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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Bd 10.COMmuniqué Yes -- and it counts! The regular season has arrived and all the games count, so we have to be on our game, with every ruling all game long, every game out. Which is not to say that off-season games, whether AAU, summer and fall leagues, or rec league games don’t matter. They do to the participants and therefore they do to us. But it’s during the regular season that the results of the games we officiate end up in the win-loss column, so they take on added importance for everyone involved. So we have to know what we’re doing, do things right, right from the start and be consummate professionals at all times. By the way, we have an essay in this newsletter about what it really means to be a professional, and hopefully, you will take it to heart. The time for “practice” and attempting to get in shape is over. We’ve had the entire off-season to condition ourselves to be ready and able to hustle right from the opening jump ball of opening day or night. (cont. on p. 2)

Also in this issue • Surviving Mother Nature’s 1-2 punch • UB and Lyman Hall food drives • New Board 10 fundraiser • Officials vs. Cancer 2012-13 • Preparing your car for winter • Watch what you post on-line • Protocol for National Anthem and flag patches • News & Notes • President’s Message • Commissioner’s Commentary • Inside the Coaching Box: Tracy Claxton, Hyde girls • Doctor is in: Pain, pain go away • Member Profile: Jim Brennan • From the trainer’s room: Stay active • Ask the Interpreter Click on any headline to go to the article

REMINDER: Refresher Exam Sunday, December 9th Make sure you attend our upcoming Board 10 meeting on Sunday, December 9th, 2012 at 8 AM. This is our annual Refresher Exam session. We will meet in the Lyman Hall High School cafeteria –- not the auditorium. Those of you who have been with us at least a year know the drill. Those who are new should be aware that we divide the members up into several sub-groups, arranged alphabetically, and each sub-group sits together, goes through the entire exam (or as much as you can cover in an hour or so), answering each question. Not all of them need to be discussed, but any test question that poses some difficulty or is something you’re not sure about, is ripe for a brief discussion within your sub-group. Be sure to have gone through the test on your own ahead of time and marked down your answers for each question. Do not just show up without having looked at the (cont. on p. 3) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Surviving Mother Nature’s 1-2 punch Punch 1: We hope that each of you has fully recovered from the damage inflicted on our state, particularly along the coastline, by Superstorm Sandy and the nor’easter snowstorm about a week later. Governor Malloy has put the cost of the damages from Sandy at $360 million and climbing. Connecticut’s two utility companies reported nearly 600,000 power outages, some of which at this writing may still not have been fixed. Countless homes were badly damaged or totally destroyed. If yours is among them and you are seeking assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), there’s a helpful fact sheet with a list of phone numbers and FEMA disaster recovery centers at: http://www.senatedems.ct.gov/SandyHelp.php. Punch 2: Mother Nature, showing a malicious sense of humor, followed Sandy by dumping 8 to 12 inches of snow on Connecticut, causing more power outages, and making life more difficult for residents who were trying to rebuild their homes and businesses post-Sandy but were throttled by the onset of heavy snow. The extent of the snowfall was much larger than most local TV meteorologists said it would be. Even Channel 8’s Gil Simmons admitted that he blew this one, calling it his worst performance ever as a forecaster. If there’s a bright side, it’s possible that the severe weather we have experienced this year before the start of the new basketball season is reminiscent of what happened last season. Remember the October Surprise – the huge snowstorm that hit us in late October of 2011? The ensuing winter was significantly milder than most, with fewer snow events during the basketball season than we’re used to. That meant fewer games cancelled and rescheduled and fewer headaches for us and for the schools. Let’s hope this year’s pre-season 1-2 weather punch is a good omen, signaling another mild winter ahead.

Yes -- and it counts! ... (cont. from p.1) We’ve also had time before the start of the season to dive back into the rulebook, and while we should continue to do so from time to time during the season, we shouldn’t be starting from scratch sharpening up on rules when our season openers are to be played. We’ll try to help you be prepared and up and running with some of our features in this issue of the newsletter -- from rules Q&A with our interpreter Jeffrey Smith, to training and conditioning tips from our resident fitness guru Carolino Monteiro, to information from Dr. Dan on how to deal with, reduce, and possibly eliminate pain from the stress and strain we put on our bodies during the season. We’ve even got some tips to clip from Craig Stockel and our friends at AAA Southern New England on how to be prepared for winter driving. All those tips aside, we also provide for your reference a rundown of the procedures you must follow throughout the season with regard to checking email and Arbiter, responding ASAP to schedule changes and being reachable by Commissioner Chernovetz at all times. All in all, we hope you will find this issue of Bd10.COMmuniqué filled with news you can use. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Refresher Exam Sunday December 9th ... (cont. from p.1) test and then write down the answers from the review session on that Sunday. The whole idea of having the exam ahead of time is to get you to dive back into the rulebook. After all, it’s called a “refresher” exam for a reason. NOTE: This is a mandatory session. You are required to take the rules refresher exam at this session in order to get credit and not have your schedule adversely affected.

University of Bridgeport women’s basketball team and some Board 10 officials aid Superstorm Sandy victims A report on the UB women’s basketball site chronicles the clothing and food drive conducted by the team and others, including some of our officiating colleagues, to help people who were adversely affected by Superstorm Sandy. They collected donations of food and clothing on November 10th and 11th and then organized the donated items so that local service agencies could more easily distribute them to people who suffered damage from the big storm. Several of our Board 10 officials who also officiate UB women’s and men’s games contributed to the drive. Thank you for your help and generosity. You can find the full story on the UB athletics web site at the following link: http://www.ubknights.com/sports/wbkb/2012-13/releases/20121113ks06bw?dec=/printer-decorator

Board 10 contributes to Lyman Hall HS food drive If you attended our first Sunday morning meeting of the season on November 11th, you know that we were collecting non-perishable food items to be donated to the food drive conducted by Lyman Hall students. If you contributed to the food drive, we thank you as do the kids at Lyman Hall and ultimately the recipients of the donated food. Keep in mind: Typically around Thanksgiving there’s a big push by such organizations as the Connecticut Food Bank to encourage donations of food items to feed the hungry for the holiday and beyond. It’s the “and beyond” part that is hard to sustain because many people only donate at Thanksgiving time. Hunger is a year ‘round every day problem for far too many families and individuals. As noted in our last issue of the newsletter, one in seven Connecticut households are struggling to put food on the table. Because of the devastation caused by Superstorm Sandy, the need is greater than ever. So please don’t only donate at Thanksgiving holiday time. Try to do so regularly. It won’t cost you much at the grocery store or supermarket, but it will make a huge difference in people’s lives. Learn more at: http://www.ctfoodbank.org.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

“We are family” – New Board 10 fundraising event Board 10 is following in the footsteps of our football officiating counterparts to raise funds to help our colleagues and their families who have fallen on hard times, suffered a personal or family emergency or tragedy or in any other significant way are suffering. The NHFAO has a fundraising infrastructure in place and in the past has raised several thousand dollars to help the families of members of both their organization and ours. Their next big fundraiser is a dance on January 26, 2013. We should have more details for you at one of our December Sunday morning meetings. We are going to follow suit with an event of our own. On Saturday, March 10, 2013, from 6 PM to 10 PM, Board 10 will hold a bowling fundraiser at the Milford AMF bowling lanes. A $25 admission ticket gets you an evening of bowling, along with pizza and soda, as well as live and silent auctions featuring sports memorabilia and other merchandise and gift cards for various products and services. Dr. Dan Davis chairs the recently formed Board 10 fundraising committee, whose members include Al Carfora, Cheryl Chiari-McCarthy and Ken Devoe. You can contact any of the committee members for more information, and as we get closer to the date of the event, we will publish information and reminders in the newsletter. We, as members of IAABO Board 10, are a strong community of over 300 individuals and we need to do more to give back. Circle the fundraiser date on your calendar and heed the words spoken by Dr. Dan at our last meeting: “We are a family. Things happen to our fellow officials or their families. Some have lost kids. Some have been adversely affected by this weak economy. Let’s help them out.”

