissions Director Mr. Lino Izzo '00 at admissions@notredamehs.com or 203-933-1673. You can also visit Notre Dame's online home to view games and other school events at www.gogreenknights.com.

MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS Weddings, graduation parties, anniversaries, Bar Mitzvahs. If you have a special occasion coming up, let DJ David Daniels III provide the tunes and entertainment. David offers a wide range of music to suit all tastes and moods. PLUS, he’ll even serve as your photographer. Call: 203 895-7727. Party on!

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Officials vs. Cancer campaign for 2013-14

Once again, Board 10 and all IAABO boards across North America, will raise money and awareness to support research and the fight against cancer. As is our practice, we will devote one specific week this season during which we will wear and use our pink whistles and pink lanyards, though you are encouraged to use your pink whistle all season long – especially when working girls’ games. You are also encouraged and urged to donate whatever you can to the campaign -- $10 at the very least. IAABO suggests donating 25% of one game fee. Either way, it’s a small financial commitment especially when compared to the amount of money you earn from officiating in a typical season. Please make your check payable to “Officials vs. Cancer” and mail it to: Hank Luzzi, 434 Thompson Avenue, East Haven, CT 06512. Last year, Board 10 contributed $3,970.00 – our highest total to date, and that was with a relatively small percentage of our members donating. Let’s make it 100% participation this season and really grow our Board 10 contribution total and once and for all let’s conquer this vicious disease.

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Food drive at Lyman Hall HS nets plenty A big thanks to everyone who contributed to the Lyman Hall High School food drive at our first meeting on October 13, 2013. All of the items are being donated to Master’s Manna, which has been providing community services to the Greater Wallingford community since 2006. Their services include a soup kitchen, food pantry and much more. Master’s Manna welcomes donations of goods and financial support. For more information, visit the website. mastersmanna.org. Special thanks to Mike Blake for helping organize the event for this worthy cause.

Special Olympics qualifying tournament is a big hit Special Olympics CT staged a very successful divisional basketball tournament at the New Haven Athletic Center on Saturday, October 19th. Jim Reynolds, as always, organized and supervised the entire event. Cheryl McCarthy Chiari, as always, went above and beyond the call of duty to recruit, assign and schedule the officials. The players, partners, and coaches did their part to provide an upbeat, energetic competition within the spirit of Special Olympics. A very special thank-you goes out to the following officials who donated their services on the court: John Anquillare, Ari Crooks, Anthony Bagnoli, Ken Devoe, Mario Rosa, Lou Matteo, Joe Pascuzzo, Gina Amato, Darrell Nelson, Mike Blake, Ed Finnegan, Anne Matlock, Ric Raffone, Jim Powers, Deb and Shannon Narowski, Kevin Russell, and Steve Cain. You all made IAABO Board 10 Proud! [Photos by Cheryl McCarthy Chiari]

Special Olympics CT needs your continuing support The next major Special Olympics basketball event is the state tournament which will be held on Saturday and Sunday, November 23 and 24 at Quinnipiac University. Please notify Cheryl of your availability for that Saturday as soon as possible by emailing chechi402@aol.com or calling 203 464-8611. NOTE: Cheryl is only assigning the Saturday games. Board 9 will assign the Sunday games. Look for more information in the near future, but if you know you can volunteer, don’t hesitate offer your services now. We need you to come out in force.

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Member-to-Member Mart

Vacation Home Rental

In Dennisport • 7/10 mile from the beach • 2 bedrooms • pullout living room couch New kitchen • new bathroom • screened in porch • washer-dryer • cable • internet access • picnic table • gas grill • $900/week. Reduced prices on weekdays. Call Rich Altieri 203 248-4398 or 203 809-4318. Find out more on line at: www.capecodaltierihome.weebly.com

Beautiful Vermont vacation rental home This well-appointed all-season house is located in Wilmington, VT. The house has four bedrooms, a washer and dryer, and an all glass frontal A-Frame. Price negotiable for Board 10 members. Contact Mike Scanlon: (203) 415-4185.

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The David Daniels III Consulting Group Workshops, seminars, training, motivational talks in the fields of law enforcement, security, financial planning, art and music. For more information, call 203 806-0619, email DAVIDDANIELSIII@ME.COM or visit our web site: http://dd3consultinggroup.com

A medical emergency can happen anywhere, even in a hospital. Should it happen in an environment of medical professionals, can they handle it?  What if it happens in a non-clinical area? Do you know proper procedure? If not, learn First Aid and CPR. We offer courses in American Heart Association(AHA) Heartsaver CPR/AED/First Aid, BLS Healthcare Provider, Family and Friends CPR and First Aid, Bloodborne Pathogen, CT State EMT and EMT Refresher Programs, CT EMT Practical and other courses as well. Classes available at your site or at our new location: 16 Main St. Suite 207, Durham CT. Phone Lou Brockett at (860) 788-3245 or visit: www.asecondchancecpr.com

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CT IAABO Summer Referees’ School

The second annual Connecticut IAABO summer school for officials was held August 3rd and 4th at the University of New Haven in association with the UNH high school girls camp, under the auspices of Board 5 and codirectors Peter Palermino and Charlene Shepard. The 42 attendees and 12 observers came from every IAABO board in Connecticut. Board 10 observers were Ray Vanacore, Mark Federico and Ric Raffone, Jr. Each attendee had the opportunity to officiate 3 games with at least two observers on hand for each of those games. Attendees received immediate feedback at halftime of each of their games plus written evaluations at the end of the camp. Each game was videotaped with running commentary in the audio and all videos were available to the attendees on YouTube with two weeks of the conclusion of the camp. Plans are in the works for a 3rd summer camp at UNH next summer. Be on the lookout for emails from Hank as the deadline for applying to next summer’s referee school approaches. [photos courtesy of Sharon Shepard]

IAABO Fall Interpretation Meeting The 2013 IAABO Fall Seminar was held on September 20 and 21 on Long Island, hosted by Boards 40 and 127. Board 10 Interpreter Jeffrey Smith delivered a presentation on PCAs and crew of 2 and 3 rotations. Board 6 Interpreter Peter Palermino offered a presentation about enhancing officials’ communication with their partners, head coaches, scores and timers. Connecticut attendees included (pictured left to right): Peter Palermino, Charley Harbach, Ray Vanacore, IAABO’s Peter Webb, Mike Thomas, Jeffrey Smith and David Raila. [Photo by Cheryl McCarthy Chiari]

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Changing of the guard in West Haven A familiar face and presence will no longer patrol the sidelines at West Haven HS. Veteran girls head coach Jim Eagan has retired after 33 years. Egan coached the Westies from 1980 to 1994 and again from 2002 to 2012, with a stint at Sacred Heart Academy in between. In fact while at Sacred Heart, Coach Egan led the Pacers to the Southern Connecticut Conference championship in 1996. Coach Eagan was inducted into the West Haven Hall of Fame in 2010. Though he won’t be coaching, Eagan will continue as a physical education teacher at the Seth G. Haley Elementary School in West Haven – something he has done for the last 42 years. Succeeding Jim Eagan as head coach of the West Haven girls basketball team will be former East Haven assistant coach Jessica Moriarty. Jessica played basketball for East Haven from which she graduated in 2007 and went on to star at Eastern CT State University where she was a 1,000 point scorer.

