Industry Asia Pacific | 34 - January 2021

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Industry

Asia Pacific THE INDUSTRY MAGAZINE FOR ASIA

ROHDE & SCHWARZ AND IHP FIRST TO CHARACTERIZE D-BAND FREQUENCIES IN OVERTHE-AIR TEST SETUP FOR 6G AND AUTOMOTIVE RADAR

12 MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC’S NEW ACB REDUCES INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE STRESS

26 TRIAD OF TORQUE, SPEED AND PRECISION. APPLICATIONS? STEP INTO THE RING

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DYNEO+ SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES THE ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF THE INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION PROCESS

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THE INDUSTRY MAGAZINE FOR ASIA

MARKET OVERVIEW

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Send your press releases to: editor@ipmediaonline.com To receive the Industry Asia Pacific newsletter, please subscribe online: www.industry-asia-pacific.com Industry Asia Pacific is the magazine for engineers published by INDUPORTALS MEDIA PUBLISHING. It contains the latest product and company news for industrial markets. Industry Asia Pacific edits its articles with the greatest of care, however we cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information presented in them. Our teams disclaim all responsibility concerning the content of this media or how it might be used. https://induportals-media-publishing.com

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English version

THE SMART FACTORY: AN OVERVIEW Author: Milton D’SILVA

The smart factory is still a work in progress, but the building blocks are already in place. A report.

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couple of years ago, a technocrat from a leading automation vendor, chatting on the side-lines of an industry event made an interesting observation. “A factory manufactures products, but that is not the purpose of the factory,” he said. “The purpose of a factory is to make profits.” Implicit in this assertion is the role technology plays in making those profits. It started with the very first Industrial Revolution in the mid-18th century powered by steam, and continues with the Industry 4.0, the fourth version – unleashed by the Internet and facilitated by cyber physical systems in the new millennium.

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Each of these revolutions brought in tremendous advantages in terms of transportation, telecommunications, access to raw materials, exploration of resources, etc., and led to large-scale manufacturing of industrial and consumer goods, gadgets and appliances for everyday use. However, by now, most of these advantages have been exploited to the hilt, and production efficiency in some sectors has reached in the higher 90s in terms of percentages. Yet today, more than at any other time in human history, manufacturers are under constant pressure to produce higher quality products in lesser time at lower prices, and to suit individual requirements as well. With margins shrinking, the only way to squeeze profits is to further increase efficiency, reduce errors, anticipate failure of equipment and eliminate break down altogether. Welcome to the Smart Factory era, made possible by the bouquet of emerging technologies now available to the industry in quest of still higher efficiency.

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MARKET OVERVIEW

5G plays a central role in the Bosch vision for the factory of the future. Picture: Bosch

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MARKET OVERVIEW

ABB’s smart factory module demonstrated at Hannover Messe 2019. Picture: Hannover Messe

What exactly is a Smart Factory? In simple terms it is a place for smart manufacturing where machines, already automated to a great extent – and increasingly intelligent robots – are linked together by smart devices through the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). This in turn facilitates self-learning and adapting, improving the processes through advanced automation and selfoptimisation, with seamless end-to-end connectivity and data analytics. The resultant benefits are not just in terms of efficient production, but also the streamlining of all related functions like supply chain logistics and pre- and postproduction processes, to make it sustainable. The secret to unlocking this potential is hidden in the data generated by these processes. According to an IBM report, an average factory generates 1 TB of production data each day, of which over 99% is not analysed. The information hidden in this data, the analysis of which is beyond human capabilities and need technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning, holds the key to greater operational efficiency.

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The smart factory does not necessarily have to be built from scratch. Existing facilities can be transformed into smart factories, provided there are investments made to put a few things in place. These include a proper network infrastructure, smart controllers, analytics software with integrated information systems including IoT, cloud computing, Big Data and technology using artificial intelligence. Above all, this needs skilled manpower and the preparedness to adapt to new technologies.

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The smart factory is still a work in progress, but the building blocks are already in place. However, there are gaps to be filled – while Artificial Intelligence plays a key role in data analytics, 5G is the go to technology for connectivity – and a lot remains to be done in both these areas. So what is the status of the smart factory and its implementation from the perspective of the leading vendors of technologies for the smart factory? Presented here is a snapshot of 5 leading vendors and their technologies. ABB and its Ability A custom-made wristwatch assembled within three minutes. That is what ABB demonstrated at Hannover Messe 2019 at the smart factory module on display at its booth, using three of its key technologies – the YuMi collaborative robot performing precision assembly operations; the SuperTrak flexible transport system ensuring timely movement of parts; and the ABB Ability Connected Services monitoring health and performance. ABB launched the Ability™ technology platform in 2017, bringing together a number of its digital products, solutions and services under one umbrella. The ABB Ability platform today offers more than 220 digital solutions, which enable enterprises to increase productivity and improve safety at lower costs. The ABB factory at Heidelberg in Germany is a classic example of a smart factory, a showcase of ABB’s cuttingedge technology as well as manufacturing prowess. One of the oldest plants of the ABB group, it manufactures miniature circuit breakers (MCBs), a common but critical safety device used in electrical installations, available in many different variants. The MCB effectively breaks the circuit in case of overload and other faults, protecting the installation from fire and damage. The Heidelberg plant is a demonstrator for smart manufacturing – of how the


MARKET OVERVIEW

factory of tomorrow looks like. It is equipped with seven types of ABB robots, all interconnected on the ABB Ability platform, the digitalisation increasing their productivity. The transformation has increased the plant efficiency to handle 3 times as many product variants as before, adding to a whopping 6000 variants now, also improving quality of the products. Predictive maintenance practices have led to accurate delivery schedules and better in-plant material handling. The Ability platform leverages intelligence gathered from ABB’s vast global installed base of over 70 million connected devices and 70,000 control systems. This not only helps customers optimise operations, but ABB also uses the insights to develop new business models. Bosch goes beyond Mobility Bosch, the renowned provider of vehicle technologies and mobility solutions, now offers Industry 4.0 technologies for smart factories. With the focus on automation, digitalisation,

Bosch’s Blaichach plant in Germany, specialised in manufacturing ABS and ESP systems for automobiles, is a smart factory working on the Nexeed platform. This brings all the benefits of the connected plant for both new and existing machinery, as Nexeed is an open system, where it is easy to retrofit IoT devices on legacy production lines. The Blaichach plant employs 3000 associates as Bosch calls them, and produce 6.7 million ABS/ESP safety systems. The transformation has made it possible for Bosch to increase productivity at its ABS/ESP manufacturing facilities worldwide by almost 24 per cent.

Bosch smart factory working on the Nexeed platform. Picture: Bosch

For Bosch, these initiatives of integrating Industry 4.0 technologies in the smart factory is paying off with the company having earned more than Euro 1.5 billion with Industry 4.0 applications in the last 5 years. By 2022, Bosch has ambitious plans to generate annual sales of over a billion euros with Industry 4.0.

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AI and IoT, the idea is to boost productivity, quality and safety. As a leading user and provider of Industry 4.0 solutions, Bosch follows the ’3S’ strategy – using sensors, software and services. These are channelised through its software platform Nexeed, on which reside a variety of ’Source-Make-Deliver’ solutions for continuous optimisation – from procurement (source) through production (make) to the end customer (deliver). Nexeed includes tools like predictive maintenance, cockpit charts, traceability and tracking solutions, manufacturing execution, maintenance support, autonomous transport systems, intralogistics – all connected. Nexeed is ideal for larger enterprises that have

deployed Industry 4.0 solutions, companies that have global production networks and plants at multiple locations. But Bosch also offers solutions to SMEs in smaller packages, introducing to them the benefits of Industry 4.0, especially when they do not have in-house digital expertise.