Officials vs. Cancer 2012-13 campaign The Officials vs. Cancer campaign will be held from Monday, January 21, 2013 through Saturday, January 26, 2013. Board 10 has purchased one pink whistle for each member. In return, we would like you to contribute whatever you can to the campaign. No amount is too small – or too large, for that matter. Please send a check payable to Officials vs. Cancer and mail it to Hank Luzzi, 434 Thompson Avenue, East Haven, CT 06512. Or bring your donation to the next Board 10 meeting where pink whistles will be available, while supplies last, in return for your donations. During the week of the campaign you are encouraged to wear and use your pink whistles at all the games you officiate, and you can if you wish use the pink whistles all season long – especially if you are working girls’ games. One point to note: Be sure that if you are going to wear and use a pink whistle that your partner does so as well. You should look consistent. We have all been affected either directly or indirectly by cancer. We all have loved ones or friends who have been afflicted with or died from this terrible disease. Let’s show our support and solidarity by donating to the Officials vs. Cancer campaign in a big way. Three years ago, Connecticut led the nation in contributions. Two years ago, we were runner-up to Colorado. But last year, contributions fell way off with only 44% of the membership contributing. Let’s make it 100% this time around.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Preparing your car to weather the 2012-13 winter season In our part of the country, basketball season is also the winter season. You rely on your vehicle to get to your games. So it’s critical that you prepare your car or truck for winter and make sure that it is in good working order. To help you do so, AAA Southern New England has published numerous winter driving tips. Here are some of the highlights: Make sure your battery is strong, charged, and clean Cold weather is tough on batteries. At zero degrees, a car’s battery loses about 60 percent of its strength. At a comparatively mild 32 degrees, a battery is 35 percent weaker. The most common sign of a weak battery is an unusual sound coming from the starter motor when the ignition key is turned, indicating difficulty in starting the engine. If the vehicle is difficult to start, check that the battery connections are tight and no corrosion is present on the battery terminal. To remove corrosion, use an old toothbrush to clean the cable connectors and terminals with a solution of baking soda and water. Keeping battery terminals clean helps, but a load test performed by a qualified technician will help determine whether a car’s battery is strong enough for winter starts. Check your tires Make sure your car is equipped with tires that are able to handle Connecticut’s winter weather. For most motorists, all–season tires are adequate. In more northern or mountainous regions, replacing your tires with four snow tires will help give your vehicle traction for slippery and snowy road conditions. Check your tires for tread wear and pressure. Be sure to check your spare tire, too. Drive, don’t skate In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice, causing extremely slippery conditions. The distance needed to stop on ice at 32 degrees is twice as long as at zero degrees. Keep your engine cool Make certain cooling system antifreeze is mixed with an equal portion of water for maximum protection. Make sure other drivers can see you Danger must be seen to be avoided. Driving with a snow-covered windshield, windows, side–view mirrors or lights invites a crash. Clear windows, mirrors and lights with an ice scraper, brush or spray de–icer. Make certain windshield wipers and defrosters are in good working order and that washer reservoirs are filled with no–freeze windshield washer fluid. Keep windshields clean You will likely use your windshield wipers to wipe of not only snow, but the sludge that is sprayed at you by the vehicle in front of you. So keep a container of windshield washer fluid in the car and make sure the fluid contains antifreeze. (cont. on p. 7)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Preparing your car to weather the 2012-13 winter season ... (cont. from p. 6) Be ready to de-ice A squirt of de–icer spray is a quick method to overcome frozen door locks. Protect your vehicle from the elements Road salt, slush and grime are especially hard on a car’s finish. To help prevent rust and paint damage, keep cars washed and waxed. A full or self-service car wash makes the job easier when temperatures are low. Here are some additional recommendations for items you should have in your car during the winter: Flashlight, jumper cables, scraper and snow brush, a small shovel, warning devices including flares and reflective triangles, blankets, gloves, hat, boots, cell phone and charger, an abrasive material such as sand or cat litter to spread under your wheels to improve traction if you get stuck in the snow or ice and some bottles of water for your journey. [Thanks to Craig Stockel for contributing to this article]

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Watch what you say, write and post on-line Anyone who’s followed the news for the past few weeks is well aware of the personal scandals that cost CIA Director General David Petraeus his job, threatened the job of the Commander of the forces in Afghanistan General John Allen, and locally cost TV weatherman Geoff Fox his job at WTIC Fox. What all three have in common is that they came under scrutiny after some of their emails became known to their superiors -- emails which conveyed inappropriate conduct. While we’re not condoning their conduct, the lesson for us here is that what you email or text or post on Facebook, Twitter, or other social media can and often is seen by people other than those for whom your messages were intended. In other words, they’re not really private. So, it’s a good idea not to post or write anything you would be ashamed of or could cause you harm if made more public than you wanted. With that in mind, pay heed to the memo issued the IAABO International office. This memo was emailed to our entire membership by Hank and later by Buddy. If you didn’t read or save that email, here’s the memo for your reference: With the onslaught of social media (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.) there are many ways for officials to become controversial very innocently. Officials love to talk, I am sure you know the old saying "tell a ref tell the world." How often does the conversation between officials start with "I had this play" and then we continue with one-upsmanship and "I had this play" and so on. We were always concerned when we were having an adult beverage in an establishment talking basketball, being heard by someone as we made comments about a coach, player or even rowdy fans. Why wouldn't we have the same concern today where, instead of being out in public making comments we now make them online? The danger again is that we do not know who views these comments, and we do not know what they will do with these comments. In regards to basketball, I have watched officials put up a play online and ask for comments from others and there may be responses from a number of officials that give their "opinion," many of which are incorrect rulings. It amazes me that officials did not ask their own interpreters who have been IAABO-trained and most likely can provide the correct response and rule citation. The interpreter also has another resource and that is Peter Webb who is IAABO's Coordinator of Interpreters and who will respond to each and every question with the correct ruling and rule reference within 48 hours. My concern is that an errant comment made by an official can come back to haunt them. In fact most Division 1 conferences have added this clause to the officials’ contract: "The official must refrain from any public criticism of the conference, conference staff, coaches, student athletes, and conference athletic departments. This criticism includes communicating with the media and other basketball officials, as well as any method of social or electronic media (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, email etc.). Any violation of this policy will result in disciplinary action being taken, which could include one or more of the following actions: private reprimand, suspension, or termination." This may filter down to the state athletic associations in the near future, thus the point of this article is to give our officials a heads-up on what is happening in our officiating world. You just might want to give some thought to the above before you make that next "click." !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart Dear friends: You’ve always known me to be an advocate of a healthy life style. I am the Health & Wellness Clinic Director working with the Ideal Protein program at Stony Creek Internal Medicine with internist Dr. Emily Nolfo. Ideal Protein is a medically designed and professionally supervised wellness protocol dispensed only by healthcare professionals. It is a muscle-sparing, fat-targeting weight loss protocol that was created for athletes in France over 20 years ago. You will lose an average of 3-7 pounds per week without exercise. Ideal Protein has a beginning and an end where we not only take the weight off and make you healthy, we show you how to keep it off. We are located at 14 Business Park Drive, Suite B in Branford. Call to find out about the next workshop or to set up a free one-on-one consultation. Contact John Moniello: 203-453-3966 OR 203907-5614 john.ip@stonycreekim.com

A medical emergency can happen anywhere, even in a hospital.  Should it happen in an environment of medical professionals, can they handle it?  What if it happens in a non-clinical area? Do you know proper procedure? If not, learn First Aid and CPR. We offer courses in American Heart Association(AHA) Heartsaver CPR/AED/First Aid, BLS Healthcare Provider, Family and Friends CPR and First Aid, Bloodborne Pathogen, CT State EMT and EMT Refresher Programs, CT EMT Practical and other courses as well. Classes available at your site or at our new location: 16 Main St Suite 203, Durham CT. Phone Lou Brockett at (860) 788-3245 or visit: www.asecondchancecpr.com

Stock up on the apparel and accessories you need to supplement your uniform and equipment. Find it all at Guilford Sporting Goods. Shoes, socks, compression shorts, under armour and more. Guilford Sporting Goods 1795-A Boston Post Road, Guilford, CT. (203) 453-2370. Frank Bepko, proprietor.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Remember the proper protocol for the National Anthem Earlier in the year, we published the protocol – as established in the Flag Code, Title 36 – for the proper way to stand for the playing of the national anthem before each game. With the new season getting underway, it’s a good time to review that protocol so that you and your partners pay proper homage to our flag and country and that you are consistent. To refresh your memory, here is the protocol: During a rendition of the National Anthem, when the flag is displayed, (a) all present should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart; (b) men not in uniform should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold the headdress at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; (c) individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note; and (d) when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.

