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2019 CANADIAN ARCHITECT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

24 M  odern Office of Design + Architecture

 oriyama & Teshima 26 M Architects

28 Patkau Architects + MJMA

30 architectsAlliance and COBE Architects

32 HDR + MJMA

34 L  ocal Practice Architecture + Design Ltd.

36 5468796

38 P  atkau Architects + Brook McIlroy Architects in joint venture

40 Lemay

42 Cameron Parkin, University of Waterloo

 randon Eli John 44 B Bergem, University of Toronto

46 J osh Wallace, Carleton University

48 S  amuel Gendron Fortier, Université de Montréal

 ierre-Olivier 50 P Demeule, Université Laval

53 doublespace photography

6 VIEWPOINT

The Bahá’í Temple of South America, 15 years back.

8 AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE 55 J ames Brittain

57 J ames Brittain

Jury remarks, profiles of the recipients, and the winning projects of the 2019 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence.

V.64 N.12

Lifting the town of Longyearbyen onto a megastructure above the floodline. From The Museum of Natural History to Ultima Thule, a thesis project by Brandon John Eli Bergem.

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THE NATIONAL REVIEW OF DESIGN AND PRACTICE / THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE RAIC

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Viewpoint

Crafting a Jewel In 2004, the cover of the Canadian Architect awards issue featured a drawing of the ninesided Bahá’í Temple of South America, a design by Hariri Pontarini Architects. 15 years later, in this issue, a stirring image of the temple appears once again (see page 53)—but this time, it’s a photograph of the realized temple, which was completed in 2016. The photo is the winner of this year’s Photo Award of Excellence. Taken by doublespace, it captures the mysterious atmosphere and majestic scale of the temple, whose curved fins are brushed by the morning light coming up over the mountains. The temple itself has secured several major awards, including the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s International Prize (formerly called the Moriyama International Prize), which comes with a $100,000 purse. Expressing the Bahá’í faith’s spirit of inclusiveness, the building has no pulpit or religious symbols. Instead, it is a circular form that uses the universal language of natural light. The cast glass exterior and translucent marble interior create a warm glow intended to lift the spirit of those who enter. The building was engineered to last 400 years in the rugged, earthquake-prone region. What does it take to bring a project like this from concept to reality? Part of it was an exceptional client, with a deep-rooted commitment to seeing the project through in a way that, in itself, embodied the values of community and inclusivity. The site selection process took nine years, and at one point, the Bahá’ís—despite being

CA Dec 19.indd 6

a relatively minor group—were offered a prime location in Santiago’s Metropolitan Park, in the centre of the city. All seven mayors agreed, and the land transfer was ratified in Parliament. But more established religious groups protested, so the Bahá’ís ultimately declined the site. The project aimed to bring people together, not to create contention, they said. Rather than the risk-mitigating contracts that have now become pervasive, lead designer Siamak Hariri was given an old-fashioned architect’s mandate. He was responsible for everything from design to project management to site supervision. Hariri responded with a wholehearted commitment to the work, with its complex technical challenges—from the use of CATIA software for modelling the structure, to working with glass artist Jeff Goodman to develop the bespoke glass cladding. All parties collaborated closely and in good faith, rather than litigating against each other. There were only four change orders, says Hariri. When steel fabricator Gartner Steel calculated that they incurred a loss on the project, the client reimbursed them. The construction budget of $36 million was tight for a project of this ambition. “People threw their lot in,” says Hariri. Craftspeople were key among the team, taking pride in each piece of the work, from the patinaed bronze doors to the polished glass sheets. To have the necessary plant material for the landscaping, “there was this one woman, for ten years, all she did was plant saplings,” says Hariri. Volunteers came from around the world to be part of the on-site labour. “The Germans [from Gartner Steel] were like, what the heck, we’re not going to work with volunteers,” recalls Hariri. But the volunteers’ dedication more than made up for their inexperience. “Believe me, after six months, they were begging for more volunteers.” Ultimately, the project was a spiritual journey for those involved. “When something comes together really well, you feel it. Things that are well made speak to how, somehow, we are trying to reach for the divine,” says Hariri. “This is a universal longing of all of us. Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, it is part of the human condition.” “The project had a will of its own,” he continues. “You start to think, where do ideas come from? The whole thing reverses. We think that we architects think and draw and noodle, and it’s all ours. No way. People would come into this project and inf luence it in critical ways. The project is a ref lection, in form, of that collective spirit.” Elsa Lam

Editor Editor elsa elsa lam, lam, fRAIC fRAIC Art Art Director Director Roy Roy Gaiot Gaiot Contributing Contributing Editors Editors Annmarie Annmarie Adams, Adams, FRAIC FRAIC Odile Odile Hénault Hénault Douglas Douglas MacLeod, MacLeod, ncarb ncarb,, MRAIC MRAIC online online Editor Editor Christiane Christiane Beya Beya Regional Regional Correspondents Correspondents Montreal David Theodore Theodore Montreal David Calgary Calgary Graham Graham Livesey, Livesey, MRAIC MRAIC Winnipeg Winnipeg Lisa Lisa Landrum, Landrum, MAA, MAA, AIA, AIA, MRAIC MRAIC vancouver vancouver adele adele weder, weder, Hon. Hon. MRAIC MRAIC Sustainability Sustainability Advisor Advisor Anne Anne Lissett, Lissett, Architect Architect AIBC, AIBC, LEED LEED BD+C BD+C Vice Vice president president & & Senior Senior Publisher Publisher Steve Steve Wilson Wilson 416-441-2085 416-441-2085 x105 x105 sales sales MANAGER MANAGER Faria 416-441-2085 x106 x106 Faria Ahmed Ahmed 416-441-2085 Customer production Customer Service Service // production laura laura moffatt moffatt 416-441-2085 416-441-2085 x104 x104 Circulation Circulation circulation@canadianarchitect.com circulation@canadianarchitect.com President President of of iq iq business business media media inc. inc. Alex Alex Papanou Papanou Head Head Office Office 101 101 Duncan Duncan Mill Mill Road, Road, Suite Suite 302 302 Toronto, Toronto, ON ON M3B M3B 1Z3 1Z3 Telephone Telephone 416-441-2085 416-441-2085 E-mail E-mail info@canadianarchitect.com info@canadianarchitect.com Website Website www.canadianarchitect.com www.canadianarchitect.com Canadian Canadian Architect Architect is is published published monthly monthly by by iQ iQ Business Business Media Media Inc.. Inc.. The The editors editors have have made made every every reasonable reasonable effort effort to to provide provide accurate accurate and and authoritative authoritative information, information, but but they they assume assume no no liability liability for for the the accuracy accuracy or or completeness completeness of of the the text, text, or or its its fitness fitness for for any any particular particular purpose. purpose. Subscription Subscription Rates Rates Canada: Canada: $54.95 $54.95 plus plus applicable applicable taxes taxes for for one one year; year; $87.95 $87.95 plus plus applicable applicable taxes taxes for for two two years years (HST (HST –– #80456 #80456 2965 2965 RT0001). RT0001). Price Price per per single single copy: copy: $15.00. $15.00. USA: USA: $135.95 $135.95 USD USD for for one one year. year. International: International: $205.95 $205.95 USD USD per per year. year. Single Single copy copy for for USA: USA: $20.00 $20.00 USD; USD; International: International: $30.00 $30.00 USD. USD. Return Return undeliverable undeliverable Canadian Canadian addresses addresses to: to: Circulation Circulation Dept., Dept., Canadian Canadian Architect, Architect, 101 101 Duncan Duncan Mill Mill Road, Road, Suite Suite 302 302 Toronto, Toronto, ON ON M3B M3B 1Z3. 1Z3. Postmaster: Postmaster: please please forward forward forms forms 29B 29B and and 67B 67B to to 101 101 Duncan Duncan Mill Mill Road, Road, Suite Suite 302 302 Toronto, Toronto, ON ON M3B M3B 1Z3. 1Z3. Printed Printed in in Canada. Canada. All All rights rights reserved. reserved. The The contents contents of of this this publication publication may may not not be be re­ re­pproduced roduced either either in in part part or or in in full full without without the the consent consent of of the the copyright copyright owner. owner. From From time time to to time time we we make make our our subscription subscription list list available available to to select select companies companies and and organizations organizations whose whose product product or or service service may may interest interest you. you. IfIf you you do do not not wish wish your your contact contact information information to to be be made made available, available, please please contact contact us us via via one one of of the the following following methods: methods: Telephone Telephone 416-441-2085 416-441-2085 x104 x104 E-mail E-mail circulation@canadianarchitect.com circulation@canadianarchitect.com Mail Duncan Mill Mill Road, Road, Suite Suite 302, 302, Toronto, Toronto, ON ON M3B M3B 1Z3 1Z3 Mail Circulation, Circulation, 101 101 Duncan Member Member of of the the Canadian Canadian Business Business Press Press Member Member of of the the ALLIANCE ALLIANCE FOR FOR AuditED AuditED MEDIA MEDIA Publications Publications Mail Mail Agreement Agreement #43096012 #43096012 ISSN ISSN 1923-3353 1923-3353 (Online) (Online) ISSN ISSN 0008-2872 0008-2872 (Print) (Print)

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

08

AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE From left to right, jury members Joe Lobko of DTAH, Cindy Wilson of LWPAC/Intelligent City and Rami Bebawi of KANVA.

LEFT

DESIGNING FOR THE FUTURE The Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence jury met at a charged time: six days after a global climate strike, midway through the federal election, with ongoing political turmoil in the US and social unrest in Hong Kong. One criterion for our awards, given to design- and constructionphase projects, is the “demonstration of social and environmental

awareness.” This year, these precepts were especially resonant. How does architecture participate—consciously or unwittingly—in larger issues? Sustainability, the jurors were glad to see, was part of most of the entries. Many were pegged to LEED criteria, but others looked to more ambitious standards, such as Passive House. The ones that were deemed award-worthy took a comprehensive lens to environmental sustainability. For instance, the Honey Bee Research Centre in Guelph features a roof planted with pollinator gardens. A pathway that ramps up the sloping surface extends an existing ground-level trail, and takes visitors on a swooping journey similar to the f light paths of bees—an issue that the Centre aims to build awareness about. The ATTAbotics facility, a headquarters and manufacturing facility for a Calgary-based robotics company, takes an ambitious design-fordisassembly approach. This allows for ease of maintenance and minimizes material impact over the building’s lifecycle. Coincidentally, two thirds of the awarded projects—six out of the nine selected—propose to use mass timber for part of their structure. It’s perhaps an indication of the widespread interest that architects are showing in this family of materials, which, in theory, can contribute to a reduction in embodied energy. Mass timber is at the heart of two projects: IW09, a mixed-use building in Calgary, and the University of Toronto’s Academic Wood Tower. Both propose to include exposed mass timber structures. While IW09 is still in design development, the Academic Wood Tower is a detailed, fully engineered design that gives a glimpse into the dynamic possibilities of mass timber. (Incidentally, three of the five Awards of Excellence went to university buildings, a hopeful indication of how some of these institutions are continuing to invest in quality architecture.) The adaptive reuse of existing structures and the densification of cities are also of vital importance in reducing GHG emissions. The John Deutsch University Centre in Kingston is a sensitive addition to a heritage structure that renders it accessible, while creating new student spaces. The jury found its composition to be an exquisite union of old and new. In a similar vein, they selected a housing project, West Don Lands Block 8 in Toronto, as a new building that learned from its old surroundings. They admired its solid urban


CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

10

AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

planning, thoughtful relationship to the ground plane, and choice of materials and forms that reference the existing urban fabric. Reconciliation was another concern that was top of mind. For the jury, the design for the new Thunder Bay Art Gallery exemplified how meaningful dialogue with Indigenous peoples might inform compelling architecture. The form of the gallery and its relationship to the site is driven by an Ojibway myth, emerging from the waterfront site like the continent emerged on a turtle’s back in an ancient legend. Finally, two projects were selected that use architecture to transform theAM ad_shure_MXA910_Can Architect_0910.qxp_Layout 1 2019-10-02 10:34

infrastructure that is vital to thriving cities. The Bellechasse Bus Centre in Montreal takes what was planned to be a large, above-ground bus garage and sinks it underground. It’s topped with a park that provides amenity to the adjacent residential areas. The Clayton Water Reservoir in Surrey, BC, uses a cladding strategy that evokes the presence of water. This adds an environmental learning opportunity and sense of poetry to what would otherwise be a bland, utilitarian structure. While it did not rise to the design level of the other awarded proposals, a project for modularly constructed homeless shelters in Vancouver generPage ated much discussion. How can architects apply their expertise to pressing social and environmental issues? Given that issues like affordability and global heating are at a crisis point, how can we move more quickly to address them? To the jurors, many of the professional entries seemed timid in this regard—bound all too tightly by client and economic constraints. In contrast, the student entries to the awards offered frank, intriguing answers to tough questions. Dystopian narratives and bold designs tackled the accelerating climate catastrophe head-on, while comprehensive research and careful analyses delved into issues affecting global cities and dilemmas closer to home in Canada’s cities and rural areas. The majority of the student projects engaged directly with big issues: from rising sea levels, urban densification and slums, to the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Arctic sovereignty and Islamophobia. The jury was so impressed by the student entries that they selected five student projects for recognition, rather than the usual one or two. In order to fund the cash prizes that accompany the student awards, the jurors, as a group, opted to forgo their honorariums. The final component of the awards focuses on architectural photography. Three entries were selected, reflecting a diversity of approaches— as well as three very different places, from Santiago de Chile to Winnipeg. The photo awards program allows us to recognize an important facet of Canada’s architecture: how built works are captured and represented. If the student awards are about pure concept, and the professional awards deal in concepts that have been informed by reality, then the photos draw things full circle. How does architecture emerge from ideas, and in photos, return to the realm of ideas? In architecture, we deal daily with the slippery world between ephemeral ideas and bricks and mortar: our drawings, models, and contracts bridge between the two. The Canadian Architect Awards, it is hoped, remind us to keep one foot in both worlds.


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13

ATTABOTICS HEADQUARTERS

LEFT TO RIGHT

Ben Klumper (MRAIC), Dustin Couzens, John Ferguson, David Vera (MRAIC), Anthony Schmidt, Nicholas Tam (MRAIC), Lauren Fagan.

Co-founded in 2013 by Dustin Couzens and Ben Klumper, Modern Office considers the design process as an untamable beast that resides well beyond the periphery of the familiar; f lourishing in its dark shapelessness, its f leeting viscerality, and its sovereignty over any one proprietor. In this regard, by intentionally not providing a shiny manifesto, we’re not being anarchistic for anarchy’s sake. Rather, we’re simply being honest in our resignation towards transcribing that which doesn’t want to be transcribed into sterile rhetoric. It’s the act of taming the untamable that not only brought all of us

to this profession, but has also resulted in the formation of incredible collaborations with like-minded individuals, producing something much bigger than any one of us could achieve alone. Some of these collaborations have been recognized nationally and internationally, some haven’t. Our process is messy, abstract and non-linear; sometimes tears are shed and pencils are thrown. However, if at the end of the process we get that tingling sensation at the base of our spines, we know that we came as close as possible to honouring that initial creative spark. In essence, this is what drives us and brings us to work every day.

UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH HONEY BEE RESEARCH CENTRE Moriyama & Teshima Architects (MTA) is a team of architects, planners and designers collaborating with visionary clients to build inspiring and enduring spaces that transform communities and reinforce civic identity. We believe that context underlies the spirit of every project, and have delivered high-quality, sustainable and award-winning design services for over 60 years. Our extensive portfolio of national and international projects has received over 200 awards, including six Governor General’s Awards, and includes everything from museums and art galleries, post-secondary buildings, schools, and corporate and government headquarters, to recreational facilities, libraries, restoration and renovation projects, and urban/campus planning. MTA’s collaborative studio is made up of a combination of industry leaders and young designers working together to design and deliver exceptional projects. Our work expresses a deep respect for natural, urban and social conditions, where we explore the history, needs and aspirations of the individuals and institutions we serve, celebrating the creative relationship between culture and nature. Whether designing buildings that delight the human spirit, developing urban strategies that generate active healthy cities, or supporting clients’ objectives with sound problem-solving and business sense, MTA strives to maintain a sense of inspiration, welcoming and curiosity in our built environment.

LEFT TO RIGHT Nicolas Mayaux, Olivia Keung, Pooya Aledavood, Veronica Madonna, Jay Zhao, Melissa Poon, Diarmuid Nash (FRAIC). Not pictured: Luis Quezada, Rutuja Atre.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

WINNERS


CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

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WINNERS

ACADEMIC WOOD TOWER

LEFT TO RIGHT, BACK ROW

Patkau Architects—John Holden, Thomas Gaudin, Pete Wenger, Matthew Harty, Edward Kim, Mike Green, Greg Boothroyd

(MRAIC), John Patkau (FRAIC), Peter Suter, Federico Mussetti. LEFT TO RIGHT, FRONT ROW Michelle de Jong, Katie Hurworth, Marc Holland, Michael Thorpe, Roy Cloutier, Sebastian Elliott, Victoria Ng, David Shone (MRAIC), Nicole Sylvia, Katy Young, Patricia Patkau (FRAIC).

Patkau + MJMA are the architects in association for the Academic Wood Tower. They share a focus on social and community space, realizing them through engagement with process, material and emerging technologies. The two firms previously collaborated on the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport at the University of Toronto (2014). Patkau Architects is an architecture and design research studio founded in 1978 by John and Patricia Patkau. The firm’s approach to design is conditioned by a focus on the particular—finding potential in circumstance, be it environmental, material or cultural. These engagements extend through a wide variety of project types, ranging from art installations to residences, from landscape interventions to major urban buildings. Patkau Architects’ work has been recognized with numerous

publications, exhibitions and awards for excellence in design. A collection of recent design research, Material Operations, is now available. MJMA is an interdisciplinary architecture and design studio focused on designing high quality public spaces that form the civic anchors and social focus of communities. The firm’s 70-person integrated practice includes architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, interior design, digital practice, community engagement and environmental graphic design, all aimed at delivering holistic design solutions. MJMA’s projects are located internationally and across the country, and consistently receive recognition for innovation and design excellence. The studio’s core community-based work has evolved to establish further expertise in post-secondary academic and library realms.


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WINNERS

WEST DON LANDS BLOCK 8 STANDING, LEFT TO RIGHT

Adam Feldmann, Tiffany Chiang, Jessica Luk, Mary McIntyre, Rogelio Bayaton, Renata Sene, Sahil Dhawan, Sarvenaz Esmaeili, Helen Tran. SEATED, LEFT TO RIGHT Bharti Vital, Peter Clewes (FRAIC).

Established in 1999 and led by founding principal Peter Clewes, architectsAlliance (aA) creates innovative, design-driven residential, mixed use and academic buildings and public spaces. aA is particularly known for a sophisticated and urbane approach to high-density development and for its innovative reinterpretation of conventional building types. Working through a diverse range of projects, our staff of 70 architects, designers and technologists express a clear philosophy regarding the cultural, social and aesthetic role that architecture can play in the modern city. Collaboration is embedded into aA’s studio practice, allowing us to share our aesthetic and culture with firms from across North America and Europe, and to help enrich Canada’s built form heritage. The firm’s work has been recognized by Canadian Architect, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Urban Land Institute, and the Chicago Athenaeum and Centre for Architecture, Art, Design and Urban Studies.

COBE was founded in 2006 by architect Dan Stubbergaard. The office of 150 architects, landscape architects and urban planners is involved in projects throughout Europe and North America. At COBE, we share a heartfelt belief that architecture can make a difference in everyday life. We are not guided by a certain style, but by local context, public realm and the needs of project users. Our quest is to create surroundings that actively contribute to extraordinary everyday urban life; cities, buildings and landscapes that are made to outlast our generation. Based in Copenhagen, COBE has played a major role in the transformation of the Danish capital into a bustling, democratic city designed for living. Among the firm’s most distinctive projects are Nørreport Station— Copenhagen’s busiest station; The Silo in Copenhagen’s North Harbour district; Adidas Halftime—a conference center for Adidas at their headquarters in Germany; Ragnarock—Denmark’s museum for rock music in Roskilde; and the development of Paper Island in inner Copenhagen.

LEFT TO RIGHT Charlie Landefeld, Tonny Jensen, Dan Stubbergaard, Joseph Haberl, Elias Lindh, Thomas Krarup, Anders Gade Jørgensen, William Lambeth, Doug Smith, Jacob Lantow, Sidse Eskildsen, Kelly Skaggs, Francisco José Gómez Tirado.


CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

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WINNERS

JOHN DEUTSCH UNIVERSITY CENTRE REVITALIZATION HDR—Donald Chong, Dathe Wong, Susan Croswell, Justin Perdue, Paul Howard Harrison. BOTTOM ROW Jeff Salmon, Jeremy Van Dyke, Sebastian Wooff, Ellen Randall, Alicja Gajewski. TOP ROW

HDR + MJMA is a project team with a collaborative and shared design commitment toward tailored, lasting and spirited spaces for the student community at Queen’s. HDR is a global practice specializing in the full integration of architecture, urbanism, engineering, infrastructure and environmental services with a research-based design studio. Its Ontario-based practice is an-

chored by an atelier approach, dovetailing generational systems thinking along with thoughtfully crafted built work. HDR’s Canadian practice extends across the country, providing a depth and diversity of projects types and innovative solutions in education, science and technology, healthcare and wellness, as well as civic and institutional spaces. MJMA see page 14.

CLAYTON RESERVOIR

LEFT TO RIGHT Evelyne Bouchard, Heidi Nesbitt, Matthew Woodruff, Melanie Wilson.

Local Practice Architecture + Design was founded by Matthew Woodruff and Michel Labrie on a collective commitment to high performance design, intergenerational equity, and community capacitybuilding. The firm has grown to 15+ architects, strategists, artists, sustainability experts, cyclists, apiarists and relentless optimists. Based in Vancouver, BC, on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples, the firm focuses on sustainable building design and infrastructure in the public realm. Projects include affordable housing, wastewater treatment plants, research laboratories, schools, daycares, park buildings, and collaborative hubs and hybrids seeking new models for holistic sustainability. The firm is united in the goal of realizing projects that improve the health and resiliency of the region.

IW09 5468796 Architecture is a Winnipeg-based architecture studio established in 2007.

Emeil Alvarez, Apollinaire Au, Pablo Batista (MRAIC), Brandon Bergem, Ken Borton (MRAIC), Jordy Craddock, Donna Evans, Ben Greenwood, Johanna Hurme (FRAIC), Andriy Ivanytskyy, Jeff Kachkan (MRAIC), Stas Klaz, Lindsey Koepke, Kelsey McMahon (MRAIC), Colin Neufeld, Sasa Radulovic (FRAIC), Helia Saadat, Shannon Scott, Hasan Shurrab, Hugh Taylor, Matthew Trendota (MRAIC), Alan Vamos, Shannon Wiebe, Jenn Yablonowski. ALPHABETICALLY


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WINNERS

THUNDER BAY ART GALLERY WATERFRONT RELOCATION PROJECT

Patkau Architects—John Patkau (FRAIC), Patricia Patkau (FRAIC), David Shone (MRAIC), Katy Young, Roy Cloutier, Sebastian Elliott, Nicole Sylvia, Pete Wenger. Not pictured: Roberto Vinante, Heba Maleki. Brook McIlroy Architects—Calvin Brook (FRAIC), Ryan Gorrie (MRAIC), Sean Serino (MRAIC).

