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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Bd 10.COMmuniqué Down the stretch we come As you read this issue of Bd10.COMmuniqué, our 2011-12 season is coming down to the final lap, so to speak, and a big push is on by teams whose games you will be officiating. This is the time to get behind the rallying cry that we always use at this juncture of the basketball season: “Finish strong.” You’ll find some excellent insights on what that rallying cry means in this issue’s “President’s Message” by Steve Wodarski, noting that you have to ratchet up your officiating prowess from here on in, as teams are fighting for conference and state tournament spots and other important goals. But finishing strong does not only include your officiating performance. It also means strengthening your physical condition and avoiding injury. Dr. Dan has some very helpful hints about the most common injury he sees among officials and the general public: heel pain. If you are experiencing heel pain or want to know how to prevent it, “The Dr. is In” is a must-read for you. (cont. on p. 2)

Also this issue... • 2012-13 Board 10 meeting schedule • Awards and recognition • Wodarski on Tech School Task Force • Dollars for good causes • Reviving a tradition • Support for Unified Games • National Anthem protocol • News and Notes • President’s Message • Commissioner’s Commentary • The Doctor is In: Heel pain revisited • Inside the Coaching Box: Tim Kohs, Mercy High School • Member Profile: John Anquillare • Knowledge Bank • Ask the Interpreter: From the mailbag Click any headline to go to the article

Your new slate of officers for 2012-13 At our annual meeting on Sunday, February 5th, following all the reports, the members in attendance voted to accept the slate of officers put forth by our nominating committee. Here are your officers for next season: President: Ken Devoe 1st Vice President: Steve Kirck II 2nd Vice President: Al Carfora Secretary/Treasurer: Hank Luzzi Interpreter: Jeffrey Smith Assistant Interpreters: Ray Vanacore, Mark Federico, Steve Kirck II In addition, the members voted for their district representatives to serve in the 2012-13 season. (cont. on p. 2). !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Down the stretch we come ... (cont. from p.1) In addition to all of the above, in every issue of our newsletter, we try to present a fair amount of “news you can use” – information to help you become a better official, including but not limited to rules knowledge, on-court demeanor and tips on various aspects of officiating and game management techniques. This issue is no exception. We’re happy to say that a number of your colleagues sent in plays and rules questions that we’re addressing in Jeffrey Smith’s “Ask the Interpreter” feature. What’s interesting and gratifying is that you have shared with us some unusual plays and situations that you have experienced or observed this season, and those real-life examples are always the best because they actually happened in a game. (Unlike many refresher exam questions). Plus, we’re happy to have a new contributor to our “Knowledge Bank” series – Ric Raffone, Jr., who shares his insights and experience on how to be a better partner. Finally, we’ve brought back our “Inside the Coaching Box” feature – an interview with a very successful coach whom you probably know well. So, please read, enjoy and hopefully learn something you can use. Your new slate of officers for 2012-13 ... (cont. from p.1) They are: Len Crone (District 1 -- Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Middlebury, Milford, Oxford, Prospect, Seymour, Shelton, Southbury, Woodbury) Dan Davis (District 2 – Bethany, Cheshire, Hamden, New Haven, Orange, West Haven, Woodbridge) Lou Matteo (District 3 – Branford, East Haven, Guilford, Madison, North Branford, Northford, Clinton) Frank Savakis (District 4 – Meriden, North Haven, Wallingford) Jose DosSantos (District 5 – Naugatuck, Waterbury, Wolcott)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Mark your calendar: 2012-13 Board 10 Meeting Schedule Announced Next season’s Sunday morning meeting schedule has been proposed as follows: November 11, 2012 – Mandatory Rules Interpretation Meeting December 2, 2012 December 9, 2012  –  Refresher Exam January 6, 2013 February 3, 2013 – Annual Meeting We plan to continue holding our meetings at Lyman Hall High School in Wallingford. Doors will open at 7:30 AM. Attendance will be taken until 8 AM. REMEMBER: You must attend at least 4 of our 5 meetings to get full credit. Also, you must attend our Rules Interpretation Meeting. If you cannot make our session you can attend one held by any of the other IAABO boards in the state. The Refresher Exam session is also mandatory. If you can’t be there, you must complete the exam on your own and submit it for credit.

Awards and recognition – All well deserved One of the most enjoyable moments during the year takes place after the season is over. It is our annual awards banquet. If you haven’t already, be sure to mark the date on your calendar: Tuesday, March 20, 2012. On that evening, beginning at 6:30 PM, we will gather for food, beverages, and camaraderie. But the highlight of the evening is bestowing our Board 10 awards on a very deserving group who have served our board and/or the game of basketball with distinction and class. Here they are:

Service Awards 40 years: Bill DeMatteo, Mark Federico 35 Years: Dave Grossman, Rick McInnis 30 years: Mike Arico, Mike Gambardella, Dave Healy, Mike Scanlon, Ed Zelek 25 years: Tom Digiovanni, Mary Mannion, Charlie Rome, Frank Savakis, Dan Scavone, Dave Silverman, Steve Wodarski 20 Years: Dr. Dan Davis, Charlie Hague, Tom Michalczyk 15 Years: Jose DosSantos, Bob Else, Dan Gleason, Carl Highsmith, Tom Morgillo, Bob Morrow, Ric Raffone, Jr., Bob Sember, Bill Sidarweck, T.J. Talarico, Kevin Wiggins.

Sportsmanship Awards Phil Casman Award (Boys varsity coach): 2011-2012: Dan Lee, Cheshire High School. Past Winners: 2010-11 - Tim Swaller, Foran 2009-10 - Tom Hunt, Woodland 2008-09 - Jim Reynolds, Wilbur Cross 2007-08 - Jeff Beeman, Hand 2006-07 - Jeff Nielson, Amity !

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Rudy Canelli Award (Girls varsity coach) 2011-12: Amanda Forcucci, Laurelton Hall Past Winners 2010-11: Sarah Mik, Cheshire 2009-10: Heather Saucier, Law 2008-09: Meghan Rooney, Guilford 2007-08: Tim Kohs, Mercy 2006-07: Vin DeNuzzo, East Haven (Continued on p. 4)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Awards and recognition -- All well deserved ... (cont. from p.3) Pasquale “Babe” Amendola Award (Athletic Director) 2011-12: George Bedocs, Sacred Heart Academy Past Winners 2010-11: Jerry Ciarleglio, Holy Cross 2009-10: Savas Synodi, Branford 2008-09: Dan Scavone, Woodland 2007-08: Paul Mengold, Amity 2006-07: Joe Tonelli, Notre Dame

Anthony “Tony” Barbaro Sportsmanship Award (Boys sub-varsity coach) 2011-12 – John Forline – Coginchaug Past Winner 2010-11: Jason Shea, Notre Dame Henry “Hank” Luzzi Sportsmanship Award (Girls sub-varsity coach) 2011-12 - Jessica Moriarty - East Haven Past Winner 2010-11 - Tina Gonyea – Platt High