Support Your Local Sheriff (uh, make that your Local Ref) With apologies for this oblique reference to the 1969 comic western film starring James Garner, this is a serious call for all of you to support your fellow Board 10 officials who advertise their products, services and businesses in this newsletter. Those products and services include: house painting, carpeting, health and fitness products, workout programs, restaurants, wines and spirits, employment opportunities, vacation home rentals, music and DJs for special events, tickets to major sporting events, CPR and other related training programs, computer service and repair, educational opportunities, business graphics, copywriting and advertising/marketing/ communications services, web site services, and more. You probably spend money on many of these products and services already. If so, why spend it with strangers, when you can get equally high or higher quality from your colleagues – as well as discounts for being a Board 10 official. Your colleagues need and appreciate your business, especially in a difficult economy. Do right by your fellow officials. You will benefit, as will they. The same goes for any time one of your fellow officials runs a charitable or public service event – most of which we publicize in this newsletter. They put an incredible amount of effort in trying to do some good for people in need. Support these events with your dollars and if need be your time as volunteers. These are all good causes. It’s time to step up. Be givers, not just takers. “Support your local ref.” There is no excuse not to.

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Member-to-Member Mart Looking for work? Know someone who is? Find fast, effective placement through Best Temps, Inc. Best Temps is Connecticut’s leading provider of temp-to-permanent employment in the technical and clerical fields, as well as in light industrial, manufacturing, and IT. Find out where the opportunities are and seize them today. Call John Ramos at Best Temps: (203) 8787762. Email: JRBESTTEMPS@YAHOO.COM or visit: http://besttemps.com to learn about the following job opportunities and more:

• CDL a and b drivers/ roll off drivers/ hauling dbristo landfill • Assemblers/mechanical/ electronic equipment/blue prints • House cleaners/commercial cleaning company/residential/commercial • Truck mechanic/ repair experience /maintenance of company’s truck fleet/ heavy equipment • Appliance repair techs / ability to work variable & flexible hours • Warehouse/ loader/unloader 3rd shift • Admin. Asst. Position/ strong computer skills/ excellent communications skills • Maintenance mechanic/ repair/troubleshoot machinery desired • Restoration workers/ experience in fire /flood water damage/full time/ top wages/great career start • Equipment operators/ must operate excavation equip. Bull dozers / pay loaders /hand tools • Welders/ MIG /stick /aluminim a must • Non CDL drivers/ must have delivery exp. Strong customer service • Office furniture installers/ must be mechanically inclined, use of hand tools /previous furniture experience a must • Warehouse / plumbing supply/ inventory, loading/unloading/ able to multitask • Sales reps/telemarketing/ new haven area/ must be well spoken/ unlimited growth potential • Machine operators/ ability to work on manual machines/BPTS/lathes/ CNC's set up/operate

From the Mailbag Want to get in shape and stay in shape by developing a condition regimen? It’s hard to go it alone. So, here’s an idea. Since we are so spread out over a large area, maybe it would be possible to have people from the Valley get together along with some border area towns. Folks from the Waterbury area could get together with others from Cheshire, Wolcott and other towns in that area. Same for people in the New Haven area and surrounding towns. It is always easier to work out with a partner or partners, and this might be the perfect opportunity to get ready for the season. If you’re interested, let your colleagues know. – Todd Miller

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NEWS & NOTES More Tap-Off Club Hall of Famers from Board 10 The New Haven Tap-Off Club will induct Board 10’s Tony Candido (pictured below right) and Pat Paulson (pictured at left) into their Hall of Fame at a dinner on November 12th at Amarante’s Sea Cliff Inn at 7 PM (social hour at 6:30 PM). Pat closed out his long basketball officiating career working the CIAC Boys L Final this past March. This season, Tony enters his 50th year of officiating, while continuing his work as an evaluator for the DI MAC and Northeast Conference, as well as at the DII and DIII levels for the East Coast Conference and Little East Conference, among others. Also inducted at this event will be former official and current New Haven director of athletics, Joe Canzanella. Whether or not you can attend the dinner and induction ceremony, you should join the Tap-Off Club. It’s the greatest bargain in sports. Annual dues are just $10. Male your check payable to: New Haven Tap-Off Club, and mail it to: Lee Franzman, 115 Rogers Avenue, Milford, CT 06460.

Print and clip the Tap-Off Club application form below and mail it in with your check. New Haven Tap-off Club 13 West Clark St., West Haven, CT. 06516 Membership Form (Please Print) Year____________ Name__________________________________________ Address________________________________________ City/Town________________State_____ Zip__________ Home Phone_____________Work Phone_____________ E-mail Address__________________________________ Dues are $10.00. Please return this form, with your check made payable to the New Haven Tap-off Club, to the address above. Thank you, in advance, for your support.

(News & Notes continued on p. 17)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 16) Diamond Club inducts John Anquillare

The Southern Connecticut Diamond Club inducted our own John Anquillare into the club’s Hall of Fame on October 17th during a dinner at Monticello’s Restaurant in Meriden. In addition to being an outstanding baseball player at West Haven High School and the University of New Haven, John was a highly successful baseball coach at the University of New Haven and the University of Bridgeport. Under his leadership as head coach at UNH, his teams appeared in 9 College World Series, and at UB he rebuilt the program into a major power.

Virgulto honored by the March of Dimes Former Board 10 official Vin Virgulto is among the 8 individuals honored by the March of Dimes at their 6th annual Elm City Legends event on November 8th at Anthony’s Ocean View. In addition to officiating basketball, Vin coached the Hamden High School baseball team for 23 years, leading the team to over 200 wins and multiple District League championships. He has also been inducted into the Southern Connecticut Diamond Club Hall of Fame (Vin is shown here here accepting HOF award) !

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Scavone receives prestigious award We’re proud to report that Dan Scavone will receive the National Interscholastic Administrators Association State Award of Merit for the State of Connecticut. The award is based on his service, leadership and contributions at the local and state level. The letter accompanying the notice to Dan of his award, commends him as follows: “The positive impact you have had on the lives of studentathletes and your service at the local, league and state levels has not gone unnoticed.” Dan will receive his award at the Connecticut Association of Athletic Directors awards banquet to be held March 27th, 2014 at the Sheraton Hartford South Hotel in Rocky Hill, Connecticut.

Alberti logs another successful season on the pro tennis circuit Kudos to Board 10 member Joe Alberti on a very successful 22nd year of officiating major professional tennis matches. His credits for the 2013 season include: Being named New England's representative for April 5-7 Davis Cup quarter finals match pitting Serbia against the USA in Boise, Idaho, service line official for the World Team Tennis Final, and a 19th straight year of officiating at the U.S. Open, including working the Women’s Singles final and the Men’s Doubles final at Arthur Ashe Stadium. (News & Notes continued on p. 18)


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News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 17)

the clinic: “The whole goal is to keep kids in school so they’re learning. If they have a physical or mental health issue, they can go to the clinic while staying in school.” Church Street School students have access to a wide range of primary care services at no cost to their families. The clinic is funded by a grant from the Connecticut State Department of Health. This is especially important as many Church Street students and their families don’t have a pediatrician of their own and some don’t even have health insurance. You can read more in the October 13th article in the New Haven Register written by Michael Bellmore. Access the article on line at: http://www.nhregister.com/health/20131009/ha mden-schools-clinic-provides-convenient-carefor-kids.

Gold medal for Federico Mark Federico’s Narragansett Creamery won another Gold Medal for their Renaissance Ricotta at the 2013 Big E Cheese Competition. The Big E’s 6th annual cheese competition drew 148 entries from 36 licensed New England cheese makers. Renaissance Ricotta had previously won a Best-In-Class award at the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association World Competition. Mark’s company also won a Silver Medal for their Fresh Mozzarella and a Bronze for their Olive Treasure spread at the Big E this year. Narragansett Creamery’s products are available at grocery and specialty stores in Rhode Island and elsewhere throughout New England. Find out more at: http://www.richeeses.com.

Hamden’s Church Street School provides healthcare clinic for students As any parent knows, it’s tough when you get a call from your youngster’s school that your child isn’t feeling well and you have to leave work and pick him or her up at school and go to the pediatrician. Church Street School in Hamden has a better option – a clinic right in the school providing students with primary care as needed. Board 10’s Howard Hornreich is the school’s principal. He explained why they have !