LEFT TO RIGHT

Patkau Architects see page 14. Brook McIlroy is an architecture, landscape architecture, planning and urban design firm based in Thunder Bay, Toronto and Winnipeg. A critical practice area is the Indigenous Design Studio, led by Indigenous designers on projects supporting Indigenous community needs. Our connection with Thunder Bay stems from leadership on the

transformation of the industrial waterfront. The implementation of this vision started with the Waterfront Master Plan and has continued with buildings, landscapes and art which have won twenty-one awards. Notable work includes the Spirit Garden, honouring Indigenous history and culture; the Water Garden Pavilion and Baggage Building, art and cultural hubs; and the Delta Hotel Thunder Bay, an asset for economic revitalization. The Thunder Bay Art Gallery is a cultural anchor within this overall vision.

BELLECHASSE TRANSPORT CENTER

Rashin Forghani, Marie-Élaine Globensky, Ryan Jackson, Julien Lauzon-Fullum, Hugo Lafrance, Jean-Francois Morneau, Maryse Ballard, Sylvie Painchaud, Camille Plourde-Lescelleur, Olivier Morin, Valentin Guirao. LEFT TO RIGHT, FRONT ROW Mohamed Nadji, Samuel Paulin-Langlois, Elisabeth Mathieu, Ricardo Serrano, Ramzi Bosha, Eric St-Pierre, Jean-Francois Gagnon, Mylène Carreau, James Sunderland, Alain Côté, Yanick Casault, Eric Dufour, Pierre Larouche.

LEFT TO RIGHT, BACK ROW

Founded in 1957, Lemay is a leading Canadian provider of integrated design services for the built environment. Its unique blend of creativity, transdisciplinary integration and its net-positive approach to sustainability bring client aspirations to life and creates value for users and communities around the world. Lemay brings together several disciplines to build living environments that are seamless and impactful: architecture, urban planning and design, interior design and landscape architecture, sustainability, engineering, branding and visual communication. The firm’s dedication to design excellence translates into the LemayLab, a research and innovation framework available to all Lemay projects and beyond. LemayLab uses applied design research and creativity to solve the most complex and diverse challenges, in projects of all types and scales—especially those whose resolution requires a high degree of creativity or a non-conventional approach. This results in meaningful, critically resonant designs that incorporate groundbreaking solutions, delivering exceptional living environments adapted to a wide range of urban and environmental challenges.  The firm holds over 350 awards and distinctions, including seven Canadian Architect Awards and three Governor General’s Medals.


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WINNERS

CODING A BIOPHILIC CORE

FROM MATTER TO PLACE

Cameron Parkin is an Adjunct Faculty member at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, an Adjunct Instructor at the University at Buffalo, and a Research Associate at Waterloo’s DATAlab. Cameron’s research focuses on the representation of complex field conditions through data driven, computationally generated drawings and models, with a specific interest in ecological systems in the urban environment. Cameron received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Waterloo, where his thesis won the AIA Henry Adams Medal.

A graduate of the M.Arch program at the Université Laval’s School of Architecture in 2019, Pierre-Olivier Demeule is currently completing a second Master’s in Science within the Living in Northern Quebec (LINQ )  research partnership. With the collaboration of the community of Salluit (Nunavik), his thesis focuses on so-called “informal” and autonomous ways of living on the tundra. The research seeks to stimulate reflection on construction methods that are empowering and create a link between the physical world and the cosmos, notably through the reliance on traditional local knowledge and local materials.

ULTIMA THULE

Brandon Eli John Bergem holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design from the University of Manitoba and a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Toronto. In 2019, he received the Kuwabara-Jackman Architecture Thesis Gold Medal. His project demonstrates his interests in climate change, narrative and regional mythologies. Brandon lives in Toronto and is working for 5467896. Additionally, he is the co-founder of oISO, an interdisciplinary research-based practice. 

BAHÁ’Í TEMPLE OF SOUTH AMERICA

LISTENING TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Josh Wallace holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design Studies from Dalhousie University and a Master of Architecture from Carleton University. He received the RAIC’s Student Medal for his thesis. Prior to his career in architecture, Josh pursued musical practices as a composer, performer and youth instructor. His thesis work focuses on acoustics and architecture’s ability to produce and facilitate novel modes of listening to and interacting with environmental phenomenon, and the cultural implications that these modes can foster. FREE / OPEN-SOURCE CITY

Samuel Gendron Fortier is a graduate from the Université de Montréal’s M.Arch program, where he won the AIA Henry Adams Medal, Lemay Prize, and Marosi Troy Scholarship. He is currently working at Guillaume Pelletier Architect in Montreal. Throughout his studies and work, Samuel focuses and plays with the relationship between architecture spaces, human interactions and machines’ omnipresence. After studying these issues on sites in Montreal and San Francisco, he is now researching their effects in Europe, while learning different programming languages.

doublespace photography is Amanda Large and Younes Bounhar. We make simple, bold and elegant architectural photography. Our creative vision is the product of our combined experience and diametrically opposed backgrounds: Amanda is trained as an architect and worked in the field for five years, while Younes is a former biologist-turnedlandscape-photographer. Our work has helped our clients garner several national and international awards and is regularly featured in architecture and design magazines. RAVINE, ONTARIO SCIENCE CENTRE / PENTHOUSE, 62 M

James Brittain read history of art at the University of Leeds, before going on to study photography at the London College of Printing. He has spent the past 18 years working on commissions in the field of architecture. He uses his commissioned work to support his own photographic practice, exploring ideas around human experience of the built environment. Brittain has been the principal photographer on books including a monograph on the work of McKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects (2017). His work has been exhibited at the Architectural Association Gallery and the Contact Photography Festival.


Sheila Kennedy

Regional LafargeHolcim Awards winner. Architect, USA.

“ Winning the LafargeHolcim Awards can make clients think differently about the project”

Design competitions boost projects, careers, and networking opportunities. Be part of the 6th International LafargeHolcim Awards for exemplary projects and visionary concepts in sustainable construction. Prize money totals USD 2 million. Independent expert juries evaluate submissions from architecture, engineering, urban planning, materials science, construction technology, and related fields using the “target issues” for sustainable construction of the LafargeHolcim Foundation. www.lafargeholcim-awards.org An initiative of LafargeHolcim, represented in Canada by


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AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

ATTABOTICS HEADQUARTERS

Calgary, Alberta Modern Office of Design + Architecture

Robotics company ATTAbotics had an unusual vision for its new headquarters. The client “referenced the spatial organization and complex circulation of ant colonies,” say the architects. These systems had inspired the company’s proprietary robotic storage and retrieval system. It was also how they wanted their manufacturing and office space to function. The site is part of Calgary’s airport district, so the architects began by examining Navigation Canada’s regulations for the location. To ensure the safety of aircraft, the building had to fit within an envelope that rises along a 7 percent slope to a height of 23 metres. This ordinance produced a wedge-like massing. Plazas carved into the slope connect the building to the exterior and frame views to the city and mountains. A ribbon of movement develops between the plazas and interior spaces, stitched together with appropriate programming. Building users can meander through, around and over the building. The building’s manufacturing section requires tall ceilings, clear spans and a rectilinear footprint to allow for future f lexibility. This facility is located on the lower two floors, which sink into the landscape. Canyon-like voids provide for light, access, parking and loading areas. The office spaces perch above this plinth-like base. A central atrium acts as a fulcrum for the plan and doubles as an informal, company-wide auditorium. This produces a complex sectional relationship between various elements of the program—similar to the organizational systems inherent in ant colonies. It also transforms the way that building users navigate around the building and socialize.

The construction looks to current developments in circular design. Instead of the cradle-to-landfill norm, it takes a cradle-to-cradle approach. The architects are pursuing a Design for Disassembly (Df D) model that allows for the reuse of building components. This aligns with the client’s desire for a f lexible environment. The building can quickly change, responding to needs for future growth or renewal as they arise. Rami Bebawi :: I really like the materiality with the veils and transparency. There’s a potential for the designers to play with the density of the mesh, which can start to inform the wayfinding of the building. Is it possible to have three dimensions of holes—from smaller for more private areas, to larger for more public areas? If there is a comment to be made, it’s the parking—maybe there was a way to work this into the landscape. Joe Lobko :: This is a powerful structure: the building is both vertically and horizontally shaped to its location adjacent an airport. An iconic building design has emerged from a thoughtful, incredibly creative analysis of context and program. The roofscape will be very special. Ant colonies indeed! Cindy Wilson :: I appreciate the architects’ future-thinking of the building disassembling into components, making the structure adaptable and flexible. The ant metaphor continues through the life cycle of the building.


AMENITY RESTAURANT OFFICE MANUFACTURING CONTEXTUAL CONSTRAINTS

CLIMATIC RESPONSE

CONTEXTUAL FRAMING

BUILDING IS LOCATED ADJACENT TO CALGARY AIRPORT RUNWAY

MASSING SLOPE TO MAXIMIZE ACCESS TO LIGHT / VIEW / SUN

CURATED VIEWS TO CITY CENTRE + MOUNTAINS

BUILDING HEIGHT RESTRICTED BY NAV CANADA

MASSING TAPERS IN PLAN TO REDUCE NORTHERN EXPOSURE

VIEWS AS TOOL TO ORGANIZE CIRCULATION / WAYFINDING

SOCIAL-SCAPE ROOF PLANE PROGRAMMED AS HABITABLE ‘SOCIAL-SCAPE’ E NCOURAGES NON-PRESCRIBED MOVEMENT WITHIN + AROUND THE BUILDING

The wedge-like form derives from airport district regulations. ABOVE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The facility combines manufacturing spaces below grade with offices above; the building’s entry passes through the R&D area; outdoor terraces cascade along the sloped roof; exterior and interior spaces are oriented towards views of downtown and the nearby mountains.

OPPOSITE

CLIENT ATTABOTICS INC. | AREA 11,150 M 2 | BUDGET $50 M | STATUS DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ANTICIPATED COMPLETION SPRING 2022 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 200KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 3.9M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

|

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CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

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AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

HONEY BEE RESEARCH CENTRE Ontario Agricultural College of the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario Moriyama & Teshima Architects

The new Honey Bee Research Centre is a place for research and education. The hive-like design takes its inspiration from bees, learning from one of nature’s greatest architects. A ground-level pathway rises up onto a rooftop garden, allowing visitors to loop around in a manner similar to a bee’s f light path. The pollinator-friendly landscape on the roof and around the centre includes working hives, native plantings and agricultural plots. Shallow pools serve as fountains for flying insects, and introduce opportunities for up-close viewing and learning. A tower serves as an interpretive centre and solar chimney. Its exhibits raise awareness of pollinator pathways—natural corridors that allow bees, butterf lies, moths and other insects to move through habitats. On ground level, the centre houses f lexible research and learning spaces. The facility welcomes children and adults alike. Windows allow visitors to see into the centre’s labs and honey processing facilities. Glazed walls with oversized doors connect the indoor and outdoor learning spaces. The interior is covered with 500 x 370-mm cells, whose size derives from the wood frames used in beekeeping. They serve for display, storage, seating and other functions. The climate emergency’s impact on honeybee health is a core design consideration. The mass timber structure is sourced from sustainably managed forests, reducing the greenhouse gas impact of the construction. All components of the superstructure—including the columns, roof and walls—are made of wood. Passive design techniques

include ground-source heating, natural ventilation, high-performance envelope and mechanical systems, and rain gardens. At a higher level, the centre’s program and design highlight the similarities between humans and honey bees. Honey bees are social and collaborative, they work and are productive, and their well-being is closely tied to the land—just like humans. Rami Bebawi :: As big as the building is, I find the architecture to be quite humble. It gives room to the rest. It’s quite surprising since it has a gigantic circular tower and a huge base, but it’s not overwhelming. I also greatly appreciate how the story of the bee is reinterpreted throughout the architecture, both as a didactic tool and as a unifying concept. Joe Lobko :: Exquisite, vibrant spaces and gardens—finally, a celebration of the honey bee in built form! A great marriage of landscape and building that becomes a magical extension of this part of the Guelph campus. The central space is going to be a beautiful, textured room. Cindy Wilson :: The angles and topography of the roof are inviting, making the building completely accessible. Programmatically, the exhibit space and landscape are so intertwined that the landscape becomes building. In addition to the connection between research and formal gardens, the discovery path feels like the flightpath of a bee, allowing education, discovery and imagination to co-exist.


