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TIFFANY SINGH ELIZABETH MILNE JAZ DAVIS RHYAN REGO FATS WHITE COURTNEY BURT KAIRAU BRADLEY VICKY TE PUNI DANIEL MCEWAN SANJI KARU TALIA SMITH JULIA GLOVER TIFFANY SINGH ELIZABETH MILNE JAZ DAVIS RHYAN REGO FATS WHITE COURTNEY BURT KAIRAU BRADLEY VICKY TE PUNI DANIEL MCEWAN SANJI KARU TALIA SMITH JULIA GLOVER TIFFANY SINGH ELIZABETH MILNE JAZ DAVIS RHYAN REGO FATS WHITE COURTNEY BURT KAIRAU BRADLEY VICKY TE PUNI DANIEL MCEWAN SANJI KARU TALIA SMITH JULIA GLOVER TIFFANY SINGH ELIZABETH MILNE JAZ DAVIS RHYAN REGO FATS WHITE COURTNEY BURT KAIRAU BRADLEY VICKY TE PUNI DANIEL MCEWAN


CONTENTS IN UNISON # 6 THE CREATIVE ISSUE MONDAY 30TH MAY 2011

LOG ON TO THE IN UNISON WEBSITE FOR FULL STORIES PLUS LOTS OF EXTRA ARTWORK AND INTERVIEW CONTENT FOR EACH FEATURED ARTIST. WWW.USU.CO.NZ/INUNISON

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TIFFANY SINGH: The Art of Process

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RHYAN REGO: Fusionary Genius

cover artist: kairau bradley

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KAIRAU BRADLEY: Downtown Discourse

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TALIA SMITH

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ARCHITECTURE PROJECT 4

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JAZ DAVIS: Secrets From Behind the Scenes


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BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

SANJI KARU

FATS WHITE: Kitsch on Canvas

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VICKY TE PUNI: A Picture’s Worth

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EDITOR Ashley Smith GRAPHIC DESIGN Mark Lovatt PHOTOGRAPHERS Sanji Karu Talia Smith Julia Glover EDITORIAL ENQUIRES ph. (09) 815 4321 ext 7927 inunison@unitec.ac.nz

ELIZABETH MILNE: Creating Homes in Landscape

ADVERTISING ENQUIRES

ph. (09) 815 4321 ext 7384 usuadvertising@unitec.ac.nz

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SPECIAL THANKS TO: Sanji Karu, Talia Smith, Julia Glover, Kairau Bradley, Westprint Limited; especially to Martin Nicholson who worked so closely with In Unison on this project. We appreciate all of your help and support in putting this incredible issue together.

COURTNEY BURT: Nostalgic Nuance

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PRINTED BY:

DANIEL MCEWAN: Sense-itive Spaces

Westprint Limited 9 Puriri Street, New Lynn.

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JULIA GLOVER

Disclaimer Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Submissions and contributors are welcome, but the publisher reserves the right to select and edit the material submitted. Materials submitted will remain property of the publisher unless alternative arrangements are made.

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Student Discounts Daily Delivery To Unitec 09 827 8531 • 9 Puriri Street, New Lynn • www.westprint.co.nz


WELCOME A

CREATIVE ISSUE WELCOME

EDITORIAL

TO THE CREATIVE ISSUE

PRESIDENT'S TIRADE

K

ia ora Unitec, Hopefully you’ll be pleased to hear that while in Egypt I didn’t run for any positions of governmental office – I was tempted, and they did have some openings. The fact that I don’t speak any Arabic at all was a red flag… among other things… Maybe I’ll stick to my knitting for now. And there’s plenty of knitting going on: Recently we worked with Unitec to convert the downstairs area of building 172 into a common space with couches and a small kitchen –success! Enjoy, guys n gals – if you’ve got some ideas as to how this space could be further improved, just let us know and we’ll see what we can do. Academic calendar changes for 2013 are still hot debate; make sure you have your say by talking to a Student Rep or by flicking an email through to our office. We received some requests for help finding places to study (I know this can be difficult in the libraries during peak times for sure) – remember, if you want to book classroom space for you or a group of friends to have a blat on the books, you can do so at http://tpa.unitec. ac.nz/timetabling/studentreq/ or by emailing Gemma at usueducation@unitec.ac.nz for some help. We’ve received a bunch of positive feedback about the “Meet Your Student Exec” posters that have gone up. All silly faces aside, it’s important that you know who we are so when you do have issues, you don’t feel like there’s no-one to hear your case. Keep on keeping in touch and stay chill. Pete Hodkinson 2011 President

s you can already tell, this is a much different issue of In Unison. In the Creative Issue, we feature some of the most stimulating work of creatives at Unitec. Through putting together this issue, I have had the opportunity to meet some amazing people. All of the featured artists are incredibly thoughtful and inspiring people, (you have all been such a pleasure to work with). I could not have pulled any of this off without the help of our three photographers, Julia, Talia, and Sanji or without the marvellous designer Mark Lovatt. I thank each of you from the bottom of my heart for all the extra time and enthusiasm you have contributed to this issue. In each of the interviews that I had with our featured creatives, I asked “What is your personal definition of creativity?” (Responses on back cover). In doing so, I find it only fair to generate my own definition through what I’ve learned about the vast nature of creative thinking. Creativity is not something that can be planned. Rather, creativity comes from a subconscious interpretation of events. Our minds are constantly processing the people and settings that surround us. Creativity is the regurgitation of our right brain spitting it back out with a twist of imagination. Every person maintains the ability to be creative. Sometimes the best way to express it comes from a release of routine and of linear thinking, which leaves us with the integrity of our unplanned, liberated minds. I encourage each of you to make the effort to discover the way that you best express your own form of creativity. ” Creativity is the quality that you bring to the activity that you are doing. It is an attitude, an inner approach – how you look at things . . . Whatsoever you do, if you do it joyfully, if you do it lovingly, if your act of doing is not purely economical, then it is creative.” – osho

Ashley Smith 2011 Editor

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FEATURED ARTIST TIFFANY SINGH

THE ART OF

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIA GLOVER

"CREATIVITY IS MORE A STATE OF MIND AND SPIRIT THAT KEEPS US OPEN E E FR TO INTERPRETING AND CHANNELING THE ESSENCE OF BEING CREATIVE. ! Y R T N E W : BEING AH O S T OTHERWISEEALMOST LIKE BIG SIEVE" N S SE D R P A TIFFANY SU SINGH E GR U H

T

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TIFFANY SINGH FEATURED ARTIST

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FEATURED ARTIST TIFFANY SINGH

“EVEN THOUGH ALL OF THE WORK THAT I DO IS SO DIFFERENT, THE SAME MEDIUM THAT RUNS THROUGH IT ALL IS COLOUR.”