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MARKET OVERVIEW

Rockwell Automation and The Connected Enterprise Rockwell Automation believes the world needs to become a smarter place and offers solutions to that end through The Connected Enterprise, where products become smarter, people become smarter, and their decisions become smarter. The 117-year-old company is a major provider of industrial automation and information technology products with global sales of USD 6.69 bn for 2019. The company conducts signature events like the annual Automation Fair in the US and the region specific TechED events at other global locations to connect with and educate customers about the latest developments in the field. The hardware offering of Rockwell Automation comprises thousands of Allen-Bradley products, the software comprises numerous software suites under the FactoryTalk banner. The Connected Enterprise is a platform that brings these smart solutions together for the benefit of discrete manufacturing as well as process industries, bringing them tangible benefits like a faster time to market for manufactured products, improved asset utilisation, lower total cost of ownership, and more effective enterprise risk management. That these are all tried and tested solutions is borne out by the fact that Rockwell Automation uses them in its own manufacturing facilities as part of its digitalisation transformation journey. The Connected Enterprise, according to the company, is a five-step journey: identify a desired business outcome; get an outside perspective; assemble the team; implement a pilot program; and scale for expansion. For companies who adopt the platform for their digital transformation, the outcome, based on use cases, leads to: productivity increases of 4–5% per year; waste reductions that result in hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings; faster time to market, which includes plants that become operational in weeks instead of months; quality improvements that result in defects being cut in half; and up to 98% on-time delivery.

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In 2017, Rockwell Automation opened its EMEA Customer Center for The Connected Enterprise in Karlsruhe, Germany, offering customers and visitors the opportunity to receive tailored advice on smart factory subjects combined with a 360-degree view of The Connected Enterprise.

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The Rockwell Automation EMEA Customer Center at Karlsruhe, Germany. Picture: Rockwell Automation


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Schneider Electric builds the EcoStruxure Schneider Electric, the leader in the digital transformation of energy management and automation, traces its origins to 1836. It is a European multinational company with operations in over 100 countries and 2019 revenue of Euro 27 billion. Since 1980, the company has grown phenomenally through a series of acquisitions, shedding its traditional steel business in favour of electricity and related technologies. Having reinvented itself for the digital era in the new millennium, the company launched its IoT enabled EcoStruxure platform for digital transformation, with sector specific suites covering not just industries, but also homes, buildings, data centres, energy and infrastructure. EcoStruxure for Industry is the Schneider Electric IIoT platform that is open, interoperable, and ready for smart manufacturing, at every level from Connected Products to Edge Control and Apps, Analytics and Services. It is the digital backbone connecting best-in-class operational technology (OT) solutions with the latest in IT technology to unlock trapped value in operations and leverage the true potential of the Internet of Things. With integrated software, it improves productivity, efficiency, sustainability, and cybersecurity for plants and machine builders. Benefits include up to 80% reduction in engineering costs and time; up to 75% savings in maintenance costs; and up to 50% reduction in carbon footprint. Schneider Electric executives often say ’we eat our own food,’ which means the smart technologies the company offers to the industry are implemented in its own plants first. The company has launched several Smart Factories around the globe in countries like France, USA, Mexico, China, India, Indonesia, and the Philippines. These are central to its Tailored Sustainable Connected 4.0 supply chain digital transformation where it leverages digitisation across its supply chain operations to deliver end-to-end integration and visibility to enhance its performance. The World Economic Forum has designated the Schneider Electric facilities in Le Vaudreuil in France, and Batam in Indonesia, as Advanced 4th Industrial Revolution (4IR) Lighthouses. The company has set for itself a target of 100 smart factories for 2020, and the same technologies are available for any company looking for similar transformation.

The Schneider Electric smart factory at Le Vaudreuil in France. Picture: Schneider Electric

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Siemens and its MindSphere Established in 1847, Siemens is the German multinational corporation and the largest industrial manufacturing company in Europe with a global footprint, with 2019 revenue of around Euro 87 billion. With its main business verticals of Industry, Energy, Healthcare and Infrastructure, Siemens today has the domain expertise and digital knowhow to generate performance improvements across the entire value chain through digital transformation. This is achieved with its two main solutions: MindSphere – a cloud-based, open IoT operating system; and Digital Twin – the virtual representation of products and production. Launched in 2016, MindSphere today connects an estimated 1.3 million devices and more than 1,000 customers. Global automobile

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The Siemens Smart Factory at Amberg, Bavaria. Picture: Siemens

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MARKET OVERVIEW

giant Volkswagen uses MindSphere in its cloud network, connecting machinery and equipment at more than 120 of its plants. This data is used to improve productivity and efficiency across plants and production lines. What MindSphere does essentially are 4 things: connect assets and upload data to the cloud; collect, monitor, and analyse data in real time; gain insights that improve efficiency and profitability; and take advantage of apps and solutions that solve real problems. Like other major vendors, Siemens too has an excellent example of the Smart Factory in its Amberg plant in Bavaria, which has deployed the MindSphere system as well as executed the digital twin. Spread over 100,000 sq.ft, the Amberg plant manufactures a mix of 1200 products, which means on an average there are 350 production changeovers per day! The plant produces 17 million Simatic components per year, and about 50 million items of process and product data are evaluated and used for optimisation! In the process of the smooth running of the plant, Siemens uses other groundbreaking technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning and Industrial Edge computing. The results of the transformation are evident in the figures – a 13-fold rise in production since the plant started operations in 1989, without any additional manpower or expansion. Summing up According to a market research report on global smart factory industry posted by Reportlinker recently, the global market for Smart Factory is estimated at US$136.4 billion in the year 2020. This is projected to reach a revised size of US$218.4 billion by 2027. The expected additional value for manufacturing industry due to productivity gains in smart factories by 2023 is expected to be between US$1.5 to 2.2 trillion, according to the Capgemini Research Institute’s estimates, published in its report ’Smart factories @ scale.’ This indicates the potential gains of smart factory for the manufacturing world. An important question that rises from these developments is the human role in the factory of the future with the spectre of massive unemployment caused by digitalisation. But Prof Martin Ruskowski, Chairman of the Executive Board at SmartFactory-KL, the manufacturer-independent demonstrator and research platform based in Germany, does not agree. According to him, “Humans will and must be able to change every decision made by a machine. We will retain responsibility for what happens in the production processes. Machines and artificial intelligence cannot and should not take this away!”

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ELECTRONICS

MONTH’S PRODUCT

ROHDE & SCHWARZ AND IHP FIRST TO CHARACTERIZE D-BAND FREQUENCIES IN OVER-THE-AIR TEST SETUP FOR 6G AND AUTOMOTIVE RADAR Academia and key industry players have identified the D-Band, ranging from 110 GHz to 170 GHz, as a candidate frequency band for beyond 5G and 6G mobile communications as well as for future automotive radar applications. Rohde & Schwarz continues its pioneering sub-THz research efforts with focus in this frequency range, reaching new milestones. In collaboration with IHP, Rohde & Schwarz has performed the industry’s first full 2D/3D antenna characterization of transceiver modules operating in the D-Band.