SECTIONAL DIAGRAM

 1 NATURAL VENTILATION / FRESH AIR (OPERABLE WINDOWS)  2 SOLAR CHIMNEY  3 GEO-EXCHANGE FIELD + VRF HVAC SYSTEM  4 INTENSIVE GREEN ROOF  5 TIMBER STRUCTURE / FRAMING  6 HIGH PERFORMING ENVELOPE + LOW WINDOW-TO-WALL RATIO

4

2

5 6 1

3

OPPOSITE Pollinator gardens carpet the centre’s roof and surrounding landscape. ABOVE An on-site apiary is part of the centre’s research facilities; beekeeping frames inspired the use of wood cells for the ceiling, walls and seating.

CLIENT ONTARIO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH | STRUCTURAL MOSES STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL/AV/IT/SUSTAINABILITY INTEGRAL GROUP | CIVIL WALTERFEDY | LANDSCAPE FORREC LTD. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDIO | CODE LMDG BUILDLING CODE CONSULTANTS | ENVELOPE MORRISON HERSHFIELD | EXHIBITION/DISCOVERY LORD CULTURAL SERVICES | AREA 19,200 FT 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS SCHEMATIC DESIGN | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION APRIL 2020 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 76 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED THERMAL ENERGY DEMAND INTENSITY (TEDI) 45 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED GREEN HOUSE GAS EMISSIONS (GHGI) 4 KGCO 2 E/M 2 /YEAR

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AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

ACADEMIC WOOD TOWER University of Toronto, St. George Campus, Toronto, Ontario Patkau Architects + MJMA

In Toronto, academic institutions are one of the leaders in championing the use of mass timber for tall buildings. The University of Toronto is part of this vanguard. Its Academic Wood Tower, on the downtown campus, is a fifteen-storey classroom and office building. At 80 metres tall, it’s vying to be North America’s tallest timber building. It’s also a test-case for new approaches that anticipate upcoming changes to the Ontario Building Code. The structure of the Academic Wood Tower—beams, columns, decks, bracing, and notably its core—is constructed of glue-laminated mass timber. A significant portion of the timber is exposed, particularly on the fully glazed north façade. The structural system features dramatic super-braces that are tied to the core, providing lateral stability to the timber frame. The super-braces diagonally wrap the tower, while floor-height trusses negotiate shifts in the grid. The designers were able to show that a partially exposed mass timber structure introduces no more risk than conventional tower construction. The tower’s podium is the northern portion of the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport, also by the same team of architects. At the base of the building, the structural braces divide to reconcile the six-bay wood structure of the tower with the five-bay steel structure of the Goldring Centre below. Similarly, at the event space crowning the building, the braces fan out—opening the corners to emphasize panoramic views out to the city. When building with timber, care must be taken to protect the structural members from fire and moisture during construction. To address

this, the entire envelope of the Wood Tower is panelized for rapid construction and enclosure. Vertical joints are constructed as 100-mm reveals, while horizontal joints are hidden within a standard 50-mm open joint between board-like pieces of fibre-cement cladding. The Academic Wood Tower links to both the Goldring Centre and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. The connective spaces between the buildings include a shared lobby, feature stair and roof terrace. Rami Bebawi :: This project is an example of excellent mass timber design in its formal, technical aspects and in dealing with urban constraints. It sets a precedent that’s convincing and serious. Joe Lobko :: A beautiful structure which advances tall wood building design in Canada, skillfully stitched into a historic context undergoing substantial revitalization. There is masterful siting between the significant heritage building on Bloor Street and the Sport Centre to the south. A great new “City Room” is about to emerge at the top. Cindy Wilson :: While this project is notable for pushing the envelope in mass timber construction, it remains an elegant tower. It appears the integration of systems has co-evolved, rather than resulting from an additive process. The team of client, architect and engineer are equally ambitious.


FLOOR-TO-CEILING GLAZING AT NORTH

STACK JOINT BETWEEN GLAZED PANELS 

10

8

5

2 1 3 9 4 6 7

1 PERIMETER HEATER

 2 STACK JOINT  3 ENVELOPE PANEL ANCHOR  4 FIRESTOPPING  5 GLULAM COLUMN (BEYOND)

OPPOSITE The mass timber tower sits atop a portion of an existing athletics centre. ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT The mass timber structure is showcased on the fully glazed north façade; the wood braces fan out to allow for uninterrupted views from a top-floor event space.

 6 GLULAM DECK  7 GLULAM BEAM  8 TRIPLE-GLAZED CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM  9 SPANDREL AND FIRESTOPPING 10 MILLWORK BENCH INTEGRATED WITH HEATER

CLIENT UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO | ARCHITECT TEAM PATKAU ARCHITECTS—JOHN PATKAU (FRAIC), PATRICIA PATKAU (FRAIC), GREG BOOTHROYD (MRAIC), DAVID SHONE (MRAIC), ROY CLOUTIER, SEBASTIAN ELLIOTT, THOMAS GAUDIN, SHANE O’NEILL. MJMA—TED WATSON (FRAIC), ANDREW FILARSKI (MRAIC), ROBERT ALLEN (FRAIC), VIKTORS JAUNKALNS (FRAIC), TIMOTHY BELANGER, LELAND DADSON, AARON LETKI, JOHN PETERSON (FRAIC), CLAUDIA COZZITORTO (MRAIC), JOHNATHAN CHAN. STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL / A/V / LIGHTING SMITH + ANDERSEN | ENVELOPE RDH BUILDING SCIENCE INC. | SUSTAINABILITY SA FOOTPRINT | FIRE CHM FIRE CONSULTANTS LTD. | ACOUSTICS RWDI CONSULTING ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS | CODE DAVID HINE ENGINEERING INC. | COST A.W. HOOKER ASSOCIATES LTD. | AREA 11,800 M 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2022 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 131 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 0.53 M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

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AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

WEST DON LANDS BLOCK 8

Toronto, Ontario architectsAlliance and COBE Architects

Block 8 is a three-building development in Toronto’s 80-hectare West Don Lands. The brownfield site has a patchwork of neighbours: the brick warehouses of the Distillery District, the glass and steel of the Canary District, and the last vestiges of an industrial waterfront. The project also has a charged socio-economic context. Toronto faces a 33 percent population growth over the next 20 years, and though renters comprise 22 percent of households, only 10.9 percent of new residential construction is purpose-built rental. As a pilot project for the City, Block 8 will fast-track 770 units of rental housing. Thirty percent of these units will be affordable. Ten percent of all of the units are sized for families. Over 25 percent of all units are either fully accessible or barrier-free, allowing residents to age in place. Affordable and market units alike are designed to a high level of quality and distributed evenly through all three towers. Inspired by their surroundings, the buildings are composed in three tiers. A masonry podium reflects the industrial vernacular of the Distillery District’s single-storey tank houses. The middle layer uses deeply carved lintels and angular infill panels to pick up on the gridded façades of local warehouses. Scallop-patterned towers crown two of the blocks, echoing the ribbed forms of nearby grain silos. The site planning encourages pedestrian activity and interweaves public and private space. Parking, loading and services are buried below-grade, making room for a fine-grained fabric of streets, promenades and plazas. Private townhouse yards open onto intimate mews, lined with trees and paved with herringbone brick. The westernmost block is set back to frame a new public plaza on a streetcar loop. On the upper levels, generous setbacks allow for outdoor amenity spaces, connected by bridges between the three buildings.

The development targets LEED Gold, with energy saving strategies including a 50/50 window-to-wall ratio, high-performance glazing, R30 green roofs, and high-efficiency mechanical units. The team is discussing the inclusion of SolarWall systems to preheat air for corridor ventilation. There is also the possibility of a district energy system being implemented. Rami Bebawi :: I’m compelled by the curved windows, which have an industrial inspiration. The decision to have the bottom five storeys in brick gives it a scale that works. And given the present densification of Toronto, such considerations for scale are essential to enhance the street-scale experience. Joe Lobko :: This project reminds us of the basic rules of great urbanism: buildings that help define streets and public spaces, with a vibrant ground plane and appropriately scaled and shaped built form that artfully interprets its historic context, while accommodating a wide range of use and population. It works on so many levels. The approach to affordable housing for this privileged site is timely, ambitious and appropriate for provincial land such as this. Cindy Wilson :: As a pilot project for the City of Toronto, enormous care has been taken to create great urbanism, and the architects have done this expertly on many fronts. Although the sustainability of the project is current today, it should be pushed to future-proof the building for the benefit of the inhabitants. Connection to a district energy system should be implemented or other measures taken to contribute to the long-term viabilty of the rental units.


PUBLIC REALM ACTIVATION

1- TRAM LOOP PLAZA RETAIL

2- 8A & B MILL STREET TOWNHOMES

3- CHERRY STREET RETAIL

4- COOPERAGE STREET TOWNHOMES

5- 8C MILL STREET TOWNHOMES

BLOCK 8 SITE PLAN

OPPOSITE Materials and detailing pick up on existing neighbourhood buildings, tying this development to its surroundings on Toronto’s formerly industrial waterfront. ABOVE Building setbacks and urban design are calibrated to create a fine-grained, pedestrian-friendly fabric at street level.

6- 8  C MILL STREET / ROLLING MILLS RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCES

0

10M

CLIENT DREAM / KILMER GROUP / TRICON | STRUCTURAL THORNTON TOMASETTI | MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL M.V. SHORE ASSOCIATES (1993) INC. | CIVIL COLE ENGINEERING GROUP LTD. | LANDSCAPE CLAUDE CORMIER ET ASSOCIÉS INC. | SUSTAINABILITY / LEED RWDI INC. | AREA 59,119 M 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS UNDER CONSTRUCTION | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION JUNE 2022 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 150 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 1.336 M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

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AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

JOHN DEUTSCH UNIVERSITY CENTRE REVITALIZATION Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario HDR + MJMA

Sitting at the entrance to Queen’s University, the John Deutsch University Centre is a well-loved student hub. It houses student clubs, a pub, meeting rooms, and a 100-room residence. At its heart are Wallace Hall and the ceilidh—large assembly spaces for concerts, performances, debates and exhibitions. But the building—built in 1949 and expanded in the mid-1970s— doesn’t have a single accessible entrance. A solution was needed to open the centre to all. The new addition pulls visitors up and into the historic building, providing accessible access to each floor. It also acts as an extension of the student centre. A secondary circulation route doubles as tiered seating, creating an informal auditorium and study area. A student-run café occupies most of the addition’s second floor. A community kitchen on the upper level is a new social hub, serving the residents upstairs as well as the larger student body. A restaurant and student-run retail space tuck under the tiered space, facing the street. From the outside, the new addition features monumental fins, a nod to the Collegiate Gothic of surrounding university buildings. The fins also deflect southern and western light. This passively regulates heat gain, allowing the addition to use oversized fans and displacement cooling—an efficient alternative to a standard system. Furthering its sustainability, the architects are proposing to construct a portion of the building in mass timber, including a cross-laminated timber roof. Renovating the existing John Deutsch University Centre is also part of the mandate. A new skylight opens up a concrete-block addition to the original building and provides open, flexible office space for the student government. The ceilidh is revitalized. Extensive stakeholder consultation contributed to the improved layout.