For full details, along with some relevant reminders, go to our newsletter archives at www.IAABO10.org and navigate to the January-February 2012 issue of the newsletter. Flag patches For several years, college basketball officials have worn flag patches on their striped shirts and IAABO high school officials have worn them on their jackets as well as their shirts to honor America, our service men and women, veterans, and those who lost their lives in the attack of 9-11. There is a difference, however. College officials wear the flag patch on one sleeve of their striped shirts, but not on their jackets. High schools officials have a flag patch on the jacket and the striped shirt, in both cases on the back, about an inch below the rear neck line. It has come to our attention that the suggested protocol for flag patches is actually different from what high school officials do. The U.S. Code does not address the positioning of the flag patch but suggests that it is appropriate to wear an American flag patch on the left or right sleeve. When worn on the left sleeve, the union would appear towards the front and the stripes would run horizontally toward the back. When worn on the right sleeve, it is considered proper to reverse the Flag patch le! design so that the union is at the observer’s right to suggest that the flag is flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward. Since the code does not specifically address the positioning of the patch, a decision is left to the discretion of the organization prescribing the wearing of the patches. As many states and cities have ordinances pertaining to the use of the flag, you may wish to contact the Attorney General of your state or the City Attorney’s office regarding this matter. The key word is that this protocol is “suggested,” not necessarily required. Since we all have our flag patches on the backs of our shirts and Flag patch reversed jackets, it would be cumbersome to remove them and re-apply them to the shirtsleeves only. However, it is a point worth considering for some time in the future. For more information, visit the Institute of Heraldry FAQ web page of the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army at: http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/FAQs/faqs.aspx. Or, visit the FAQ page on Flag Rules and Regulations of the Betsy Ross U.S. History site at: http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/faq.htm#q57. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

HoopHall Classic coming in January The 2013 Spalding Hoophall Classic is being held on Friday, January 17th through Monday, January 21st, 2013. The event will be held at Blake Arena, Springfield College, Springfield, Massachusetts. Several Board 10 officials have worked this prestigious tournament in the past and will again this year. Try and attend. You will see high school basketball played and officiated at its very best. For further information go to http://thehoophallclassic.com.

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

NEWS & NOTES A new sheriff in town (well, in school anyway) for East Haven

Dave Reno selected to the ASA Elite Umpire Program

Congratulations to Vin DeNuzzo for his appointment as the new principal at East Haven High School. Vin has multiple ties to East Haven High – as a graduate, an athlete including captaining the boys basketball team his senior year, an educator there for 13 years, and the girls head basketball coach. In the 2006-07 season, he won the Canelli Sportsmanship Award given by Board 10 to the girls varsity coach of the year. He transitioned from coaching to officiating, becoming a member of Board 10. Best of luck at the helm of East Haven High School.

This reward program is the highest honor an ASA umpire can obtain other than selection to the ASA Hall of Fame. The program was launched in 2003, with 153 umpires approved in February of that year. There are currently 360 qualified umpires that have been selected for the "Elite" program. Members who are approved as "Elite" umpires can apply for their international certification (ISF), and are the only umpires selected for the National Championship Series (SP) and the Armed Forces Slow Pitch Championships. In future years, it is anticipated that "Elite" umpires will be selected for major Fast and Modified Pitch Championships. Dave Reno is the only umpire in Connecticut and in the New England Region to receive this award. He recently returned from the ASA National Major Championship.

Raucci inducted into New Haven Tap-Off Hall of Fame On Tuesday, November 13, 2012 Tom Raucci, was inducted into New Haven Tap-Off Club's 45th Annual Hall of Fame at Amarante's Sea Cliff.  In addition to Tom, the 2012 Hall of Fame Inductees included:  Nick Augelli, Kara Crismale Burgarella, Eva Esposito, Howard Hewitt, Maria Holland, and Carolyn Vanacore.  Hats off to all the inductees and thanks for a delightful evening to the officers of the club: President Elaine Piazza, Vice President Lee Franzman, Secretary Bob Antonio, Treasurer George Piazza, and Past President Anthony Vitelli. !

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CIAC football tourney crews feature Board 10 colleagues The quarterfinals of the 2012 CIAC state football tournament have come and gone, with a number of our fellow Board 10 members on the crews. The crew for the Berlin vs. Bullard Haven Photo courtesy CT Post game featured Ralph Zingarella as the referee, with Steve Bernstein handling duties as the electronic clock operator (ECO). Dan Akier was the line judge and Lou Brockett the head linesman for the game between Masuk and Middletown. Don Ardito served (cont. on p. 15)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 14) as the umpire and Chris Warner the back judge for the Southington vs. Glastonbury match-up. Semi-final assignments went to Dave DeMartino and Rick Ogurick for the game between Berlin and Weston, and Joe Kepics was the ECO for the game between Bunnell and New Canaan. [Editor’s Note: If any of our Board 10 colleagues work the finals, we’ll report that in the next issue of the newsletter.]

All in the family We hear from Rich Ogurick that his son, Matthew, competed in the Ironman Wales Competition, held in Tenby on September 16th. It was his first full Ironman. The event included a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a 26.2 mile marathon run. Matt completed the three events in 12 hours, 13 minutes, putting him in the top third of all competitors. Rich was also on hand, stationed at the finish line where he was a race volunteer. Rich and Matthew spent five days in Wales and they say that it is beautiful country with friendly people who take pride in hosting this world-class event… … Dan Baccielo joined Board 10 three years ago after 8 years as a member of Board 9. He is also a soccer referee and a member of the GNHSOA and USSF, the national governing body of soccer in the U.S. Dan tells us that his son Joe, a graduate of Platt Tech, has quite the soccer resumé. Joe is a junior at Post University where he was named Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference 2012 Men’s Soccer Player of !

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 the Year. He finished the regular season second in the conference in points and third in goals. Nationally, he’s ranked 12th in total goals and 15th in points per game. Other accolades include: CACC Player of the Week and ECAC Offensive Player of the Week in late September. He was named to the All-CACC first team and the Capital One Academic All-District First Team, having been selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America, all of which makes him eligible for Academic All-American status. Most recently, Joe was named 2012 Daktronics NCAA Division II Men's Soccer Player of the Year for the East Region, which makes him eligible for Daktronics All-American status. Joe helped Post earn back-to-back CACC regular season titles, back-to-back conference tournament finals appearances and an NCAA Tournament berth. In fact it was the first time in program history, that the #25 (National Ranking) Post University men's soccer team qualified for the NCAA Tournament. Joe scored Post’s first-ever NCAA tournament goal in a match against UMass Lowell… …Carl Highsmith is delighted to announce the birth of his first grandchild, Carlton Wardell Smith, born on October 12th of this year. The happy (and relieved) parents are Carl’s daughter Alexis and her husband Ken Smith, both of whom are Board 10 officials. Keeping things all in the family, you’ll notice from the photo that young Carlton is wearing a University of Wisconsin knit hat. Granddad has already made him a Badger fan… (continued on p. 16)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 15) …Not to be outdone are first-time grandparents Cindy Simell-Devoe and Ken Devoe. Their granddaughter Finley Grace Devoe was born on Sunday, November 25th at 3:01 PM at the St. Raphael campus of Yale New-Haven Hospital. The happy parents, Lucas and Aislinn Devoe are doing great, as is the baby, who’s already being groomed as a Chicago Bears fan… …Our returning champion Rich Altieri is a grandfather once again. His daughter Tricia gave birth to Joseph Salvatore Morello in October. Congratulations to Tricia, her husband Salvatore, and Grandpa Rich.

Music for your listening enjoyment You may not know it, but our colleague Tom Schultz has some considerable talent off the court. He plays acoustic guitar and from time to time will sit in with two acoustic bands from the Shoreline area – the Wayne & Chris Duo and The Rubber Band. Both bands play mostly classic rock – a lot of Beatles, Eagles, and of course, the Grateful Dead. Tom is pictured here playing alongside his friend Wayne Stevens of the Wayne & Chris Duo. ! PAGE 16

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Wedding bells will be ringing next October We’re happy to hear that Bill Bodin is now engaged to Ralph Zingarella’s daughter Andrea. The wedding is set for October 5th, 2013. Two points, Bill: 1) Congratulations to you and Andrea. 2) Does Ralph know about this? Daniels keynotes Buffalo Police Award Dinner Our David Daniels III was honored by the Buffalo New York Police Department’s African American Police Association. He was asked to be the keynote speaker at their Community Awards Dinner. David is a police lieutenant for the city of Bridgeport. We featured David in our Member Profile in the October 2011 issue of the newsletter which you can find in the archives at www.IAABO10.org. Church Street School in Hamden needs your support Board 10’s Howard Hornreich is the principal of Church Street School in Hamden and he would like to enlist your help in earning funds for the school to acquire new technology and school supplies by participating in the Stop & Shop A+ School Rewards Program. You can help by logging on to www.stopandshop.com/aplus and choosing “Designate Your School” from the A+ menu found under “Our Stores” to register your card online. Then, each time you shop at any Stop & Shop using your Stop & Shop Card, you will earn cash for Church Street School. You can track the amount of points you earn (cont. on p. 17)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN News & Notes ... (cont. from p. 16) for the school by checking your grocery receipt or by going online and creating an account at www.stopandshop.com. Each month, the amount of cash awarded will be updated on the Stop & Shop website. The school will receive a check at the end of the program. The money can be used for any of the school’s educational needs. Howard says, “Please take just a minute of your time to register your card. It can make a huge difference to our school. We need your support. Please be sure to register your card and choose Church Street School, in Hamden, CT at www.stopandshop.com/aplus. Please encourage your friends and neighbors to do the same. It would mean the world to our students.”