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imilar to 5G networks and devices supporting mmWave frequencies, antenna systems and RF transceiver modules for future mobile communications standards or automotive radar applications will share the same features that make their testing a challenge. Their wide frequency range, a greater number of antenna elements and the lack of conventional external RF connectors will demand testing over-the-air in a shielded environment. Wireless communications test expert Rohde & Schwarz and IHP GmbH (Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics) have transferred this test method successfully into sub-THz range: They demonstrated the first full 2D/3D over-the-air measurements of a radar module at D-Band frequencies. The test setup consists of the R&S ATS1000 antenna test system, the R&S ZNA43 vector network analyzer and the R&S AMS32 antenna measurement software from Rohde & Schwarz. The R&S ATS1000 antenna test system is a compact and mobile shielded chamber solution for OTA and antenna measurements, ideal for 5G mmWave applications. To cover the D-Band frequencies, extensions from Radiometer Physics GmbH, a Rohde & Schwarz company, are used in the setup, which allows direct frequency conversion at the probe in both transmit and receive directions. No mechanical modification or additional RF cabling to the antenna test system is necessary. The setup can measure the amplitude and phase coherent response of a DUT radiating in the D-Band. Fully automated 3D-pattern measurements including post-processing can be performed in a short time thanks to the R&S AMS32 software options for nearfield to farfield transformation and the highly accurate precision positioner.

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IHP provided four different devices under test (DUT), based on the same D-Band radar transceiver chipset but with different antenna structures, including on-chip single and stacked patches with air trenches and an on-chip antenna array. The over-the-air characterization verified the wider bandwidth provided by the stacked patches than that by the single patch.

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The performance of the various DUTs was characterized by spherical measurements, using two different setups. By increasing the angular theta step-size from 1 degree to 5 degrees, the total test times for a DUT could be reduced from 70 minutes to 12 minutes. By comparing the different DUT designs based on the obtained measurement data, researchers of IHP were able to analyze the effect of the finite on-board reflector area on the radar sensor FoV (fieldof-view). Prof. Gerhard Kahmen, Managing Director of IHP, says: “Sub-THz frequency systems are getting more and more attention in research and many fields of applications. The Rohde & Schwarz OTA test system, extended to D-Band, provides an excellent way to characterize radiation patterns of the complex antenna structures, realized in our D-Band radar chips, in a time-efficient and precise way. For IHP, these measurements are valuable to understand the physics of the antenna structures and to further improve their performance. The very successful cooperation with an industrial partner leading in the field of wireless and mmWave communication shows the benefit of close interaction between research and application.” Alexander Pabst, Vice President of Systems & Projects at Rohde & Schwarz says: “We are excited to work with such an excellent partner as Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics on advancing our industry-leading test solutions for over-the-air testing. These joint efforts will help researchers and key industry players to test and characterize antenna systems and transceiver modules for future automotive radar applications and wireless communication standard, that we eventually call 6G.” For further information on OTA measurements in the D-Band watch the video at: https://www.rohde-schwarz. com/_251220-987264.html To learn more about of the initiatives of Rohde & Schwarz beyond 5G, go to https://www.rohde-schwarz.com/ wireless/B5G


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ELECTRONICS

TRIAD OF TORQUE, SPEED AND PRECISION. APPLICATIONS? STEP INTO THE RING

Many applications require drive solutions that have a central opening through which, e.g., light, cables or parts of the application can be guided. Examples of this can be found in optics and photonics for laser steering systems or in automation and robotics for semiconductor handling systems. Until now, conventional systems always resulted in compromises here. The hollow shafts were often quite small, the drives slow, heavy or the mechanical integration required a great deal of work. A new direct drive now offers a promising alternative. Its large opening has a diameter of 40 mm and, thanks to stepper motor technology, achieves a balanced combination of speed and torque with low weight and volume.

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here are many drive technologies and solutions available that are generally suitable in cases where a central opening is needed. In practical use, however, each has its own disadvantages. With hybrid stepper motors, for example, the diameter of the hollow shaft is usually limited to approximately 10 to 12 mm on account of the necessary copper filling factor or magnet yoke. Due to their multi-pole design, torque motors do permit larger openings, but cannot achieve high speeds due to their large moving mass. In addition, they are relatively expensive and often difficult to integrate. Many applications therefore use rotary tables with a central opening that are driven by a “normal” motor. Such solutions require transmission and complex mechanics, however. The resulting inevitable backlash needs to be compensated by means of elaborate measures before this type of motor can be used in high34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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precision applications. This complicates system integration considerably. Furthermore, numerous wear parts are involved, which leads to high maintenance requirements. Rotary tables actuated by a hybrid stepper motor are likewise often the tool of choice, but have a large volume and are heavy when higher performance values are called for. Finding a practical solution when the application requires an opening has, thus, not necessarily been easy until now. New approach – new possibilities The drive specialist FAULHABER therefore took up this topic and developed an entirely new drive solution with the stepper motor of the DM66200H series, which is designed especially for applications that require a large opening. With a total diameter of 66 mm, it offers a very large hollow shaft inner diameter of 40 mm. And it is only 24 mm thick and


DM66200H

Optic Photonics Laser

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Athlete Prosthetics

weighs just 218 g. As a result, the compact drive is easy to mount and requires very little installation space. The rotor with the opening directly drives the mechanics, which are arranged around the opening and does so without transmission. As a result, there is no mechanical backlash that needs to be compensated for. Originally designed for optics and photonics applications, the new hollow shaft direct drive also opens interesting possibilities in many other areas, such as wheel drives in cases where the drive shafts are guided through the motor for space reasons or in prosthetics with artificial knees or shoulders. In principle, it can be used wherever cables need to be guided through the opening or in cases where gases, fluids or light signals are to pass through the opening. Apart from the field of optics – e.g. for microscope stages, apertures, zoom lenses, laser beam controls, etc. – it can thus be used for a wide range of control and positioning tasks. Typical applications also include turntables, antenna feet as well as air and gas vents. MORE INFORMATION

High performance values in optimum combination The direct drive is based on the proven stepper motor technology from FAULHABER. The multi-pole, two-phase motor with permanent magnets delivers 200 steps per revolution. With a high resolution of 1.8° in full-step mode, it can execute positioning tasks precisely in open loop operation. It achieves a dynamic torque of up to 200 mNm and can move correspondingly large loads. The 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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maximum static torque is 307 mNm, and even 581 mNm when boosted. Brakes are thus unnecessary. Speeds of up to 2,000 revolutions per minute can be achieved. For many applications, the compact direct drive thereby offers a perfect balance of speed and torque. It enables maintenance-free continuous operation, as the only wearing part is the ball bearing. Application-specific modifications are possible on request, for example, specific lubricants, customer-specific windings, special cables and connectors as well as mounting flanges. www.faulhaber.com/en/news-events/news/direct-drivewith-very-large-aperture-and-high-performances/


ELECTRONICS

AWARD: FAULHABER IS FIRST “PREFERRED TECHNOLOGY PARTNER” OF HEIDELBERGER DRUCKMASCHINEN AG

Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG has been a reliable partner with great innovative strength for the global printing industry. The company’s mission is to shape the digital future of the sector. For the extraordinary technological achievements and innovative support on the way to achieving this goal, Heidelberger has now designated FAULHABER as “Preferred Technology Partner.”

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AULHABER is especially happy about this sign of recognition as it is the first time that Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG has granted a distinction of this type to a supplier. In explaining its reasoning, Heidelberger emphasised the exceptional technological know-how and the modern production processes at FAULHABER which together lead to well thought-out solutions for complex technical issues.

We value FAULHABER as a reliable partner and are therefore very pleased to present FAULHABER with the Preferred Technology Partner award due to the contribution in the area of technical innovations and cost optimisations.” Kai Albrecht, Senior Manager R&D: “FAULHABER is a strong partner in the realisation of technologically complex issues. Our high requirements in the area of drive technology are taken into account by FAULHABER and implemented with customised solutions. We value the cooperative partnership as well as the efficient development of appropriate solutions for our company.”

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The award is also the new highpoint in a long series, as FAULHABER has already been honoured by Heidelberger in the past four years with the title “Preferred Supplier” within the “Electric Drives” product group. Various performance indicators play a role in the evaluation of this category. These include the zero-error rate in product and process quality, continuous improvement, a cooperative partnership and reliability with regard to logistics. “FAULHABER was able to convince us in all of these aspects,” commented Helmut Braun, head of Quality Assurance/Electronics Procurement at Heidelberger.