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Support the A+ School Rewards Program Also from Howard Hornreich: Once again, Church Street School in Hamden is participating in the Stop & Shop A+ School Rewards Program. Through March 20, 2014. Church Street School in Hamden can earn cash through this exciting program. You can help. Log on to www.stopandshop.com/aplus and choose “Register Your Card” from the A+ menu on the left to register your card online. Then, each time you shop at Stop & Shop using your Stop & Shop card, you will earn cash for the school. You can track the amount of points you earn for the school by checking your grocery receipt or checking online when you create an account (News & Notes continued on p. 19)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 18)

at www.stopshop.com. Each month, the amount of cash awarded will be updated on the Stop & Shop website. Church Street School will receive a check at the end of the program. The money can be used for any of the school’s educational needs. Taking just a minute of your time to register your card can make a huge difference. Howard said, “Church Street School needs your support. Please be sure to register Church Street School using ID 06377 at www.stopandshop.com/aplus. Also, don’t forget to encourage your friends and neighbors to do the same. It could mean the world to our children.”

Helping youngsters develop their basketball skills

FALL 2013

Officiating on a big stage You may have read about the unusual and entertaining scrimmage at UCONN between teams with both men and women players. What you may not know is that Board 10’s Nick Timburini, an intramural official at UCONN, was selected for the crew that officiated that scrimmage. Nice going! And thanks to Bhavin Parekh for bringing this to our attention. Bhavin is the Director of Intramural Sports at UCONN and a former Board 8 member who has transferred to Board 10 this season. Welcome aboard, Bhavin.

Young talent in the spotlight

Each summer, Board 10’s Al Carfora runs the Slamma Jamma Basketball Clinic in Branford and East Haven for boys and girls, ages 5 through 14. This summer, 60 kids from Branford and neighboring towns participated in the clinic. It’s a fun and effective way for youngsters to learn and practice the fundamentals of basketball while enjoying spirited games and getting lots of physical exercise. Al (second row center) is pictured here with his clinic participants at the Walsh Intermediate School.

Dig, set, spike, repeat… Congratulations to Danielle Rea who successfully completed the clinic to become an NCAA volleyball line judge and scorekeeper. Danielle is now officiating games at the college level including matches at Fairfield University and Sacred Heart University.

Ava Loughlin, granddaughter of Ron DeNuzzo, was featured in the Whitney Players Theater Company’s big summer production of Shrek the Musical which played to sold out audiences at the Hamden High School Theater this past August. Pictured here, left to right, are Ava as Little Fiona, Rachelle Zaretsky as Fiona, and Jillian Elliott as Teen Fiona singing their show stopping number “I Know It’s Today” which brought the house down every night. This Southern Connecticut premiere of Shrek the Musical was directed by Cindy Simell-Devoe. (News & Notes continued on p. 20)

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News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 20)

mian Lillard and world champion figure skater Michelle Kwan in a variety of games, including basketball and soccer. Our own Ed Bruce, pictured here on the end line as the lead official, was selected as one of three officials for the basketball contests. You can learn more about the

On September 29th, the Kingswood-Oxford school in West Hartford held a prep school soccer tournament for area independent grammar schools. Chase Collegiate of Waterbury finished in second place and their captain, Lenny Crone’s daughter, 8th grader Samantha, was named to the all tournament team. Congratulations.

We’re happy to hear from Anne Matlock that her son recently moved to Connecticut from Kentucky and continues to pursue a music career. He met with DEFJJAM in New York City and that could bode well for his musical pursuits. The talent is definitely there, as you can see in his current music video, posted on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFhrGqGc CJU. Check it out.

Disney-ESPN initiative as well as the special events at the announcement ceremony by going on line to: http://frontrow.espn.go.com/2013/09/disney-an d-espn-celebrate-new-special-olympics-unified -sports-initiative-with-basketball-soccer-and-fl ag-football-games/.

Wedding bells have rung Proud father of the bride Ralph Zingarella announced that his daughter Andrea was married to fellow

Disney teams up with ESPN to support Special Olympics Unified Games On September 6th, The Walt Disney Company and ESPN announced a two-year global initiative with Special Olympics Unified Sports during a special ceremony at the ESPN headquarters in Bristol, CT. Through a multi-million dollar financial and in-kind investment, Disney and ESPN will help grow Unified Sports programs in Connecticut and elsewhere. After the ceremonies concluded, a number of Special Olympics Unified Sports teams from Connecticut joined sports notables such as NBA Rookie of the Year Da!

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Board 10 official Bill Bodin on October 5th in a ceremony at the Candlelight Farms Inn in New Milford, CT. The happy couple honeymooned in Jamaica. Life is good! (continued on p. 21)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 20)

Speziale on the links with the pros Bob and John Speziale (pictured here left to right) kept their streak of volunteering and golf vacationing at major US golf events that started with the US Open in 2002.! This year the brothers were part of the Mobile Device Courtesy Committee at the President’s Cup at Muirfield Village, Ohio. Through one of Bob’s clients, the boys also got to play the Firestone Country Club which has hosted the Bridgestone Championship (formerly the Firestone Invitational) annually since 1961.! In this photo, in the background, is renowned pro golfer Ernie Els working on his putting game prior to his upcoming pairs match with partner Peter Dejonghe against Americans Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson on the Friday of the President’s Cup. If you have a personal, professional, family or accomplishment you would like to share, click on: News & Notes and Story Ideas

Member-to-Member Mart

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Promote your business, products, and services to your fellow Board 10 officials with an ad in this newsletter. It’s free for all members. Send us your ad and artwork. Or if you wish, just send us your information and we will design and create an ad for you. Email us by clicking on:

Member to Member Mart


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

President’s Message: “Christmas comes early” -- Steve Kirck II

Everyone loves Christmas. I love Christmas because of the joy I see on my kids faces that morning and those great smiles of my nieces and nephews later in the day as gifts are unwrapped.!Well, that same Christmas spirit and anticipation is flowing in my blood right now. You see, my Christmas day excitement comes when we get the email releasing the schedule. The gifts I get excited for the most are the upcoming games assigned to us. The day that I don't get excited about the leaves turning and the chill in the air and the anticipation of getting my schedule will be the day when I know it is time to retire.!I hope you feel the same way.!While we eagerly await beloved Commissioner Chernovetz hitting that “publish” button, I hope everyone is getting ready for the season. This should be done in a variety of ways, from exercising to be in the best shape possible, to making sure your blocks are in Arbiter, to reading the rule book in preparation of the season, to making sure you attend all our meetings. My theme for the year is KIDS. The reason we love this avocation is to give something back to the game so the kids can learn all the ideals of competition, camaraderie, and sportsmanship that athletics and basketball offer. The KIDS deserve our time to get ready to start the season. They are working out and doing everything in their power to be prepared when the ball tips. We need to match that intensity and effort. The KIDS deserve that. You owe that to yourself! (cont. on p. 23)

Commissioner’s Commentary: “The Commissioner’s Preseason Top 10”-John “Bud” Chernovetz In any sport, you’ll see preseason polls ranking the top teams, even though no team has yet played a game. Accordingly, with our season approaching – even though you haven’t yet officiated a regular season game – I offer my ranking of the Top 10 policies and procedures with which I need you to comply so that I can assure the schools we service that all their games will be properly covered. You’ve heard and read this before, but the fact that I have to remind you means that there are still occasions where policies and procedures are not followed. So, for your reference, here are my “Commissioner’s Preseason Top 10”: 1) Accept your assignments Game assignments have been completed, with the possible exceptions of a few schools that submit their schedules much later than others. By now you should have put all your blocks into Arbiter. So, if I have assigned you a game for which, according to Arbiter, you are available, then you must accept the game, or else you will be fined. No exceptions. Of course, if an emergency arises preventing you from officiating an assigned game, let me know as soon as you can and I will cover with someone else. Similarly, if you receive a college assignment that wasn’t on your original schedule, let me know and I will remove you from your high school game so that you can take the college assignment. (cont. on p. 23) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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President’s Message: “Christmas comes early” ... (cont. from p. 22)