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

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Officials from Board 10 and our fellow-boards step up for Special Olympics – again! Volunteering for Special Olympics is one of many ways that we Board 10 officials continue to give back to the community. IAABO officials from around the state donated their time for the Special Olympics Divisioning Tournament at the Floyd Little Field House in New Haven on October 20 and the 2012 Special Olympics Connecticut Holiday Classic in Hamden on Saturday, November 17 and Sunday, November 18 at Quinnipiac University. The Classic featured 36 teams and 360 athletes from all over Connecticut. It was a tremendous statewide effort by all five boards with special thanks to Board 9 for volunteering to work all of Sunday’s games. The Quinnipiac University Bobcats Men’s basketball team made a visit to the field house as well, cheering on the special athletes. Coach Jim Reynolds, the tireless organizer of these events, made a point of contacting our Commissioner Buddy Chernovetz to express his thanks to all our volunteer officials. He said that there was never a lapse on any court and that some courts had 3 officials working. The amount of organization it took to put this together is huge, and the fact that Jim Reynolds can count on Board 10 with support from the other boards as well shows how much IAABO cares and steps up to give back to the community. !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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Special Memories from Special Olympics

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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President’s Message: “The true meaning of professionalism: There are no bad days in radio” -- Ken Devoe What does radio have to do with professionalism on the basketball court? Let me help you out with that question. Some of you know that before I became a copywriter full time, I spent nearly 20 years on the radio as a rock ‘n’ roll DJ at stations in New Haven, Hartford and Bridgeport. This was from the late 1960s to the mid 1980s. I started while in college at the Yale student radio stations WYBC AM and FM, where I learned the basics. In 1967, during my junior year, I got my first paid on-air radio job at WNHC as a part-timer doing weekends and vacation fill-ins and went full time immediately after graduation. (Some of you, willing to admit you are that old, probably listened to me back in the day). At that time the big Top 40 stations all over the country were AM stations. In New Haven, WNHC and WAVZ were locked in a ratings battle not unlike WABC vs. WMCA in New York. I bring this up because I learned a valuable lesson in my first year in radio from one of the jocks at WNHC – a guy who was not only talented, but was someone I liked and respected. He told me: “There are no bad days in radio.” Here’s what he meant. No matter if you had a fight with your spouse or kids or your boss, or if someone or something has put you in a rotten mood – or if you’re just not feeling well – you cannot let that affect your on-air performance. And even if you’re feeling fine and nothing is bothering you, you simply must not have a bad show -- ever. Whenever you’re on the air, you must be a professional and give the audience (and your boss) what they expect, every second, every moment of every show. You have to bring it every day. In Top 40, they expect the jocks to be upbeat, happy, witty, concise, and technically sharp. You have to consistently deliver a high level of performance -- that is, if you want to keep your job. That’s the true meaning of professionalism. I can tell you from experience it’s not easy. Nor should it be. If it were easy, anybody could do it. Well, not everyone can do radio and do it well. The same is true for officiating basketball. (cont. on p. 20)

Commissioner’s Commentary: "The Commissioner’s Points of Emphasis” -- John “Bud” Chernovetz Two sights you never want to see during a basketball season are: 1) A gym full of people, two teams ready to play, and no officials in the building, and 2) An empty gym – empty except for the officiating crew that has arrived. In both cases, a major gaffe has occurred. I’m happy to say that those gaffes have been virtually eliminated over the last several years, but that can only remain the case if we all continue do our jobs properly. That means following certain procedures and policies. They are my Commissioner’s Points of Emphasis (POEs). To first-year officials, this may be information that’s new to you. To everyone else, these should be familiar. Even so, you should brush up on these POEs, just as you do on the rules. Check Arbiter and emails daily I made approximately 6,000 game assignments to start the season. It’s fair to say that the schedule you received will not necessarily be the schedule you end up with when the season is over. Changes occur daily, and in fact I’ve already made a host of changes since the schedules were first released. Games get cancelled or rescheduled for any number of reasons. Sometimes the game site gets changed. Officials get ill or injured and have to beg off games, which means someone must take their place. That someone could be you. One of the great features of Arbiter (cont. on p. 20) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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President’s Message: “The true meaning of professionalism” ... (cont. from p.19)

Let me put the degree of difficulty into perspective. The average radio personality (rock jock) does a four hour show, six days a week. In my day, we went on mic (we call that a “mic break”) for just about every song we played, either introducing the tune or doing a promo for a station contest. That could mean 8 to 12 mic breaks an hour, sometimes more. Over a 20 year period, that’s nearly 300,000 mic breaks. 300,000 times on-air. 300,000 times when you have to perform as a professional. Nobody is at their best that many times, but I learned how to sound as if I were at my best, even if I wasn’t feeling that way. If you wanted to stay in radio and be eminently employable you couldn’t have peaks and valleys, or good days and bad days. You didn’t have to be brilliant. But you did have to deliver at a consistently high level every time. During my on-air career, some days things just clicked and the shows were almost magical. My timing was really on. The witty ad-libs would just come into my head one after the other all show long. Fortunately I recorded and saved some of those shows. But those kinds of days don’t happen all the time. When they don’t, you still have to sound like a pro. Nothing less. I used to tell my students at the Connecticut School of Broadcasting: You don’t have to be great every show, but you have to be really good every show. That’s how you build a radio career and a solid reputation. That’s how you get better gigs as time goes on. Officiating is remarkably like radio in that respect. When you step onto the court, the expectation is that you will know what you’re doing, make good judgments and correct rulings and so forth and that you will do so from the opening jump to the final buzzer – every game. You can’t have good plays and bad plays, good quarters and bad quarters, or worse, good games and bad games. The old saying is: As officials, you’re expected to be perfect at the start of the game and get better as the game goes on. But that’s not the reality. No one has ever officiated a perfect game and in truth nobody really expects you to. However you are expected to deliver a consistently good, solid performance every time. That’s something you can control through preparation, conditioning, concentration and dedication to your craft. It’s very do-able, and there’s no excuse for not delivering. When you do so game in and game out, you are a true professional, and to be called a professional is the highest compliment anyone can pay you. Here’s hoping you earn that compliment every single game. Think of it this way: “There are no bad days in basketball.” Commissioner’s Commentary: “The Commissioner’s Points of Emphasis” ... (cont. from p.19)

is that when a change is made to your schedule, the system automatically sends you an email with the changes or with an alert to check Arbiter for change information and then to confirm your acceptance of the change on line. That’s why you must check emails and Arbiter every single day -- preferably a few times a day. In the event of inclement weather, games may get cancelled. If so, you should receive an email notice – another reason to check emails throughout the day. However, if a school is closed due to bad weather, that doesn’t necessarily mean the game won’t still be played. Check to be sure. Varsity games cancelled due to bad weather will be rescheduled. Often, but not always, that’s also true for subvarsity games. In any event, if your game is rescheduled, I will try and assign you to the rescheduled game, unless you’re already assigned elsewhere on the new date. Know where you’re going This POE has two components. 1) Know WHAT the game site is. Sometimes the site is not at the host school because the school doesn’t have its own gym. For example, the Hyde boys play at Fair Haven School, and the Hyde girls at Truman School. And know the difference between Sacred Heart Academy (Hamden) and Sacred Heart High School (Waterbury), between Platt Tech (Milford) and Platt High (Meriden), and between Hamden Hall’s Taylor Gym and the Beckerman gym. The Arbiter listing on your schedule specifies the home team, away team and the site. Read the listing carefully. 2) Know WHERE the game site is. If you go on Arbiter and click on “Schedule” (cont. on p. 21) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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Commissioner’s Commentary: “The Commissioner’s Points of Emphasis” ... (cont. from p. 20)