Sebastian Huber, Senior Manager Purchasing: “FAULHABER has already in the past proven its outstanding performance in the collaboration with Heidelberger which, in each of the last four years, was honoured with the “Preferred Supplier” certificate.

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ELECTRONICS

RUGGED CONNECTIVITY: LESSONS I’VE LEARNED FROM HIGH-END RACING

Electronics play a key role in crossing the finish line first, especially when dealing with ever-changing wind and wave conditions. Fischer Connectors is an official supplier of fiber optic connectors for American Magic, Challenger for the 36th America’s Cup. Copyright: Amory Ross / NYYC American Magic

Top Competitors Take Big Data and the Internet of (Boating) Things To the High Seas in Their Quest for the America’s Cup.

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igh-end racing, whether on land or water, is notorious for its secrecy. With the Prada Cup and America’s Cup races in 2021, no one working with any of the hypercompetitive teams would dare give away those secrets.

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Spoiler alert: This isn’t about secrets. Even though Fischer Connectors is the exclusive connectivity sponsor of American Magic – a challenger for the 36th America’s Cup – and has provided connectors and solutions for many racing yachts over the past five decades, we can’t give away any of our trusted partners’ competitive secrets. This article is about the lessons learned working on various racing yachts over time, and how some of the latest connector technology and strategies used in racing can be applied to other real-world applications.

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Racing into 2021 From the moment the America’s Cup AC75 class rule was first published on March 29, 2018 by the current America’s Cup Defender, Emirates Team New Zealand, challenger teams have been designing and engineering their boats within the set rules to give them every possible edge in a temperamental racing environment. In fact, American Magic spent over 76,000 man hours producing its first AC75, DEFIANT. So, what are the stats for an AC75? • Length: 22.76 m • Width: 5 m • Weight 6.4 tons • Crew: 11 • Crew weight: 990 kilos • Construction: carbon fiber and double-skinned soft mainsails • Construction hours: 76,000+ • Design hours: 90,000+ • CNC machine and/or 3D printing hours: 45,000 • Individual parts: 25,000 • Sensors: 400+


Racing yachts such as the UK Team Ineos’ “Britannia” are estimated to have over 300 sensors on board to help guide sailors by giving race teams realtime data on changing conditions. Copyright: Chris Ison

All of this development comes at a significant cost to the teams entering the America’s Cup. To put this into context, the last event in 2017, held in Bermuda and won by Emirates Team New Zealand, is believed to have cost upwards of USD 100 million, with some teams reporting that they had to pay twice this figure to actually become competitive for the Cup. Races can be won or lost in the design, construction, and/or operational phases. Even fractions of seconds are of critical importance in a race for the America’s Cup and for the pride of a nation. Despite huge R&D budgets, it’s ultimately the team of 11 sailors working as one in precise harmony that determines who’ll be the winners on race day. So, the engineering teams do everything they can to give their sailors the advantage.

Given the strict weight criteria for such a “flying machine”, designers and engineers are constantly deliberating over each component used on the vessel: Will it deliver during practice, during the race, once or over time? Is it rugged enough? Is it too heavy? Is it really needed? The Importance of Interconnect Solutions Reliability in both the sensors and connector solutions is essential. Maintainability is critical, as is IP (Ingress Protection) sealing and the ability to withstand saltwater ingress and spray. Elevated temperatures are also a challenge to connector solutions, as most electronics are stored (and operated) in sealed airless compartments and may be exposed to extreme solar heating. Indeed, a black carbon panel can easily reach above 70°C in the UK sunshine – let alone in New Zealand! These places significant duress on the reliability and functionality of the electronics enclosed within.

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Lesson One: Sensors Create Real-Time Data for Immediate Decision Making Sailors and their support teams operating in high-pressure situations have to deal with many more variables than, say, the driver of a “simple” NASCAR vehicle. Wind speed and direction, water movement, water temperature, hull angle and foil position are all variables in yacht racing that can not only affect each vessel differently, but also change constantly during the race. Sensors are everywhere on the boat, from the foils to the wingsail, gathering data that enable sailors to calculate and use them to their advantage. Additionally, sensors help to adjust strategies or tactics in a

fraction of a second if they get the right information at the opportune moment.

Fiber Optic Plays an Important Role One area of great interest beyond the use of conventional copper wired interconnect solutions is the use of fiber optics for data transmission. In the America’s Cup in 2017, fiber optic sensors were embedded in the race boat foils and in other key components. This allowed the team to measure, 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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Fiber optic sensors embedded in race boat foils can be used to measure the lift, drag and horizontal force generated by the foil in real time. Image courtesy of Epsilon Optics www.epsilonoptics.com/marine.html. Fischer Connectors’ ruggedized optical connectors are used in the UK-based company’s latest sensor system.

This was demonstrated to greatest effect in the 2019 Sail GP event in Cowes on the UK’s Isle of Wight. There Tom Slingsby’s Australian Team utilised the foils in a completely different mode than any competitor, sailing three races with the bow firmly down, reducing the rudder loads, and maintaining control in winds of over 25 knots. The result was three straight wins over the remaining international competitors. Fiber optic devices tend to be smaller and lighter than the conventional copper. The cable is essentially a glass tube less than 2 mm in diameter. It comprises layers protecting the fiber glass that propagates data using light energy, which is converted into an electrical signal at the destination source. In essence, data speeds move in near perfect conditions within the fiber, resulting in the highest data transfer rates, without loss or low delay. Another advantage of fiber optics is the ability to physically embed these miniature single-strand sensors into the laminated carbon structures of the boat, without affecting the structural integrity of the foil or mast/wing section or the functionality of the hardware. These embedded sensors also ensure you can monitor potential breakages of such highly stressed parts of the boat at all times and avoid them if at all possible. Clearly, these items are very asset-sensitive due to cost, material and build time; hence only the most appropriate cabling and connector systems can help ensure longevity and avoid delays in this challenging environment.

analyse, predict and optimise the design of the parts, while keeping stress levels under control. If set correctly, the foil offers both lift and drag, similar to an aircraft wing in flight. “The electronics and data acquisition on an America’s Cup yacht such as American Magic’s Patriot are absolutely crucial to our success,” says Antoine Sigg, Fiber Optic, American Magic. “Loads of data streams are processed constantly, feed models, trigger alarms and help the sailor to make adjustments for wind, attitude and stresses on the boat. It’s essential that the connectivity solution deliver accurate data. The fiber optic solutions from Fischer Connectors help us have simple and reliable connections to many key zones on the boat, especially where lines are connected and disconnected daily. They link the boat system to moving parts, and the robustness of the Fischer FiberOptic Series is used at its full potential to withstand shocks, fast movements and exposure to the elements in a firehose-like environment.”

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In a racing yacht, the foil rake and angle of attack are adjusted for different points of sailing (upwind and downwind) and different wind strengths. Getting real-time information from the sensors through fiber optic connections allows optimisation of the foil angle and load, providing the appropriate lift for any given displacement and wind condition.