The Board - from Hank to Buddy to the executive board - are all doing their part. This is a well-oiled machine, the best in Connecticut. We need you to keep us in that top spot and you can do that by doing everything in your power to start the season right. Special thanks to Mike Scanlon for resurrecting the mentor-mentee program. This is a great vehicle for those chosen to learn from our veterans. To the mentees, absorb all you can. To the mentors, remember you were in their shoes once. To those that didn't get in, don't get discouraged. Seek out a veteran. Work and improve your game all year and apply again next season.! Finally, I hope everyone has that kid-like feeling starting to fester each day as we get closer to receiving our schedules. It's Christmas Eve for me every day from now until that email is received. Maybe, it's just because I am a kid at heart. Maybe, it's because I can't wait to see the looks on the kids faces before each game knowing how much it means to them to play. Maybe, just maybe, it's because I know I have done everything I can to give the KIDS a chance to do something they love. And something I love too. Commissioner’s Commentary: “Commissioner’s Preseason Top 10” ... (cont. from p. 22)

2) Make sure your information on Arbiter is current and accurate Check your Profile page on Arbiter and make sure your phone number(s) and email address are correct. If you have more than one phone number, indicate which is your “primary” number by filling in the “NOTE” box with “Call this number first.” If you change your information on Arbiter, email Hank Luzzi with those changes as Arbiter and the Board 10 database are not linked. 3) Check Arbiter and your email every day The schedule I start the season with is never the schedule that I end the season with. Changes happen daily. If I add a game to your schedule or move you to a different game from your originally assigned game, the only way for you to know that is to check email and Arbiter. Then go on Arbiter and “accept” the change so that I know the game in question is covered. I won’t call you with a change unless it’s a last-minute “emergency” and there’s no time to do otherwise. 4) Call and/or email your partner before every game The emails you receive notifying you of upcoming game assignments contain your partner’s name, phone number and email address. Call or email your partner at least a day before the game to confirm that you will be there. The “R” should make the contact, but if you are the “U” and haven’t heard from the “R” then you make the call or send the email. 5) Call me in an emergency if you cannot make an assigned game CALL ME. DO NOT EMAIL. I must speak to you directly, as I am not always at my computer to check emails. 6) Make sure your cell phone works If I, your partner, or the AD at a school needs to reach you at a moment’s notice, your cell phone will be how they reach you. Perhaps your partner is stuck in traffic and running late. Perhaps there’s a late decision to cancel a game after you already hit the road to get there. So, keep your cell phone on and make sure your voice mailbox is not filled, so that the caller can leave a message if need be. If I have a last minute change having to add you to a game, and I can’t reach you, I will call someone else and you will miss out on that assignment. (cont. on p. 24) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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Commissioner’s Commentary: “Commissioner’s Preseason Top 10” ... (cont. from p. 23)

7) Arrive at the game site in a timely manner For varsity officials, this means arriving at least an hour before your game is scheduled to start. Use some of that time to observe the JV officials. For early afternoon freshman and middle school games, it’s understandable if you can’t get there much before game time because of your work schedule. Everyone understands that. However, get there before the scheduled tip-off. If you are running late, call your partner and the host school AD to give them a heads-up. If you are on time but your partner hasn’t arrived for a middle school or freshman game, start the game by yourself. You should be able to handle it. If you’re doing a freshman-JV doubleheader and your partner has not arrived by halftime of the freshman game, call me I’ll try to get someone to work the JV game with you. DO NOT start a freshman or JV game late, as that will delay the varsity game. 8) Dress for success For varsity games – business attire, or at the very least business-casual. No jeans, sweat shirts or sneakers. For all games, on-court: IAABO jacket, striped shirt with IAABO patch, long black slacks, black socks and shoes – all clean, pressed, and polished. 9) Put your photo into Arbiter Your photo is how coaches, AD’s, your partners and I can identify you if they don’t know you. This is not a request, it is a requirement, and not complying may impact your schedule. 10) Work hard Nothing irritates coaches, players, spectators and observers more than a lack of hustle. It indicates that either you are not in good enough shape to officiate, or you simply don’t care to expend the energy. On the other hand, hustling to get the best angle on a play will increase the probability of making correct rulings and will diffuse potential complaints that you are out of position to make a call. Act like you want to be there. Do more than act. Actually WANT to be there. If you don’t want to be there, don’t take the assignment. NEWS YOU CAN USE Good news. In addition to Joe Kepics and Tom Raucci, we have enlisted the services of Steve Kirck and Amado Vargas as Observers. That greatly increases our ability to see you in action and give you constructive feedback to help you improve. Plus, we’ve eliminated the “Sub-assigner” function. Now, if you are a bona-fide IAABO member, you may work any game, any time, as long as it doesn’t conflict with a game I assign to you, and you may work with anyone – IAABO partner or not -- and still be covered by the association’s insurance. That’s better for you and simpler for me. Everyone wins. Have a great season!

REMINDER: Remaining Board 10 meetings for 2013-14 November 17, 2013 December 8, 2013"-- Refresher Exam January 5, 2014 February 2 , 2014 -- Annual Meeting All meetings are on Sunday mornings, 8 AM at Lyman Hall HS in Wallingford. Attending at least 4 meetings is required. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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THE DOCTOR IS IN Board 10’s Dr. Dan Davis discusses injury prevention and treatment, as well as general health and fitness, to help keep you on the court.

“Back pain and how to deal with it”

Q:! How common is back pain? A:! It’s more common than people think. In fact, back pain is one of the most common reasons why people go to the doctor or miss work. There are many kinds and causes of back pain, and most people will experience some sort of back pain during their lifetime. Q:! What are some of the different kinds and causes of back pain? A:! There’s muscular strain, which could result from any number of actions, such as lifting something heavy. Back pain could result from a bulging disk or a herniated (ruptured) disk. Disks act as cushions between the vertebrae in your spine. They have an outer layer of tough cartilage which covers softer cartilege in the center of the disk. A bulging disk is one that extends outside the area where it is supposed to fit. A herniated or ruptured disk results from a crack in that tough outer layer of cartilege which allows the soft cartilege inside to protrude from the disk. As you get older, with increased wear and tear on your body, you may experience spinal stenosis which is a narrowing of the open spaces within your spine, putting pressure on your spinal cord. The !

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result can be pain or numbness, even muscle weakness. Also, as you get older you may develop osteoarthritis in the lower back area. There are also congenital conditions such as spondylolethesis, whereby the vertebrae in the lower back don’t fullly develop and they can shift a little which puts pressure on the spinal cord and causes significant pain. Other causes of back pain are poor biomechanics – how you run, walk, jump, or move – which can cause problems in your back, or down into your feet and throughout the entire kinetic chain. In my practice, for example, we see many patients with heel fractures and about 20 percent of those patients have a fracture in their lower back. It’s fairly common. Q:! What are some symptoms of back problems? A:! Well, pain of course. That pain might be a muscle ache. It could be a shooting or stabbing pain. It could be a pain that runs down your lower back, into the buttocks, down your leg and into the foot, which is what people experience when suffering from sciatica. Q:! What can someone do about back pain and when is it time to see the doctor? A:! If you have pain down the back or thigh, you should see a doctor quickly. If your pain is not that specific, then you could try (cont. on p. 26)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN The Dr. is In ... (cont. from p. 25)