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Board 10’s Steve Wodarski serves on State Technical School Task Force The only time you probably think about our tech schools is when you are assigned to officiate at one of them. However, there’s more to Connecticut’s network of vocational technical schools than the basketball games we work. These schools play an important role in the education of Connecticut’s young people and in developing the future workforce for our in-state industrial companies. Accordingly, last year, Governor Malloy decided that there should be a task force to research whether the Connecticut Technical High School System (CTHSS) should remain a centralized system operated by the State, or instead transfer the responsibility for operating the schools from the State Board of Education to local boards of education. The task force was also asked to develop recommendations to improve and strengthen the votech school system’s role in educating Connecticut’s workforce. Steve Wodarski was selected to serve on that panel, known as the Connecticut Technical High School System Task Force. The 15-person task force was chaired by Mark Ojakian, former Deputy Secretary of the Office of Policy and Management and current Chief of Staff to GoverSteve Wodarski, far right, at the December 13, 2011 nor Malloy. Other members included Dr. Mark McQuillan, public hearing on the Vo-Tech school system former Commissioner, Connecticut State Department of Education, Patricia Ciccone, Superintendent of Schools, CTHSS, Dr. Paul Susen, Chief Academic Officer, Connecticut Community Colleges, Dr. Craig Edmondson, Executive Director, Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES), Raymond Coombs, Jr., President, Westminster Tools, Inc. and Hamden Mayor Scott Jackson. Wodarski was selected for his experience as a teacher at Wilcox Tech (of which he as an alumnus) and as a former member of Connecticut’s industrial workforce. The task force met once a month for five months beginning last September. After considerable study and discussion, the task force concluded that the current technical school system should remain centralized and operated by the State. According to their report, “Quality, statewide standards could be lost if the system was decentralized, and having this centralized entity oversee the entire regional school system reduces duplication and provides better coordination of efforts.” The report went on to say: “While the cost of shifting operation of the system to local entities would be a potential cost savings to the State, analysis showed that this cost would shift to municipalities, requiring towns to increase their education budgets, some significantly, to educate the technical high school students for whom they have not had to budget funding.” The task force also made the following recommendations: • Requiring the State Department of Education to develop CTHSS’s strategic plan in conjunction with the Departments of Labor, Economic and Community Development, Higher Education, and specific business and industry consortiums. • The State should establish a separate CTHSS board to set standards. The Superintendent would be accountable to the new CTHSS governing board. • The Department of Education should endeavor to benchmark standards against international leaders. These recommendations are currently being reviewed by the powers that be in the State. For more information, and to read the task force’s report, go on line to: CTHSS Task Force Report.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Dollars for good causes As in past seasons, Board 10 participated along with all the other IAABO boards statewide and nationally in raising money and awareness for the fight against cancer in general, and breast cancer in particular. During the “Officials vs. Cancer” campaign, we trust that you wore your pink whistles and lanyards at least during the designated campaign week, and at most, at every girls’ game you officiated. Many of you made financial donations to the campaign. That’s the good news. To date, Board 10 has raised over $3,000.00. The bad news is that we did not get 100 percent participation, nor did we come close. As of this writing, just slightly more than one third of our members made a contribution. If you haven’t contributed yet, perhaps you might reconsider. Every dollar counts. If you recall, two years ago Connecticut led IAABO nationally in contributions. Last year, we were runner-up to Colorado. If our current figures hold, we won’t be among or near the top. Let’s change that – if not this season then certainly next season. Also, have you ever asked yourself – or the powers that be – what happens to the money collected at our raffles at our Sunday morning meetings? The proceeds from our 50/50 raffles go to the New Haven Tap-Off Club’s Canelli Scholarship fund. We’re happy to report that Hank sent the club a check for $800, which is what we raised from the raffles. Thank you for your participation.

Member-to-Member Mart

Notre Dame High School of West Haven is accepting applications for the class of 2017.   Transfer students welcome. For more information, email Admissions Director Lino Izzo '00 at admissions@notredamehs.com or call 203-933-1673 or visit http://www.notredamehs.com. You can also visit Notre Dame's online home to view games and other school events at www.gogreenknights.com. 

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Reviving a tradition – Developing the next generation of excellence It used to be that every Friday night, during the high school basketball season, you could head on down to places like Howard Johnson's (now the Greek Olive Diner) on Long Wharf, and hear stories of the glory days from officiating legends, such as Tony Barbaro, Jimmy Potter, Babe Amendola, Buck White, Frosty Francis, Hank Luzzi, Porky Vieira, Tommy Raucci, Joe Kepics, Rick McGinnis, John Anquillare, and Buddy Chernovetz. Guess what – you still can. Those legends who are still around still hold court at the Greek Olive. They paved the way for Board 10 becoming and being known as the best board in the state. If you come to the Greek Olive now, you’ll hear stories of finals in the New Haven Coliseum, the Hartford Civic Center, and the Boston Garden. You’ll hear about legendary coaches and players from the past. But, it’s not all nostalgia. Come on down and you will hear about plays and rules. It’s knowledge you can put to good use in your games. For younger officials, it’s an opportunity to be inspired to develop and get to the point when they too will work in the postseason, in conference finals and maybe a state tournament final. That’s what many of our top officials today used to do, and still do -- to glean the knowledge offered to them by the legends of board 10. This is how they learned and climbed the ranks to become the next group of elite Board 10 officials. We’re talking about the likes of Steve Kirck, Brad Chernovetz, Jeffrey Smith, Pat Paulson, Dan Tammaro, Gary Rispoli, Ric Raffone and others. They were always looking for the next great game and crew to watch, and then would wait so they could ask questions. They worked hard and continue to work hard. They watched games and discussed plays. They read their rule books. They listened and learned. And, look where they are today. This is an important lesson for our newer officials. Year after year new candidates sign up for our clinic, but not all become officials who go on to do postseason tournaments, finals, or even reach the higher ranks of college and pro. If you aspire to climb higher, know that it takes more than just going through the motions, working game after game. It’s more. It’s a passion. It’s love of the game. It’s the need to continue to absorb all there is to learn. As Tommy Raucci, Joe Kepics, Buddy Chernovetz and other members of the Better Officiating Committee make the extra effort to observe our officials, they sometimes find some newer officials who maybe -- just maybe -- have what it takes to become really good, or even great officials. (cont. on p. 9)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Reviving a tradition -- Developing the next generation of excellence ... (cont. from p.7) Today, Board 10 is over 300 members strong. Now that there is more competition, could it be we are seeing the return of a greater work ethic? Several of our newer officials are actively seeking mentors like Steve Kirck and Jeffrey Smith, emailing them to ask for their schedules and asking them to come to their games to give them a constructive and objective critique. Young officials like Benjamin Fan, Philip Kobus, Eli Levy, Michaelangelo Palmieri, and Alexis Highsmith are indeed going above and beyond. Perhaps these dedicated new officials are evidence that we are returning to our tradition of listening, learning, sharing and mentoring. Maybe it means that we are going back to hard work, and blood, sweat and tears. This is the very same work ethic that our old guard pursued when they got started. Has that work ethic been reborn in our newer officials? Hopefully so, because anything worth having is worth working for.

Up and comers to keep an eye on (clockwise from top left) Philip Kobus, Benjamin Fan, Eli Levy, Michaelangelo Palmieri and Alexis Highsmith.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

United effort to support the Unified Games Once again our Board 10 officials volunteered their on-court services on behalf of Special Olympics – officiating at the Unified Games at the Floyd Little Athletic Center in New Haven. That was the site for the Southern Connecticut Conference annual Unified Basketball Tournament on January 30th. Twelve SCC teams participated in the event: Amity, East Haven, Cheshire, Sheehan, Jonathan Law, Guilford, Foran, Wilbur Cross, Daniel Hand, Shelton, West Haven and North Haven.  Thanks to all who volunteered and to West Haven High School Athletic Director, John Capone, who organized the event.

Volunteer officials, left to right:  Chip Wilby, Bruce Reynolds, Paul DeLucia, Brad Chernovetz, Dom D'Aurio, Ric Raffone

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

National Anthem protocol If you are conscientious, then you conduct a thorough pregame with your partner before every game. That pregame should not just cover the checklist that you receive each year with your rulebook. It also extends to the small details of how your crew appears on the court. For example, you should agree beforehand on whether you and your partners will shake hands with or fist bump players when they are introduced and come over to you. Another important detail is how you stand during the National Anthem. Some put their hands over their heart, others hands behind their back, and others, arms at sides. It looks better if you all stand the same way. But, did you know there actually is a standard protocol for what to do during the National Anthem? Proper protocol for the Star Spangled Banner is found in the Flag Code under Title 36: “Patriotic and National Observances, Ceremonies, and Organizations” and listed under Chapter 3, Section 301 on the National Anthem. It is as follows: During a rendition of the National Anthem, when the flag is displayed, (a) all present should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart; (b) men not in uniform should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold the headdress at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; (c) individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note; and (d) when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.