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A final significant benefit for the AC75 is the weight advantage offered by this type of fiber optic. When considering electronics control systems on board boats, it’s fair to assume most yachts carry in excess of 60 kg of wire for their control and instrumentation circuits. This weight can be greatly reduced if the traditional copper is replaced with state-of-the-art, high-capability fiber. Data as a Commodity As reported by Martin Whitmarsh, CEO of Land Rover BAR, with all this live real-time data from in excess of 400 sensors per boat*, it’s a veritable treasure trove of data. It’s essential that adequate data connection, onward transmission, storage and subsequent analysis are performed for all modes of sailing and conditions. As a dinghy sailor myself, I consider my surroundings and speed while sailing, just two variables that affect my performance. For these highperformance racing yachts, however, sailors consider up to an estimated 300 variables simultaneously to evaluate and adjust performance, including water time, flight time, speed, boat position, angle, loads, foils and rudder angle. To do this perfectly in a race requires gathering, transmitting, analyse and acting on reliable data. In 2017, it was estimated that Team Oracle’s boat accumulated between 200 GB and 500 GB of data every day. It’s no wonder that so much data crunching is needed to ensure you can optimise the performance of every element for live sailing conditions. This explains the involvement of companies like database giants Oracle and Dell EMC in the last America’s Cup and, more recently, Hewlett Packard for this 2021 campaign. Clearly, reliable data management ensures the boat performs as competitively as possible and defines a clear configuration setup for each and every condition that the boat is raced in. Recent reports from the teams out in New Zealand suggest that the typical data now being collected by this year’s


Catamarans in previous America’s Cup races may not have been the first to utilise “big data” during competitive sailing for real-time and post-race analysis, but they pushed ideas that led to today’s electronics designs. Copyright: Stuart Doe

Cup teams are in excess of 1 billion data entry points. This makes the data collation and sifting activity a significant contribution to the teams’ performance and understanding of the data variables, with significant implications for performance.

resistant to water ingress (IP rated) and harsh saltwater corrosion. As previously mentioned, weight is also a critical performance criterion for any foiling craft, so the provision and support of this technology is often a balance against weight, performance, functionality and cost.

Lesson Two: Connected Technology and the Internet of (Boating) Things To help them race today, every single competitive racing yacht utilises world-leading engineering and design, Internet of Things (IoT) devices, data analytics and data modeling.

The use of real-time data from these sensors is pivotal to both design measurement simulation and actual optimal performance, thereby allowing both prediction and practice of the fastest method of sailing in pursuit of the Cup. This is also true of weather measurement, and wind and wave prediction. If one side of the course is favorable for optimal performance, it’s key to identify tactically how and where patterns of wind will be emerging. This is especially the case in New Zealand, with its interesting harbor course and sheltered racing areas.

Ease of accessibility and interconnectivity between these sensors and any instrumentation are critical and, of course, the performance of any marine-based connector must be

It isn’t just the racing yachts that are outfitted with a myriad of sensors. Chase boats and support vessels are deployed prior to the event to survey, mark out and ensure sailing areas are clear of underwater obstructions. All these vessels use 3D sonar scans and data overlaid on conventional chart plotters, which are updated live via 4G networks. Teams are increasingly utilise the higher bandwidth and live-streaming capabilities of 5G that became available with significant infrastructure updates during the end of last year.

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Modern racing boats take full advantage of the IoT, integrating hundreds of sensors taking various measurements – including state-of-the-art sensors for wind measurement, speed and angle, accelerometers, and a significant number of load sensors buried deep within the mast/rig and foil construction. These load meters are also supported by numerous water-based sensors calculating GPS, depth, turbulence and temperature and, most importantly, speed. This was shown on the SAIL GP event in 2019, when two methods of boat speed were needed to validate the over 50 Knots (57.5 mph!) achieved by both the Australian and UK teams during this race series.

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This life-vest-wearing mannequin was on display at CES 2020, sporting AC75 buoyancy aid fitted with HD Camera with 1080P 30FP/S and Fischer LP360 connectors. Copyright: Stuart Doe/ Fischer Connectors

data and video back to engineers and designers at the base straight off the new AC75 boat. Dan Bernasconi, Head of Design for Emirates Team New Zealand, said in a 2019 Yachts and Yachting interview that the 5G service is a game changer for the team. “There’s a huge amount of innovation in the design and build of the AC75. The boat is a completely new concept, so we need to be able to push the potential of this boat to its extreme in testing,” Bernasconi commented. Prompt onward data transmission in all areas is critical for the teams to support live monitoring and performance enhancement. Broadcast-Quality Communications on Every Boat Transmitting information to the base team for their use is a given, but racing organizations also have technical information available worldwide, broadcasting on multiple platforms and applications, even to devices carried in a spectator’s hand.

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The sailing world first saw the production of stadium-style racing introduced in the late 1990s. These boats, like those competing for the 2021 America’s Cup, were live-streaming on-board video and telemetry data, along with audio, directly to audiences. With ever more information and data from the boats now being displayed live to audiences through traditional broadcasts, interactive apps and across the Web, etc., the races come even closer to those on spectator boats or on shore. All cases require robust and 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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secure connectivity boat-to-boat and boat-to-shore to facilitate this. Lesson Three: Innovation and the Connected Team With enormous budgets on these boats, even for high-end racing, it’s clear that every team is pushing the frontiers of technology, science, innovation and performance of the boat and the crew. That’s only what we know about now, not what’s being kept secret! In years gone by, the crew was there to provide power to drive the winches for sail movement and trim. While this is still the case to some degree, there’s also a small amount of battery support topped up by the crew grinders. Crew role, weight and performance output have now become critical. This means, in addition to data gathered from the boat itself, there’s now far more interest in the biographical data from the crew itself, along with individual communication and data sharing on board the boats. Years ago, wind noise was not an issue for the sailors, who now travel at speeds in excess of 60 mph. Specialist headsets and microphones had to be generated to allow interconnected radios among the team members. Buoyancy aids now hold radios, batteries and multiple interconnects between buoyancy aid and headsets. Each sailor is effectively a network-connected worker and, with today’s technology, it’s possible to monitor individual


The American Magic team reviews data from a practice session. Copyright: Amory Ross

Support vessels and chase boats are also outfitted with communications gear and sensors. Copyright: Amory Ross/ NYYC American Magic

heart rates, biometrics, temperature and performance of the entire team. Such monitoring manages the physical elements of the sailing team and adjusts and optimises for peak performance during the critical race season. Applying the Lessons The key to applying the lessons of high-end racing to other, less dynamic, industrial or instrumentation applications is to understand the impact of the data you need. Not everyone needs 400 sensors, but when you do, it’s important to have a connectivity strategy that delivers the data in meaningful, actionable ways. Consider how much data you need to be able to move and how fast it needs to travel. Use the Internet and analytical tools, including artificial intelligence (AI), to make faster decisions that push you forward. Remove unnecessary weight while increasing data transmission with fiber optic solutions. If IoT strategies and technology are available to racing yachts, then they can be available to any application, anywhere.

first across the finish line. However that finish line is defined, always remember the fun of the race. Published on the Occasion of the 36th America’s Cup World Series (ACWS) Race in Auckland, New Zealand, December 1719, 2020. A special thanks to American Magic for use of their photography to illustrate this story. By Stuart Doe, Head of Active Solutions, Fischer Connectors *Martin Whitmarsh, CEO of Land Rover BAR, 2017 www.silicon.co.uk/networks/bar-americas-cup-2-210191 www.fischerconnectors.com/global/en/american-magic www.fischerconnectors.com/global/en

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Ultimately, engineers looking for a solution may be seen to be competing, whether it’s against their actual competition, or simply because the application being designed is a challenging puzzle that needs to be solved with the best, most efficient design. My advice as a sailor: When you need to stay competitive, strive for excellence and aim to be the 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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ELECTRONICS

WEARABLE CONNECTIVITY SOLUTIONS NOW EASIER TO INTEGRATE INTO FLEXIBLE STRUCTURES

Fischer Connectors is enhancing the integration capability of its versatile plug & use Fischer Freedom™ Series. The product line has been extended with new products and accessories allowing design engineers to further optimise cable management in line with their SWaP (size, weight and power) requirements, and integrate low-profile connectors, cable assemblies and active devices easily into all sorts of materials, even the most flexible of fabrics.