an anti-inflammatory, ice, extra rest, or perhaps go for some physical therapy. If you do see a doctor you should probably start with your GP or internist. He or she might start you on a muscle relaxer. If that doesn’t work, you should get examined by a neurologist. Because there are so many different potential causes of back pain, it’s important that your doctor becomes a good “detective” who can discover the true cause of your back pain and then it’s important to see or be referred to the kind of doctor who deals in that particular injury or affliction. For example, kidney stones cause incredible pain in the back area, and if you experience a kidney stone you need to see a urologist. If you have a stress fracture – and those can happen when you least expect them to -- you may need a surgeon to intervene and hopefully repair the vertebrae so this doesn’t happen to you again. One of the keys when talking to your doctor is to try and identify the specific action or moment that precipitated your back pain in the first place. Maybe you were playing golf and the torque of your swing resulted in a pain in your back. If you lifted something you shouldn’t have because it was too heavy, that could be the cause to focus on. Believe it or not, even a sneeze could cause back pain. The point is: Find the root cause of your symptoms in order for you and your doctor to come up with the appropriate treatment. An MRI might be an excellent tool for that purpose. Q:! What are some of those treatments? A:! As noted earlier, an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, along with a few days of rest, might be sufficient. In other cases, physical therapy may provide relief. In fact a good physical therapist may be invaluable in getting you comfortably back on your feet. Chiropractic manipulation to move your vertebrae a little can take pressure off the nerves in your spine. Acupuncture might also work. There is a treatment known as TENS (trans-vertebral electrical stimulation) which involves delivering

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FALL 2013 a low-voltage eletrical current through the skin via electrodes in the area where you are experiencing pain. This treatment blocks pain going to the back and provides short-term relief. Of course you need to rule out the existence of a fracture or tumor which would require entirely different forms of treatment. Sometimes the solution might be simpler and less technical. For example, an overly-soft mattress could be the source of your back problem. In that case you may want to look into something like a Sleep Number mattress which enables you to adjust the amount of support the mattress provides. Q:! In summary, what do you recommend with regard to back pain? A:! Back pain is a catch-all. There are a great many possible causes, making it difficult to medically identify and track the pain. But, identify you must. You and your doctor have to find out the cause of your problem. Only then can he or she figure out the treatment that will do you the most good and ideally prevent your back pain from recurring. There are a number of things you can do, as well, to protect yourself. Stay in shape. Exercise. Build muscle strength. Stretch to build muscle flexibility. Keep your weight in check to reduce the amount of stress you put on your back, legs, and feet, especially when you are running up and down a basketball court. Wearing the right shoes can help in that regard as well. I wish you a pain-free season, but if back pain occurs and if it persists, see your doctor as soon as you can. Got a health and fitness question for Dr. Dan? Email it by clicking here: Ask Dr. Dan


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FROM THE LIGHTER SIDE

For a humorous look at the life of a basketball referee, check out Kevin Sparrock’s “Fouls & Violations” web site: www.foulsandviolations.net

Member-to-Member Mart

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FALL 2013


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

With Dave Magarity Women’s Head Basketball Coach U.S. Military Academy, West Point We’re taking a different approach and going outside the high school ranks to interview an outstanding DI college basketball head coach. We’re doing so because of his remarkable story and his insights into the coaching and officiating of basketball. Dave Magarity has coached college basketball for 40 years and is one of only four active Division I coaches to have coached both men’s and women’s basketball – an elite list that includes Paul Westhead, among others. Dave’s accomplishments are too numerous to include in their entirety here, so we present a few of the highlights. Upon succeeding the late Maggie Dixon, following her death after the 2005-06 season, Dave took over the Army women’s basketball program. His 121 Division-I wins over the last seven seasons are the most in the program’s history. In his first year as head coach, Dave’s Army team posted a 26-4 record, the most single-season DI wins in the academy’s history. In fact, he is the first Army head coach to record multiple 20-win seasons. In 2012-13, Coach Magarity led the Black Knights to just their second Patriot League regular season championship and their first WNIT bid. No wonder he was named Patriot League Coach of the Year at the end of that season. Dave has been extremely successful everywhere he’s coached. He’s been named Coach of the Year by four different leagues, including when he coached at Marist in Poughkeepsie NY and at St. Francis University in PA. While at Marist, he led this team to the NCAA tournament in 1987 and the NIT in 1996. Dave Magarity’s illustrious basketball experience extends beyond coaching. He has served as assistant commissioner of men’s basketball operations for the Mid-American Conference (MAC), responsible for scheduling games and working closely with the conference’s coordinator of officials. He held a similar position at the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC). Dave Magarity is a Philadelphia native, a St. Francis University graduate, a father of three and grandfather of two. Basketball excellence runs in the family. His daughter Maureen served as his assistant coach and associate head coach at Army and now is the head women’s basketball coach at the University of New Hampshire. As previously noted, these are only highlights of Dave Magarity’s career. You can find his full story on the Army women’s basketball web site at: http://www.goarmysports.com/sports/w-baskbl/mtt/magarity_dave01.html.

Q: How did you get started in coaching? A: I played college basketball at St. Francis in Laredo, Pennsylvania in the early 1970s when the Vietnam War was going on and we still had the draft. I had a low draft lottery number which made me more likely to get drafted and realized I wouldn’t graduate on time. So instead I enlisted in the Navy. After spending time in the Navy I wanted to return and finish my college studies. But someone in the Navy thought I was well suited to attend their Officer Candidate School and I was transferred to Annapolis. That wasn’t !

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what I wanted to do with my life so I returned to St. Francis to complete my studies and get my degree. The school offered me the opportunity to coach the men’s freshman basketball team and in return, they would help me with my tuition costs. That’s how I got into it. After that first year, they asked me to stay on. At the time, I had a job lined up in Philadelphia and had my sights set on attending law school at Temple. But the opportunity to coach college ball was too good to pass up, so I stayed on and have coached for 40 years since. (cont. on p. 29)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN Q: How did you get to be the head coach at Army? A: After four years as St. Francis’ only assistant coach, legendary coach Gary Williams, then the head coach at American University long before his Maryland days, offered me a job as his assistant. Initially, I accepted the job, but my head coach at St. Francis said he was leaving to go to Niagara and offered me the job as his successor, making me, at age 27, the youngest D-I college basketball coach in the country. Five years later, I went to Iona as an assistant to Pat Kennedy who was a good friend of mine. They were a Top 25 team, so this was a great opportunity. In 1986, I became the head coach at Marist and remained there for over 20 years. After that, I left coaching for a while and had stints as a supervisor of officials and an associate commissioner. I worked for the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) as director of men’s basketball operations and had the chance to work closely with their supervisor of officials, which later provided me with an excellent perspective about officiating when I returned to coaching. After time with the MAAC, I worked for the Mid-America Conference (MAC). They sent me to cover the Central Michigan vs. Army football game in my role as assistant commissioner. At that time, West Point had an opening for head women’s basketball coach and hired DePaul assistant Maggie Dixon, who was an excellent coach. Her brother is Pittsburgh men’s head coach Jamie Dixon, who was also a friend of mine. One thing led to another and I was hired as Maggie’s associate head coach at Army for the 2005-06 season, which is how I got into the women’s game. Maggie’s team had a remarkable season, winning their first Patriot League regular !