The exterior picks up on the limestone found elsewhere on campus, but reinterprets it using standard, residential-scale units. This strategy aims to mediate between the campus and the adjacent neighbourhood. Careful attention has been paid to the resolution of the building’s massing at the scale of a single masonry unit. A particularly complex transition between planes is resolved through a set of rotated reverse corbels. Elsewhere, widened, raked joints create textural contrast to the CLT fins. For the landscape, the university’s traditional tartan is re-imagined as a grid of stone and plant material. Rami Bebawi :: Bravo—I find this very skillful and elegant. It’s so intimidating to work next to a heritage building. It doesn’t contrast or mimic the historic building, but keeps its own identity. Joe Lobko :: This is an intelligent and effective addition in the heart of an established university campus. It creates a beautiful and convincing student gathering place while strongly marking its corner site and providing a welcoming invitation to this part of the campus. It knits old and new, but allows each to be of its time. Cindy Wilson :: The complexity of the project is executed very skillfully. The historic façade is re-interpreted in the new, appearing more porous and light while maintaining presence. The large glass façade allows for an important visual connection both through the new building and to its urban environment. Additionally, the visual connection complementing the setback of the old building visually reinforces the idea of an urban porch.


SECTION

0

5M

OPPOSITE The addition provides new study and student-run retail spaces, while improving access to the existing student centre. ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT Steps double as tiered seating, creating an informal auditorium; careful detailing gives texture to the façade, clad in standard brick.

CLIENT QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY | ARCHITECT TEAM HDR—SUSAN CROSWELL, DONALD CHONG, DATHE WONG, JUSTIN PERDUE, PAUL HOWARD HARRISON, JEFF SALMON, JEREMY VAN DYKE, SEBASTIAN WOOFF. MJMA—TED WATSON, ROBERT ALLEN, ANDREW FILARSKI, VIKTORS JAUNKALNS, TIMOTHY BELANGER, CHRIS BURBIDGE, LELAND DADSON, MATEUSZ NOWACKI, KYUNG SUN HUR, CALEB TSUI, JOHN PETERSON, AMANDA CHONG | STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL SMITH + ANDERSEN | SUSTAINABILITY FOOTPRINT | LANDSCAPE NAK DESIGN STRATEGIES | AREA 8,400 M 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2023 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 200 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 0.53 M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

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AWARD OF MERIT

CLAYTON RESERVOIR Clayton Heights, Surrey, British Columbia Local Practice Architecture + Design Ltd.

The Clayton Reservoir is one component in a series of climate resilience upgrades being made to Metro Vancouver’s water infrastructure. Local reservoirs play an important role in managing the distribution of water, particularly in the face of increasingly warm and dry summers, and a supply dependant on winter rainfall. Rapid population growth in the former agricultural area of Clayton Heights has put additional pressure on water capacity. Although new reservoirs are a part of the solution, reducing water consumption is also critical. This project set an aspirational goal of citizen engagement, aiming to create stewards for water conservation. The design expresses the reservoir’s purpose through undulating curves that reference the water held within. The patterns allude to the mountain creeks from which the water comes, and the ocean to which it ultimately f lows. The shadows on the façade shift depending on time of day and weather, which influences the mood of the project in a way that is reminscent of a lake’s ever-changing surface. The building has already been sparking conversations amongst neighbours, construction workers and visitors about the role water plays in all our lives. Reducing the apparent scale of this massive piece of infrastructure was also important to residential neighbours and to the City of Surrey’s Parks staff. The design uses a strong horizontal datum to break down the mass. At twilight and on cloudy days, the luminescent white upper half of the project blends with the sky. In contrast, the dark base grounds the project, connecting it to the surrounding landscape. Rounded corners further soften the structure’s appearance.

Water reservoirs have rigorous health, post-disaster and resiliency requirements, which entail massive structural walls. The design team developed a precast concrete cladding system that hangs from these walls, using an intricate system of embedded stainless steel brackets. Black steel panels allow access to underground chambers and to the reservoir roof. The industrial palette allows the reservoir to be durable, resilient and vandal-resistant. Clayton Reservoir transforms a standard typology into infrastructure that remains robust and reliable, but also has the potential to inspire. Rami Bebawi :: The architects were asked to build a box that can’t ever leak, and they gave it quality. It reminds me of Herzog & de Meuron’s copperleafed power station: who was going to celebrate that building type? And yet they transformed it into something. The bottom makes me think about 70s brutalism, then there’s the soft poetry that comes out of the reflection. Joe Lobko :: How we design infrastructure matters, particularly when its physical presence is significant. This project provides a good example of the benefit of architectural thinking in the design of our major infrastructure projects. It’s a skillfully crafted design that responds superbly to its considerable scale and context. Cindy Wilson :: I don’t imagine the RFP for this infrastructure project listed “poetry” as a requirement, yet in the delicate hands of this team, there is a demonstration that even infrastructure projects are capable of more than functionality.


WALL SECTIONS

4

1

5

CLADDING DETAIL

The water reservoir’s massive walls are clad with precast concrete panels, hung from embedded stainless steel brackets. ABOVE The reservoir, which is nearly complete, has a sculptural presence that visually alludes to lakes and oceans.

OPPOSITE

 1 RESERVOIR ACCESS ROOM  2 WATER RESERVOIR CELL 1  3 WATER RESERVOIR CELL 2  4 ROOFTOP ACCESS  5 OUTLET CHAMBER  6 INLET CHAMBER

2

3 6

0

CLIENT METRO VANCOUVER | STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL/PROCESS MECHANICAL ASSOCIATED ENGINEERING | LANDSCAPE SPACE2PLACE | CONTRACTOR WESTPRO / POMERLEAU | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS UNDER CONSTRUCTION | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION DECEMBER 2019

5M

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AWARD OF MERIT

IW09

Inglewood, Calgary, Alberta 5468796

Located just south of Calgary’s downtown business district, Inglewood is the city’s oldest neighbourhood. Lately, a younger generation is rediscovering the area, and its historic storefronts are being replaced by midrise structures. IW09 is a mixed-use building that seeks the best of new and old: it’s an unapologetically contemporary form that’s shaped by its historic context. Three floors of commercial and retail space build up from the sidewalk, referencing the existing urban fabric. The upper residential floors twist to make room for the century-old Canadian Bank of Commerce building, while stepping back from 9th Avenue SE. The form rises up towards 12th Avenue SE, meeting requirements for a taller scale at the gateway intersection. The tapering form minimizes shadow impact, and gives an appropriately shallower f loorplate to the residential units. A triangular

ABOVE The hybrid structure includes a cast-in-place commercial podium topped with cross-laminated timber residential floors. The building is wrapped in a wood diagrid. OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT The diagrid is visible from the lobby; the wood projects out to form an entrance canopy.

forecourt provides access to both the new building and renovated bank. More entrances are carved out facing the corner and other streets, adding to the sculpted quality of the form. Community-oriented spaces include rooftop terraces atop both buildings, and a third terrace that overlooks a lawn bowling green. The design also activates a public lane behind the site. The building’s lower f loors and underground levels are constructed with cast-in-place concrete. Above, the residential f loors are constructed in cross-laminated timber. The entirety of the prismatic form is wrapped in a structural wood diagrid, which ties the two systems together and reduces the need for shear walls. The mass timber grid aims to lessen the development’s carbon footprint, and is a contemporary take on the heavy timber buildings that were once numerous in the neighbourhood.


PUBLIC ENTRY

SHEAR FACING

MASSING - PEDESTRIAN IMPACT

SETBACK

PUBLIC AMENITIES COMMERCIAL CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

FIRST FORM

RESIDENTIAL CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER

SECTION

Rami Bebawi :: There’s an interesting relation to the heritage building, with the building angled in deference, rather than stepped back like a wedding cake. If they can get this approved, it could become a positive catalyst for the city in terms of pertinence and sensitivity to an existing urban fabric. Joe Lobko :: I admire the ambition for the wood structure—a diagrid that gives the building apparent stability, as well as iconic character. The wood skeleton is lovely and wonderfully rendered, although I’m not sure it convincingly supports the glass. Cindy Wilson :: Although still conceptual, this project boldly integrates the materiality of mass timber, its structural capabilities, and its aesthetic qualities to create urban form. It expands notions of how mass timber might be used in the future.

0

6M

CLIENT RNDSQR | STRUCTURAL RJC ENGINEERS | URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN CIVICWORKS | LANDSCAPE AND URBAN DESIGN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN | AREA 11,445 M 2 | BUDGET WITHHELD | STATUS DESIGN DEVELOPMENT | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION 2022

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AWARD OF MERIT

THUNDER BAY ART GALLERY WATERFRONT RELOCATION PROJECT Thunder Bay, Ontario Patkau Architects + Brook McIlroy Architects in joint venture

Until the 1970s, Thunder Bay’s port was a key node between the Prairie railways and Great Lakes freight routes across Canada. A former shipyard, Prince Arthur’s Landing is the new home for an art gallery. The site, say the architects, is “beautiful but wounded.” It looks across the water at the majestic Sleeping Giant geological formation, identified in an Ojibway legend as the body of the trickster Nanabijou. But the shoreline suffers from soil contamination and is estranged from the daily lives of Thunder Bay’s residents. Can a gallery—equal parts museum, community centre and social hub—begin to heal these wounds? By mandate, the Thunder Bay Art Gallery maintains a particular focus on contemporary artwork by Canadian Aboriginal and Northwestern Ontario artists. So before embarking on schematic design, the architects organized a consultation workshop with stakeholders from local Indigenous communities, including Elders and artists. “The Gallery is a ‘Story House,’” said one workshop participant. “This is what art does: its power is to tell stories.” One story in particular came to the foreground: a sacred Ojibway story in which the Earth is reborn after a flood, upon the back of a turtle’s shell. The Turtle

Narrative, as interpreted by Ryan Gorrie, the team’s Indigenous Design Advisor, emphasizes dualities: land and water, body and spirit. In Gorrie’s recounting, the Turtle pulls from water into the land, leaving the Gallery in his wake. The Turtle’s passage represents time, and the creation of culture through the telling of stories. “Long after turtle became Turtle Island and Nanabijou laid down for the last time, the spirits of both are very much alive,” writes Gorrie. “The emergence of the Turtle from the water to form the gallery creates a powerful narrative and connection to culture […] The gallery resides on the shore, left by Turtle to house great collections and to continue telling stories of culture, tradition and thought. The form of the gallery is organic in nature, part building, part animal, and part landform.” The revitalized lakefont is the focus of the building. Its main hall— large enough for public events and functions—opens onto panoramic views of Lake Superior and Nanabijou. Visitors climb into the space from the west-facing entrance, through a tree-planted berm that conceals the building’s bulk from view. Below the main hall, a sheltered terrace overlooks the shoreline, connecting to a network of waterfront trails.


The art gallery curves around the revitalized lakefront. On the upper floor, a generously sized hall accommodates large gatherings; the entrance plaza is carved from a landscaped berm; the building embodies the mythic Turtle’s journey. OPPOSITE

ABOVE, TOP TO BOTTOM

Rami Bebawi :: The poetics charm us, I love the story. There is still some fine-tuning that seems to be needed in reasserting the parti through the landscape plan, particularly at the waterfront. For the interior, how is the shell expressed on the inside? Joe Lobko :: The building is like a beautiful whale that has beached and given up its soul for us all to explore. Thunder Bay is close to my heart. I was born there. I sense that the city has become a very important “telltale” now in helping us better understand our Canadian psyche. It is a city that is challenged in many ways, but it also has much to celebrate, and I am so pleased to see a great work of architecture emerge along its shoreline. Cindy Wilson :: The interpretation of an Indigenous narrative to create form is powerful. The building curves and hovers over its waterfront site protectively, making it feel as if it is a reconciliation to its wounded landscape. Rather than eliminating natural light in the gallery spaces, finding solutions to mitigate daylight would add significantly to the enjoyment of the building and underscore the power of its art to tell stories.