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he rugged sewing junction of the new Fischer Freedom Quick Detach System allows to easily convert flexible material into a potential panel, e.g., heavy duty tarp cover/tent, sail, vehicle tire blankets, smart backpacks. The system’s adapter and retaining ring facilitate the quick fit and interchange of receptacles.

The new Fischer Freedom cabled receptacle in size 08 is a smaller version of the receptacle introduced to the market last year. With a metal housing, four signal and power contact tracks, IP68 sealing and EMI shielding, this new cabled receptacle is ready to use under any conditions, easy to integrate into garments or mount on panels, and quick to fit and remove.

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Easy integration: two recent applications The multiple award-winning Fischer Freedom technology platform enables design engineers to integrate more technology and functionality into fixed, portable or wearable devices and ecosystems in markets such as: defense & security, medical, instrumentation, industrial and civil engineering, robotics, wearables, the Internet of Things (IoT). The two following applications recently introduced to the defenseand industrial markets show how the unique features of Fischer Freedom – easy 360° mating, easy cleaning, easy integration thanks to low-profile design and ergonomics – benefit OEM integrators. 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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Wearin’s connected vest (Platinum 2020 Technology Innovators Award) is a centralized, integrated connectivity system featuring six Fischer Freedom 7-contact receptacles fitted using the new Quick Detach System. VRaktion’s design engineers have integrated Fischer Freedom 4-contact receptacle in plastic into a smart work shoe using an obstacle warning system with laser sensors. More info: • Fischer Freedom™: www.fischerconnectors.com/global/ en/fischer-freedomtm-series • Wearin’: www.wearin.tech • VRaktion’s smart shoe: www.fischerconnectors.com/ global/en/case_studies/robust-connectivity-smart-shoes

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC’S NEW ACB REDUCES INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE STRESS

The new AE V Series C-class ACB from Mitsubishi Electric (Drawout type: left, Fixed type: right).

Targeted at commercial facilities, factories and other buildings, Mitsubishi Electric launches its new air circuit breakers (ACBs) with a breaking capacity of up to 50kA. The new range, called “AE V Series C-class”, offers a number of built-in features that reduce the need for multiple additional accessories. For example, when utilizing the built-in solenoid for remote operation the traditional motor charging devices and closing coils can be dispensed with as the breaker only requires an appropriately matched shunt trip device. This helps to eliminate additional parts that were previously required to achieve remote operation. User friendly breaker design reduces panel maintenance stress. Installation, use and maintenance represent the whole life cycle of an air circuit breaker. At each stage the AE V Series C-class breakers have been designed to bring additional benefits to users. At installation the universal terminals make wiring easier and more flexible, which in turn reduces unnecessary time wastage and streamlines stock holding.

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The overall unit design consolidates many points within the main breaker frame, reducing the number of required external devices. When options are required such as a shunt trip device or an under voltage trip device they can be quickly fitted into slots accessible by panel builders from the front of the breaker, making the panel quick to construct but also aiding maintenance as the accessories can be checked simply by removing the front cover. Also owing to the solenoid, maintenance processes can be reduced by 30% over existing models, helping to reduce both the 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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maintenance time and time the breaker is offline. The new design also includes a built-in drawout handle on the front, making maintenance work easier. Furthermore, as the C-class can be “charged” electronically via the solenoid the charging power can be reduced by 88% compared to spring-charge type ACBs using motor charging devices and closing coils. In addition, charging noise can also be kept extremely low, again, providing increased benefit in maintenance. As already noted the optimal design removes unnecessary accessories, reducing the number of potential failure points which, during the use life of the breaker, contributes to greater breaker durability. ACBs that do the job today and into the future. With over 86 years of breaker design, manufacture and test, quality is a very important criteria for Mitsubishi


User friendly breaker design reduces panel maintenance stress. Built-in handle for drawout types.

Quick fitting and easy access to accessories facilitates installation and maintenance.

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Universal terminals provide flexibility of wiring arrangements by panel builders. 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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Mitsubishi Electric circuit breakers are tested at every stage from design to mass production.

Electric’s air circuit breakers, and the AE V Series C-class is no exception; from operational design through to maintenance considerations and final standards compliance meticulous attention is applied to all aspects. The company’s commitment to quality is embodied in its tough testing regime, from initial design tests to verify the design performance to its on-going quality and functional test-all policies for every circuit breaker it makes. With sales in over 100 countries, high quality products are universally required. Going forward, additional high-end models in the AE V series will be released in the future. They bring the promise of network connectivity supporting users as they integrate power management into their Smart Factories and Digital Manufacturing processes. Furthermore, IoT functions and the possibility to consider new ways of access, including wireless monitoring by the users’ smart devices such as tablets and smartphones are also being planned.

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www.mitsubishielectric.com

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

NEW WEBSITE OFFERS PRACTICAL GUIDE TO MAKING DECISIONS ON DIGITAL MANUFACTURING INVESTMENTS

“Digital Manufacturing from Mitsubishi Electric” demonstrates a framework that enables management to make decisions on step-by-step investments.

Industry 4.0 and digital processes are indispensable for future manufacturing growth. While many companies understand the importance of automation, they sometimes struggle to make it a reality. They need a strong partner with the know-how to guide them.

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itsubishi Electric has a 100-year history of supporting manufacturers, plus a prolific track record for achieving factory automation at its own and other manufacturers’ facilities. The approach embodies the Japanese philosophy of Kaizen that is now recognized worldwide.

This website also introduces some examples of how customers achieved real ROI around energy reduction, productivity improvements, and cost reductions ranging from 30% to over 90% with the use of Mitsubishi Electric’s e-F@ctory digital manufacturing solutions.

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The company’s new website titled “Digital Manufacturing” demonstrates a framework that enables management to make decisions on step-by-step investments to maximize profitability and accelerate growth. This approach, called the “Smart Manufacturing Kaizen Level (SMKL),” is a maturity model to help manufacturers navigate their way through the digital morass by defining shared key actions and expected outcomes across their organization with the target of achieving a high ROI from their digital manufacturing initiatives.

Key Points 1. Ensure everyone in your team shares a clear understanding of where you are with regard to digital manufacturing, where you think you need to be, and how you will plan to get there by using a practical review and planning tool. 2. Match your steps to your own company’s individual needs, budgets, objectives and execution speed. 3. Utilize suppliers’ know-how for smooth execution, even for complicated processes, based on years of experience. 4. Benefit from optimal solutions offered through collaboration with global experts.

For more, visit the new website “Digital Manufacturing from Mitsubishi Electric” at https://www.mitsubishielectric.com/ fa/sols/digital-manufacturing/en/index.html

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

RED LION INTRODUCES NT4008 GIGABIT LAYER 2 PROFINET SWITCHES

PROFINET Performance without Compromise.

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With copper and fiber options in both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit configurations, as well as advanced security and traffic control, Red Lion’s NT4008 combines the power of PROFINET real-time data exchange with the performance and trusted reliability only Red Lion can deliver. This helps to ensure the success of Industry 4.0 initiatives worldwide.

Red Lion’s NT4008 is UL Class 1, Division 2 and ATEX listed for use in hazardous and ordinary locations, ABS certified for shipboard applications and EN50155 certified for rail applications, ensuring reliable operations in nearly any environment. The IP-30 metal DIN-Rail enclosures, redundant 12–58 VDC power inputs, wide -40 to 75°C operating temperature ranges and up to 50G shock resistance handle even the most extreme industrial conditions.

www.redlion.net

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ed Lion is excited to introduce NT4008, a new 8-port Gigabit managed Industrial Ethernet switch series. The NT4008 series switches are certified to meet PROFINET PNIO v2.34 Conformance Class-B standards to ensure seamless integration into PROFINET networks using standard PLC configuration and management tools.