T

iffany Singh has an incredible approach to her work. The beauty of her foundation is that the entire process is an art form in and of itself. It’s one thing to visit a gallery, and admire the piece of art hanging on a wall, in all of its post-production glory. It’s another to generate an entirely creative process that lends a story supplementing the polished final product. Tiffany specializes in the art of installation. Installation art is, “Art that uses the whole space as its medium. It’s when the actual overall environment becomes the art”-john pusateri (collaborative artist) 10

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She is currently working on her masters in art and design at Unitec. In her most recent project, Tiffany is exploring the artful sound and visual associations to the chakra points of the human body. She has collaborated with John Pusateri on her project featuring the connection of sound, colour and pattern to create visually stimulating prints that embrace a multisensatory representation of each chakra. The two artists complete a synergized team. The combination of their passion and talent create a full circle understanding for the complexities of their print venture. The consideration that plays into a project

above left: tiffany and john pusateri reflecting back on the book that inspired them above middle: tiffany showing off the printing sheets above right: final product prints


FEATURED ARTIST TIFFANY SINGH

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from tiffany’s exhibition: “einstein was a buddhist”

“during” audience interaction with “newton and the piece bomb”

of this dimension is an aspect of Tiffany’s art that certainly deserves to be recognised and celebrated. There is a certain amount of spirituality that exudes from all of Tiffany’s projects. She describes it as an “eastern-western blend”. Her visions maintain a mindfulness about them that creates a multifaceted definition to all of her displays. In her last exhibition, “Newton and the Piece Bomb”, Tiffany celebrated the natural interaction of an audience with her art work. After allowing the stunningly sterile display to sit motionless for thirty days,

Tiffany invited the public to come in and interact with her exhibition. Each person contributed their part to the installation to create a re-worked and colourful version of the original artwork. It requires a great deal of humility and acceptance of human kind to allow others to control the outcome of such a personal project; and that’s just what Tiffany did. “With the initial installations that I set up…the way people engage with those and the aspects that are added that I wouldn’t expect, turn the work into something I myself would not ever have envisaged it being. It’s nice that

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there’s that continuous thread of what I set out to convey, but I realize at the end of the day that there’s still a disparity, still a magic element of things I could never have expected” Tiffany has been expressing her artistic self since before she can remember. She has an ongoing devotion for the art of formation. This is a stable explanation for why the whole process of creation has become an art form for Tiffany. She is not just working towards a final masterpiece, but allowing the entirety of her projects to become a form of expression. This encompasses the inspiration, conception,


TIFFANY SINGH FEATURED ARTIST

“after” audience interaction with “newton and the piece bomb”

and execution of her original ideas. There is a distinct aspect of seeing outside the box that Tiffany practices. She sees the potential of elaboration in things that would not ordinarily contain much of an imaginative definition. I asked her who, if anyone, she would desire to collaborate with on a future project. “Einstein. He was a genius, and he comes from quite an Eastern philosophical positioning which I think was really interesting from his day in age. A lot of his work hasn’t come to the foreground because it was Eastern based in a Western world. Quite a bit of his

research revolved around the healing capacity of colours. Yea…Einstein would be amazing to work with” In her current project with the printed simulations of chakras, Tiffany has created an intense connectivity between the viewer and the art. John and Tiffany plan to have a speaker playing sounds next to their respective prints, to fully capture the sensatory significance of that chakra point to the human condition. This installation would become an exploration of the senses, and empower the viewers to identify the art within themselves.

The appreciation and commitment to the creation process is what truly moulds an artist. An artist is a full time master of creation, and in Tiffany’s case: a Master of Procession. Her incredible visionary genius and naturally developed execution of projects is what distinguishes artistry from a craft into a lifestyle.

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The USU AnnUAl

Student experience

(mini!) Survey Help improve your student experience And you could

Win An ipHOne 4 or 1 of 10 $100 petrol voucHers!

you’ve got until June 10 to Jump onto tHe us u website And give us tHe low do wn on tHe student ex perience.

usu Students’Association at Unitec

www.usu.co.nz


ELIZABETH MILNE FEATURED ARTIST

CREATING

IN LANDS

HOMES

CAPE

ELIZABETH MILNE IS A RECENT GRADUATE OF THE MASTERS P H OTO G R APHED PROGRAMME OF LANDSCAPE B Y TA L IA S M IT H ARCHITECTURE AT UNITEC. IN HER FINAL PROJECT, ELIZABETH CONCENTRATED ON A VERY ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH TO HER LANDSCAPE DESIGN IDEAS. SHE FOLLOWED AND STUDIED THE CULTURE OF HOMELESSNESS IN AUCKLAND, AND DESIGNED URBAN LANDSCAPE SPACES FOR THIS PORTION OF THE POPULATION. HER MOST RECENT PROJECT WAS THE DESIGN FOR THE DOWNTOWN SPACE BETWEEN ST. MATTHEW’S CATHEDRAL AND THE CITY MISSION. IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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FEATURED ARTIST ELIZABETH MILNE

above: elizabeth’s architectural model of st. matthew’s cathedral and the courtyard beside it.

I

n her research leading up to the project, Elizabeth took the time to fully understand the wants and needs of the homeless in order to appropriately create for them. She studied the functionality, and aesthetic preferences of their spaces. She then added humour into the mix of her design. The reason for this: anyone (homeless or domiciled) can appreciate humour, and it connects the two demographics. “I designed two sets of stairs that pivot and generate sound when walked on. The intention being that the sound and movement will provide entertainment for the homeless who may enjoy watching the domiciled public use the stairs while they sit to the side. The design generates an unexpected reversal of 'roles'; usually the homeless laugh at themselves, but this design provokes a laugh at the domiciled public, who are also expected to laugh at themselves.” Elizabeth was drawn to landscape architecture for its, “creative integration

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of space, flora and fauna and people.” Her motivations are apparent in her obvious appreciation for the manner in which her landscape design affects the population it surrounds. The unique aspect of Elizabeth’s landscape work is the attention paid to the people and culture that interact with her space. Although an incredible landscape architect, I believe she is an anthropologist deep down! What sparked your interest in designing spaces for the homeless? My final research project in the bachelors programme was a social project that looked at designing sustainable tourism in a tourist village at risk of tsunamis in Samoa. My social conscience followed through into thinking about topics for my masters project. It occurred to me one day that there might be something to learn about urban space from the most marginalised community who live out their lives in the landscape. The potential therefore was that this knowledge could influence the way in which we design urban space.