you’ll see the list of all your games. If you click on the name of the school in the “Site” column, Arbiter will display the school’s street address. If you click on the street address, you’ll be taken to a Google page with a map showing the site’s location, and there you can click on “Directions” to learn how to get to the site from wherever you are. If you have a GPS system for your car, enter the address into the unit and it can guide you to your destination. Even with these aids, if you’re skittish about driving to a place you’ve never been before, you might consider driving the route before game day to become familiar with the territory. Keep the lines of communication open You must be reachable at all times. I am. You can get me at any time on my cell. If an official notifies me on game day that he or she can’t do their game because of some emergency, I have to assign that game to someone else ASAP. If I see you are available and I want to put you on that game, I will call you. If I don’t get you, I may have to call someone else and you would miss out on that game. That said, you MUST have a cell phone with you at all times. Make sure the phone is charged and turned on. Make sure your voice mailbox is not full. If I can’t get you “live” on the phone and I can’t leave you a callback message, I will move on to someone else. Confirm game assignments with your partner No later than the day before your game, email, text, or call your partner to confirm that you will be working together. Ideally, the “R” on the game should initiate the contact, but if you’re the “U” and haven’t heard from your partner, you then should make the call or send the email or text. Request a reply so that you know your message was received. Get there on time! Allow ample time to get to your game on time. For varsity officials that means at least an hour before tipoff, so you can observe the JV officials and have enough time for a thorough pregame. For early afternoon freshman and middle school games, it’s understood you might not be able to get there early because of work. But get there by game time at the very least. If you are running late, call your partner and alert him or her to the situation. Your partner can let the host athletic director know that you will indeed be there, even though you may be cutting it close. If you have an emergency on game day and you know you can’t do your assigned game, call me on my cell at 203-494-9659 as soon as possible and I will find a replacement. Similarly, if you’re caught in some horrendous traffic jam from which there seems to be no end in sight and you realize you won’t make it to the game on time, call your partner and call me on my cell. Be sure that you talk to me. Don’t email and don’t just leave a voice message. If you are working a freshman game (or a JV game if there is no freshman game), and your partner is not there, start the game on time anyway. The idea is to keep that day’s games on schedule so that the varsity game starts on time. If yours is a varsity game and your partner is not there, call me on my cell and I will determine who will work with you. Don’t ever start a varsity game with one official and don’t let a coach or A.D. decide who will work in your partner’s place. If you pay heed to these Points of Emphasis, you will go a long way toward ensuring that every game is properly covered, that there will never be officials going to an empty gym, and that there won’t a gym full of people but no officials on hand.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

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With Tracy Claxton Girls Head Coach, Hyde School of Health Sciences and Sports Medicine New Haven native Tracy Claxton made her mark as a standout high school and college basketball player long before she took over as head coach of the Hyde girls team. Tracy played for Wilbur Cross High School back in the days when the program was in its early stages. She scored 2,420 points, a state record at the time and now third on the all time list, including one game in which she netted 54 points. She helped lead Cross to 53 straight victories and three straight CIAC L championships – 1978, 1979 and 1980. After graduating from Wilbur Cross, Tracy played for Kansas for two years before transferring to Old Dominion University. ODU was already a women’s college power. Tracy helped make it more so, leading the Lady Monarchs to an NCAA D-I championship in 1985. She was the Most Valuable Player of the 1985 women’s Final Four. She brought the same determination, drive, dedication and discipline she exhibited as a player to her role as head coach of the Hyde girls team and has engineered one of the more remarkable turnarounds in all of high school basketball. She inherited a program that had difficulty attracting skilled players. Three seasons ago – her first season as coach – Hyde went 0-18. The following year, they went 4-16. Last year, the Hyde girls had a breakout year, with a record of 17-8. The team qualified for the CIAC state tournament and made it to the quarter-finals. Off the court, Tracy Claxton works for the City of New Haven’s Livable City Initiative, dealing with the problems of blight, abandoned houses and other community issues that affect quality of life.

Q: How did you get started in coaching? A: After graduating from college in 1985, I coached a New Haven YMCA boys team, and we went to the championship that season. In 1989, I joined the Quinnipiac University women’s team as an assistant coach. But eventually with a baby on the way, I stepped down, as the time needed for practices and traveling to away games was time I needed instead to raise my son. I then began working with New Haven Park-Rec and coached the East Rock boys’ middle school team. Over the years a number of people approached me and encouraged me to at least think about coaching the Hyde girls. I didn’t decide right away one way or another, but I gave it some thought. I knew about the challenges that the program presented, and finally, I thought I’d give it a try. And, as you know, we evolved from a winless program to making the quarter finals of the state tournament. !

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Q: How did you change the fortunes of the Hyde girls basketball program? A: We had to start all over from scratch. There weren’t a lot of girls enrolled at Hyde, let alone girls interested in playing basketball. For those who were, we had to teach the basics of ball handling, passing and shooting. We took our lumps as the team’s losing streak continued during my first year. But the next year, on December 23rd, to be exact, we finally broke the losing streak with a victory over North Branford. To see the joy that our players felt and the smiles on their faces – that still is my ultimate highlight as a coach. I think the key to our turnaround was first getting a couple of players with real skills to join the program. When you have those players in the mix, it makes the other players who may be less skilled want to work harder and improve. Then, once you get a few wins under your belt, that attracts even more kids who can really play and then winning becomes contagious. But I want to


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN emphasize that I wasn’t just looking for good basketball players. First and foremost I wanted to see how these kids were doing in the classroom. Education is more important than athletics. We want our girls to be successful in the classroom first, then on the court. As a small school, I think Hyde offers an environment in which students can get a lot more individual attention and support than perhaps in much larger schools where they could get lost in the crowd. As a result, we are starting to see more and more of our student athletes having academic and athletic success. Q: What is your coaching philosophy? A: It’s all about being determined, dedicated and disciplined, and being willing to work hard and make the sacrifices that are necessary to be successful – on and off the court. These are the things that help you succeed in life well after school is over. Once you embrace the idea of determination and discipline you can do whatever you want to do in life and do it well. We want that for our players so that they will become productive young ladies in society. Q: What is most challenging about coaching? A: As a coach you have to convey what you want to get across to your players in a positive way and make sure they understand what you’re talking about and what you want from them. The challenge is that each student athlete is different emotionally and mentally. Each player has her own distinct personality and as a coach you have to adjust. Some players want and need to be pushed harder. Others don’t respond well to that. You have to know the difference and act accordingly and convey what you need to convey in a positive manner and tone. And you have to get everyone on the same page. While that’s a challenge, I think I’m fortunate because our team feels that we are a family. My players know they can come to me or to my assistant coach with any kind of problem and that we are available to them and will keep everything confidential. Q: What is most rewarding about coaching? A: It’s very rewarding to see our players take what we’re trying to implement – whether it’s !

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 technical or tactical – and compete successfully both on the court and in the classroom and see the satisfaction on their faces when they do. For example, a former player of mine was doing reasonably well academically, but she settled for getting Bs and Cs and never made honors. But I knew she had the potential within herself to do better and so I pushed her to work harder and she did, so she will graduate with honors this year. I am elated to see our kids apply themselves with determination, dedication and discipline and excel at what they do. Q: How has girls basketball changed over time? A: One thing that changed was, when I played we didn’t have the three-point shot. But even more than that, I think the biggest change involves the bigger players. It used to be that the bigger and taller girls weren’t good ball handlers, as least not as good as the guards. Now, girls who are 6-1 or taller, they can all handle the ball really well. Q: What would you like the relationship between officials and coaches to be? A: I think it should be a relationship of mutual respect, built upon good communication. That would be better for both the officials and the coaches. I don’t have a problem with officials and I don’t think they have a problem with me. All I’m looking for is basic fairness and not taking the game away from the players. If I do have a question about a play or a call and I ask it in a respectful manner, I would hope the official would reply respectfully as well. I think for the most part, that’s what happens. I will give officials respect and I expect the same in return. I tell my players not to say anything to the officials. If there’s something happening that is detrimental to my players I will bring it to officials’ attention. My players know that if they don’t show the officials respect, they will be disciplined. I will say that you officials have a very tough job. I wouldn’t want to do it. You’re often between a rock and a hard place and you can’t please everyone. But that comes with the territory. As long as the kids and I are treated with respect, that’s all I can ask.