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

NEW INTESIS GATEWAY FOR INTEGRATION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGERS INTO MODBUS-BASED BMSS

HMS Networks announces a new Intesis™ protocol translator that enables monitoring and control of OCPP 1.6-based Electric Vehicle Chargers from any Modbus based BMS.

A growing need for charging Electric Vehicles in buildings The Electric Vehicle (EV) industry has been growing exponentially during the last years and it is here to stay. According to the International Energy Agency, there were about 7.3 million chargers installed worldwide in 2019. The chargers are available in all sorts of facilities: private parking lots, public buildings, shopping malls, public transportation, etc. Installing chargers in buildings helps to promote the EV industry and speeds up the move towards renewable energy. However, it also represents a challenge for the facilities where the chargers are installed. Energy management and the availability of these EV parking lots require a lot of communication between Building Management Systems and the charging stations. Intesis protocol translation between OCPP and Modbus RTU/TCP enables monitoring and control of EV charging points One of the most used protocols in the EV industry is OCPP, a standard that provides monitoring and control of the EV Charging point operations such as starting or stopping the charge, managing users or reading out energy parameters. While used by many EV charging point manufacturers, it is not a protocol frequently used in BMS or Building Automation controllers.

Easy and standard integration in any BMS thanks to Intesis MAPS The gateway is configured using Intesis MAPS free configuration tool for all Intesis protocol translators. Intesis MAPS is designed to easily discover the OCPP chargers in the network and integrate them in the Building Automation system, using a standard register map that simplifies the integration into any Modbus TCP or RTU BMS. The combination of Intesis MAPS and the Intesis OCPP to Modbus TCP/RTU protocol translator makes integration of electric vehicles to Building Management Systems easy, helping building owners to optimise the use of the EV technology in their facilities and get ready for the EV revolution.

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The new and innovative Intesis protocol translator from HMS Networks provides a standard solution that connects the EV and BMS markets. It allows BMS system integrators and EV charging point manufacturers to provide basic monitoring and control of OCPP 1.6-compatible EV charging points from any Modbus-based automation system in an easy,

cost-efficient, and reliable way. The gateway enables the Modbus BMS to manage EV users, charging operations, and every measurement provided by the EV Charger, so the BMS can provide control, maintenance services, and energy reporting to the building owner. The gateway is available in two versions: one for 1 charger and 7 connectors, and one for or up to 20 chargers and 7 connectors each.

www.intesis.com

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

DYNEO+ FROM NIDEC LEROY-SOMER SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES THE ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF THE INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION PROCESS

Nidec Leroy-Somer, the world specialist with a wealth of experience in drive solutions for industrial refrigeration, has for more than 40 years provided refrigeration professionals with its motors and speed drives for improved productivity. Its latest development, the Dyneo+ range of IE5 synchronous reluctance permanent magnet (PM) motors, with rare earth free rotor, offers multiple advantages for driving screw compressors, piston compressors, circulation pumps and condensers, be it in terms of energy efficiency, performances or reliability.

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ompanies that use industrial refrigeration equipment have long been aware of the impact that the power consumption of a refrigeration installation can have both on energy bills and on the environment. The cold compressor, at the heart of the system, remains the most energy-hungry element, and can represent up to 80% of total power consumption. Electric motors, which are ubiquitous in the cold chain, constitute the main source of potential energy savings.

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Thanks to its expertise in the design and manufacture of industrial drive systems, Nidec Leroy-Somer offers a wide range of drive solutions at fixed or variable speed, providing significant energy savings on the refrigeration market. In addition to these complete and well-established ranges for this sector, Nidec Leroy-Somer has just launched its new Dyneo+ synchronous reluctance PM motor, ranging from 11 to 500Â kW, for speeds of up to 4500Â rpm. Specially designed for variable speed, this motor offers an economic 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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and ecological solution for the requirements of industrial refrigeration. To address the energy transition challenges, the European Parliament recently voted, on 8 October 2020, in favour of a new ambitious climate law targeting 60% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, and climate neutrality by 2040. As part of this approach, the latest Commission Regulation (EU) 2019/1781, applicable to electric motors and variable speed drives, defines and schedules increasingly stringent efficiency levels for machines sold on the European market. Every industry - and in particular the most energyintensive ones - is affected by these developments, designed to help protect the environment, not least considering that the cost of electricity is likely to climb significantly in the years to come. With its IE5 Ultra-Premium efficiency level, Dyneo+ has all it takes to rise to this energy challenge, offering as it does substantive energy savings in real conditions of


NEWS

use over the course of the cycle, at variable speed and load, as is typical with industrial refrigeration, where needs fluctuate considerably according to season and production level. Thanks to its energy performance, the Dyneo+ solution makes it possible to significantly increase the COP (“Coefficient of Performance”, expressed by the ratio between refrigeration capacity produced and power consumption) of a refrigeration unit. As well as helping to reduce the carbon footprint, the range offers a TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) among the lowest on the market, and for rapid return on investment, generally in less than one year. Dyneo+ motors are designed to operate exclusively with a variable frequency drive, allowing them to adapt to the speed of the machine being run and improve its performance when operating in overspeed. This provides the benefit of additional refrigeration capacity for a given device, thereby avoiding having to start up another compressor during a production peak. Moreover, the Dyneo+ solution enables optimisation of the number of compressors for a given installation. Delivering precise speed and torque control in sensorless mode, it guarantees constant torque over extensive speed ranges, with no derating or forced ventilation.

Dyneo+ is connected to the Systemiz interactive application, which provides a wide variety of digital services, including instantaneous access to all the product literature, and easy and intuitive drive setup by simply scanning the QR code on the nameplate. With its “Made in Europe” and low carbon footprint credentials, the Dyneo+ motor is eligible for Energy Savings Certificates, also known as White Certificates, generating government aid through the energy savings made. This makes for easy financing, meaning considerably faster return on investment, on top of the accrued energy savings Environmental compliance, energy performance and topnotch reliability: Dyneo+ motor represents a drive solution that is perfectly suited to the optimised productivity needs of industrial refrigeration.

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Nidec Leroy-Somer has developed the Dyneo+ range based on the mechanical platform of its IMfinity® induction motors, known for their robustness and reliability. The use of proven components makes these new motors extremely robust and long-lived by design, thereby limiting the risk of refrigeration system failure. What is more, Dyneo+ has been designed for ease of installation, simple setup and easy

maintenance. Generating low rotor losses, the magnetic synchronous reluctance technology reduces maintenance costs, in particular by extending the lubrication intervals. Whether compact or IEC interchangeable, with aluminium or cast-iron housing, or in IP55 or IP23 version, these motors are as easy to fit in new machines as they are to retrofit in existing installations as part of an energy optimisation project.

www.leroy-somer.com

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

IXXAT CANNECTOR – THE SWISS ARMY KNIFE FOR CAN

HMS Networks now introduces Ixxat® CANnector, a flexible solution for logging, bridging and extending CAN networks. Complementing the existing CAN@net NT and CANbridge NT series, CANnector offers additional interfaces and functions, as well as data logging functionality. Since it is compatible with CAN@ net NT and CANbridge NT, CANnector enables easy expansion of existing installations. A flexible all-rounder – logger, bridge and range extender Like CAN@net and CANbridge NT, CANnector is a standalone device, which means that no PC is needed. In addition to a generic CANnector, three preconfigured versions are offered:

CANnector Range – For simple CAN(FD) range extension via Ethernet or as a CAN interface connected to the PC via Ethernet. CANnector Bridge – CAN(FD) bridge/gateway, frame or signal based and with functions, like e.g. online floatingpoint data manipulation for all bus systems. CANnector Log – Data logger with trigger and ring buffer as well as low-power sleep mode with wake-up on CAN(FD), for logging frame or signal based CAN(FD) data.