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FALL 2013 season and tournament championships and their first trip to the NCAA Division I tournament. Sadly, Maggie Dixon died unexpectedly from a heart ailment in the spring of 2006 at the young age of 28. I was asked to succeed her as the Army women’s head coach. Q: You are one of a small handful of coaches to coach both men’s and women’s DI basketball. How did you transition to the women’s game? A: I don’t think I could coach women’s basketball anywhere else but West Point. These kids are different from typical college students. There’s an atmosphere here that eliminates many things you’d have to deal with at other institutions. Q: How are student/athletes at a service academy different? A: They’re very goal-oriented and committed to the reason that they’re at West Point, and that is to serve their country. This is a prestigious university, and one thing that separates us from other prestigious universities is that we have a leadership component here. In fact we’re the preeminent leadership institution in the world, which is one reason that more CEOs and CFOs of Fortune 500 companies have come out of West Point than any other school. Q: What are the challenges of coaching that type of student/athlete? A: They have a lot of responsibilities and priorities other than basketball, such as academics of course and the military aspect to their college career and beyond. At some point they have to decide not only on a major but what they will do in the military and come to grips with the fact that they are going to be deployed somewhere. They are part of a company, a regiment, a brigade. There are (cont. on p. 30)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN people in authority who spend more time with them than I do as a coach. So my challenge is to help them focus on basketball. Another challenge I face, as do most other college coaches, is that young people today are different culturally from the kids of a generation ago. They’ve been heavily recruited. This is a very difficult school to get into and it’s very competitive. These kids have been told most of their lives that they are special and they start to believe it. But I remind them when they come here that they are just freshmen and don’t know everything, so they’d better not give me attitude. I challenge and motivate them while trying not to push the envelope too far. Q: What is most rewarding about coaching the Army women? A: It’s what they do with their lives after studying here and playing for me. I’ve seen 8 graduating classes who have done remarkable things. I’ll give you an example. I recruited a young lady who complained that coming to West Point was the last thing she wanted to do. Her father was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Marines and didn’t get to go to a military academy. Instead, he attended St. Joseph’s in Philadelphia and was part of the ROTC program there and was deployed in Iraq. His daughter wasn’t even one of our top prospects But she made 1st Team All America in her final two seasons and was a finalist for the Lowe’s Senior Class Award, one of the NCAA’s most prestigious individual awards. She lost out to UCONN’s Maya Moore, which is nothing to be ashamed of. She graduated and is now doing incredible things in the Army as an engineer. She’s been deployed to Afghanistan where one of her duties was to sweep out and find land mines and other IED’s. !

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FALL 2013 Q: Our featured topic for this newsletter is the Technical Foul. What is your view as a coach about technical fouls being assessed? A: I’ve been a coach as well as an assigner and supervisor of officials, so I’ve got a broad perspective. Some coaches believe that there is a point in a game where they want to receive a technical. Maybe their team needs a wake-up call. That’s okay. But today, some coaches cross the line with inappropriate conduct and language and deserve to get T’d up. I used to be more volatile as a coach but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve mellowed a bit. It’s been years since I received a technical foul. As a coach, you have to be smart about it, while still looking after the welfare of your players. Q: What’s your view of the relationship between officials and coaches and how that relationship can be improved? A: There has to be a level of mutual respect. Some coaches keep tabs on the officials that work their games and some may feel that a particular official tends to make more calls against them than against their opponents. Others don’t pay attention to that sort of thing. I recognize that officials have a very difficult job and I know they are trying to improve every game and every season, and I respect that. But the respect must be mutual. If I feel I need to talk to an official and that official blows me off, that bothers me. I’m not looking for an in-depth conversation, just perhaps a clarification. If I think an official missed a call, I’m not adverse to pointing that out, but I don’t hold that against the official for the entire game. If an official says to me that he or she might have missed a call, I respect that more than anything. After all, as a coach, I’m not infallible. I make some bad play calls, too. Again, it gets back to mutual respect. [Photos courtesy of Army Athletics]


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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Special Feature: Technical Foul Usage In January of 2006, USA Today ran an article written by Erik Brady called “Technical Foul Calls Gone Wild.” The premise of the article was that technical fouls often trigger highly emotional responses and become the best-remembered part of a game, involving exchanges between coaches and officials that often make for good stories. There is a lot of truth to that premise. Here are a few of the examples that Brady cited: In a game when Tom Penders coached the University of Texas, he stood up to protest a call and blacked out, suffering from dehydration. One of the officials saw the coach slump to his hands and knees and thought he was overreacting to a call and hit him with a technical, prompting one observer to remark: “Can you get a technical for dying?” Billy Tubbs recalled this situation when he was coaching at Oklahoma: “The officiating hadn't exactly been to my satisfaction. And the crowd didn't much like it either. Evidently some fans threw something on the floor. Referee Ed Hightower came over and said, 'Go to the mike and tell them not to throw anything.' And I said, 'No, I'm not going to do that.' And he motioned like if I didn't, he was going to give me a technical. So I walked to the mike and simply said, 'Regardless of how terrible the officiating is, do not throw stuff on the floor.' And surprisingly, I got a technical for that.” Tubbs’ team was trailing Missouri at the time and he says this was the spark that got the team fired up and they went on to win the game. A story is told about the legendary Al McGuire who reportedly ran on to the court to complain about a call and was told by one of the officials that he would get a technical for every step it took him to get back to his bench. So McGuire had two of his bigger players come out and carry him back to the bench.

As entertaining as these and other stories are in the USA Today article,which you can read at: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/college/mensbasketball/2006-01-25-technical-fouls_x.htm, we wanted to give you the benefit of the knowledge amassed by some of our veteran officials, starting with the following Knowledge Bank feature. [Photos above courtesy of the University of Houston, Lamar University and Marquette University]

Board 10 Knowledge Bank A closer look at the technical foul -- by Jeffrey Smith In my opinion, the technical foul is an extremely useful and effective tool for officials when used appropriately. “Appropriately” in part means adhering to and enforcing the rules for situations in which your judgment as an official is involved in deciding whether a player or coach warrants a “T” by virtue of his or her unsporting conduct, abusive language or other action that crosses your line, whatever and wherever that line may be. At the same time, however, it is important to remember that there are numerous technical fouls that are clearly mandated by rule for which there really is no judgment involved -- such as too many players on the court, changes to the scorebook after the 10-minute mark before the game, a 2nd delay of game, dunking during pregame (cont. on p. 32) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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Knowledge Bank -- a closer look at the technical foul ... (cont. from p. 31)

warm-ups, etc. It is imperative that you study all rules with provisions that call for a technical foul for specific actions and in specific situations. We address a few of these rules and situations in our “Ask the Interpreter� feature toward the end of this issue of the newsletter. Rule 10 contains many, but not all, the rules relating to technical fouls, but it is a good place to start. You must know not only the rule that calls for a technical foul for a given situation but also the procedures that you must follow once you issue a technical foul of that nature -- such as who may shoot the technical foul free throws, where the ball will be put in play after those free throws, whether a technical foul by a player or bench personnel must be charged as an indirect technical foul to the head coach, and so forth. Here are a few case plays that may help to illuminate some of those situations: 3.2 SITUATION A: Seven minutes before the scheduled starting time for the game, Team A presents its team roster and its starting lineup to the scorer and then, at six minutes prior to the game starting time, Team A presents two additional names to the scorer for the team list. RULING: Team A is assessed one technical foul for the violation of not presenting its team member list and not designating its starting lineup at least 10 minutes prior to the scheduled game starting time. Team A is also assessed one technical foul for the two names which were added to its team roster six minutes prior to game starting time. (10-1-1, 10-1-2) 3.2.2 SITUATION B: Team A properly submits its team member list and designates its five starters. However, the number for each team member is erroneously indicated. The error is not detected until after the game has started. RULING: Only one team technical foul is charged regardless of the number of players and substitutes not wearing the number indicated in the scorebook. Each player must wear the number indicated in the scorebook or change the scorebook number to that which he or she is wearing. Any substitutes who become players and require the changing of the number indicated for them in the scorebook will not result in a penalty as the one maximum technical has already been charged to the team for an administrative infraction. (10-1-1 Penalty) 10.4.1 SITUATION C: A1 commits his/her fifth foul and is disqualified. On the way to the team bench, A1 removes his/her shirt or pulls it over their face: (a) before the coach is notified, or (b) after the coach is notified. RULING: In (a) and (b), a technical foul is charged to A1. In (b), an indirect technical foul is also charged to the head coach resulting in the loss of coaching-box privileges as A1 is considered to be bench personnel at that point. (10-4-1h) 10.4.1 SITUATION D: Fifteen minutes before the game is scheduled to start, team member A1 dunks. Two minutes later A2 dunks. RULING: A1 and A2 are each charged with a technical foul. In addition, the head coach is charged indirectly with a technical foul for each act. The two technical fouls are team fouls for purpose of reaching the bonus. When dunking occurs during the pregame practice period the official notifies the team member and the head coach, but does not sound the whistle. If the game is played in a state which utilizes the optional coaching box, the coach should be informed that he/she has lost the privilege of using the coaching box for the entire game. (10-4-1i) (cont. on p. 33)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