So, it’s very simple. If you and your crew want to be on the same page, with no question about what to do, just follow the protocol – and be sure to go over this point during your pregame. Thanks to Don Perkins, for bringing this to our attention. And, thanks to American Legion Post 463 in Roanoke for publishing the protocol on their web site. You’ll find it by clicking on: National Anthem Protocol.

Watch for Board 10 banquet invitation This year’s post-season awards banquet will be held Tuesday, March 20, 2012 at Villa Rosa Catering at the Coco Key Resort in Waterbury – a different venue, but the same fine catering and cuisine. The address is 3580 East Main Street, Waterbury and the place is near Costco. Check your email for further announcements and an invitation. The cost is included in your dues. You must RVSP. NOTE: If you respond to the effect that you will attend but then do not show up, you will be billed for the cost of your meal. However, if you have an unavoidable conflict that comes up at the last minute, notify Hank Luzzi and he will work something out with you.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

NEWS & NOTES Smile -- you’re in the spotlight Our Jim Brennan once again received a high profile, nationally telecast postseason college football assignment. He was the side judge for the Chick FilA Bowl on New Year’s Eve, 2011. This was Jim’s 2nd consecutive Chick Fil-A Bowl assignment. The game was broadcast on ESPN and featured Auburn vs. the University of Virginia. The game was played in the Georgia Dome, where Auburn defeated Virginia 43-24... ... The 2012 Spaulding HoopHall Classic featured not only top high school players, but top officials. Mike Scanlon, Brad Chernovetz and John Gill were the crew for one of three games broadcast on ESPN on Sunday, January 16 – the contest between Notre Dame Prep (Massachusetts) and New Hampton (New Hampshire). Mike Scanlon and Steve Kirck also officiated the game between 5th-ranked Dematha Catholic High School (Maryland) and Northwest Catholic (CT). That game was broadcast on CPTV. Additionally, Cheryl McCarthy-Chiari was on the crew for the girls game between Mater Dei High School (CA) and East Longmeadow High School (MA). All games were held at the Blake Arena at Springfield College...

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... Ric Raffone, Jr. and Amado Vargas have been named to the NCAA Division II Women’s tournament list. Nice going! Moving from the basketball court to the tennis court, Joe Alberti is entering his 20th season as a professional tennis official. He is in the midst of his largest winter-spring tour, 9 ½ weeks’ worth of professional tennis matches. Upcoming tourneys include the ATP-WTA in Memphis beginning February 17th, the ATP-WTA in Miami beginning March 19th, and the WTA in Charleston, South Carolina beginning April 2nd... ... News from the diamond: Mike Durso was named 2011 Umpire of the Year for Connecticut American Legion Baseball.

The kids are making parents proud Last November, Ric Raffone, Jr.’s daughter, 10year old Mikayla, won the title of Miss Northeast Silver Queen of 2012. The pageant was held at the Windsor Locks Sheraton. There were 10 age divisions and over 125 contestants, and those contestants were judged on stage presence and speech. As Silver Queen, Mikayla had the highest point total of anyone not winning their age division. (cont. on p. 14)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 13)

This is her third title in with several runner-up awards in three different pageant systems...  ... We hear from Ann Matlock-Ethier that her son, Jacob, has made quite an impact at his college and beyond. Jacob is a student at Murray State University. Before the beginning of the basketball season, Jacob wrote a song for his team, the Racers. That song is now played when the team first runs on to the floor for pre-game warmups. The university also asked Jacob to create a music video for the team that could be played at the games. That song just might make musical waves nationally, too. There’s a chance ESPN may pick it up for use during their broadcasts of the NCAA tournament. To hear the music track, go to the iTunes Store and enter Murray State in the search box. To watch the music video on YouTube, click on: Murray State Anthem... ... John Ramos is doubly proud these days. His son, Matt, was named a co-captain of the Springfield College football team. Matt plays strong safety for the Pride. He’s pictured here to the right of Coach Mike DeLong… ...Not to be outdone, John’s daughter, Kara, will be gracing the pages and covers of magazines as well as advertising spreads. She recently signed a modeling contract with Click Models, a Philadelphia-based agency. As should be obvious, Kara gets her good looks from her !

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 mom... On January 24th, George Bradford’s daughter, Briana, scored her 1000th career point – and then some – for Holy Cross High School and led the Crusaders to a 71-36 victory over St. Paul. Briana finished the game with 25 points, bringing her career total at that point in time to 1,009... ...We’re happy to report that Bruce Reynolds, Jr., son of Board 10’s Bruce Reynolds, graduated last December from Florida State University where he doublemajored in geography and environmental studies at the university’s College of Social Science.

The Stork Delivers More newborns for our Board 10 extended family. Mike Durso is a proud grandparent. His grandson, Michael Edward Durso was born on January 21st, entering the world at 6 ½ pounds. Congratulations to the parents, Andria and Michael Durso... ... Daniel and Anna Akier welcomed their new daughter to the world on January 3rd. Addison Claire Akier tipped the scales at 6 pounds, 6 ounces. Addison is the Akiers’ third child and has a big brother, 4-year old (cont. on p. 15)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 14)

Daniel Jr., and big sister, 2 year-old Alexia... ...Another “Gramps” is in the fold. Doug Capasso has a new grandson, Cal Douglas Wilson, born on January 6th to Doug’s daughter, Jenna and her husband, Jim Wilson... ...And the births just keep on comin’. Frank Costa is beaming with pride as his daughter, Danielle Butkiewicz, gave birth to her second daughter, Aubrey Madison, on January 22nd. It was a truly special day, because it also happens to be Frank’s mom’s birthday, and this year she celebrated her 97th.

All for a good cause See some great pro golfers and help the community at the same time. Joe Mrozowski is looking for volunteers to help out at the 2012 Travelers Championship golf tournament which runs June 18 to 24. In particular, Joe needs volunteers to become laser operators. You will be trained for the job if you do volunteer. Your youngsters can also become volunteers and perform a variety of tasks at the tournament, and in the process, get community service hour credits. For more information, see the Traveler’s Championship ad in one of the Member-to-Member Mart sections of this newsletter. Or, call Joe directly at 203-2138794 or email him at: JWOODSTER@SBCGLOBAL.NET... ... Once again, selected NFL players will be coming to the area to support United Way. It’s the 19th annual NFL Players’ United Way Weekend, Friday March 9th and 10th, 2012. Events include silent and live auctions that Friday at Zandri’s Stillwood Inn out in Wallingford, a Youth Clinic on Saturday at the Johnson Athletic !

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 Center on the campus of Choate, also in Wallingford. And a “Bowl with the Pros” day on Saturday at Wallingford’s Colony Lanes. For more information call 203-235-4403 or visit www.unitedwaymw.org or contact Craig Hazel at 203-630-7033, and look for the event flyer in one of the Member-to-Member Mart sections of this newsletter... ... On January 18th, John Moniello volunteered his time to referee the North Branford Education Foundation’s fundraiser basketball game between the Harlem Superstars and the North Branford Faculty. This was the 3rd year for the event. North Branford’s “Dream Team” included police, administrators, the mayor, town manager, staff and students.

Some good news at last Cheryl McCarthy-Chiari is pleased to report that her son John and his girlfriend Tara are recovering from injuries suffered in a car accident. She thanks everyone who sent emails, texts, phone calls, and especially all the prayers. Those prayers are being heard. And, Cheryl would like to extend a belated happy 13th Birthday to her son, Connor.