What has this project taught you? The key concept that came out of the project is spatial status: that the most marginalised people occupy the most marginalising space. An example of this is that homeless often sit below eye level on improvised seats or on the ground, usually to the side of a path, in an alcove or bus stop. The project argues that the best co-existence in urban space may be achieved when the homeless are validated by designs that enhance their status, dignity and sense of self worth. What has been the biggest challenge? Homelessness is a challenging topic and I was aware from the outset that opinions are polarised. Sean Godsell, an Australian architect states that "the measure of a sophisticated society is how well it treats its underprivileged.” The project has been a rewarding journey however and I am happy with the outcome. Over the two years that I was working on my masters I have been a part of a touch rugby team predominately made up of homeless men


ELIZABETH MILNE FEATURED ARTIST

Invisibility

“I’ve realised something lately – that invisibility of street people blinds both ways. Those with houses and cars, DVD players and ThinkPads, don’t really see us. To them we are all one person with a yellow beard, a torn blue coat and gin blossoms. Our name is Homeless Dave. But when you’re on the street, when you’ve got no car or ThinkPad, those who do are faceless too. When you walk down Queen St you see Igor and Heartattack, Friday, Sugar Sunny and Dan. You see a guy you know and give him the nod, maybe even a solid – knocking fists like he’s your brother, just for the hell to it. But you don’t see the money people, th pretty ones. They’re all the same person. And their name is Tom Cruise” (BishopStall, 2004, pp. 132-133).

ch

ws. and st he h grass

The main objective of this drawing was to observe the domiciled public watching a group of homeless people as they made their way past (figure 16). The observation concluded that most people who walked past didn’t look at the group, but those people who were walking alone and therefore more vulnerable, were more inclined to look and to hold their gaze for longer. Visibility therefore increases with the vulnerability of individuals in a public setting.

ion. g e co-

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nal

w’s ntry ion e. It is pared ed nd

ve et

tion

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Figure 16

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far top: observational drawing from elizabeth’s research above: drawn model of elizabeth’s “humour stairs”

and women. Initially I was hesitant self Figure 41: The Clappingand Terraces: conscious but soon realised I was welcome, respected and from then on have really enjoyed being a part of the team. Elizabeth’s refreshing perspective on landscape architecture is leaving an amazing impression on her field. It’s introducing a humanitarian approach to a creative craft. Elizabeth is proving that a “home” doesn’t need to be defined by four walls and a roof. A home can be created from whatever surrounds you.

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FEATURED ARTIST JAZ DAVIS

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JAZ DAVIS FEATURED ARTIST

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIA GLOVER

VISITING THE THEATRE IS AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE. THE GLAMOUR OF AN ENTIRE LIVE PRODUCTION IS FULL OF ENERGY AND EXCITEMENT. WHILE THE AUDIENCE SITS IN THEIR RESPECTIVE SEATS, WAITING FOR THE MOMENT THAT THE CURTAINS ARE DRAWN, THERE IS A STIR OF COMMOTION AND LAST MINUTE PREPARATION HAPPENING BACKSTAGE. A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF WORK GOES IN TO PREPARING AND EXECUTING THE BACKSTAGE HAPPENINGS OF A STAGE PRODUCTION. MAKING SURE THE ACTORS ARE ON CUE, THE LIGHTS AND SET JUST RIGHT, AND SYNCHRONIZING SOUND EFFECTS ARE JUST A FEW OF THE ELEMENTS THAT JAZ DAVIS NEEDS TO CONSIDER. IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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FEATURED ARTIST JAZ DAVIS

“I PREFER A LARGE VENUE TO A SMALL ONE. THE THRILL OF A LARGE SPACE, AND IT’S CAPACITY FOR LIGHTING EFFECTS AND SURROUND SOUND IS WHAT EXCITES ME”

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n her third year of Screen and Performing Arts Studies, Jaz Davis has distinguished herself among the theatre stage production crew. Her vigor for the practice is apparent as she speaks about her inspiration and dream projects. Jaz formed an initial interest in theatre while in high school. She was part of the drama group, but soon recognised that her true passion lay behind the scenes. Since attending Unitec, she has been studing and perfecting the creative art form that is required to put on a successful theatre show. “I prefer a large venue to a small one. The thrill of a large space, and it’s capacity for lighting effects and surround sound is what excites me” 20

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I spoke with Jaz about which shows she aspires to work on one day. She explained that when she went to see a production of “Phantom of the Opera” it was a confirming moment for her enthusiasm in the stage management field. Jaz opened up about how the show gave her a driving interest in the potential that a stage show can contain. She explained that her dream job would one day be to work backstage for a Broadway production of “Phantom of the Opera”. Jaz spoke about the impact her backstage work has on a complete stage show. Her management of the lighting is what affects the emotion of each scene. The consideration of sound and music creates an atmosphere in the theatre to help create an overall mood. Jaz explains that from start to finish, her work as a stage manager is non-stop. She is constantly time-lining the tasks of backstage organisation as the show is occurring. As an audience it’s hard to imagine that so much time and energy is being dedicated back stage. We watch from our seats as actors flawlessly deliver their lines and create a storyline for our viewing pleasure. The show just would not have the same effect if it weren’t for the dedication of the backstage crew. Jaz has a true talent to be able to manage what’s happening in front of the curtain, while remaining behind it all the while.


Apply now for Spring Graduation

You could be one of 800 celebrating our Spring Graduation. If you’re about to complete your qualification, check www.graduation.unitec.ac.nz to find out whether you’re eligible for our Spring Graduation, 14 September 2011 at the Auckland Town Hall.

Application forms are available online or from Student Central (Te Pae Ko-rero). You can apply before you’ve received your exam results. Remember, whether or not you’re attending a ceremony, you’ll need to apply to receive your graduation certificate.

You can apply before you’ve received your exam results. ApplicAtions close 1 JulY 2011. » 0800 10 95 10 » www.unitec.ac.nz


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RHYAN REGO FEATURED ARTIST

GEN US PHOTOGRAPHED BY SANJI KARU

I’VE REFLECTED BACK IN MY 2011 DIARY FOR THE EXACT DAY I MET RHYAN REGO: MARCH 15, 2011 AT 2:00 PM. RHYAN CAME INTO MY OFFICE WITH A PORTFOLIO OVERFLOWING WITH AMAZING GRAPHIC PRINTS, AND A BRIMMING CREATIVE ENERGY ABOUT HIM.