Knowledge Bank -- a closer look at the technical foul ... (cont. from p. 32)

Again, these are only a few examples, but what they have in common is that there is no gray area here with regard to the need to issue a technical foul. There is no “judgment” involved. The real gray area has to do with an official determining whether the actions or language or other conduct by a player or coach crosses over that line that each individual official has when he or she is working a game. There is no specific standard or benchmark. You have to determine for yourself whether to issue a technical foul, and you have to be confident in yourself and your ruling. Such situations often provide highly agitated, emotional responses on the part of the person to whom you issue a technical and to his or her teammates and/or fellow coaches, as well as the fans of that particular team. Because these are highly charged situations, many officials -- new and veteran alike -- may be reluctant to issue a technical foul. However, not assessing a “T” when warranted may lead to additional rough play or worse, and a game can spiral out of control if you are not careful, thoughtful and confident. Officials should not state: “I never give technical fouls.” It is a rule, and if a penalty needs to be assessed, then the official must penalize the offender. Officials should try to handle situations in a professional manner. This is not to say that officials should have running dialogues with players or coaches all during the game. In addition, if a coach constantly breaks your concentration during live ball action over the course of the game, you should verbalize to him or her, when appropriate, that their actions are unacceptable. If they chose to ignore your request, then this might be the time to give a warning and move on to the next play. Subsequently, if this type of inappropriate behavior continues to break your concentration, and you feel that it needs to be addressed, a technical must be assessed. An official who warns a coach and does not follow-up with a technical foul when warranted, may be looked at by coaches as giving idle threats and not following through. This will only re-enforce their negative behavior in future games, causing the official to lose credibility in the eyes of coaches, partners, supervisors, etc. Note that there at times when obvious behavior or conduct by players or coaches does not require a warning and should result with assessing a technical foul immediately. Finally, officials should not show anger when assessing a technical foul, but being firm and showing strength in a professional manner will set the tone as the game continues. After assessing a technical, an official should move away from the individual once the penalty is reported to the official scorer. There will likely be some type of reaction from the coach or player, which is natural. However, the official should not inflame the situation and make it worse. On the other hand, do not let any participant become out of control. Once a technical foul is assessed to a coach, your partner should not engage him or her in a dialogue. If the coach wants to talk to your partner, he or she should say, “Coach, now is not a good time.” In addition, at no time during the game, should you let any player or coach disrespect the game, you, or your partner. These are the times when you must immediately penalize their unsporting conduct. Jeffrey Smith is Board 10’s interpreter and the Connecticut State interpreter and has worked numerous conference and state tournament finals.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

Bd 10.COMMuniqué Survey When, how, and why would you issue a technical foul? We put this question to a number of our more experienced officials to get the benefit of their experience when thinking about how to best make use of the technical foul. Here are some of the responses: • The most significant impact of a technical foul on a coach is the potential threat of receiving one. The severity of two free throws and possession of the ball at the divisional line for the opponent is a severe penalty that can be the difference between winning and losing. Just the possibility of a technical foul is a great tool for officials to help prevent unsporting behavior that would otherwise occur. • The technical foul, if used appropriately, should make the game better. It is just like any other foul. Yes from time to time the blood pressure will go up, but so what. Basketball is a competitive game. You have to have thick skin and be willing to call a technical foul when necessary. Sometimes we officials swallow the whistle when it come to technical fouls. Just call it, get it right and move on. • A technical foul is a tool like any other foul.! It’s not something to give in anger or with great demonstration. If it’s needed, call it. • Technical fouls are just one resource we have as officials to ensure proper sportsmanship and conduct in a basketball game. We should use them effectively and when needed. We should first use our people skills to help promote good sportsmanship. If we use technical fouls too often and too quickly we lose credibility and this could negatively impact our reputation as officials. On the other hand, if we do not utilize the technical foul when necessary, we could lose control of the game as well as the respect of educated observers -- including coaches who may sense an advantage that could be gained. So it is critical that we know the proper time and place to invoke this valuable resource. Used wisely and in a timely manner, the technical foul can make the game better for everyone. • Technical fouls need to be taken seriously and used judiciously. Everyone knows when a coach or player crosses the line, so some are easier to call than others. Like everything in life, communication is key. Having an appropriate conversation with players and coaches throughout a game can help you diffuse a potentially volatile action or discussion. A key to the success of any official is to know when a technical foul is warranted and needed and that comes with experience. • I haven't had to give many technicals in my career (hopefully that’s due to not making a lot of bad calls), but I always go back to what Buddy told me and that was that the T should make the situation better.! If I felt I made a call that was "iffy" then I might take a little more than usual from a coach. But once you let it be known that you've heard what was said and are ready to move on, you need to act on that belief.! I also feel I can let a coach get away with more if he or she is doing it quietly. But a coach who tries to become the focal point of the game in front of an entire crowd needs to get whacked with a T. I also feel that a lot of technicals can be avoided if you take some time to listen to coaches. Remember: They don't like to be ignored. • Buddy has said: “Once you’ve been doing this long enough a coach should know where your line is and not cross it. If you haven’t established in your career yet where that line is, you are asking for trouble.” I echo that bit of guidance. Coaches should know where the line is and not cross it. You can give a warning if you want -- not an official “rulebook” warning – but a look, or saying “that’s enough, coach” and they should know that a line has been drawn which should not be crossed. There should be no tolerance of assistant coaches. Assistant coaches are not allowed the same wiggle room as head coaches. And no coach should ever be surprised when he or she receives a technical foul. Upon reflection, every technical I have ever given a coach, they have realized it was definitely warranted.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

ASK THE INTERPRETER

With Jeffrey Smith, Board 10 Interpreter and CT State Interpreter

It’s time to kick off a new season and that means refreshing our knowledge of the rules. With that in mind generally, as well as specifically relating to changes for 2013-14, we posed the following questions to our Interpreter.

Q1) A new mechanic has been introduced to indicate that the ball has entered the backcourt as the result of a tip by or contact from a defensive player.! At what point in the play should the official use that signal? Should it be as soon as the the ball is tipped, as soon as the tipped ball enters the backcourt, or after any player retrieves the ball in the backcourt? A) When the ball is tipped by a defender, the official should indicate that such is the case, as soon as the tip occurs, using the newly approved mechanic. In doing so, the offensive player(s) and your partner(s) will know the status of the ball when it is retrieved by any player (See the signal chart for the new mechanic). Q2) There are many different kinds of technical fouls. Which ones are considered administrative technical fouls, and to whom, if anyone, are those technical fouls charged? Also, what technical fouls are charged to the head coach as indirect technicals? !