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

President’s Message: “Finish strong!” -- Steve Wodarski Hard to believe, but we’re already in the final stage of the regular season. So, my message to you is: “Finish strong.” That’s not just what we tell ourselves as officials, it’s also what coaches are telling their players at this time of year. You may be working games with teams who are trying to get the win they need to qualify for the state tournament. Or, you may be presiding over a game in which one or both teams have already qualified for the tournament but are seeking that extra win they will need to ensure themselves of a home game in the first round. You may work a game with a team that didn’t qualify for postseason but is motivated to be a spoiler. In all cases, those games are important. But so are other games, where tournament status is not the issue. For example, think of the seniors you’ll see who are playing in the last game of their high school careers. Imagine how important that last game is to them. Also, think of a JV game you might have as the season is coming to an end. Some, if not all, of those players are going to give it something extra because they want to impress the coaches and give themselves a better chance to make varsity next year – just as you may be trying to impress our observers so you too can make varsity as an official. The bottom line is, every game is important to the participants, and you MUST treat that game as the biggest game of the season. It is to the players, coaches and spectators involved. As the games dwindle down to a final few, they will ratchet up their intensity and so you must ratchet up your concentration, energy and effort. That said, I have noticed a somewhat disturbing trend during the course of the season among some of our sub-varsity officials, and it needs to be corrected. To put this in context, there’s an old adage that I find is extremely relevant. (cont. on p. 19)

Commissioner’s Commentary: "What will you do to get a little better?” -- John “Bud” Chernovetz That question is a constant for us every year, because every one of us can improve, no matter our years of experience or level of games we’ve worked. That said, I’d like to recap some of the key improvement factors that I talked about at our January 8th meeting – both for the benefit of those who didn’t attend as well as to reinforce the information for those who did attend. I came up with these points as a result of observing a lot of officials this season, and it has become clear to me that we need to make these our “points of emphasis.” First point: When you arrive at the game site, people immediately judge you by your appearance. Which is why you need to look like a professional. This is true for all levels, but especially for JV and varsity officials. Come to the games in “business casual” attire – at the very least – or formal business attire if you can. Granted, if you are trying to make a 3:30 PM freshman or middle school game, you may not be able to change from your work clothes into business attire. But certainly for a 5:30, 6 or 7 PM game, you should have the opportunity to do so and therefore should make the effort. Remember: Perception is reality. Make a good first impression. DO NOT COME TO THE GAME SITE WEARING YOUR UNIFORM. DO NOT LEAVE THE GAME SITE WEARING YOUR UNIFORM. It looks bad and reflects poorly on Board 10. Second point: Three words -- Mechanics, Mechanics, Mechanics. Mechanics are how we communicate on the court with our partners, the scorer and timer, and the coaches and players. Therefore, your mechanics must be precise, clear and correct. By “correct” I mean: Use approved (cont. on p. 19) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

President’s Message: “Finish Strong” ... (cont. from p.18)

“Character is who you are when no one is watching.” The point is, some of you have taken the approach that, if you are not being observed by Joe Kepics, Tom Raucci, or Buddy, you seem to feel that you can slough off and not hustle or switch on all fouls or go to the proper spot to administer a throw-in. Or, you may be more conscientious on the court when you see that the varsity officials doing the game after yours are in the gym, but then you turn off the switch, so to speak, when they leave and go to locker room to get ready for their game. You cannot and must not turn your switch on and off depending on when you are being observed and/or evaluated. Plus, you never know who is actually watching you at any given point in time. You may be surprised. The point is: You should give 100% every play and every minute of every game. There can be no peaks and valleys. This is the time of year that teams and players are showing everyone what they can do. You should do the same as an official. Be a professional. Make your next call your best call. And – finish strong. Commissioner’s Commentary: “What will you do to get a little better ?” ... (cont. from p.18)

high school mechanics. Don’t ad lib. Don’t use college mechanics or emulate what you may see on TV. Do it by the book. The official’s manual is very clear about proper mechanics, as are the presentations that Ray and Jeff make at our Sunday morning meetings. I’ve seen a lot of JV officials who do not understand or use proper mechanics. Why? There are only two reasons I can think of: 1) You don’t know what the proper mechanics are, or 2) No one has pointed out to you what you’re doing wrong. My predecessor, Tony Barbaro, used to say: No one intentionally does something the wrong way. So, if you are doing something wrong, it’s only because you don’t know that it’s wrong. Someone with more experience needs to point out those “wrong things” so you can make them right. Third point: HELP EACH OTHER. When Joe Kepics, Tom Raucci, or I come to one of your games, we’re there to observe. But most of all we’re there to help you by offering constructive criticism with specific suggestions on what you can do to improve your officiating skills and performance. But the three of us can’t be everywhere and we can’t see everyone during the course of a season. So we need experienced varsity officials to come early to the JV games, observe the officials and offer constructive criticism to help those JV officials get better at what they do. We also need the other part of that question – namely, we need sub-varsity officials to seek out and ask for this input from the varsity officials. Most varsity officials will not offer their observations unless asked. So, please ask. Equally important, stay and watch at least the first half of the varsity game that follows your game to learn by observing experienced officials who are good at what they do. This used to be standard procedure for Board 10. It seems that this is not happening with enough regularity. Let’s get back to that protocol. Similarly, after every game you work, whatever the level, you and your partners should discuss the game and ask each other: “What did you see?” Be honest and objective and you will find this a valuable tool for improvement. I realize that much of the above is something you’ve heard and read before. But it’s important, which is why we keep discussing these “points of emphasis” with you. The bottom line is, we have to know what we’re doing on the court and be professional at all times in every aspect of officiating. Coaches and athletic directors may complain about a call or something else that transpired in a game. That’s to be expected. I can defend you only if you act professionally. However, I cannot defend a lack of hustle, or a lack of enthusiasm for officiating the game to which you have been assigned. When an A.D. calls me and says, “That guy looked like he didn’t want to be here,” there’s not much if anything I can do to back you up. If you really don’t want to be there, I can and will find someone who does. You are only as good as your last call or your last game. Treat every game as the most important game of the season. It is exactly that to the participants and spectators. Attack every game as if it is your last game and the most important game of your career. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

THE DOCTOR IS IN Board 10’s Dr. Dan Davis discusses injury prevention and treatment, as well as general health and fitness, to help keep you on the court.

“Heel pain revisited” Q: How prevalent are heel pain injuries? A: It’s the most common ailment we see in our medical practice, and that’s true both for our fellow officials and our other patients. It amounts to about 10 percent of the people we treat, which is a lot for one type of injury. I, myself, see about 15 cases a week. The percentage among Board 10 members is a bit higher, which stands to reason, since our fellow officials do a lot of running and that puts more stress on the feet. Interestingly, we also see a lot of coaches who complain of heel pain. Q: “Heel pain” isn’t just one type of injury or problem, is it? A: Correct. There are different types of heel pain. The overwhelming majority of them affect soft tissue. There are two types of soft tissue ailments: fasciitis and bursits. The most typical is fasciitis, which is an inflammation of one or more of the three bands of fascia – facia being the fibrous tissue that connects to the heel bone and runs along the entire length of the bottom or sole of the foot toward the toes. Additionally, in rare instances, there can a neuritis, which is an inflammation of a nerve in the heel area. Bone can also be involved. For example, there might be a stress fracture of the heel bone. You may have heard of the term “bone spur” or “heel spur.” Bone spurs are bony projections that develop along the edges of bones. But, it’s usually not a heel spur that causes the problem, !