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

THE DOCTOR IS IN Board 10’s Dr. Dan Davis discusses injury prevention and treatment, as well as general health and fitness, to help keep you on the court.

“Pain, pain go away” A look at non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and other remedies for pain and inflammation due to injury

Q: What causes the kinds of pain officials encounter due to injury? A: Pain can be caused by inflammation and also by a contusion (a direct, blunt blow or continuous blows to a muscle) or a basic trauma. Q: What is inflammation? A: Inflammation can be a response to an injury. Inflammation is also one of the ways the body tries to heal itself. It, too, can result from an acute episode of some sort of chemical reaction inside the body. There are different varieties of pain – sharp acute pain, chronic pain, and pain associated with where it occurs in the body. Inflammation can be thought of in that context as an “itis” such as inflammation of the bursa (bursitis), inflammation of a tendon (tendonitis), etc. So, when you look at different types of inflammation, you have to figure out how to best treat the inflammation, especially if it affects quality of life and inhibits your ability to pursue the activities you want to pursue, such as officiating basketball. Some medications, such as Tylenol, relieve pain but not inflammation. Others relieve inflammation but not pain. Some do both. Q: Why would you not want to relieve both? A: Sometimes pain is a good thing because it provides a signal. It is your body’s way of telling you (and your doctor) that something is wrong and needs attention. If your medication masks the pain, what’s wrong with the body remains wrong, but you have no signal to tell you that is the case. !

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Q: Aren’t steroids often prescribed to relieve both pain and inflammation? A: Yes. Steroids are designed to do so. But steroids are particularly strong anti-inflammatory medications and over time can break down the body. They can adversely affect the adrenal glands as well as the body’s mechanisms for defending against infection. So we want to avoid steroids if possible. Sometimes you don’t have a choice -- for example, when someone is afflicted with pulmonary fibrosis. It’s a condition whereby the lungs can’t expand, and you are unable to take a deep breath. You take steroids to knock down the inflammation. With Crohn’s disease or colitis, inflammation can cause a blockage which, if untreated, can be fatal, and you need steroids to reduce that inflammation. But, if you must be on steroids for a specific medical reason, you don’t want to have to be on them too long. Q: What is an alternative to steroids? A: There are a number of non-steroidal antiinflammatories, or NSAIDs, that can do the job, depending on the nature of the pain and inflammation that needs to be treated. Some NSAIDs are over-the-counter medicines, such as Advil or Aleve or any brand of aspirin. Others, such as Celebrex, require a prescription. Q: How do you determine which to recommend? A: One thing to take into consideration is that there are two inflammatory pathways in the body that cause pain. We refer to (cont. on p. 25)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN The Doctor is In ... (cont. from p. 24)

them as Cox 1 and Cox 2. Without getting too technical, let’s just say that some medications are designed to be Cox 1 inhibitors and others Cox 2 inhibitors, and they each work differently. For example, Advil has its own way of knocking out the Cox 1 inflammatory cycle, but it doesn’t work for everyone. Aleve takes a different pathway to knock out the Cox 1 inflammatory cycle, but it too might not work for everyone. One drug that covers both Cox 1 and Cox 2 is a prescription drug called Mobic. Another factor is how long each dose has a positive effect. The longer you can keep inflammation down, the better chance you have of breaking the pain cycle, and that’s a good thing. Motrin lasts about 4 hours, but Aleve is designed to work up to 12 hours. Q: What are the pros and cons of these meds? A: There are potential side effects. For example, aspirin can be rough on the stomach lining and in time can cause stomach ulcers. Like aspirin, both Advil and Aleve have nothing to protect the stomach, and that can be a problem. Advil can also adversely affect the kidneys. Vioxx was designed to be up to 50 times stronger in relieving Cox 2 inflammation. But the higher doses caused cardiac toxicity and led to heart failure. You may recall that Vioxx has since been taken off the market. Today, every non-steroidal anti-inflammatory comes with a black box warning that too high a dose of any of these can cause cardiac toxicity. A black box warning is a warning required by the Food & Drug Administration that must appear on the product’s package as to side effects associated with that medication. Q: Aren’t there some highly effective topical remedies, such as patches? !

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 A: There are topical anti-inflammatories that relieve inflammation sometimes as well if not better than oral medications. One is Voltaren Gel. Another topical anti-inflammatory is a Flector patch. The gel will last 4-6 hours upon application. The patch will last up to 12 hours, and it is applied directly to the area of the body where there is pain and inflammation. In other words, these anti-inflammatories are site-specific. Topical anti-inflammatories provide a nice alternative for people with sensitive stomachs. Q: What are your overall recommendations for treating pain and inflammation? A: Any time you have inflammation in soft tissue or continuous pain in any part of the body, that is not a normal condition and you should see your doctor. If you have acute pain that you have to control, you should probably take a good anti-inflammatory, whether prescription or non-prescription. Take the medication that is safest for you and that will allow you to continue the activity level you wish to continue. For example, if you just need enough pain relief to help you get through a basketball game, then a couple of Advil or Motrin tablets would probably be sufficient. 400 miligrams is a normal dose, but you could go up to 800 mgs. Definitely do not take as much as 3200 mgs of Motrin in a single day. For longer periods between doses you might consider Aleve which gives up to 12 hours of relief for both pain and inflammation. Be sure to take Aleve with food. If pain continues on a daily basis, you need to see a doctor, and your doctor can recommend the appropriate medication. Whatever you end up taking, make sure your doctor monitors you as long as you take it. Got a health and fitness question for Dr. Dan? Email it by clicking here: Ask Dr. Dan


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member Profile: Jim Brennan As a high school basketball official, you may think you are under a lot of pressure and scrutiny, especially at state tournament time.  To an extent you are.  But it pales in comparison to the pressure and scrutiny that our Board 10 colleague Jim Brennan is under in his other sports officiating capacity – working D-I AA college football for a major conference, usually on TV, and often seen nationally.  We talked to Jim about what that’s like. But first, a little background.   Jim is from West Haven, CT.  He attended West Haven High School where he played football and captained the baseball team, and from which he graduated in 1977.  After that, he attended UCONN where he earned a business degree in 1981.  After a few years in the working world, Jim went to Sacred Heart University and earned an MBA in 1992. His career has been in financial management.  For the last 10 years, Jim has been working at Yale University where he currently is the business manager for the Summer Session department.  He is responsible for their budget, expense reporting, and all financial transactions. The department runs a variety of programs including summer school in New Haven, study-abroad programs, programs for high school students as well as for Yale grads who want to come back and take a few courses in their field of interest.  The department also offers an English-as-a-second-language (ESL) program.  Though a “summer session” department, the work needed to keep it running goes on all year long. Before working at Yale, Jim held financial management positions at companies such as Bayer Pharmaceuticals in West Haven and Sikorsky Aircraft, among others. Jim currently resides in Orange with his wife of 22 years, Susan, who is employed as a dental hygienist.  The Brennans have three kids: 16 year old Michael who attends Amity Regional High School, 18 year old Dan who is a freshman at Adelphi University studying pre-med psychology, and 30 year old April who with husband Jeff Silverman has a young son of her own, Noah.  April works at Rehab Associates, an agency that helps young mothers with life skills and child development. Jim has been with Board 10 for the last five years. But long before he joined the ranks of basketball officials, he embarked on a highly successful career as a college football official.  After his playing days at West Haven High, and realizing he wasn’t big or talented enough to play football for UCONN, he still wanted to remain involved in the game. While a senior at UCONN, Jim joined the New Haven Football Officials’ Association (NHFOA).  He began officiating Ray Tellier midget football (what we now know as Pop Warner football).  He put in his time with the NHFOA and worked his way up to varsity within 3 years. Jim sought opportunities to improve and advance in his football officiating career.  He got on to the ECAC college officials’ board and worked D-II and D-III games for about 10 years with schools such as Central CT, Western CT, Trinity, Wesleyan, Coast Guard, SCSU, and UNH. He eventually moved up to D-IAA football.  The opportunity arose when they expanded the crew sizes from 6 to 7, adding a downfield official, and accordingly Jim became a field judge working the downfield sideline.  He began officiating Ivy and Patriot League games in 1997, working on a crew that involved overnight travel. The following year he was hired by the Atlantic 10 conference, a stronger league that offered more player scholarships than the Ivy and Patriot schools.  They hired a small staff of the best officials they could find, and that included Jim.  He worked games involving Delaware, Richmond, Villanova, Maine, New Hampshire, UMass and others. (cont. on p 27) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member Profile: Jim Brennan ... (cont. from p. 26)