CLIENT CLIENT THUNDER BAY ART GALLERY | STRUCTURAL BLACKWELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS | MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL SECURITY / A/V SMITH + ANDERSEN | LIGHTING AES ENGINEERING | LANDSCAPE JANET ROSENBERG & STUDIO | CIVIL HATCH CORPORATION | INDIGENOUS DESIGN ADVISOR RYAN GORRIE/BMI | CODE JENSEN HUGHES CONSULTING | LEED/ENERGY/ACOUSTICS RWDI | BUILDING ENVELOPE WSP | WAYFINDING ENTRO | COST TURNER & TOWNSEND | COMMISSIONING CFMS | MUSEUM CONSULTANT LORD CULTURAL RESOURCES | GEOTHECHNICAL EXP | PROJECT MANAGER COLLIERS PROJECT LEADERS | AREA 3,480 M2 | BUDGET $30 M | STATUS BUILDING PERMIT | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION FALL 2022 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 531 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 0.147 M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

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AWARD OF MERIT

BELLECHASSE TRANSPORT CENTER Montreal, Quebec Lemay

When the Société de transport de Montréal (STM) set out to build a new parking garage, it had a bare-bones design in mind. The 87,000-square-metre building, housing 250 hybrid buses and 600 occupants, was to be a 20-metre-high fortress, occupying two city blocks. The architects instead proposed to sink the facility down into the site, making it the first completely underground bus depot in North America. Skylights allow natural light to enter the maintenance and parking areas, while the majority of the roof becomes a system of parks and scenic paths that gives back to the neighbourhood. The facility becomes an amenity for the adjacent residential area and extends the Réseau-Vert trail system south of the site. Going underground greatly reduces both the visual impact and noise of the facility. A utilitarian building is transformed into a public space for the community. Atop the park, a circular figure holds administrative offices and a courtyard garden for STM workers. The office’s geometry reflects the shape of the ramps that bring buses around the site and down into the garage. As the most visible part of the facility, the offices have a similar scale to former industrial facilities in the area. The facility’s four below-grade storeys include a car park, repair and maintenance areas, bus parking, and a level for mechanical equipment. The two-storey above-ground structure houses administrative offices, fire prevention training rooms, and areas for drivers and maintenance crews. The structure is encircled by white fritted glass and metal fins, positioned to mitigate solar gain. The offices are topped with a CLT roof.

Rami Bebawi :: It’s solving the spatial needs of dealing with buses and the administrative offices. And it’s trying to heal an urban wound in the city and linking it by becoming an above-ground park. Those two notions are noble and it tends to do it with elegance. Can the development of the landscape be pushed forward, beyond planes and stairs, so that it becomes more inviting for occupation? Joe Lobko :: This is a remarkable transformation of a building type, taking a massive parking garage with all its negative impacts and turning it into a landscape and public space feature. It is an ambitious city-building effort that cleverly and effectively synthesizes a challenging program and context, creating a great new landmark for this community. Cindy Wilson :: This is an interesting reinterpretation of a transportation center within a dense urban environment. By burying the electric buses underground, the park can exist: a green transportation network creating a green public space. An investigation into the energy supply and heat recovery could further support the existing neighbourhood’s journey towards a greener future.


EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

SITE PLAN

CLT

ROOF STRUCTURE

-

-

-

-

-

DN

DN

METAL FINS

ST DOMINIQUE RUE ST DOMINIQUE

DE GASPÉ

AVENUE DE GASPÉ

WHITE FRITTED GLASS

-

DN

TUBE PRIVACY SCREEN

WHITE TERRAZZO FLOOR

BRONZE GLASS RUE DE BELLECHASSE BELLECHASSE

0

00

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

SECTION

OPPOSITE The bus storage and maintenance facility is sunk underground, allowing a park to occupy the large site. A circular pavilion houses offices for the transport agency.

CLIENT SOCIÉTÉ DES TRANSPORTS DE MONTRÉAL (STM) | DESIGN TEAM JEAN-FRANCOIS GAGNON; ARCHITECTURE: RAMZI BOSHA, VALENTIN GUIRAO, RICARDO SERRANO, SAMUEL PAULIN-LANGLOIS; LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE: MYLÈNE CARREAU, CAMILLE PLOURDE-LESCELLEUR, OLIVIER MORIN ALICE MARIA CAVALCANTE LIMA. | PROJECT MANAGEMENT TEAM PIERRE LAROUCHE, ERIC DUFOUR, YANICK CASAULT. | PRODUCTION TEAM HUGO LAFRANCE, JEAN-FRANCOIS MORNEAU, JAMES SUNDERLAND, CLAUDE JEAN, MARYSE BALLARD, ERIC ST-PIERRE, ALAIN CÔTÉ, QUINCY BACCANALE, JENNIFER NOËL, RASHIN FORGHANI, JEAN DESLAURIERS, ELISABETH MATHIEU, NADINE CHARTOUNI, MARIE-ÉLAINE GLOBENSKY, KEVIN WANG, ELISABETH FORTIN, FRANÇOIS DUBOIS, RYAN JACKSON, JULIE PETTIGREW, JULIEN LAUZON-FULLUM, ANNE-MARIE BROCHU, SYLVIE PAINCHAUD, LOUISE RANGER. | STRUCTURAL SNC-LAVALIN / ELEMA / INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING DIVISION STM | MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL BOUTHILLETTE PARIZEAU | CIVIL SNC-LAVALIN | INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TETRATECH | AREA 87,000 M 2 | BUDGET $225 M | STATUS UNDER CONSTRUCTION | ANTICIPATED COMPLETION SPRING 2022 PROJECTED ENERGY USE INTENSITY (EUI) 300 KWH/M 2 /YEAR PROJECTED WATER USE INTENSITY (WUI) 0.276 M 3 /M 2 /YEAR

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STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

CODING A BIOPHILIC CORE: DIGITAL DESIGN TOOLS FOR TORONTO’S AVIAN HABITAT NETWORKS Cameron Parkin, University of Waterloo Advisor: Maya Przybylski

Toronto’s downtown is rapidly densifying. One of the results is that residents have reduced access to biodiverse green spaces, which foster mental health and environmental responsibility. This project aims to move beyond ornamental lawns, exploring a dynamic strategy to creating complex urban habitats for flora and fauna. The work explores computational methods of modelling networks and habitats that are borrowed from landscape ecology, graph theory, and parametric architecture. It involves simulating the two-dimensional and three-dimensional movement of birds through the city, and using this information to locate and inform a variety of interventions. The work is divided into three parts, with each part exploring a progressively smaller piece of urban fabric. The first part maps avian habitat networks in Toronto’s downtown and central waterfront. Using layered GIS data and aerial imagery, it creates a “resistance map” showing

where birds can most easily travel. High-resistence areas such as highways and tall buildings are lighter in colour, while areas that accommodate birds such as tree canopies and natural ground covers are darker. Simulated birds are deployed into the map at various point to reveal key movement corridors and significant barriers in the urban matrix. This allows a series of intervention types to be located within the network. The second part explores how these interventions would affect bird movement in the three-dimensional fabric of CityPlace and Fort York. Guided by the initial model, habitat is added with green roofs and places for nesting and perching, and travel corridors are enhanced with street trees, shrubs, and bird-friendly glass frit. The resulting interventions are tested in a 3D model. A evolutionary algorithm allows hundreds of intervention combinations to be tried, to determine which are the most effective in generating connectivity through the area.


The final part of the study composes an artificial habitat that attracts local bird species and acts as a biophilic amenity for residents in CityPlace’s Canoe Landing Park. The habitat is designed by analyzing, deconstructing, and replicating elements from natural areas such as forests, marshes and woodlands areas, then reassembling them using parametric modelling. The resulting assemblies are built on a scaffold of laminated timber ribs, and have specific attributes, such as nesting boxes and planters, that mimic key elements of natural habitats. OPPOSITE Two- and three-dimensional mapping is used to analyze the movement of birds through the city, and to locate interventions to facililtate their passage. ABOVE Artifical habitats include nesting boxes and planters for different types of vegetation, mounted on a timber scaffold.

Rami Bebawi :: This goes beyond analyzing the problem and starts thinking of solutions. Joe Lobko :: An imaginative exploration and analysis of the evolving life of birds in our densifying cities, proposing strategies for more effective understanding of behaviours and impacts while offering creative suggestions for the evolution of bird-friendly habitat. Cindy Wilson :: This thesis takes a rigorous approach to a pertinent aspect of sustainability that is part of the health of urban enviroments. As cities continue to grow, how can we mutually benefit and exist with nature?

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STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

THE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TO ULTIMA THULE Brandon Eli John Bergem, University of Toronto Thesis Advisor: John Shnier

The Museum of Natural History to Ultima Thule engages the histories of two Arctic islands. One is an archaic fantasy; the other exists in reality, but is challenged by environmental change. For centuries, the northernmost regions of the world were mysterious. The supposed discovery of a remote island called “Thule” led to rampant speculation about the north. The island would be mythologized as “Ultima Thule” (furthest Thule) by poets, cartographers, and early explorers. It came to symbolize the edge of the unknown world. Today, the actual Arctic Archipelago of Svalbard hosts the world’s most northern permanent settlement. The islands were discovered in 1596, and featured in a revised edition of Gerardus Mercator’s arctic projection map. Svalbard is a peculiar island, as the most remote location in the world.

Claims of sovereignty are disputed. Century-old detritus—remnants from the age-of-exploration and early exploitation—have become cultural monuments. The landscape is nearly barren of vegetation, but carries fossilized imprints of grand primordial ferns. Scientific instruments littering the mountains attempt to register the changing climate, while Russian and Norwegian coal mines continue their work of extraction. Highly documented and surveyed, Svalbard has eliminated the notion of Thule as an off-the-map marker of the unknown. At this same moment of cartographic clarity, the archipelago is being consumed by climate change. Mountains are crumbling from rain-induced landslides, glaciers are retreating from view, and the descending permafrost is destabilizing the ground. Like the mythical Thule, Svalbard’s future is uncertain.


This thesis posits the disappearance of the islands as an inevitability. It uses drawing as a means to explore, re-imagine and re-constitute the realities, legends, devastation and plausible futures of the island. The drawings depict the familiar, authoritative context of a natural history museum. In the fictitious Museum of Natural History to Ultima Thule, the imagined future is represented as the past. The chronicles of Svalbard are told through ten theatrical mise-en-scènes, each presenting part of the museum. Dioramas show taxidermied animals deformed by toxins, the luxurious Hotel at the End of the World being consumed by rising sea levels, and an army of drones attempting to shore up the island’s crumbling rock faces, pebble by pebble. The museum itself is shown as being in a state of incomplete assembly, suggesting that catastrophe has already struck. Visible scaffolding supports landscape facsimiles and partially installed backdrops, spilled paint and wet floors hint at melting glaciers, boxed-up taxidermy renders the scenes slightly uncanny. The Museum of Natural History to Ultima Thule explores drawing and architecture as mediums for storytelling. It reflects on Svalbard’s real complexities as the stuff of future mythology.

OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT A workshop where exhibitions are constructed is a museum-within-a-museum, consolidating key imagery from the project in a single scene; in the island’s Hotel at the End of the World, guests move up as rising sea levels claim the lower floors; drones attempt to rebuild the island’s crumbling coastline one pebble at a time; a marble palace reinforcing Norway’s sovereignty collapses during construction, creating a living ruin.

Rami Bebawi :: These images are so beautiful. They have the capacity to embody both critical statements and nostalgic historical compositions. Joe Lobko :: I could linger over these incredible drawings and the tales they evoke for hours. This is a magical dissertation on place and time. Cindy Wilson :: If myth is the past and fantasy the future, this project makes me ponder how our fantasies become myth.