PAGE 20

but rather, the spur can become actively inflamed when symptoms of fasciitis are present. Most of the time the spur has no inflammation at all. We have found people who have spurs that are a good inch and half long but have no symptoms. Q: You wrote extensively about plantar fasciitis and heel pain in the January 2009 issue of this newsletter, but it would be helpful now to revisit some of the basics. For starters, talk about the causes of this type of injury. A: The primary cause is calf muscles that are too tight – usually because of a failure to properly stretch the calf muscles before a game or between games. Lack of calf flexibility leads to over-stressing of the arch and plantar fascia. If that happens, the tissue becomes inflamed and it thickens, which leads to a loss of flexibiltiy and strength. Another potential cause of plantar fasciitis – and other foot problems for that matter – is your shoe. For example, if your shoe doesn’t provide proper arch support, or doesn’t fit right, or just isn’t comfortable, that could lead to problems. If you change to a different brand or model of referee shoes, the new shoes may not be as good a fit (pun intended) for you. Which is why I recommend that if you have found a make, model and size of shoe that you really like and that’s really comfortable (cont. on p. 21)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN Dr. is In: “Heel pain revisited” ... (cont. from p. 20)

and supportive, buy several pair. You never know when the shoe company will discontinue that make and model. Q: How do we know if what we feel is plantar fasciitis and what should we do if it is? A: Be careful, because sometimes the pain can come and go, and you might think you’re okay. But you’re not. After a game, you might not immediately feel any heel pain. You might even get to bed and fall asleep pain free. With classic fasciitis however, you wake up the following morning and experience severe heel pain on your way to the bathroom that eventually subsides after about five minutes on your feet.  The fasciitis may intensify to the extent that the pain returns even after sitting down for a short period of time, or when getting out of a car after driving. This kind of pain usually requires professional care. Q: What is the treatment? A: Of course, prevention is the best medicine, and that involves doing proper stretching exercise to maintain flexibility. But if the injury is there, see a doctor -- ideally someone who regularly treats heel pain injuries. As I wrote in my previous article in the January 2009 newsletter, treatment of plantar fasciitis depends on the severity of the problem and how quickly you want to get back on the court, assuming that you can get back. Treatment may include any or all of the following: Oral anti-inflammatories, injections, or taping of the foot (that relieves

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 stress on the fascia). Long term treatment may include using custom orthotics to give your arches proper and standardized support. And, as noted in my previous article, DO NOT walk around your house in bare feet, socks, or slippers. If you do, you put more strain on the arches, which can aggravate your injury. Q: What’s your bottom line recommendation? A: Stay flexible. Do your stretching exercises. Find a comfortable shoe that provides ample arch support and stick with it. If the normal preventive approaches don’t work, see a doctor and have your pain and injury properly managed. Otherwise, you could suffer with a chronic problem, and you don’t want that. Chronic heel pain affects your quality of life. It certainly prevents you from running sufficiently to do a good job of officiating. So, try not to let things get to that point. Stretch, stay healthy, get in shape, and stay in shape. Officiating is so much easier when you are pain free. [Graphic courtesy of CurePlantarFasciitis.org] Editor’s Note: To read Dr. Dan’s previous article on Plantar Fasciitis, go to the Board 10 web site -http://iaabo10.org -- and click on “NEWSLETTER” to get to the archives. Then click on January 2009.

Got a health and fitness question for Dr. Dan? Email it by clicking here: Ask Dr. Dan

FROM THE LIGHTER SIDE

For a humorous look at the life of a basketball referee, check out Kevin Sparrock’s “Fouls & Violations” web site: www.foulsandviolations.net

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PAGE 21


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

With Tim Kohs, Girls Head Coach, Mercy High School Tim Kohs has been the head basketball coach at Mercy since the 199394 season. This is his 19th season at the helm. In that time, his teams have won 323 games – including going 20-0 in the 2004-05 regular season -- and lost just 137. Mercy has qualified for the state tournament every year during his tenure as coach and has won at least one tournament game in each of those years. Mercy has been to the state finals four times, the semifinals eight times and quarter finals 12 times. They won the Class L championship in the 1995-96 season and finished as Class LL runner up three times between 2005 and 20211. They have also won 12 SCC Quinnipiac Division championships and one SCC tournament, the latter in 2007. Coach Kohs has also been an active supporter of girls’ high school basketball off the court, serving as a member of the CIAC Girls Basketball Committee for 13 years, and he has been chairman of that committee. He has also been a member of the CT High School Coaches’ Association (CHSCA) for 7 years, and served as that association’s All State Banquet coordinator for the last 7 years. Coach Kohs has been highly honored for his work, including receiving Board 10’s Rudy Canelli Sportsmanship Award not once, but twice – a rare accomplishment. He coached the 2005 CHSCA All Star Game, won the 2007 New Haven Tap Off Club Coach of the Year award, the 2009 CIAC Merit Award, and was named the 2010 New Haven Register All Area Coach of the Year. As for his “real job,” Tim Kohs was, until last year, the assistant Athletic Director and chair of the physical education department at Xavier High School. Tim is now the Athletic Director at Mercy High School.

Q: How did you get started in coaching? A: I played basketball at Xavier High and Springfield College and after that I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do. I got the opportunity to coach freshmen and JV boys at my alma mater, Xavier, and enjoyed it and thought if the head coaching job became available there, that would be my dream job. It didn’t, but the opportunity to coach at Mercy did become available. When I got to Mercy, we had a really good group of younger players my first year. The following year, we went to the state semifinals and the year after that, we won the championship. So, it was a very good situation for me. Q: What is your coaching philosophy? A: I try to get our kids to buy into our team concept, work hard, and play with passion. My goal !

PAGE 23

is to have my team play as hard as, if not harder than, anyone on our schedule. We do a pretty good job of that, but we can always do better. I may yell at a player for not working hard. The player might not like it at the moment, but most of the time she’ll figure out that I’m yelling because she’s not doing something she’s supposed to do, so then why not just do it right. I promote a team-first mentality. I’ve been lucky to have some great individual players. They get a lot of attention and honors. But we treat them the same as we treat everyone on our team. There’s no star system here. Every player is important. We try to play team basketball. The other thing I stress is the importance of academics. Mercy is a great school, and when you come here, it should be school-first, not basketball. (cont. on p. 24)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN Inside the Coaching Box ... (cont. from p. 23)

Q: What is most challenging about coaching? A: The biggest challenge is that basketball is a long season. We start practicing and scrimmaging in November. The regular season starts early December, and because we’re usually in the postseason, we play into March, often going deep in the tournament and therefore deep into the month. The challenge there is to play consistently through that long stretch. Plus the fact that we’re a good enough team that every opponent considers their game with us a big game, and we have to match that intensity. Another challenge is trying to keep all our players happy and involved. Playing time can be an issue. Some nights, I have to play my starters the whole game, others I might be able to go 7 or 8 deep. Usually we have 11 or 12 players, but this year, we dressed 15. It’s challenging to keep them all motivated and get them to work hard in practice, when we sometimes can’t reward all of them with playing time. But, I do try to reward the kids who have a great week of practice. Q: What’s most rewarding about coaching? A: Many things. First and foremost, coaching fuels my competitive fire. I love practice as well as game day. The first day of practice is like Christmas for me. I can’t get enough of practice, game prepration, watching film, and working with the kids. But beyond that, perhaps the most rewarding aspect of coaching is the relationships my players and I build with each other. I have a lot of players who have gone on to play in college and I try to get to some of their games. There are many players who come back long after they’ve graduated and they come to see us play. When you can make a connection like that with your players, that’s very rewarding. Q: What changes have you noticed in the girls’ game? A: We still get very good players, and some may be a little better than those of a few years ago. But in general throughout the girls game, with so many kids playing in the off season, you’d think the game would be crisper and cleaner, but it’s not. I’m not sure of the reason for that. AAU !

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 may have something to do with that. I tell my players that if you are going to play AAU, that’s great. But that should be a bonus. It shouldn’t take the place of working out on your own and working on your individual skills, and kids in general today aren’t doing that as much as was done years ago. It’s hard to work on skill development during the regular season, because we need to spend time on putting in an offense and defense and preparing for our upcoming games. But the time between March and November is when individual players should work on getting better. Some really good players play AAU, but they also practice like maniacs on their own. We need more players like that. Q: What is your view of the relationship between officials and coaches and what could we do to make it better? A: I think the relationship is fine the way it is. I might have a game where I think I got the short end of a call and it cost me the game. But that’s not the official’s fault. Nor is it necessarily why we lost the game. There are other plays in the game that could have gone our way, too. Officials have an unbelievably difficult job. Any coaches who don’t think so should try running a scrimmage without officials and ref those scrimmages themselves. It’s not easy and it’s not fun. Plays happen and you have a fraction of a second to make a judgement and a call, and I think for the most part, you do a very good job. I think respect is key. I respect officials and I expect them to respect me, even when I might be yelling at them. Part of my job is to be an advocate for my team. But the respect is still there. I do things for officials, such as having water for them, and after a game, I may go over to their room and tell them they did a good job. And I insist that our players respect the officials. Our players do not play with their shirts untucked. And any player who says anything disrpectful to an official will be removed from the game. It gets back to mutual respect and that’s what I promote.