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FALL 2013

A) Administrative technical fouls are charged for the roster, starters and numbers not being entered into the scorebook 10-minutes prior to the start of the game. Also, after the 10-minute mark, changes and additions to the roster are charged as administrative technical fouls. Other administrative technical fouls include: team not ready to start the half, the use of a TV monitor or electronic communications, not occupying the assigned bench, having more than five players participating, excessive time-outs, delay of game after a first team warning for delay, and not all players returning to the court at the same time following a time-out or intermission (10-1). Any technical foul assessed to bench personnel, a disqualified player or an assistant coach is also charged as an indirect technical foul to the head coach (10-4). Once the head coach is charged with a first direct or indirect technical foul, he/ she must abide by Rule 10-5 for the remainder of the game – i.e., the head coach must remain seated for the remainder of the game, except to request a time out, confer with scorer table personnel to request a time out to address a correctable error, timing error scoring error or A/P error, or to replace or remove a disqualified player or any player who is directed to leave the game. Q3) Assistant coaches who stand during live play often express surprise or even anger when reminded by an official that they have to remain seated during live play.! What is the rule that applies, so that officials can be confident that they have the rule “on their side” so to speak? A) Rule 10-4 applies to any bench personnel with regard to their standing, addressing an official, inappropriate behavior, etc. Officials should thoroughly know this rule’s restrictions and assess the penalty if any team member violates the rule. Q4) What is the difference between a flagrant technical foul and a flagrant personal foul and how should they be reported and administered? A) They may be of a violent or savage nature, or a technical non-contact foul which displays unacceptable conduct. If personal, it (cont. on p. 36)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN Ask the Interpreter ... (cont. from p. 35)

involves, but is not limited to, violent contact such as striking, kicking and kneeing. If technical, it involves dead-ball contact or non-contact any time when there is extreme, persistent, vulgar or abusive conduct. Fighting is also a flagrant act (4-19-4). When either a flagrant technical or flagrant personal foul is committed by a player, it should be reported verbally to the official scorer and the offending head coach. After the head coach is notified, the player should be immediately removed from the game. The official should then signal to the official timer to start the 20second interval for replacing the disqualified player and the head coach must have a substitute enter the game at the expiration of that time limit (10-5-2). Once the disqualified player is replaced, play is resumed as follows: Flagrant technical foul: 1) The offended team is awarded two free throws with no players lined up on the lane lines, 2) any player (including substitutes) may attempt the free throw(s) and 3) the offended team will be awarded a designated outof-bounds spot throw-in at the division line opposite the scorer’s and timer’s table (8-3; 10-6). Flagrant personal foul: 1) The offended player is awarded two free throws with no players lined up on the lane lines, 2) if the offended player is unable to attempt his/her free throws, then the head coach or captain may select any eligible substitute to attempt both free throws and 3) the offended team will be awarded a designated outof-bounds spot throw-in nearest the foul (8-2; 104b). A single flagrant technical foul or the second technical foul charged to a player results in disqualification to the team’s bench (10-3 NOTE). Ejected adult bench personnel shall leave the vicinity (out of sight and sound) of the playing area immediately and are prohibited from any further contact (direct or indirect) with the team during the remainder of the game. Failure to comply with the rules of ejection may result in the game being forfeited (10-4 NOTE). Q5) The NCAA has made rule changes for men and women.! Specifically the 10-second backcourt rule has been added to the women’s rules, !

PAGE 36

FALL 2013 and accordingly, the 5-second closely guarded count in the backcourt has been eliminated.!Plus, for women, the 5-second closely guarded count in the front court is when the defender is within 6 feet of the player holding the ball rather than 3 feet. !Also, both men and women will use the shot clock as the determinant of a 10-second backcourt violation, and the officials will no longer use a visible 10-second count. The prep schools we cover typically follow some of the NCAA rules. Can you clarify the NCAA changes and tell us how, if at all, these NCAA rule changes may affect the rules for our prep schools? A) NCAA Women: On a throw-in, the offensive team will have a “magic” number of 20 on the shot clock before a 10-second violation occurs, because both the game clock and the shot clock start when the ball is legally touched or legally touches any player on the court. However, officials must be cognizant of when player/team possession occurs after a missed field goal or free throw, and be sure that the shot clock resets correctly in order to adjudicate the rule properly. NCAA Men: On a throw-in, the offensive team will have a “magic” number of 25 on the shot clock before a 10-second violation occurs, because both the game clock and the shot clock start when the ball is legally touched or legally touches any player on the court. However, officials must be cognizant of when player/team possession occurs after a missed field goal or free throw, and be sure that the shot clock resets correctly in order to adjudicate the rule properly. NCAA Women & Men: Violation - 10-Second Back Court. (Rule 9-11). The 10-second count shall begin when a player legally touches the ball in that team’s back court except on a rebound or jump ball. In such case, the 10-second count shall start on player control. Once the 10-second count begins, an inbounds player (and his/her team) shall not be in continuous control of a ball that is in his/her back court for 10 consecutive seconds. Beginning in 2013-2014, officials will eliminate the visible 10-second backcourt count, unless there is less time on the game clock than the shot clock, which will be turned off (cont. on p. 37)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

Ask the Interpreter ... (cont. from p. 36)

at 25 seconds for men and 20 seconds for women. The official who administers the throwin in the backcourt will use the shot clock for the 10-second backcourt count, with no visible count. The Center official and the “New Lead” official will have secondary responsibility for the 10second backcourt count.

FALL 2013 in their leagues and games, even though the coaches may not be aware of the changes. However, it is imperative that the officials know and understand the changes if they are to be used. !"#$%&#'()*#(#+&*,-%.#(/%&0#1&2*,3#4*5'(.65,3#%1# 71%5*8&1*,3#72*(,*#*4(62#$%&1#+&*,-%.#/$#526596.:# %.;##<,9#0'*#!.0*171*0*1=

PREP SCHOOL GAMES: Most of the time, officials will ask the coaches prior to the game how they handle these changes

YOUR AD HERE Promote your business, products, and services to your fellow Board 10 officials with an ad in this newsletter. It’s free for all members. Send us your ad and artwork. Or if you wish, just send us your information and we will design and create an ad for you. Email us by clicking on: Member to Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

Member-to-Member Mart

Aunt Chilada’s, voted New Haven’s Best Mexican Restaurant, is the perfect place for food, fun, entertainment -- and parties for any occasion. If you can’t come to us, no problem. We cater and deliver to your home or office. Enjoy 25 cent wings and $5 pitchers of Miller Lite every football Sunday. We have the NFL Sunday Ticket so you can see every game on any of our 10 TVs. Eat, drink and be merry at Aunt Chilada’s. 3931 Whitney Ave., Hamden. (203) 230-4640. Charlie Hague, proprietor

Visit us at www.sachemwineandspirits.com and get added to our email list. Frank Bepko, proprietor !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

FALL 2013

Calendar Board 10 meetings for 2013-14 November 17, 2013 December 8, 2013"-- Refresher Exam January 5, 2014 February 2 , 2014 -- Annual Meeting All meetings on Sunday mornings, 8 AM at Lyman Hall HS in Wallingford. Attendance at at least 4 meetings is required Next issue of Bd 10.COMmuniqué: Fall, 2013

NOTE: All past issues of the newsletter are now posted at our Board 10 website. Visit: www.iaabo10.org, navigate to the home page, and click on the “NEWSLETTER” tab.

Helpful Links Bd 10.COMmuniqué is an interactive, electronic document. Wherever you see text highlighted in blue, bold, underlined type, that is a hot link to either an email address or a web page. Simply click on that link to submit ideas and questions, or to get more information. Here are some helpful links: • Board 10 Website" • Ask Dr. Dan • News & Notes and Story Ideas" • Ask the Interpreter" • CIAC Officials’ Association • ArbiterSports • Women’s Coordinating Committee" • Board 10 Knowledge Bank# • IAABO • Member to Member Mart

Bd 10.COMmuniqué EDITOR IN CHIEF: Hank Luzzi hluzzi@comcast.net MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF CORRESPONDENT: Ken Devoe kendevoe@pantheon.yale.edu CO-MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Cheryl McCarthy Chiari CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Jeffrey Smith, Ray Vanacore DESIGN & LAYOUT: Ken Devoe Email story ideas, news and notes, and questions to: Ken Devoe or Hank Luzzi

All issues of Bd 10.COMmuniqué are available on-line at the Board 10 Website.

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PAGE 39

Board 10 Fall 2013 Newsletter  

The fall edition of our News Letter

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