FEATURED ARTIST RHYAN REGO

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s some of you know, Rhyan Rego went missing from Muriwai Beach on April 7. His disappearance remained somewhat of a mystery for three weeks before his body was found at South Head. At Rhyan’s funeral service on May 3, 2011 it was clear that he had left an amazing impression on those who knew him. Rhyan had an amazing talent. He was a “fusionary artist”, meaning that he combined different facets of art and culture to create an overall artistic message. He was a talented musician, part of the musical group: Tangaroa (previously known as Damage Tones). He fused his musical inspirations with his visual ones to create a synergized art form. Since I hadn’t had the chance to explore Rhyan’s art with him personally, I met up with a few of his closest friends, Sanji, Michaela, and Ray, to better understand the origins of his creativity. The first thing we discussed was Rhyan’s visual combination of Indian and Maori symbols in his graphic pieces. Rhyan was born in India, and moved to New Zealand with his family nine years ago. He was continually inspired by the mythological culture of both countries, and blended the visual images of both cultures in his art work. His friends reflect, “He was always talking about the Hindu gods and their meanings. He was driven by mythology and its stories. His family really supported this direction because he was one of the only family members who blended the two cultures so successfully.” 24

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“hongi of the gods”

“taniwha king”

One of his most stunning pieces, “Hongi of the gods”, is the image of the Hindu and Maori gods facing one another, joined at the forehead, breathing in the same air. This epitomizes his conceptual vision of “a hybrid fusion of cultures”. Rhyan was truly in touch with his roots, and how they connected him to multiple places throughout the world. When I met Rhyan, he was particularly driven by screen printing. I discussed this with Sanji, Michaela, and Ray, and they explained that, “He explored quite a lot. He was into painting at one stage, but focused more on the illustrative side of things. Once he began experimenting with screen prints, he found the beauty of mass production while incorporating a handmade-ness about it” This is just another example of his fusionary artistic vision. Rhyan had motifs that often returned

to his visual and vocal creations. One of these motifs is the ocean. His band, named Tangaroa, translates to “God of the Sea”, through which he often sang about the water and its hold over him. The ocean appeared as the subject of many of his drawings as well. “He had an awe and fear of the ocean, not an obsession, but more of a curiosity and a thirst for knowledge of the ocean” His friends elaborated on more of the themes that his work featured. They explain that he was particularly influenced by the culture of the 1960’s, dubbing the phase, “psychedelic surrealism”. There are strong psychedelic tones in his prints, and they accompany the oceanic themes flawlessly. Sanji, Michaela and Ray remember how much Rhyan enjoyed collaborative work, recalling that it was never a chore for him. He was always keen to jump onto a project


RHYAN REGO FEATURED ARTIST

“how the gods kill”

with someone to create something new and different. They chatted about how well he fed off of other people’s creative energy. This must be why he worked so well within a band dynamic. Rhyan was truly a creative genius with the ability to share his inventiveness with anyone involved. His inspiration was a never-ending cycle as his music inspired his art, and his art inspired his music. You can find traces of both when you flip back and forth between the two media. Rhyan will be remembered as a son, brother, and friend. But he will also be remembered through the artwork that he left behind. He truthfully left parts of himself in the pieces that he created, as I’ve discovered in “getting to know Rhyan” in the aftermath of his tragedy. We will remember you Rhyan. Rest In Peace.

“lord shiva”

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FEATURED ARTIST FATS WHITE

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FATS WHITE FEATURED ARTIST

KITSCH ON CANVAS PHOTOGRAPHED BY TALIA SMITH

FATS WHITE, A POPULAR PAINTER AMONG THE UNITEC CAMPUS, HAS JUST AS COLORFUL A PERSONALITY AS HIS PAINTINGS REFLECT. HIS USE OF A TECHNOCOLOUR PALLET MAKES HIS WORK INSTANTLY RECOGNISABLE. HE PAINTS USING MOTIFS OF ANIMALESQUE CREATURES, AND SCANTILY CLAD SUBJECTS. HIS MERGE OF POPULAR CULTURE AND HIGH ART FORM THE ULTIMATE KITSCH ON CANVAS.

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FEATURED ARTIST FATS WHITE

I DECIDED TO SHAKE HANDS WITH MY DEMONS. ANYTHING THAT I’D BEEN SCARED OF OVER MY LIFETIME, I’VE TRIED TO PROCESS

F

ats is a mature student studying for his masters in painting at Unitec. He had experienced an interesting life that has led him to his most recent ardor: painting. Fats has spent the better part of his life as a sort of jack of all trades. He has worked in the filming industry, as a musician, as a commercial fisherman, and even as an impromptu life coach. He has an extreme amount of energy that is directly translated into his interests and hobbies. Lucky for us, for the past few years, he has exhausted that energy onto canvas. As the story goes, the origins of Fats’ curiosity for painting began when he was thirteen. He explains that he once painted "something really simple" out of 28

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black enamel, and the thoughts flowed so effortlessly from his head onto the page. Once the painting began to formulate itself, the intensity of the situation was so frightening for young Fats that he never let the memory escape him. “At that point, I decided I wasn’t ready for painting. It freaked me out” This was maintained as the theme of Fats’ endeavours over the past twenty years: battling and tackling developed fears. “I decided to shake hands with my demons. Anything that I’d been scared of over my lifetime, I’ve tried to process that fear and squash it” He also had an extreme fear of the sea, which was conquered through his

time spent as a commercial fisherman. The experience taught him a lot about personal growth and himself. By facing the fear head on, he found that there was no way to escape, and became a better person because of it. He even reflects on the residual benefits, as he recalls, “Actually there are lots of perks about getting back on land after being at sea for so long. You find that you’re really good in the sack and on the dance floor.” As seriously as he takes his work, Fats lives by a very simple philosophy to have fun and soak up all of your surroundings. His next excursion is a trip to Berlin, in which he seeks the potential to break up the patterns of everyday life. While speaking about his trip to Berlin, he


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FATS WHITE FEATURED ARTIST

left: fats in his studio 1: “the house of the body” 2: part of “bull rider scenes” 3: part of “bull rider scenes”

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FEATURED ARTIST FATS WHITE

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FATS WHITE FEATURED ARTIST far left: part of “bull rider scenes” left:“raise the flag”