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After unpacking and connecting, all three versions can be used directly. As the base hardware is the same, and the different functions of CANnector are provided by loadable configurations, all CANnectors can be reconfigured to include the functionality of choice.

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Performant and versatile A powerful Linux platform allows CANnector to execute complex applications and data manipulations directly on the device. The support of bus description files also enables operation on signal level. By using “Wake-up on CAN” and the possibility to switch off the TX function on the CAN buses, the device can be used in applications which are sensitive to power and safety. CANnector is available in different hardware versions, which differ only in the number of supported interfaces. The maximum number of interfaces is eight CAN(FD), two LIN, two Digital IO and one EtherCAT slave interface as well as Ethernet and USB. The EtherCAT slave interface is implemented using an Anybus® CompactCom technology from HMS, allowing future support of other industrial Ethernet protocols as well. USB extensions like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are available as an option.

All functions can be executed in parallel on the CANnector device, so that e.g. logging of data can be executed in parallel to CAN(FD) bridging and data visualization on mobile devices. Easy configuration via drag & drop HMS provides a free Windows tool which enables easy configuration of CANnector, in which the “connections” between source and target are established using a Drag and Drop concept. CAN(FD) bus descriptions can optionally be imported for configuration. The standard range of functions can be extended using the integrated development and debug environment and own C-user code or Matlab/ Simulink models, which can be executed directly on the device. www.ixxat.com MORE INFORMATION

Cloud and PLC connection Ixxat CANnector offers numerous additional functions which enable for example live data visualization and simulation using mobile devices (smartphone or tablet) via Wi-Fi, or cloud connectivity via OPC-UA, MQTT or via HMS Hub – HMS’ own solution for industrial data connectivity.

Using the EtherCAT slave interface, CANnector enables a direct connection of CAN(FD)-based networks to industrial Ethernet networks or a PLC.

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S M A R T FA C TO R Y

MANUFACTURING IN THE NEW NORM

“Many manufacturers are focusing on social distancing through shift management,” explained Hajime Sugiyama, Industrial IoT Evangelist of Factory Automations Systems Group, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.

Social distancing, protecting your employees, restarting operations and machines, catching up on supply chain gaps. Just like society as a whole, manufacturers are experiencing a lot of additional challenges they didn’t expect, and to top it all many are facing reduced budgets. So how do you navigate the new manufacturing norm?

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Manufacturers are now trying to adapt to the changes in conditions, especially in two major aspects,” said Hajime Sugiyama, Industrial IoT Evangelist of Factory Automations Systems Group, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. “For example how do you implement social distancing in a factory?”

It’s a very interesting question which has more permutations than most people initially consider. Starting with the individual we can all imagine the use of face guards and masks, and indeed many industries have traditionally used such PPE (Personal Protection Equipment), but this was driven from a hygiene or clean environment standpoint for industries producing such things as food, drugs or even sensitive electronics and semiconductors. But such PPE is not necessarily desirable in all industries. For example, in hot or humid environments the act of wearing a mask may actually increase risks of heat exhaustion, so care must be exercised in truly understanding the worker’s environment. Some plant managers are considering using screens between workers, but this is also not a panacea as there potentially can be space and restricted movement issues as well as possible problems around access to emergency devices (E-STOPs) or reporting/controlling devices….. or simply visibility challenges. Stepping back from the individual challenges, Sugiyama goes on to say, “Many manufacturers are focusing on

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As an initial quick fix to social distancing in a factory, individuals could use face guards and masks.

social distancing through shift management. For shift management, you need to balance work shifts so that fewer people are working together at the same time to prevent a pandemic situation inside the factory. But this presents a whole new set of challenges.” While balancing shift patterns provides factory managers with a level of operational redundancy, i.e. if one shift needs to be “suspended” due to infection, the second and/or third shifts can continue business as usually after the plant has had a thorough cleaning, it is a natural consequence that less people working will naturally lower the productivity. So how do you counter that? Let your Co-bot take the strain “Building extensive automation solutions takes a great deal of time, budget and planning,” says Sugiyama, “and in these times when manufacturers want to get up and running quickly and flexibly all three resources are likely to be in short supply.”

“It’s clear one solution will not fit all, so flexibility to adopt the right social, ‘mechanical’ and collaborative solutions will be the norm. An additional area of consideration is remote access,” claims Sugiyama. Remote is not just for homeworkers Returning to full operations, restarting processes and lines often reveals underlying problems which were not previously visible and creates a maintenance nightmare of unquestionable proportions. Remote access is a key benefit but if the device you are accessing is not intelligent, the value is drastically reduced as the amount of information is restricted. However, if you are lucky enough to be using intelligent automation devices which have degrees of self-determination and extensive diagnostics resolving maintenance issues can be accelerated. But aren’t all automation devices intelligent?

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So what’s the alternative? One possible solution is the increased use of industrial collaborative robots like “Assista”. Typically these “light” devices can be quickly deployed, are human friendly and so flexible that they can be quickly trained to do a variety of tasks, i.e. you do not need to have extensive robotics expertise. And probably a key deciding factor is that on the whole they are very cost effective. Enhancing the co-bot solution further with

AI driven environmental management software as seen with solutions such as e-F@ctory Alliance partner Realtime Robotics reduce programing burdens even further and offer live travel path adaptation so that the robot can dynamically navigate around obstacles such as humans, other robots and alike.

“While the essential product performance/function maybe similar, you would be mistaken if you thought that all products are equal for example, it is not really true to say ‘a drive is a drive, is a drive,’” states Sugiyama. 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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Some plant managers are considering using screens between workers, but this is not a panacea as there can be operational limitations (left). One possible solution is the increased use of industrial collaborative robots like “Assista” (right).

As an example may traditional users of Mitsubishi Electric’s inverters will be familiar with simple features such as a 3-wire fan, the significance of which only becomes apparent in times like now. The benefit being the ability to diagnose the health of the cooling fan – which in turn helps extend the life of the inverter. In more recent products there are unique environmental sensors on the circuit boards to detect effects of corrosive or polluted atmospheres which is complimented by the merging of communications, intelligence and AI through the inverter hardware and partner software to provide advanced maintenance diagnostics. Sugiyama explains, “Advances in product technology are not limited to the ‘external function’ of the device but also in how its operational life is managed and that means maintenance and performance KPIs – but such knowhow cannot remain locked up inside the product and really excels when it can be remotely accessed by the maintenance teams.”

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IIoT, Industrie 4.0, etc. have already been talked about for years, but at their core is the process of communication, extraction of data and subsequent analytics. However, often when plant managers consider remote access solutions they quake in their shoes as they contemplate a large, extensive SCADA system and all its associated paraphernalia. It is true these comprehensive systems are excellent for capturing vast amounts of data, providing alarming and analytics and reviewing historical data but as mentioned earlier they do take time to correctly plan and install. Other, quicker 34 | Industry Asia Pacific | January 2021

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solutions can be remotely, but directly, connecting to an HMI device on the shop floor to mimic the local screen or accessing data over a wireless interface to finally the more recent trend towards utilizing Edge controllers. So what is the new Norm? Actually for Sugiyama he sums it up as “A practical approach is critical. Sometimes the answer is simply a partition screen, other times it is an investment in a co-bot, but the watch words are flexibility, scalability and results focused. So maybe the new norm is actually reminding us to identify what is important.” Learn more about industrial IoT through Webinars on the Mitsubishi Electric FA channel at: “Latest Industry IoT trends for everybody” www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxvXqpUZsjY&list=PLz5PEyPEYH1uKbSRl219l6_ogJp1u82O


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