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

MEMBER PROFILE: John Anquillare Had things turned out slightly differently a while back, John Anquillare might have been a household name to major league baseball fans. But instead, we’ll have to settle for knowing John as an award winning high school and college football and baseball player, a record-setting college baseball coach, a published author (“Winning Softball”, now in its 6th edition), a coach of the year, basketball official of the year, a fixture on the state basketball tournament list, and a member of numerous sports halls of fame, including West Haven High School, University of New Haven, National ASA Softball, Connecticut ASA Softball and the New Haven Gridiron Football Hall of Fame. So, it seems that Major League Baseball’s loss was everyone else’s gain. John Anquillare is a true native son of West Haven. He was born there, graduated from West Haven High School, studied, played and coached at the University of New Haven (which is also in West Haven), had a sporting goods business in town and continues to live in West Haven with his wife of 44 years, Joyce. His son, Mike, is the head baseball coach of the West Haven High team. They won a state championship two years ago. At West Haven High, John played and starred in football, basketball and baseball, earning 9 varsity letters. He was an All State quarterback and led the state in scoring (143 points). As a baseball player, he made the All District Team three times and in his senior year, led the state with a .500 batting average. At West Haven, John played for the legendary Whitey Piurek, whom John calls “one of the greatest fundamental baseball minds I have ever met.” He attracted plenty of interest from college football and baseball coaches and was on the radar of a few major league baseball teams. His goal was to play football at a major college and then go and play baseball. The University of Maryland offered him a football scholarship but wouldn’t let him also play baseball because they wanted to “protect” their quarterback. That didn’t work for John, so he left Maryland after a year and enrolled at the University of New Haven – a wise choice, as it turned out. Back in 1963 when he got to UNH, they were in the process of starting up a baseball program. In the three years he played for them, UNH baseball finished with a record of 87-11. While there, he played for the legendary Frank “Porky” Vieira. John graduated from UNH with a degree in marketing. After that, he went to work for Raybestos, in large part because they had a team that was part of a nationally known fast pitch softball league. That way, not only was he able to hold a steady job, but he played for Raybestos for 16 years and traveled the world with the team. During that time, John’s teams won 5 national championships. He was named to the All American team 9 times and was twice named MVP in the national tournament. He set a single season record with a .432 batting average and was named Player of the Decade. (cont. on p. 26) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Member Profile: John Anquillare... (cont. from p. 25)

Despite that success as a player, John was bitten by the coaching bug. Accordingly, he started coaching football and baseball as an assistant at UNH in 1983 and continued there for the next 15 years. Over the years at UNH, he got to work with some outstanding football coaches, including Chris Palmer, former Cleveland Browns head coach and Giants quarterbacks coach. He also worked with Mark Whipple who went on to UMASS where his team won a national championship and currently is the quarterbacks coach for the Browns. And, he worked with Tony Sporano, most recently the head coach of the Miami Dolphins and next season will be the offensive coordinator for the New York Jets. During his time at UNH, John’s baseball teams appeared in the College World Series 9 times – including 7 consecutive appearances, something no other team has done or is likely to do in the future -- and 32 of his players signed contracts to play professional baseball. While at UNH, he served in the dual roles of assistant coach and assistant athletic director. 16 hour days and 7 day working weeks were not uncommon. They were, however, a bit too much even for a workaholic like John. So he left the university and the coaching ranks and for two years sold scoreboards. That’s when the University of Bridgeport contacted him. You may recall that UB was going through trying times back in the 90s and was in danger of shutting down altogether. They got through that crisis, however, and the powers that be told John they were rebuilding their athletic programs and asked him to be a part of that process. In 2002, he agreed to join UB and coach the baseball team and started to develop what has become a hugely successful college baseball program. Last season, his team set a school record for wins in a single season, going 31-13. In 2007, he was named Conference Coach of the Year and later National Sports Writers’ Coach of the Year for the Northeast. On a more personal note, his son David is one of his assistant baseball coaches at Bridgeport. Somewhere, John found the time to work with many organizations on and off the court and field of play. He has been President of West Haven Youth Hockey, President of the West Haven Babe Ruth league, Commissioner of the West Haven Athletic Complex, Coordinator and Northeast Rep for Junior Pro basketball (a concept co-developed by Digger Phelps), and when fast pitch softball was designated an Olympic Sport, John was the representative for the sport and served on the Olympic Committee for four years. The sport is no longer part of the Olympics, though efforts are underway to reinstate it. What about officiating basketball? Well, we had to get through all of the above first. Porky Vieira, who was not only John’s college baseball coach but also a highly acclaimed basketball official, suggested to John that he go into officiating. At the time, John had been playing recreational and semi-pro basketball, but he kept getting injured. He saw officiating as a way to stay in the game – and in shape -- and make a little extra money. One of the UNH assistant coaches took John under his wing, and at a local gym, taught him the basics of mechanics. Then, John took the officiating test and joined Board 10. That was back in 1974. Rudy Canelli was Commissioner at the time. John took officiating to heart. He worked and hustled and after just one year of doing JV games, he received a full varsity schedule of 24 games – something that simply would not be possible today. (Timing is everything.) Since then, John has made the state tournament list for 35 consecutive seasons. However, his duties as head baseball coach for the University of Bridgeport are such that he has to take his team on the road every (cont. on p. 27) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Member Profile: John Anquillare... (cont. from p. 26)

March when the state high school basketball tournament gets into the later rounds. Which is why we haven’t seen John work a state semifinal or final. John has also served as President of Board 10 as well as President of the State Board. With about 40 years of basketball officiating behind him, John has learned a lot about the game and how to be a good official. We asked him to share some of what he learned, and here it is. “One of the keys to being a good official is to use common sense,” says John. “We can save ourselves a lot of problems by using common sense with coaches and applying preventive officiating to make things run more smoothly. For example, consider the play we talked about at our January meeting where the clock showed .6 seconds left. In that amount of time it’s possible for a player to catch and shoot the ball, but not to catch, dribble and shoot. I might remind the coach of that (as well as myself) to avoid the mess that could happen otherwise. Similarly, if I am administering a designated spot throw-in, I’ll let the player know that such is the case and that the player can’t run the line. These are little things you can do to avoid having problems occur and calling attention to yourself as an official. The best compliment you can ever receive after a game is, ‘Gee. It was like you weren’t even there.’” Come on out and support John Anquillare’s University of Bridgeport baseball team this season. Here is their upcoming schedule.

March 10 vs. Assumption at Ormond Beach, FL 1 PM

March 13 vs. Bently at Winter Park, FL 11 AM

March 14 vs. Stonehill at Winter Park, FL 11 AM

March 15 vs. Bentley at Ormond Beach, FL 1 PM

March 16 vs. Stonehill at Ormond Beach, FL 1 PM

March 20 vs. Pace 3 PM

March 21 at C. W. Post 3 PM

March 22 vs. C.W. Post 3 PM

March 25 vs. Caldwell 2:30 PM

March 27 vs. St. Thomas Aquinas 3 PM

March 30 at St. Thomas Aquinas 3 PM

March 31 vs. Dowling 1 PM

April 1 at Dowling 1 PM

April 3 at Caldwell 3 PM

April 4 at Queens, NY 3 PM

April 7 at Mercy 12 PM

April 9 vs. Mercy 3 PM

April 10 at Molloy 3:30 PM

April 12 at Post 3 PM

April 14 vs. C. W. Post 12 PM

April 15 at C. W. Post 1 PM

April 18 vs. Post 3 PM

April 20 at Adelphi 3:30 PM

April 21 at St. Thomas Aquinas 12 PM

April 22 vs. St. Thomas Aquinas 1 PM

April 24 at Dowling 3 PM

April 27 vs. Dowling 1 PM

April 28 at Queens, NY 12 PM

April 29 vs. Queens, NY 1 PM

May 2 vs. Mercy 3 PM

May 4 vs. Molloy 1 PM

May 6 at Molloy 1 PM

May 10 ECC Championship at TBA

May 11 ECC Championship TBA

May 12 ECC Championship TBA

NOTE: UB home games are played at the Ballpark at Harbor Yard in Bridgport, home also to the Bridgeport Blue Fish. For more information, click on: University of Bridgeport Baseball.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Board 10 Knowledge Bank Board 10 officials share their knowledge and experience with tips to clip and news you can use