In 2001, Jim was hired by the Big East, a conference that included Miami, Virginia Tech, Boston College, West Virginia, Rutgers, Pittsburgh and Syracuse.  The games became more high profile.  In fact, in Jim’s first season with the Big East, Miami went on to win the national championship. In 2002 and 2003 Jim worked as an official for NFL Europe, their version of a developmental league for players and officials.  It was at one of their preseason clinics that Jim heard former NFL Supervisor of Officials Mike Perreira explain how he expects his officials to handle the pressure of high profile games played on national TV in front of large stadium crowds.  “Is there a lot of pressure?  Sure.” Perreira said.  “But pressure is a privilege.  You cannot walk off the street and do what we do.  You’ve put in years of studying, training, and effort to earn the spots you are in.  Keep your focus and use your experience and training to react to play situations.” Jim remained with the Big East and was assigned to some extremely high profile games, including the 2006 Orange Bowl pitting Florida State against Penn State, which meant Bobby Bowden vs. Joe Paterno.  Last season, Jim was on the crew of the Michigan-Notre Dame game, which drew the biggest crowed in college football history: 114,804.  He’s had Notre Dame a few times, including this season’s game against Boston College.  Notre Dame of course completed an undefeated regular season and will have a trip to the BCS Championship game. In basketball, we stress the importance of preparation and pregame conferences.  Big time college football takes those steps to an extreme level. Jim told us about what a typical week is like: • Review tapes of the teams you will officiate next time out – looking for tendencies, who the playmakers are, who might be the cheap shot artists. • Stay sharp on the rules, including taking a short test each week. • Watch training tapes from the Big East Supervisor of Officials with plays from all of the games in the conference that week, showing those well done and those not-so-well done by game officials. • Arrive at the game site on Friday for a Saturday game. •  Have dinner with your crew and conduct a 2 to 3 hour pre-game conference the night before the game. • Review plays from the week before and comments from evaluators, and watch game film with your crew of the teams who will play the next day. • On the morning of the game, arrive at the site 2½ hours early and complete the pregame conference. • An hour before kickoff, go on the field, observe the teams warming up, stretch, do some running to get loose, greet the coaches. • Shortly before kickoff return to the field and give instructions to the ball boys and chain crew. • During the game itself, make written notes on your game card (when you can between plays or during time outs) on any penalties you call and the specifics of those plays. • After the game, contribute your information toward a game report, which gets entered into a computer system. Chart the penalties, including the time of each play, who was involved, what the call was and why. (continued on p. 28) !

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member Profile: Jim Brennan ... (cont. from p. 27)

• On the way home, review tape of the game you just officiated on your iPod or iPad. (when flying or on the train, not while driving or course). Then there’s the review of your work.  Each conference has a supervisor of officials (the Big East’s is an NFL Referee), and use current and retired NFL officials who grade the tapes of every call on every play.  The available technology used by the graders is state of the art, complete with multiple angles and zoom capabilities.  There definitely is nowhere to hide on film.  By mid-week you receive your grades, and Jim says that review can be a very humbling experience.  If that isn’t nerve-wracking enough, officials operate on a one-year contract.  You have to get renewed and resigned by your conference each year, that is, if the conference wants you back.   By comparison what we do on and off the basketball court seems a lot less pressurized.  Which is not to say that we should take what we do lightly in terms of preparation, pregame conferences, in-game performance, and post-game review.  But ask yourselves honestly whether you could stand up to the rigors and pressures of the “routine” that Jim Brennan and his college football colleagues go through. Getting back to basketball, Jim had been working for youth basketball leagues in West Haven for about 20 years before joining Board 10 for the 2008-09 season, and he is in the process of hopefully working his way up the ranks. As with his college football career, he is putting in his time and hard work into developing as a basketball official. We asked Jim what he’s learned in his football and basketball officiating experience so far.  “You get out of officiating what you put into it,” Jim said.  “If you want to move up to varsity or to the college ranks, it takes hard work and dedication in rules and mechanics.  Promotional opportunities in officiating don’t come along very often, but when they do you have to be completely prepared and focused to take advantage of them.  You have to put everything you have into every game you work, because you never know who is watching. You have to stay in shape and treat every game as if it is the Super Bowl or the NCAA Final Four, because to the players, it is.”  He also notes that it takes a lot of sacrifices to do what we do, and you need a supportive family who knows you’re going to be away for many important family events.  Jim also has learned to appreciate the camaraderie of his fellow officials and how important it is to enjoy the friendships you make along the way.  His final word:  “Hustle, be prepared, be ready to go.  The players, coaches and fans expect and deserve that from you. You should always be looking forward to your next game and enjoying it.”

Member-to-Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

From the Trainer’s Room: “Stay active” Fitness and exercise tips to help you stay in shape for the basketabll season from Carolino Monteiro, American Council on Exercise certified personal trainer With the season having started for some and about to begin for others, it is necessary to stay healthy and injury-free when on the court. Whether you do 5 games or 35 games a year, or if you officiate all year ‘round, basketball injuries can happen no matter how physically active you are. As we prepare for the upcoming season, and as we work on the court throughout season, we can all benefit from staying active off the court. Staying active is the easiest and most basic way that we can prevent or at least reduce the probability of injury. It’s something we can all benefit from and something that can help us remain healthy. With that in mind, here are some suggestions on how to “stay active.” Walk&Run Many times throughout a basketball game you have to move and run in short quick bursts in order to get in the correct position to see the play and make a correct ruling. But it’s those very same short bursts that can be an injury waiting to happen if you you are not in good physical condition and you haven’t properly stretched before the game. So, you need to improve your overall conditioning as well as strengthen your leg and ankle muscles and tendons. And you should do so regularly, including off-days when you don’t have a game scheduled. Suggestion: Get on the treadmill at your local gym and follow the format below and repeat until at least 10 minutes are completed. 1) Warm up -- 2 minutes; 2) Jog/Run -- 1 minute; 3) Walk/jog -- 1 minute. Step Up When running on the court, you are putting extra weight and pressure on your legs as you make those quick movements I referred to earlier in order to get into position for each play. Suggeston: Use the stair climber at the gym, walk the stairs at a local stadium, or even walk the stairs in your home. These are all good ways to strengthen your leg muscles. When walking the stairs, focus on your form and work your calf muscles. This has the dual benefit of strengthening your calf muscles and your knees. Core Strength Many people here the word “core” and think simply about making their stomach muscles tighter. But a strong core encompasses much more then that. During a basketball game, as you run up and down the court, your arms are swinging, your torsos are twisting and your legs are churning. Your core is the center of gravity that keeps every part of your body moving as you go up and down the court. Suggestion: To help strenthen your arms and torso, try simple pushups. Pushups will not only engage the muscles in your lower and upper body but also engage the core muscles. Understandably, not all of us can still do floor pushups. So, one effective alternative is to lean on a table and push up from that table, as pictured here. That will do the job well until you have built up the strength to do “real” pushups. (continued on p. 30)

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

From the trainer’s room ... (cont. from p. 29)

Balance is another element of core strength that fades with age if we don’t actively engage those muscles. When making quick movements on the court, as we all have to do, we must be in good balance so that we don’t fall, and that we can prevent muscles injuries that could otherwise linger for months. Suggestion: Try adding one-leg reaches to your routine to engage, stretch and strenththen these muscles. As you improve, sustain the reaches for longer periods of time and increase the distance of movement in your torso. Last fall, a football official asked me what kind of stretches he could do to strengthen his hamstrings, because he had experienced hamstring tightness all year during the football season. I showed him a few hamstring stretches and told him to hydrate, but I knew that if he wasn’t training the muscle correctly, he would be more subject to possible injury. With 5 minutes to go in the 4th quarter of a tightly contested JV game, my fellow official pulled a hamstring muscle and had to sit out of the rest of the game because of it. Conditioning the hamstring will not only help prevent injury but also improve the tendons and muscles surrounding the knee. The deadlift exercise pictured here will strenthen the hamstrings and knees while improving lower back and overall core strength. As you implement all these exercises, focus more on form and time and less on weight. During the season it is important to stay active to build muscular endurance. Incorporate these simple exercises in your current routine or, if you don’t have one, get started on a new routine. The season is starting, so now’s the time to Stay Active! FROM THE LIGHTER SIDE

For a humorous look at the life of a basketball referee, check out Kevin Sparrock’s “Fouls & Violations” web site: www.foulsandviolations.net

Member to Member Mart

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

ASK THE INTERPRETER

With Jeffrey Smith, Board 10 Interpreter and CT State Interpreter

Exam stumpers We asked Interpreter Jeffrey Smith: Which questions on the new candidates’ rules exam gave them the most difficulty. See if they challenge you, too. 4. B1 jumps in front of dribbler A1. B1 gets both feet down, is facing and gets to the spot first but does not give A1 any time or distance to stop. The official rules a blocking foul on B1. Is the official correct? NO – 4-23-1, 2 a & b – The defender met all of the criteria set forth by the rule, therefore if contact is more than incidental (4-27), the play shall be ruled a player-control foul on dribbler A1. Play will resume with Team B being awarded a designated spot throwin nearest where the foul occurred.