“ACTUALLY THERE ARE LOTS OF PERKS ABOUT GETTING BACK ON LAND AFTER BEING AT SEA FOR SO LONG. YOU FIND THAT YOU’RE REALLY GOOD IN THE SACK AND ON THE DANCE FLOOR.” reflects on the potpourri of different cultures to be experienced. He also touches upon the fact that Germany runs on a completely different mindset than he’s used to. He anticipates the change of pace to be refreshing. Based on the fact that Fats is well known for his rainbow coloured paintings, I asked for his stance on Black and White painting. It turns out that he once created a black and white painting, which has since been destroyed. He explains that in his experience, painting monochromatically forces an artist down a path of "reductionalism”, and sometimes the colours can be distracting to the overall composition. But Fats is certainly an artist who has found an affinity with colour. They are truly expressive of his liveliness and vigor for his projects. IU: If you had to pick one colour that represented “Fats White” which would it be? FW: Iridescent Pink The ukulele is a strong representation of Fats’ colourful personality. The light hearted sound and nature of the instrument characterises the positivity that Fats projects onto others. He is often spotted plucking away at his small instrument in between painting sessions. Music has become a powerful force in his life, and I spoke with him about the effect that his ukulele has had on his work. “It’s a good breather. It can get quite intense when painting all the time. When the going gets tough, it’s nice to break it up with a high pitched, four string simple instrument” Fats is currently traveling in Berlin and using the experience to grow as an artist and an individual. IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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COURTNEY BURT FEATURED ARTIST

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIA GLOVER

21 YEAR OLD COURTNEY BURT IS AN ARTIST FROM VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SPENDING A SEMESTER STUDYING AT UNITEC IN THE ARTS AND DESIGN PROGRAMME. COURTNEY APPROACHED ME WITH A VERY UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE TO HER WORK THAT PLAYS DEEPLY INTO HER TIME AWAY FROM HOME, BUT ALSO HER OWN PERSONAL BATTLES.


FEATURED ARTIST COURTNEY BURT

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ince arriving in Auckland, her style of artistry has made a drastic change. Where Courtney once used coloured charcoals to create photographic look-a-like self portraits, she is now loosening and darkening up her methods. There’s been a certain nostalgia attached to Courtney’s most recent work. Her time away from home has given her the opportunity to reflect on the concepts of loneliness and isolation. In trying to explore these emotions, she is studying photographs of family members that she believes to encompass these similar dark feelings. Rather than portraying her own sentiments through self portrait, Courtney is now projecting her mental experiences onto the portraits of other people. Her new medium: dripped charcoal. Rather than manually controlling the outcome of each drawn stroke, Courtney has been allowing the charcoal to control itself on the canvas. I believe this is representative of her ability to let go of a controlled version of herself in the past. I spoke with Courtney about what drew her to the medium of charcoal as her main artistic device. “I can control it, but I can’t at the same time. I like being involved in the process. I can touch it, I can choose where it goes. I’m now adding water into the mix, meaning I’m controlling it, but I’m kind of letting go” We discussed the major differences of 34

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COURTNEY BURT FEATURED ARTIST

top left: courtney’s self portrait work from vancouver. top middle: working with hair as medium bottom: courtney in her studio, explaining her inspiration right: dripped charcoal medium

the art scene in Auckland compared to that in Vancouver. Courtney explained that there is a lot more cultural association to the art that she’s seeing in Auckland; whereas in Vancouver, the art is more so about making a bold statement. She compares the art school life style between schools as well. At home, her programme is structured and assignment based. She reflects that the freedom and space that Unitec has provided her as an artist has facilitated her self expression. This explains the drastic change in her work over the past three months. The opportunity to have so much artistic freedom has opened up her mind to a more pure and honest fashion of creation. Courtney quotes one of her inspiration artists, Yi-Hsin, who discovered that, “by being away from her homeland was able to achieve a new level of self discovery” To follow suit to her nostalgic tendencies, Courtney has recently been experimenting with her hair. In some of her most recent drawings, she has used her hair as the medium. She associates the use of hair with a more personal touch to her work. Her aim is to attach as much of her personal self into her work as possible. Courtney provides an exceptional outlook into the art inspired by loneliness. Her time in New Zealand has clearly provoked a more liberated version of her work. The inspiration that is enticed by travel is uniquely nuanced. IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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s e s u b , q beer, bb

! y b g u and r

Sound like you? Buy a $10 ticket from uSu reception to Support the auckland BlueS Saturday June 4th aS they play againSt the chiefS! We’ll have a free BBQ and drinkS here at mt alBert campuS, in the huB, from 5pm, then all Jump on the party BuS to eden park to cheer on the BlueS aS the loudeSt fanS in the Stadium.

Game StartS at 7.35pm / ticketS are only $10 from uSu reception make Sure you get in Quick BecauSe ticketS are limited to SeatS on BuSeS!

usu Students’Association at Unitec

www.usu.co.nz/whats-on or Search uSu at unitec on faceBook


USU PRESENTS

MARDI GRAS War m u p pa rt y

FRiday 17 JUNE 8Pm CaRRiNgToN’S PUmPhoUSE

LimiTEd $5 PRESaLE TiCkETS aT USU RECEPTioN (bLdg 180) oR oNLiNE aT daShTiCkETS.Co.Nz (booking fee applies) $10 dooR SaLES R18 EvENT

wiN a TRiP FoR Two To ThE ohakUNE moUNTaiN maRdi gRaS, JUNE 24-26!

yoU’LL gET Two TiCkETS To maRdi gRaS PLUS Two NighTS aCCommodaTioN iN a PREmiUm STUdio iN ThE hEaRT oF ohakUNE! aLL yoU NEEd To do iS ‘LikE’ USU oN FaCEbook. ThE wiNNER wiLL bE dRawN oN JUNE 17.

usu

www.USU.Co.Nz SEaRCh FoR ‘USU aT UNiTEC’ oN FaCEbook


FEATURED PROJECT THIRD YEAR ARCHITECTURE

RESTORATION OF

FOUNDATIONS PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED BY AK SHAY SHAH

AK SHAY SHAH IS PART OF A COLLABORATIVE THIRD YEAR ARCHITECTURE PROJECT. HE AND A GROUP OF STUDENTS FACILITATED IN THE DESIGN AND EXECUTION OF A MAORI RETREAT BUILDING IN KAIAUA (50 KILOMETERS OUTSIDE OF THAMES). THE COMPLETION OF THIS TASK WAS NO EASY MISSION, AS THE GROUP HAD A SMALL BUDGET AND THE RAINY WEATHER WORKING AGAINST THEM. IN KEEPING WITH THE TRADITIONAL MAORI DESIGN, AND IMPLEMENTING THEIR OWN INNOVATION INTO THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THIS SITE, THE THIRD YEAR STUDENT ARCHITECTURE GROUP SHOWED OFF AN IMPRESSIVELY VARIED FORM OF CREATIVITY. 38

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“IT WAS A WHANAU GROUP WHO BOUGHT A PLOT OF LANDS, TRANDITIONALLY USED BY THEIR ANCESTORS. THE STRUCTURE USED TO BE AN EXTENSION OF A BUDDHIST TEMPLE. THE WHANAU GROUP WANTED TO SOMETHING A BIT MORE MAORI WITH THE STRUCTURE ON THE SITE.”