“Raising your comfort level” – Ric Raffone, Jr. Basketball is a team sport. That goes for the players and coaches, but it also goes for the officials. You and your partners are a team. You have to work together, support and help each other, and have each other’s back. The more comfortable you and your partners are with one another, the greater the likelihood your “team” will have an excellent game. With that in mind, I would like to share some of the practices and approaches I use to raise my partners’ comfort level with me and vice versa. Some of these, you may already do; others not. These are only suggestions. Feel free to use those which you think might work for you. Before the game Your pre-game with your partner can and should set the tone for the relationship you will have during the game. Use that opportunity to get comfortable with each other and get your mindset into a professional mode. In addition to going through your pre-game checklist, talk about situations that have happened perhaps with either or both teams or that might happen, given what has gone on before. If you and your partner have never worked together, take some time to get to know one another. Talk about where you’re from, what you do for a living, etc. Establish a friendly relationship well before the game starts. At the other end of the spectrum, if you are working with a partner or two with whom you have worked numerous times before, don’t feel you can forego the important discussion about the game, rules, duties and responsibilities of each official which every (cont on p. 29) !

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“Will you go viral” -- Jeffrey Smith To date, over 7 million people worldwide have viewed the infamous YouTube video of the high school basketball officials who were caught not taking care of business during a game between Connell H.S. and Highland H.S. in Connell, Washington: If you haven’t already, you can see it at: Officials on YouTube. Michael Christenson captured several plays in one game in which flagrant or intentional fouls should have been called, but weren’t. He was attempting to gather video evidence that their league needed better officials. We know all too well that this type of attitude and perception exist among parents, coaches and fans regarding officiating. Unfortunately, the officials in this game did not deal with over-aggressive actions by a couple of players. We know that perception is reality. So we must consistently enforce the rules and take care of business when appropriate. When viewing the video at one of our Board 10 meetings, there were lots of moans and groans from the audience.

How could those officials not have seen that? Why didn't the officials address those players? Why didn't they rule intentional or flagrant fouls? How could the officials rule a holding foul when an opponent "clothes-lined" an airborne shooter? What were the officials (cont on p. 29)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

“Raising your comfort level” ... (cont. from p. 28)

“Will you go viral?” ... (cont. from p. 28)

pre-game should include. Don’t let personal familiarity lead you to assume that these items and topics will automatically be on your mind when you’re on the court. Talk them through. During the game I always make sure that my partners and I have good eye contact throughout the game. I know that’s pretty basic, but it’s worth emphasizing. I try to make sure we’re aware of each other and our positioning in transition. Before putting a ball in play, I give my partner some visual acknowledgement – a wink, nod, or thumbs up – that we and the players are ready, and that the right number of players are on the court before we do anything else. As the game proceeds and situations happen that warrant further discussion, I try to file some of those situations in my mind so that my partners and I can have that discussion, perhaps during a dead ball or at halftime. I try to raise our collective awareness of something that we may need to watch closely so that we don’t get caught by surprise. Help each other out We officials are taught to focus on and take care of our Primary Coverage Area (PCA), and we should. But the main objective is to get the calls right. I tell my partner that if he or she sees something I missed and it’s something that absolutely needs to be called, then make the call. I will do the same for my partner. Maybe you’ll pick up a tipped ball or an illegal screen that your partner was unable to see. HOWEVER, be absolutely sure it needs to be called. If I merely THINK my partner missed something but am not 100% certain, I’m not going to go in and make a call my partner didn’t make or overturn a call he or she did make. If you and your partner are able to help one another in this manner, it does wonders for building up your comfort level and trust in each other during the game. Also, if your partner made a particularly good call, say something like: “Nice call, partner” or “Good catch.” That’s a great way to build up your partner’s comfort level and confidence. (cont. on p. 30)

thinking...??? My questions to you are: What would you have done? Are you ready to step up and take care of business? Or, do you look like you are just going through the motions during your game? Are you attentive to players’ actions, words and body language toward opponents or you? Most importantly, are you willing to take the necessary and appropriate actions to control and manage your game? After all, when the stuff hits the fan, everything will fall on your crew’s shoulders! When situations like this occur, it affects each official, the crew, the board, and the entire officiating community. We all have a vested interest in the proper enforcement and adjudication of the rules, penalizing unsporting behavior and caring about the game. As officials, we are in a fishbowl. Everyone has a video camera. That said, if you do what is right and what you have been trained to do, you will minimize the chances of going viral for obvious situations that are under your immediate control. As soon as the contest is under our jurisdiction, we must do all that is expected of us: "We are the GUARDIANS of the Game"! These situations can happen to anyone of us, in any game, at any time no matter the circumstances. In a recent game, I experienced a situation I've never had in a high school game in 21 years of officiating. First of all, I had a double dead ball contact technical foul in the 2nd quarter. Fast forward to the 4th quarter. A1 was attempting an uncontested layup, when out of nowhere B3 lunged at and clothes-lined A1 around the neck and shoulder area while A1 was airborne. I couldn't believe what I saw! I immediately signaled an intentional foul! While tableside, I kept the injured player's teammates and coaching staff in the bench area. When I looked back at the injured player, he was out cold. I called the crew together (Ron DiOrio, Lenny Crone and myself) and we ruled an intentional flagrant foul and ejected the offending player. (Rule 4-19-3 & 4; Rule 10-6 Penalties, Rule 10 Summary 4 & 5). This was a (cont. on p. 30)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

“Raising your comfort level” ... (cont. from p. 29)

“Will you go viral?” ... (cont. from p. 29)

At the other extreme, however, let’s hope you are not so uncomfortable with a partner that you spend most of the game looking into his or her PCA. If you do, you’ll miss a lot of obvious stuff that happens right in front of you. That is not a good situation. Have your partner’s back and hopefully your partner will have yours. That’s especially important when you have a controversial play, or a technical is issued, or a player collects his or her 5th foul, and you have an irate coach to deal with. If your partner made that call, then you might want to be the one who communicates with the coach instead, perhaps to inform the coach that the player has his or her 5th foul. Hopefully your partner will do the same for you. Or perhaps you have an intentional (hard contact) foul, or even a flagrant foul. It’s a good idea to get together with your partner(s), before reporting the foul. Talk it over. Make sure you are all on the same page. Have fun out there I always end my pregame with my partner(s) by saying something like: “Let’s go out there and get the calls right. Let’s be professional. But, have fun.” That’s the key. Basketball is a game. We need to be professional at all times and treat the game as if it is the most important game for the players, coaches, and spectators. But it is also supposed to be fun for all participants, and that includes the officials. Let the emotion die down a bit. And then, take care of business. Report. Make sure the correct team or player is shooting at the correct basket, if free throws are involved. If you can raise the comfort level of your officiating crew mates, before and during the game, you go a long way toward ensuring that you will all have a good game – and have fun doing it.

horrific event, as the game was suspended for 25 minutes while EMT and emergency personnel attended to the injured player and removed him with all the necessary braces, etc. to stabilize his body. Players can and will do unexpected things at any given time. We must always be alert, attentive, and observant. We must penalize rules infractions and unsporting behavior and take all other necessary actions to properly run the game while under our jurisdiction. We must always take care of business. If you don’t do all of the above, you may go viral -- or worse, find yourself on the receiving end of a law suit.

Ric Raffone, Jr. is a 15-year Board 10 official and has officiated women’s college basketball for the last 7 years at the D-II and D-III levels.