6. As the official bounces the ball to A1 for a throw-in and prior to A1 catching the ball, B2 fouls A2. The official rules a personal foul. Is the official correct? NO – 4-19-1; 6-1-2b – By rule, the ball does not become live until it is at the disposal of the thrower-in; this play is ruled as a technical foul for illegal contact during a dead ball. Play will resume with any player on Team A (including a substitute) attempting two free throws and Team A awarded a designated spot throw-in at the division opposite the scorer’s table. 9. Jumper A1 taps the ball which hits the floor and jumper A1 catches it. The official rules a violation. Is the official correct? NO – 4-28-3; 6-3-8 – This is a legal play; the jump ball restrictions ended when the legally tapped ball

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 contacted the floor. Play continues as if a violation had not been ruled. If one official had ruled a violation, the play can be corrected since it was a misapplication of a rule. 18. A1’s throw-in is caught by A2 while A2 has one foot touching the floor in the frontcourt. A2 then places the other foot down in the backcourt. The official rules a backcourt violation. Is the official correct? YES – 4-4-2; 4-4-1; 9-9-1 – A1 had frontcourt status when he/she caught the ball with one foot on the floor, and the ball has the same status. The exception would ONLY apply if A1 had been an “airborne” player. Play will resume with a designated spot throw-in nearest where the violation occurred. 21. During an alternating possession throw-in, Team A commits a throw-in violation. Official awards Team B the ball and has the scorer turn the arrow toward Team B’s basket. Is the official correct? YES – 6-4-5 – By rule, since the throw-in violation occurred during an alternating possession throw-in, play will resume with Team B being awarded the ball for a designated spot throw-in (nearest where the violation occurred) and Team A loses the possession arrow when the next held ball is ruled. 23. A1 from the backcourt throws the ball toward the frontcourt. B1, in the frontcourt bats the ball into the backcourt. A1 catches the ball and the official starts a new 10-second count. Is the official correct? YES – 4-4-2; 4-4-1; 9-8 – Once B1 (located in the frontcourt), contacted the ball, the ball now had frontcourt status according to the rule. Play shall continue with the official beginning his/her new 10second backcourt count. 24. Prior to dribbling, A1 passes to A2. The pass is behind A2 and A2 cannot reach the ball. A1 runs across the court, recovers the ball with both hands and then starts a dribble. The official rules a legal play. Is the official correct? NO – 4-15-1; 4-15-4a; 9-5-3 – By rule, A1 could have recovered the ball or continue to bounce/ dribble the ball without violating. Once A1 recovered the ball, he/she ended his/her dribble, because throwing the ball was the start of the dribble since he/she did not dribble prior to the pass to A2. Play will resume with a designated spot throw-in nearest where the violation occurred. (cont. on p. 32)


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN 25. On a try by A1, the ball is bouncing directly above the ring when B1 touches the ring. The official rules basket interference. Is the official correct? NO – 4-6-1 – This play does not meet the criteria for the definition of basket interference. Play should have continued without a violation being ruled. However, since basket interference was ruled, the goal shall count and play will resume by awarding Team B will a throw-in anywhere along the end line with the option of moving. 30. A1 commits his/her fifth foul and is disqualified. Prior to A1 being replaced, Team A requests a timeout. The official denies the request. Is the official correct? YES – 5-8-3 – By rule, Team A must replace the disqualified player before he/she is granted a time-out. After A1 is replaced, play will resume with the official granting a time-out to Team A. 36. B1 fouls A2 while A1 is in the act of shooting and before releasing the ball. A1 continues the motion and scores. The official disallows the basket stating that continuous motion only applies if the shooter is the one fouled. Is the official correct? NO – 4-11-1, 2; 6-7-5c – By rule, continuous motion applies as long as the act of shooting started prior to the foul being ruled on B1. Play will resume with the official scoring the goal by A1 and penalizing the foul by B1. If Team A is in the bonus, A2 will attempt a 1-and-1 or 2 two free throws (depending on the number of team fouls) or, if not in the bonus, Team A will have a designated spot throw-in nearest where the foul occurred. 37. A1 dives for a loose ball, secures the ball while on the floor and slides several feet on his/her stomach. The official rules a traveling violation. Is the official correct? NO – 4-44-5b; Case Book 4.44.5 Situation B – The Case Book play clearly states what A1 can and cannot do once he/she “Stops” sliding. A1 may not roll over on his/her stomach. However, A1 may shoot, pass, call a time-out or start a dribble before attempting to get up without violating the rule. Since the official ruled a traveling violation (although incorrectly), play will resume with a designated spot throw-in nearest where the violation occurred. 38. Jumper A1 taps the ball which is touched simultaneously by A2 and B2 and goes out of bounds. The

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NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 official rules the jump ball will take place between A2 and B2. Is the official correct? YES – 6-4-3 Note; 7-3-2 – By rule, since the alternating possession procedure has not been established, play will resume with a jump ball between the two players involved in the subsequent action. 40. As the official bounces the ball to free thrower A1 and before A1 catches the ball, is the ball dead? YES – 4-4-7b; 6-1-2c – By rule, the ball does not become live until it is at the disposal of the free thrower. Once A1 catches the ball, it now has become live. Play will continue with A1 attempting his/ her free throw. 45. Prior to releasing the ball on a pass, A1 lifts his/ her pivot foot off the floor. The official rules a violation. Is the official correct? NO – 4-44-3a – By rule, A1 may lift his/her pivot prior to releasing the ball on a pass or shot without a violation. Since the official ruled a violation, play will resume with a designated spot throw-in nearest where the violation occurred.  If  you  have  a  ques-on  about  rules,  mechanics,  or   procedures,  please  email  your  ques-on  by  clicking   on:    Ask  the  Interpreter.

Member-to-Member Mart

Aunt Chilada’s, voted New Haven’s Best Mexican Restaurant, is the perfect place for food, fun, entertainment -- and parties for any occasion. If you can’t come to us, no problem. We cater and deliver to your home or office. PLUS, enjoy 25-cent wings and $5 pitchers on Sundays while watching the NFL on any of our 10 TV’s. Eat, drink and be merry at Aunt Chilada’s. 3931 Whitney Ave., Hamden. (203) 230-4640. Charlie Hague, proprietor


IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Member-to-Member Mart

Visit us at www.sachemwineandspirits.com and get added to our email list.

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IAABO BOARD 10 NEW HAVEN

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012

Calendar Meeting Schedule for the 2012-13 season December 9, 2012  --  Refresher Exam January 6, 2013 February 3, 2013 -- Annual Meeting Next issue of Bd 10.COMmuniqué: Late December 2012 or early January, 2013

NOTE: All past issues of the newsletter are now posted at our Board 10 website. Visit: www.iaabo10.org, navigate to the home page, and click on the “NEWSLETTER” tab.

Helpful Links Bd 10.COMmuniqué is an interactive, electronic document. Wherever you see text highlighted in blue, bold, underlined type, that is a hot link to either an email address or a web page. Simply click on that link to submit ideas and questions, or to get more information. Here are some helpful links: • Board 10 Website • Ask Dr. Dan • News & Notes and Story Ideas • Ask the Interpreter • CIAC Officials’ Association • ArbiterSports • Women’s Coordinating Committee • Board 10 Knowledge Bank" • IAABO • Member to Member Mart

Bd 10.COMmuniqué EDITOR IN CHIEF: Hank Luzzi hluzzi@comcast.net MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF CORRESPONDENT: Ken Devoe kendevoe@pantheon.yale.edu CO-MANAGING EDITOR/CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Cheryl McCarthy Chiari CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Jeffrey Smith, Ray Vanacore DESIGN & LAYOUT: Ken Devoe Email story ideas, news and notes, and questions to: Ken Devoe or Hank Luzzi

All issues of Bd 10.COMmuniqué are available on-line at the Board 10 Website.

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Board 10 November/December News Letter