THIRD YEAR ARCHITECTURE FEATURED PROJECT

“ MOST OF US COMING FROM DIFFERENT CULTURES WAS ONE OF THE BEST PARTS OF THE PROJECT. WE DID NOT ALL UNDERSTAND HOW THIS COMBINED COMMUNITY OF FAMILY WORKED, AND GETTING TO KNOW HOW THAT GROUP FUNCTIONED WAS AN EXPERIENCE.”

“IT’S A TWO WAY RELATIONSHIP. THE FAMILY GETS FREE LABOUR, OR MORE OF A HELPING HAND, AND THEY HELP US OUT BY PROVIDING SHELTER DURING THE DAY. IT’S A CROSS-RELATION PROJECT.”

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FEATURED ARTIST KAIRAU BRADLEY

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KAIRAU BRADLEY FEATURED ARTIST

DOWNTOWN

DISCOURSE PHOTOGRAPHED BY SANJI KARU

KAIRAU BRADLEY, A THIRD YEAR GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDENT, MAY BE A GRAPHICS WHIZ, BUT HIS TRUE GENIUS IS REVEALED ON THE URBAN CANVAS.


FEATURED ARTIST KAIRAU BRADLEY

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t 23 years old, Kairau has recently been asked to be a member of Auckland’s graffiti crew, TMD, and is also one of the original artists of the GBAK crew. A quick spin around the downtown Auckland area will find you a significant amount of exposure to the stunning graffiti work of both of these collectives. Kairau visited Miami in 2010 with TMD for the Miami Dream Project, an internationally recognized graffiti “conference”, where worldwide graffiti artists join to celebrate the beauty and range of their work. 42

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Aside from his graphic artistry, Kairau is an incredibly down to earth guy. He exudes an amazing passion for the work that he does, and genuinely cannot get enough of it. His fervent attitude has undoubtedly contributed to his growth and success in the past few years. He explains that the origins of his enthusiasm come from growing up in the household of an artist father. His dad, a painter and illustrator, always encouraged pursuing creative work. Kairau ran with this ethos and chased the path of graffiti artistry, and thank goodness for it!


KAIRAU BRADLEY FEATURED ARTIST

“I FEEL LIKE I STARTED AT THE BOTTOM,II WAS TEN YEARS OLD JUST TAGGING IN MY BOOKS, WHICH MADE ITS WAY TO PUBLIC TOILETS, AND SO ON…AND IT WASN’T UNTIL I WAS ABOUT FOURTEEN THAT I FOUND OUT WHAT GRAFFITI REALLY WAS.”

“I feel like I started at the bottom, I was ten years old just tagging in my books, which made its way to public toilets, and so on… and it wasn’t until I was about fourteen that I found out what graffiti really was.” One of the most interesting aspects of graffiti artistry is the taboo nature of “public defacement”. I spoke with Kairau about the culture that surrounds his type of art, and how it affects his limits. Thankfully, he has found a constructive way to handle the controversy. Graffiti artists do not receive the same sort of Council support as other creative mediums

in the city. The Auckland City Council has notoriously painted over some of the classic displays of wall art that were once found around town. “Defacing Public Property” is an issue that graffiti artists are constantly struggling with. The timeless argument remains whether or not the spaces are actually enhanced by the artwork. Regardless of our opinions on the matter, graffiti is technically made illegal, which generates a certain risk factor and glamour to the practice. As Kairau interestingly put it, he knows that with

clockwise from top left: gbak, amsterdam, 2011; hische, hamilton, 2011; munich; haser, ghent, belgium; haser, los angeles, 2010; haser, miami, 2010; haser, rotorua,2011.

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FEATURED ARTIST KAIRAU BRADLEY

“IT’S PAINFUL TO THINK THAT I’M WRITING MY OWN CRIMINAL RECORD, BECAUSE FOR ME, I’M GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY…" every new piece of public wall art he is “creating and writing his own criminal record”. “It’s painful to think that I’m writing my own criminal record, because for me, I’m giving back to the community…I’m producing artwork for them. I run the risk every time I go out, and it’s getting worse as I get older, but that’s the passion I have for the art, that I’m willing to risk it all” Kairau speaks highly of the graffiti culture in Auckland. He explains that the work in the city is more collaboratively competitive than viciously spirited (as the reputation holds in other major cities). Auckland graffiti artists have adopted a term, “NETCH”, meaning: Next Echelon. This term encompasses the next generation of style. Kairau describes the style as a mash up of everything that’s been done, brought together in a way that’s hardly graffiti anymore. This is the collaborative style that put the Auckland graffiti scene on the map. “That’s kind of the benefit with Auckland; we run into each other on almost a daily basis, so it’d be stupid to create any tension. I do feel like in the last decade, Auckland has found itself in graffiti, and begun to unify its style— heading in a positive direction” One of the unique things about graffiti is the myriad of canvases that can be used for display. Graffiti is found on clothing, urban walls, furniture, paper, etc. As we spoke 44

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about this, Kairau explained that he prefers painting freight trains, because it connects him with the historical culture of his work. “There is no feeling like painting a train… that’s where it all started. When you’re painting a train, you have these instant flashbacks to what kids in New York were doing in the 80s, and that connection is the best feeling ever” Kairau’s positive attitude about his work radiates when he sits down to chat about it. He has high hopes for his future as a graffiti artist. He recently visited New York, but would also like to visit places where graffiti doesn’t really exist (like Egypt) and introduce the art form into the culture there. IU: What do you think was you’re breakthrough moment as an artist? KB: I feel I’m still nowhere near it. I’m still at the bottom of the food chain, I know what my goals are…and I haven’t reached them yet. IU: Which would be…? KB: World Domination! We wish you the best of luck with that Kairau! You are well on your way! There’s a lot to look forward to from this young aspiring artist. He is a prime example of how talent and passion create an unstoppable combination.