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STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE POLAR SPECTROGRAMS

HUMAN VOICE HUMMING (SUNG BY AUTHOR OVER “SUIREN” BY DEEP LISTENING BAND)

IONE (COMPOSED BY DEEP LISTENING BAND IN THE DAN HARPOLE CISTERN)

GUITAR ELEMENTS (AUTHOR’S COMPOSITION)

WALKING ON THIN ICE (FIELD RECORDING BY ANDERS ÖSTBERG)

CANYON WREN BIRD CALL (CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY)

YOU ARE LOVED (COMPOSED BY FOUR TET)

BEARDED SEAL (CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY)

BOAT THROUGH ICE (FIELD RECORDING BY CEDRIC PEYRONNET)

GLACIER CALVINGS AND FRACTURES (FIELD RECORDING BY H. LENTFER, MARGERIE GLACIER, GLACIER BAY, ALASKA)

WIND HOWLING (ANDREE81’S

METAL BOWLS IN THE RAIN (FIELD RECORDING BY AUTHOR)

WIND OVER THE SURFACE OF THE ROSS ICE SHELF (SEISMIC SENSOR FIELD RECORDING BY JULIEN CHAPUT, ANTARCTICA)

YOUTUBE CHANNEL)

LISTENING TO CLIMATE CHANGE: INTEGRATING AWARENESS & ACCEPTANCE THROUGH A MORETHAN-HUMAN MUSIC Josh Wallace, Carleton University Advisor: Catherine Bonier

Climate change is often seen as an abstract phenomenon that occasionally manifests in fragments of local weather. But could it also become a cultural object? How could the medium of sound allow climate change to be woven into human imagination and memory? This thesis explores these questions by blurring the lines between human-made music and environmentally produced sound. The research phase included recording the sounds produced by the shifting Athabasca Glacier, and visually cataloguing these recordings alongside human music. Human-produced music is often tonal and rhythmic, with consistent boundaries and divisions. Environmentally produced sound is often atonal and arhythmic, with an enormous range and granularity of frequencies and frequency relationships. The author then turned to designing a series of environmentally activat-

ed instruments to allow participants to interface with the climate. A Glacier Accordion, anchored to the shifting ground of the Athabasca Glacier, is “played” by the movement of wind through a series of membranes. The instrument is operated both by humans, who can tune the membranes by adjusting cranks and pulley, and by the glacier, whose movement changes the instrument’s geometry. In this new method of music-making, the non-human climate is as much an active participant as the human. The instruments aim to create a visceral knowledge of climate realities. Players engaging these new devices and landscapes must listen and adapt, letting go of accepted musical norms to incorporate the climate’s sonic language into their musical sensibilities. It is anticipated that this “letting go” may aid in the necessary philosophical shift towards adapting to a new climate paradigm.


v = 2.14m/d

PERSPECTIVAL SECTION

v = 2.28m/d

R

R

v = 2.35m/d

v = 2.53m/d

Q

+1800

Q

-350

-350

+1800

3200

+900

P Pulley system with steel cables @ 2.5mm

+7350

-675

Allow your ears to guide your movements and follow them curiously. Would you have come here without your ears? Where have you gone?

O Elastic sound-reflective textile membrane

N

Listen to the change in wind through the framework of the instrument. Now listen to the change in ice flow in the same manner. What patterns and languages present themselves?

M

L

Round aluminum pipe @ 120mm

K

H

l = Hz

I

F

l = Hz

J

6800

l = Hz

Expand your listening to the horizon of the soundscape. Respond locally by moving, or singing, or tuning the instrument.

G

E

D

Turn crank Turn the cranks in response to a change in wind or ice velocity. Can your turning align with these phenomena?

Suspended rope bridge

-675

Listen to the niche of absent frequencies between those present. What relationships do you notice while listening from this bandwidth? Inhabit this space.

v = 2.4m/d

+1832 v = 2.57m/d

Ice screw

v = 2.11m/d +900

Tune the instrument to compliment the surrounding soundscape. What do you notice in your inquiry? Is the soundscape, in turn, “tuning” you?

v = 2.61m/d

v = 1.75m/d v = 1.79m/d

v = 2.54m/d

Rami Bebawi :: This project is amazing in telling us to remember the melting glaciers through sound. It is valuable that a more sensorial approach to space is created to transmit an experience of memory. Joe Lobko :: This project is about the engagement of senses, being in the moment, the awareness of place and most importantly giving voice to climate change. The imagery is seductive. Can’t wait to hear it. Cindy Wilson :: The sound recording and accompanying graphic representations are a connection to climate change I have never considered before. It could be an interesting way of connecting numerical data to our senses.

OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT Field research for the project included recording the sounds of a glacier; polar spectrograms show the differences between human-produced music and sounds from the natural world. ABOVE Anchored into the Athabasca Glacier, the Glacier Accordion yields sound from the wind and shifting ground plane, as well as from human tuning using turn-cranks.

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STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE SECTION

THE SOLID ROOF OF THESE GIGANTIC WALLS SERVES AS A SAFE PLACE FOR MECHANICAL DEVICES

ROBOTS STORE AND MANAGE BOTH THE PRODUCED GOODS AND THE MATERIALS NEEDED TO OPERATE THE PLANT INSIDE THE WALLS

THE WORKERS’ ENTRANCE IS AT THE BASE OF THE WALLS

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TRAINS ARE LOADED AND UNLOADED IN RECORD TIME BY THE ROBOTIC FLEET

THE BASEMENT IS USED AS A MECHANICAL PLENUM, WHERE WALLS DISCHARGE RESIDUAL MATERIALS

FREE / OPEN-SOURCE CITY: PRODUCTION SPACE OF THE ACCELERATED TRANSACTION Samuel Gendron Fortier, Université de Montréal Advisor: Alessandra Ponte

This project explores a future where accelerated transactions, enabled by blockchain technology, bring artificial intelligence (AI) into production spaces. Ricocheting between utopia and dystopia, the project’s building constantly transforms itself, optimizing between the balance of spaces dedicated to humans, robots and artificial intelligence. The project site is the northern sector of Pointe-Saint-Charles in Montreal, an industrial brownfield. To begin, sections of abstract images taken from photos of microchips were superimposed on the site to form an initial plan. The building is a megastructure, like a machine or a giant computer. It can be used for various types of production: from manufacturing electronic devices, to growing food, to microbiological research, or even for a creative industry such as music recording. Inside, a modular system of gigantic internal walls of different thicknesses moves on rails. Within these walls are spaces for servers, robotic production, storage and space support equipment. In these areas, robots store and manage both the produced goods and the materials needed to operate the plant. Between the programmatic bands are human production spaces, where workers use tools prototyped by robots and collaborate with robots on production. Adjustable bridges, walls, and floors can be deployed to reconfigure these spaces. Giant engines allow the building to shift on site. The building envelope is like an accordion, expanding and shrinking with market needs and production capacity. Mechanical systems and work surfaces are optimized and used at all times. As the artificial intelligence succeeds in understanding the market—and even inf luencing or controlling it—the plant

expands and becomes increasingly profitable. The building could also be programmed to deconstruct itself. The project raises questions about the limits and potential of AI. What happens when the building occupies the entire site dedicated to it? Will the AI seek to increase its controlled territory? Will emergency stop switches need to be installed as precautionary measures? Is the worker’s quality of life improved? Are humans aware of the full control of AI over their environment? Rami Bebawi :: I’m fascinated—I’ve never encountered someone who considers the spatial relationship between humans and robots. It’s the first time someone ever brings that subject up to me. Robots are always improving: can the architecture continuously change as the robots learn about what they are making? Part of the way the project was presented to us was through an interview with Siri. I like the guts behind this approach. Joe Lobko :: Lou Kahn’s ‘servant’ and ‘served’ spaces meets the future of robotics and a digital world to create the ultimate ‘maker-space’. Cindy Wilson :: This project represents the undeniable fact that robotics and AI will be a future part of our industry, and I appreciate the consideration of the challenge in this project. While data already creates space, to what extent will AI influence or expand our assumptions around data?


SITE PLAN

SPACE RECONFIGURATION TOOLS

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

ROBOTIC CIRCULATION HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE ROBOTIC CIRCULATION

AI SERVER ROOM

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

SPACE RECONFIGURATION TOOLS

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

AI SERVER ROOM

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

SPACE RECONFIGURATION TOOLS

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

AI SERVER ROOM

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

ROBOTIC PRODUCTION FACILITIES

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

AI SERVER ROOM

HUMAN PRODUCTION SPACE

INSIDE A WALL

BETWEEN WALLS INSIDE A WALL

BETWEEN WALLS

INSIDE A WALL

INSIDE A WALL

BETWEEN WALLS

BETWEEN WALLS

INSIDE A WALL

PLAN

SOME EXPLORATION MODELS USING NINE LAYERS OF SUPERIMPOSED INFORMATION, RENDERED PHYSICAL IN LASER-CUT CARDBOARD, TO GENERATE A FIRST IDEA OF A POTENTIAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE BUILDING. WE CAN SEE EXCHANGES AND COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN A CLOSED SPACE AND A MORE OPEN ONE. THESE SPACES WILL BECOME ROBOTIC SYSTEMS (WITHIN THE WALLS) AND HUMAN PRODUCTION AREAS (BETWEEN THE WALLS). STUDY MODELS

ABOVE The megastructure includes thickened walls that house robotic systems, and human production areas between the walls. Gigantic engines allow the whole building to shift on site. The building takes on its own life as the AI that manages it continually optimizes the spatial configuration for production needs.

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STUDENT AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

​ ROM MATTER TO PLACE: F A CAMP FOR THE TRANSMISSION OF INUIT LOCAL KNOWLEDGE Pierre-Olivier Demeule, Université Laval Advisor: Myriam Blais

For the Inuit of Nunavik—the northern region of Quebec—the traditional activities of hunting and fishing contribute to a sense of place. Today, they are also linked to healing, recreation, crafts and socialization. From this point of view, tundra camps are the mainstays of local identity and Inuit well-being. Despite its proximity to existing settlements, the land remains accessible to few, due to the high costs of travel and construction. Resilient buildings are needed, whose layout and materials can adapt to changing Northern conditions. What can be learned from Inuit camps, which both symbolize and provide access to the tundra? How can the know-how behind the existing modest buildings inform new, resilient spaces that maintain a beneficial relationship with the land? This project proposes a new tundra camp located two kilometres from

the village of Salluit (62ºN), along a fjord accessible by canoe or ATV. The proposal’s key spaces facilitate the expression and transmission of local knowledge. It creates a restorative and responsive architectural environment, inviting spirit and soul to harmonize with the tundra. The project explores the concept of sustainable vernacular architecture. It seeks to combine local know-how, local materials, and Northern construction processes. By doing so, it supports a model of healthy co-dependence between ecosystems, culture and the local economy. Components of the camp include an expandable community hall, cabins, camping platforms, and a hut for drying animal skins and meat. Each element has a limited ecological footprint. The structures use passive heating and cooling strategies. They use natural materials such as goose feathers for insulation, sealskin for weather stripping, and peat for roof-


MORPHOGENESIS

PHASE 1 A COMMUNITY HALL IS BUILT ON A GABION FOUNDATION, FACING THE FJORD ENTRANCE. A SOUTH-FACING TERRACE EASES ACCESS TO THE TUNDRA AND OFFERS VIEWS TOWARDS NIAQUNNGUT (A NATURAL HERITAGE SITE).

PHASE 2 THE UPPER LEVEL IS CONNECTED TO THE POSTS AND BEAMS, AND PROJECTS TOWARDS THE FJORD (THE COMMUNITY PANTRY). THE COMMUNITY HALL BECOMES A WORKSHOP AND OFFERS A PROTECTED SPACE WHERE EARTHEN CONSTRUCTION CAN BE INITIATED.