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Jeffrey Smith is Board 10’s Interpreter and the Connecticut State Board Interpreter.

Member-to-Member Mart


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

ASK THE INTERPRETER With Jeffrey Smith, Board 10 Interpreter and CT State Interpreter

From the mailbag Actual questions sent in by actual Board 10 members about actual plays that have occurred or been observed this season. PLAY 1: We know that team control exist when teammates are passing the ball between one another. And that if an offensive player pushes an opponent during this time, the foul is reported but no foul shots are awarded even if the team is in the bonus. Furthermore, team control exists even while the ball is passed but is still in-flight between teammates. It ends when the opponent secures control, the ball is in flight during a shot attempt or the ball goes out of bounds. Considering the above, why is it that officials should not grant a time out while a passed ball is in-flight between teammates? RULING: The rules do not allow for an official to grant a time-out while the ball is in the air being passed between teammates. In order for a requested time-out by a coach or player to be granted by an official, a player must be in control of the ball. Team control can exist when player control does not, but when player control exists, team control also exists. Consider an errant pass between teammates and the ball either goes out-of-bounds or into the backcourt. In that situation, the offensive team cannot be granted a time-out to prevent a violation (Rule 5-8-3). PLAY 2: In a boys varsity game there was a lay-up attempt in transition. The defender went up to block the !

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 lay-up attempt but missed the ball. Because he missed the ball, he hit the backboard. The shot was missed. The coach wanted a goal-tending or basket interference call. The trail official had no call as the defender did not intentionally strike the backboard. Was this a correct ruling? RULING: It was correct. There is no basket interference or goal tending on this play. As long as the defender did not slap the backboard in an unsporting manner or draw attention to himself/herself, there is no violation. (Rule 4-5; Rule 10-3-4a,b) PLAY 3: What do you do if you have to eject a coach and there is no other coach available to the team? We had this happen in a middle school game where the coach drew 2 technical fouls. We had no choice but to issue those T’s given the coach's behavior. Another adult -- a woman, affiliated with the team (a parent) -- came forward and offered to coach the team for the remainder of the game, and we proceeded on that basis. Granted, this was a middle school, not a high school game. And except for freshmen games, there usually is more than one coach on the bench, as the freshman coach becomes the JV coach’s assistant and both become the varsity coach’s assistants. But it could still happen that on any given day or night, even a high school team might only have one coach. So, if we have to eject that coach and no other coach is available, does the game end at that point? Is it suspended? Is it a forfeit? If so, what are the final score and result? RULING: If the head coach is ejected and there are no other coaches available, only an adult associated with the school who holds a coaching certificate is allowed to replace the ejected coach. If no one is available, the game ends in a forfeit. If Team A is the offending team and is behind in the score, Team B wins and the score at that time is the score of record. If instead (cont. on p. 32)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN Ask the Interpreter ... (cont. from p. 31)

Team A was leading Team B, Team B wins by the score of 2-0. (Rule 2-5-4; Rule 10-4-5 Note) PLAY 4: During A1’s free throw attempt, the ball comes to rest on the flange of the ring: a) During the first of multiple free throws, or b) During the last free throw attempt, which will remain in play, or during the first free throw of a bonus (1-1). RULING: In (a), the ball becomes dead and free thrower A1 will attempt the free throw and play resumes as after any other free throw. Rule 6-7-2. In (b), play will resume with an alternating possession throw-in by the team entitled to the alternating possession arrow, from a designated spot nearest where the ball became dead. Rule 6-7-3. PLAY 5: There are players/substitutes on the bench and they have numbers on their jerseys so if any of them are involved with a bench technical, their number is entered in the scorebook as getting a bench technical.  If there are adults on the bench and one of them gets tagged for a bench technical, how does the scorekeeper know which one got the technical?  Does the scorekeeper have names for all people on the bench to make sure the proper adult gets duly charged with the technical? RULING: If any bench personnel is assessed a technical foul, it will be an "indirect" technical foul to the head coach. However, only one team foul is charged and two free throws are awarded to the offended team with a throw-in at the division line opposite the scorer’s table. If you can identify the offender, do so. If not, it's ok because the head coach is ultimately responsible and will be impacted. That is why you don't necessarily need to know their numbers, if they're team members.

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012 Consequently, it is the head coach’s responsibility to control all bench personnel. As far as other adults seated on the bench, the official scorekeeper does not have their names. But if you assess a technical foul to a specific individual, you and/or your partner should know who that individual is and if the behavior persists, that individual can be assessed a second technical foul and ejected from the game. Rule 10-4-1. Rule 10-4 Penalty (Articles. 1, 2, 3, 4); Rule 10-4 Note PLAY 6: A1 is attempting a 3-point shot. B2 pushes A2 into A1. (a) A1’s try is successful and Team A is: 1) in the bonus, 2) not in the bonus, or (b) A1’s try is unsuccessful and Team A is: 1) in the bonus, 2) not in the bonus RULING: B2 is charged with an intentional foul in both situations. In (a), A1’s successful goal is scored, A2 will be awarded two free throws and Team A will be awarded a designated throw-in at the spot nearest where the foul occurred. In (b), no goal is scored, A2 will be awarded two free throws and Team A will be awarded a designated throw-in at the spot nearest where the foul occurred. Rule 419-3c; Rule 7-5-4b; Rule 8-5-3. Thanks to our colleagues Craig Hazel, Bob Else, Peter Battistoni, Billy DeMatteo, Daryl Lovett and Dave Scasino for sending in these plays and questions. Please do the same for our upcoming issues of the newsletter. If you have a question about rules, mechanics, or procedures, please email your question by clicking on: Ask the Interpreter.


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

For more information, contact Advisory Board Member Ken Devoe at kendevoe@pantheon.yale.edu

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

Aunt Chilada’s, voted New Haven’s Best Mexican Restaurant, is the perfect place for food, fun, entertainment -- and parties for any occasion. If you can’t come to us, no problem. We cater and deliver to your home or office. Eat, drink and be merry at Aunt Chilada’s. 3931 Whitney Ave., Hamden. (203) 230-4640. Charlie Hague, proprietor

Off I-95 exit 57, next to Guilford Sporting Goods. Frank Bepko, proprietor. Visit us at www.sachemwineandspirits.com and get added to our email list.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2012

Calendar Board 10 Annual Awards Banquet: Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 6:30 PM at Villa Rosa Catering at the Coco Key Resort 3580 East Main Street, Waterbury Be sure to RSVP to your email invitation

Meeting Schedule for the 2012-13 season November 11, 2012 -- Mandatory Rules Interpretation Meeting December 2, 2012 December 9, 2012  --  Refresher Exam January 6, 2013 February 3, 2013 -- Annual Meeting Next issue of Bd 10.COMmuniqué: Late March or early April, 2012 NOTE: All past issues of the newsletter are now posted at our Board 10 website. Visit: www.iaabo10.org, navigate to the home page, and click on the “NEWSLETTER” tab.

Helpful Links Bd 10.COMmuniqué is an interactive, electronic document. Wherever you see text highlighted in blue, bold, underlined type, that is a hot link to either an email address or a web page. Simply click on that link to submit ideas and questions, or to get more information. Here are some helpful links: • Board 10 Website • Ask Dr. Dan • News & Notes and Story Ideas • Ask the Interpreter • CIAC Officials’ Association • ArbiterSports • Women’s Coordinating Committee • Board 10 Knowledge Bank# • IAABO • Member to Member Mart

Bd 10.COMmuniqué EDITOR IN CHIEF: Hank Luzzi hluzzi@comcast.net MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF CORRESPONDENT: Ken Devoe kendevoe@pantheon.yale.edu CO-MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Cheryl McCarthy Chiari CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Jeffrey Smith, Ray Vanacore DESIGN & LAYOUT: Ken Devoe Email story ideas, news and notes, and questions to: Ken Devoe or Hank Luzzi

All issues of Bd 10.COMmuniqué are available on-line at the Board 10 Website.

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IAABO Board 10 News Letter Jan/Feb 2012