KAIRAU BRADLEY FEATURED ARTIST

TO WATCH THE MAKING OF THIS PIECE IN A 3 MINUTE CLIP, LOG ONTO WW.USU.CO.NZ/INUNISON IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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FEATURED ARTIST VICKY TE PUNI

A PICTURE’S

WORTH…

IT’S BEEN SAID THAT A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS. IN THE CASE OF VICKY TE PUNI, THAT WOULD BE A VAST UNDERSTATEMENT. VICKY RETURNED TO UNI AFTER A FEW YEARS OF WORKING TO PURSUE HER PASSION IN CREATING MEANINGFUL MESSAGES THROUGH STUNNING PHOTOGRAPHY. HER APPROACH TO TAKING PICTURES IS FUELED BY THE POTENTIAL THAT THEY HAVE TO CREATE A STORY FOR A LARGE AUDIENCE.

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VICKY TE PUNI FEATURED ARTIST

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FEATURED ARTIST VICKY TE PUNI

W

hen Vicky returned to school, she knew she wanted to study art, but realized that she did not contain the innate ability to draw or paint. Because of this, she turned towards photography. The study allowed her to express herself in a creative and artful way by learning the technicalities of the craft. She acknowledges that in learning the procedural application, she is developing her visual perception of the outside world. Vicky has a particularly keen eye for portraits. She captures the emotions and the soul of her subjects in a frighteningly accurate way. She clarifies that her interest in portraits comes from her curiosity for people’s personal stories. “For me, that helps the creative process. When it comes to photographing something, 48

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it’s important to have a story behind what I’m capturing” Her still shots have the capability of conveying extremely strong and complex meanings. Her second year project focused on portraits of indigenous women who live in the urban area. “Being Maori myself, I found that there were a lot of historical issues that many indigenous cultures throughout the world can relate to. It was quite interesting to do a bit of research into how the Maori were colonized, and how it related to the colonization of other cultures.” Another theme of her photographs is displayed in the attention she pays to portraits of women. Vicky explains that her purpose in focusing on women is to encourage them to be uniquely themselves and to be proud of who they


VICKY TE PUNI FEATURED ARTIST

are. The women in her project each had their own personal and cultural story that was captured through the photographs. Vicky discussed the significance of the research that goes into her projects. It was apparent that she applied a great deal of prior knowledge to the perspective of her photography. She explained that it is within the nature of the degree at Unitec to teach and encourage students to find a meaning to their photographed subjects. “I’m glad, because when I started, I didn’t really have a structure around my work, there wasn’t a lot of depth. So now that I’ve learned how to research, analyze, and explore outside my comfort zone, my photographs have a deeper meaning” Vicky has recently been experimenting with film photography. She recommends the medium to any keen photographers.

“IN DOING RESEARCH ON INDIGENOUS CULTURES, I REALISED THAT A LOT OF INDIGENOUS WOMEN HAVE HAD SIMILAR EXPERIENCES. MOST OF THEM WERE HARDSHIPS. THESE EXPERIENCES HAVE MADE THEM STRONGER, MORE COMPLEX WOMEN. THE STORIES THAT THEY HAVE LIVED THROUGH CREATE AN INTERESTING BACKGROUND BEHIND THE PHOTOGRAPHS.”

She believes that the time and attention required for film photography helps the person behind the camera develop a fuller passion for the art form. The entire process from shooting, to post-production becomes a lot more tedious, which she explains, “encourages you to be so much more passionate about the craft. It forces you to really pay attention to each shot, to really focus on the colours and look through the lens. You have to make sure every shot counts”. Vicky’s work is both visually stunning and mentally compelling. The combination of her mastery of the technique and her enthusiasm for a meaningful message create an amazing final product. Her awareness of spreading positivity and encouraging words through her photographs is a true creative talent. IN UNISON THE CREATIVE ISSUE

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FEATURED ARTIST DANIEL MCEWAN

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DANIEL MCEWAN FEATURED ARTIST

VE E E-ITI SENS ITIV SESEN SPACES PHOTOGRAPHED BY TALIA SMITH

I MET DANIEL MCEWAN ON A SATURDAY NIGHT AT A BAR, AND IT ONLY TOOK FIVE MINUTES OF CONVERSATION TO REALISE THAT THIS GUY WAS REALLY ON TO SOMETHING. IN THE FOURTH YEAR OF HIS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMME, DANIEL HAS SOME EXTRAORDINARY PERSPECTIVE TO APPROACHING THE DESIGN ELEMENTS OF LANDSCAPE.


FEATURED ARTIST DANIEL MCEWAN

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aniel bypassed the standard approaches to space design and created an entirely new tactic to landscape architecture that maintains a certain integrity to the land. Because of his musical background, Daniel is very in tune with the sense of sound. Accordingly, he applies this knowledge to his professional work. His initial step to creating a space is taking sound samples of the land in its different elements, and using those sound samples to guide the creation process of the final landscape blueprint. Daniel has an incredibly interesting ideology surrounding his landscape objective. Most important is his eye for detail concerning the understanding of a land space through all sensory experiences. What initially drew you in to landscape architecture? I was searching for something that combined my interests

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d

and hobbies into a single profession. I originally considered landscape design, but realized that landscape architecture was what I was really looking for. What differentiated the two? Landscape design is more focused around garden design, and a residential scope of things. Landscape Architecture is a lot more versatile, and seems to be one of those professions that dabbles with a bunch of other professions. So you’ve got your ecology component, science component, construction and design component. It forces you to pull your creative disciplines into your logical disciplines. From first seeing a landscape site, what is your process of thinking in terms of design tactics? I start by scoping out the natural things that are occurring on the site, like: slope and sun studies. Then I add in the social and


DANIEL MCEWAN FEATURED ARTIST

far left: daniel at his workspace top middle: the soundboard used to mix-match sound samples. top right: rain. middle: locations of sound samples. bottom: sound models.

cultural aspects of the site like: how are humans using the space right now. I use these observations as cues to where I’ll delve further into my research.

f

k

g

Are there certain landscape spaces that you’re attracted to right away? Not so much, but I guess I like these sort of semi-urban seminatural spaces. Also un-used space that through development of society have been used, and then un-used, and have become a bi-product of the growing city. Daniel explained that he is attracted to spaces that are known as “drosscapes”: which is the term for old landscape spaces that have been abandoned. He prefers these because the land still provides evidence of what used to be there, and still have “a richness about them”. It seems that he enjoys to observe some of the history that is encompassed in the land. How did your idea of sound orientation to a landscape space start? I like to combine everything I’m doing at a certain moment, because I end up being much more productive. At the time, I was really into electronic music soundboards, so I applied it to my professional work. As the idea developed I started to realize how space is perceived through sound and the senses that we don’t often focus on. The profession of landscape architecture tends to be visually based, even though it’s proven that the way we hear and feel shapes the way we see things. So that’s why I started to look into these cases of blind people who sense space through ecolocation, and I’m delving more into that idea. My opinion is that one should design a space that any human: whether sound impaired, or sight impaired is able to experience the richness of that landscape just as much as a full, able-bodied person. Daniel is currently working on a landscape space in New Lynn/Titirangi. You can find audio and visual footage of his landscape observations on In Unison's full online feature.