PHASE 3 THE THIRD VOLUME FITS INTO THE SLOPE AT A RIGHT ANGLE. THE LIVING SPACES FORM A CENTRAL HEARTH, WHILE THE MORE INTIMATE SPACES RELATE TO THE LAND.

OPPOSITE The design for a tundra camp in Nunavik centres on local materials and know-how. ABOVE The camp’s structures expand over time. RIGHT Local, natural materials and seasonal adjustment strategies are integral to the design, furthering local capacity and autonomy.

ing. The buildings adapt to each season with strategies such as adaptive fenestration, and a flexible use of space according to the time of year. The project aims to further local capacity and autonomy with construction methods that can be replicated, adapted or transformed by the Inuit. The project also promotes “soul-healing.” Its spaces strengthen community ties and enable activities that allow for the sharing of Inuit values. The new camp can be transformed and evolve over time according to local needs. At each design phase, the project aligns itself with the principles of Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, meaning “living technology” or “what the Inuit have always known.” The design and construction of this place of healing hopes to demonstrate the ingenious know-how of the North—a Qaujimajatuqangit that can reconnect the Inuit to their land in ways that are harmonious, innovative and adaptive.

Rami Bebawi :: Perhaps the word “resilient” is what seems to bring to life the value of this project. I greatly appreciate this forward-thinking attitude that attempts to contemporize past values. Joe Lobko :: A traditional Inuit camp reinterpreted and reimagined, applying contemporary building science and traditional cultural understanding in the effort to create a resilient and adaptable model. A wonderfully presented project with a thoughtful and convincing thesis. Cindy Wilson :: This beautiful project is both a record of the past and a window to the future. The use of natural materials to support more contemporary building methods is intriguing, and these materials are more accessible in the context of a northern climate.

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BAHÁ’Í TEMPLE OF SOUTH AMERICA doublespace photography Client: Hariri Pontarini Architects

Photographers Amanda Large and Younes Bounhar see their job as a two-phase process. As a baseline, they document built projects in a literal manner. But they also strive to translate the less tangible qualities of projects into photographic images. “It is not so much about how a project looks, but rather how it feels, how one experiences it,” says Large. When photographing the Bahá’í Temple of South America, the duo was awed by the structure’s monumental scale. They felt that this quality was missing from many of the existing photographs, where the temple is dwarfed by a mountain range. To communicate the Temple’s exceptionality, says Large, “we felt that is was critical to abstract the building from its surroundings.” They decided to photograph it at 9 am, about two hours after sunrise. The sun was still partially hidden behind the mountains, and its rays illuminated one side of the Temple. The side-lighting produced highlights on the edges of the petals that make up the structure. Meanwhile, the mountains and front of the Temple remained relatively dark. A human figure, standing in one of the nine doorways, completes the scene, giving a sense of scale to the image.

Rami Bebawi :: This image creates a powerful ambiance—it’s so amazing. In a first glimpse, it’s as if we all felt an attachment to a photograph that captured the experience of a moment. Joe Lobko :: The magic of an image can be that it wants you to know more, it draws you in, it excites your imagination. This image, and this building, certainly do that. Ema Peter :: For me, this is a very impactful image. We have seen so many images of this building and this one shows a completely different perspective. The quality of light is spectacular—the side is lit perfectly. The silhouetted person that is so masterfully hidden in the shadow makes the image look like a real piece of art. Cindy Wilson :: The subtly in this photo allows the imagination to enter.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

PHOTO AWARD OF EXCELLENCE


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1. Residence for the Sisters of Saint Joseph, Toronto, Ontario. Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, 2013. Credit: James Dow, Courtesy Shim-Sutcliffe Architects 2. Residence Aanischaaukamikw Cree Cultural Institute,Toronto, Oujé-Bougoumou, Quebec. Rubin & Rotman Architects collaboration with Douglas Cardinal, 2011. Credit: Mitch Lenet 1. for the Sisters of Saint Joseph, Ontario. Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, 2013. Credit: in James Dow, Courtesy Shim-Sutcliffe Architects Photography & Digital Arts, with the permission of Aanischaaukamikw Institute 2. Aanischaaukamikw Cree Cultural Institute, Oujé-Bougoumou, Quebec. Cree RubinCultural & Rotman Architects in collaboration with Douglas Cardinal, 2011. Credit: Mitch Lenet 3. Coronation Pool, Edmonton, Alberta. Hemingwayofand Laubenthal Architects, 1970. Credit: Courtesy James Dow Photography & Digital Arts, with the permission Aanischaaukamikw Cree Cultural Institute 4. Coronation Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario. Saucier + Perrotte 2006. Credit: 3. Pool, Edmonton, Alberta. Hemingway and Laubenthal Architects, 1970.architectes, Credit: Courtesy James Marc Dow Cramer, Courtesy Saucier+Perrotte Architectes 4. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario. Saucier + Perrotte architectes, 2006. Credit: Marc Cramer, Courtesy Saucier+Perrotte Architectes


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RAVINE, ONTARIO SCIENCE CENTRE James Brittain Client: Moriyama & Teshima Architects

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the value of revisiting architecture with a camera, and the specific things this can reveal. In my commissioned work, I’m usually asked to photograph a project at the moment of its completion. But I’m also fascinated by how buildings age, and how they’re inhabited and adapted over time. There’s also the evolving relationship between a building and its site, and wider contextual environment. So I was very pleased when Moriyama & Teshima Architects asked me to re-photograph the Ontario Science Centre, along with several other of the practice’s early works in Ontario, to mark the anniversary of their 60 years in practice. Moriyama & Teshima encouraged me to approach the project with my own vision, and I tried to make pictures about the experience of the architecture—what it feels like to be there—rather than a description of formal arrangement. The Science Centre is set on a dramatic site in the Don Valley, with the complex’s concrete volumes spanning a wooded ravine. The original 1960s concrete formwork is exceptional, but in the intervening years, trees and vines have grown up, and in several places made their way onto the exterior of the buildings. Because of this, it’s now tricky to make wide views that show the whole ensemble. However, a walk around the outside reveals a lovely interplay between concrete built forms and rambling woods and foliage. The view shown here is underneath the main footbridge spanning the ravine, which connects visitors above from the arrival halls to the exhibition galleries.

I was happy when I took it as I felt it captured the ambition and spirit of Raymond Moriyama’s original vision, in harmony with nature re-asserting itself. -James Brittain Rami Bebawi :: There’s something I love about this image that celebrates a simple bridge. The composition creates a powerful line. There’s an imaginative, wonderland quality to it. Joe Lobko :: This isn’t the typical image that you’d get from a commissioned photo shoot. It evokes the pull between nature and intervention. Ema Peter :: It’s a subtle image—the streaming light is absolutely beautiful. It’s out-of-the-box thinking for architectural photography. Cindy Wilson :: The balance of light and shadow, structure and nature, smoothness and texture makes the column look ecclesiastical.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

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PENTHOUSE, 62 M James Brittain 5468796 Architecture

Photographing architecture on commission is a slightly chaotic mixture of accident and control. I think about the process in terms of rigour and f luidity. The tension between these two ideas is what makes for interesting pictures, allowing room for the unexpected to occur. To make an interesting photograph on a commissioned shoot— or at least one that resonates in some way beyond simple description— a few different elements need to come together. There’s usually a host of practical concerns: co-ordinating access, arranging equipment and lighting, familiarizing yourself with the routines of a place and the passage of light and the sun. However, many aspects are completely out of your control. For example, natural light, how it falls and moves, the weather, and the life of people occupying a place. I particularly cherish my work with 5468796 because of a shared commitment to challenge the boundaries of how architecture is represented in pictures. Each project is considered for its specificity, with nothing taken for granted. 62M, pictured here, is a disk-shaped housing complex set on an abandoned site next to a highway in Winnipeg. It has a beautiful combination of refinement and raw, and because of that we chose to shoot all the exterior photography in overcast skies or rain. But clouds and sunshine suited the penthouse. It sits on top of the building’s concrete elevator core, with various modes of habitation—eating, enter-

taining, working, bathing, sleeping and repose—all laid out in one volume. The view out is perfectly positioned at a height just above the treetops to enjoy Winnipeg’s downtown core. -James Brittain Rami Bebawi :: It took me time to allow myself to plunge into this image… yet once one overcomes the harshness of a glass box, we find ourselves in a subtle moment between skies and living spaces. Perhaps the technical talent of the photographer has allowed the architecture to become more expressive. Joe Lobko :: A privileged view of the city. Wouldn’t we all like that? Ema Peter :: What a way to connect the interior and exterior. The clouds reflect beautifully in the space. From a purely technical perspective, it is a difficult image to do. Few interior spaces can be this impactful— with the symmetry, perspectives, interior and exterior connection, as well as the human element. Cindy Wilson :: This photo captures the sky on all vertical surfaces, creating a rhythm of the clouds. I would like to see this as a video when the clouds are moving fast—a natural flickering disco ball.

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 12/19

PHOTO AWARD OF MERIT


OUR JURORS

the firms are making significant and meaningful contributions to the conceptualization, quality, delivery and viability of affordable urban housing, a field largely unexplored. JOE LOBKO

CINDY WILSON

RAMI BEBAWI

EMA PETER

JOE LOBKO is a partner at DTAH , a Torontobased multi-disciplinary design firm. He is the recipient of an urban leadership award from the Canadian Urban Institute (2006) and a Lifetime Achievement Award from Sustainable Buildings Canada (2012). As an advocate for design excellence, Joe has served as the chair of the Toronto Society of Architects, and is a current member of the City of Toronto Design Review Panel. Notable award-winning projects include leading the design of renewal and restoration projects such as Artscape Wychwood Barns and Evergreen Brick Works, the planning and urban design of Waterfront Toronto’s West Don Lands community, and the L’Arche Dayspring Chapel.

is an entrepreneur and founding principal of Vancouver-based LWPAC (Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture) and Intelligent City. Through the examination, integration and evolution of culture, design, ecology, economy, and technology, the firm has designed a wide range of projects—from the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria to Monad and Roar_One housing projects. In recognition of design excellence, the firm has received the Governor General’s Award, Lafarge Holcim Foundation Award for North America, and City of Vancouver Awards for Innovation and Excellence. LWPAC and Intelligent City have created an integrated ecosystem of product, platform and process technology solutions. Together, CINDY WILSON

THE COLLECTIVE YOU

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RAMI BEBAWI is a co-founder of Montrealbased KANVA . Rami is an active participant in the local, national and international architectural scene, leading panel discussions, speaking at conferences, participating in juries, mentoring master’s students, and engaging in design festivals and outreach programs. Rami has also travelled across Canada lecturing for the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and internationally sharing the work of KANVA . The multidisciplinary collective’s vanguard work has won many awards, including the 2015 Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Emerging Architectural Practice Award, and several Awards of Excellence from the RAIC, Canadian Architect, Ordre des Architectes du Québec, and Grands Prix du Design. More recently, they were awarded the Professional Prix de Rome by the Canada Council for the Arts and garnered the World Architecture Festival’s ‘Experimental – Future Projects’ award for their Imago project. KANVA has also won the international Space for Life architecture competition to re-imagine the Montreal Biodome Science Museum. EMA PETER is principal of Ema Peter Photography. In the past decade, she has worked with some of North America’s most prominent architecture and interior design firms. Ema holds a master’s degree in art and applied photography from the national academy of theatre and film arts in Sofia, Bulgaria. Her work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Elle Décor, Azure, Architectural Record and Dwell. Ema has been named one of the world’s top 12 women in architectural photography, and has been listed as a top five architectural photographer for three consecutive years by the Architizer A+ Awards. In 2018, she won the Architizer A+ Award in both juried and public choice competitions.


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Profile for IQ Business Media

Canadian Architect December 2019  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...

Canadian Architect December 2019  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...