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Thursday 9Th JuNE 12.30pm spoT prizE draw! in USU‘S Uni LoUnge bldg 180-the hub from 12pm-4pm

Be there at 12.30 for a chance to win a tony hawk wirLeSS SkateBoard controLLer for XBoX 360.

usu Students’Association at Unitec

www.usu.co.Nz/whaTs-oN


SANJI KARU CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

SANJI KARU WWW.SKAAESTHETICS.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SKAAESTHETICS

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anji has loved photography since a young age, and first started to photograph on a professional level for USU. He began by taking pictures at the concert and party events on campus. This developed his interest in event photography, and he has since worked with many New Zealand and International music artists, such as: Tiki Taane, Katchafire, NERD, and Moby. He has a definite sense of travel, as he has moved around the world with his family for his entire life. He was born in Malaysia, and has been living in New Zealand for three years. Sanji enjoys combining his photography with the artistry talent of other disciplines. He has worked collaboratively with graphic designers and illustrators in order to create the distinctive edginess in his photographs. More recently, he has been working for talent agencies in New Zealand, taking head shots for actors/actresses. He currently photographs for publications in both NZ and Malaysia.

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CONTRIBUTING ARTIST TALIA SMITH

TALIA SMITH TALIASMITH.TUMBLR.COM

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alia is in her third year studying photography at Unitec. The approach to her photographs is simple: capturing the absurdity of the banal. Her photography projects feature the everyday displays of home, emotion, and artifacts. She plays on a bit of irony in her photographs, by capturing uncomplicated settings that contain intricate undertones. Her series work runs with strong themes that are aesthetically charming. The mental juxtaposition of the simplicity and irrationality of everyday creates a stimulating photographic motif. On a personal level, her work characterises her own “conflict of identity�, as she comes from a half European/2nd generation Pacific Islander lineage. Talia has a graphic design background, which she likes to include in her work. Her interests for the future lie in an interactive experience for her viewers, and she plans to move towards installation and video creation.

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JULIA GLOVER CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

JULIA GLOVER JULZGLOVER.TUMBLR.COM

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ulia is studying for her bachelor degree in photography at Unitec. She is very inspired by her own past, and the female genealogy of her family. Her most recent work has featured the connection to her mother and grandmother through old artifacts and heirlooms. This year, Julia has been incorporating a bit of installation into her photography. She stitches photographs together with red thread that represents the bloodline of her ancestors. Apart from her family, Julia is inspired by Chiharu Shiota, Annegret Soltau, and her own personal self-discovery. In doing so, her photographs have incorporated her own body and hair, to discreetly tie pieces of herself into her work. Julia has an amazingly positive and explorative attitude about photography. Her ability to capture the tangible visibility and also the intangibility of a subject is what makes her a truly unique artist.

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stay tUned in to the in Unison Website to check out Issue 7!!

WWW.UsU.co.nZ/inUnison

usu Students’Association at Unitec

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“I GUESS THE ULTIMATE GOAL WOULD BE TO ABLE TO CREATE WHAT IS NOT THERE, BUT UNLESS YOU ARE SUPER HUMAN I DON’T THINK IT’S POSSIBLE. I THINK CREATIVITY IS THE ABILITY TO TEASE NEWNESS OUT OF THE EXISTING.” “CREATIVITY IS WHAT DEFINES THE ARTIST, IT’S A REFLECTION OF HOW THE ARTIST VISUALIZES AND PUTS THINGS INTO CONTEXT WHEN CREATING THEIR WORK, ALSO A COMBINATION OF RESEARCH AND STATE OF MIND.” “I GUESS THE ULTIMATE GOAL WOULD BE TO ABLE TO CREATE WHAT IS NOT THERE, BUT UNLESS YOU ARE SUPER HUMAN I DON’T THINK IT’S POSSIBLE. I THINK CREATIVITY IS THE ABILITY TO TEASE NEWNESS OUT OF THE EXISTING.” “CREATIVITY IS WHAT DEFINES THE ARTIST, IT’S A REFLECTION OF HOW THE ARTIST VISUALIZES AND PUTS THINGS INTO CONTEXT WHEN CREATING THEIR WORK, ALSO A COMBINATION OF RESEARCH AND STATE OF MIND.” “CREATIVITY IS MORE A STATE OF MIND AND SPIRIT THAT KEEPS US OPEN TO INTERPRETING AND CHANNELLING THE ESSENCE OF BEING CREATIVE AND OTHERWISE ALMOST LIKE BEING A BIG SIEVE REALLY” “TO ME CREATIVITY IS SOMETHING THAT COMES FROM WITHIN, FROM YOUR SOUL. IT IS A WAY OF EXPRESSING YOURSELF TO THE WORLD. IT’S ABOUT FOLLOWING YOUR INTUITION. CREATIVITY IS TO BECOME ONE WITH YOUR WORK AND MOST IMPORTANTLY NEVER FORGETTING TO HAVE FUN WITH IT.” “CREATIVITY IS ABOUT IDENTITY, WE ALL EXPRESS ART IN OUR OWN UNIQUE WAY, WE ALL STRIVE TO EXPLORE NEW CREATIVE PROCESSES OR TECHNIQUES TO HELP COMMUNICATE IDEAS THROUGH OUR RESPECTIVE MEDIUMS. THUS OUR IDENTITY IS ALSO SHAPED/MOULDED THROUGH ARTICULATING OUR CREATIVENESS.” “ THE ABILITY TO DETACH YOURSELF FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD OR FROM SOCIETY AND AT THE SAME TIME EXPRESS AND SHOW THE WORLD THINGS THAT THEY CAN NOT SEE. I FEEL IT’S OUR CREATIVE IDEAS AND HOW WE SHOW THEM THAT ILLUSTRATES WHO WE ARE AS A PERSON.”


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09 827 8531 • 9 Puriri Street, New Lynn • www.westprint.co.nz

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I T O A S O • D LI T

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In Unison #6, The Creative Issue