Page 1

Beijing

GANSU QINGHAI Themchen

A

Chabcha Tsapon Chentsa

TIBET M

K

TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

• Self-immolations • Further protests

S

A

N

G

Tridu

Damshung Lhasa

Ü

Sog

Driru

Bankar

H

Chamdo

A

Kangsta

D

Chigdril Machu Dzoge Pema Ngaba Dzamthang Serthar Kardze Barkham Dranggo Tawu

Darlag

Jyekundo

Nagchu

T

Dzatoe

Rebkong Gepa Sumdo Tsekhok Sogpo

Sangchu Tsoe Amchok Bora Luchu

O

M SICHUAN

YUNNAN

Flames in Tibet: Five Years of Resistance and Repression On 27 February 2009 Tapey, a young Tibetan monk, walked out into the street in Ngaba carrying a homedrawn Tibetan flag and a photograph of the Dalai Lama. He doused himself in petrol and set himself on fire, shouting slogans as he burned. People’s Armed Police (PAP) personnel opened fire and shot Tapey, extinguished the flames and took him away. Tapey is known to have survived but his current whereabouts and well being remain unknown. With Tibet still reeling from China’s crushing of plateau-wide mass demonstrations in 2008, this form of resistance appeared to be an isolated incident, until March 2011 when a second young monk from Ngaba, Phuntsok, set fire to himself and died. Five years after Tapey’s protest at least 127 Tibetans, young and old, men and women, have lit their bodies on fire across Tibet, calling for freedom and of their wish to bring the Dalai Lama home. The vast majority have lost their lives.1 Despite an increasingly aggressive official response, Tibetans continue to demonstrate their resistance to China’s rule in large numbers. In February 2014 over one thousand Tibetans gathered together to protest the detention of the highly respected Tibetan lama, Khenpo Kartse, displaying an unwavering determination and commitment to nonviolent resistance.2 China’s extreme, relentless and repressive policies, and the severe and worsening security crackdown, have created a critical situation in Tibet. 1. See www.StandUpForTibet.org 2. Radio Free Asia, ‘Thousands of Tibetans Pressure Monastery to Push for Monk’s Release’


བཀྲ་བྷེ། ཕུན་ཚོགས། ཚེ་དབང་ནོར་བུ། བློ་བཟང་དཀོན་མཆོག། བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། སྐལ་བཟང་དབང་ཕྱུག། མཁའ་དབྱིངས། ཆོས་འཕེལ། ནོར་བུ་དགྲ་འདུལ། བསྟན་འཛིན་དབང་མོ། ཟླ་བ་ཚེ་རིང་། དཔལ་ལྡན་ཆོས་མཚོ་། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཕུན་ཚོགས། བསྟན་ཉི་། ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་བསོད་བྷ། བློ་བཟང་འཇམ་དབྱངས། རིག་འཛིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། བསོད་ནམས་རབ་ཡངས། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཆོས་སྒྲོན། བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ། དམ་ཆོས་བཟང་པོ། སྣང་གྲྲོལ། ཚེ་རིང་སྐྱིད་། རིན་ཆེན། རྡོ་རྗེ། དགེ་བྷེ། འཇམ་དབྱངས་དཔལ་ལྡན། བློ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས།Gudrub བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། བློ་བཟང་ཤེས་རབ། བསྟན་པ་དར་རྒྱས། འཆི་མེད་དཔལ་ལྡན་། སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་ཨ་ཐུབ། ཨ་ཚེ། ཆོས་འཕགས་སྐྱབས། བསོད་ནམས། རྡོ་རྗེ་ཚེ་བརྟན། དར་རྒྱས། རི་སྐྱོ། རྟ་མགྲིན་ཐར། བསྟན་འཛིན་མཁས་གྲུབ། ངག་དབང་ནོར་འཕེལ། བདེ་སྐྱིད་ཆོས་འཛོམས། ཚེ་དབང་རྡོྲོ་རྗེ། བློ་བཟང་བློ་འཛིན། བློྲོ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། Tsultrim Gyatso སྒྲོལ་དཀར་མཚོ། གཅོད་པ། བཀྲ་ཤིས། ལུང་རྟོགས། བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། དམ་ཆོས། པ་སངས་ལྷ་མོ། གཡུང་དྲུང་། དགུ་འགྲུབ། སངས་རྒྱས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་། རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། དོན་འགྲུབ། རྡོ་རྗེ་རིན་ཆེན། ཚེ་སྤོ། བསྟན་འཛིན། ལྷ་མོ་ཚེ་བརྟན། ཐུབ་དབང་སྐྱབས། རྡོ་རྗེ་ལྷུན་གྲུབ། རྡོ་རྗེ་། བསམ་གྲུབ། རྟ་མགྲིིན་མཚོ། རྡོ་རྗེ་སྐྱབས་། Ngawang Norphel and Tenzin Khedup ཚེ་རྒྱས། སྐལ་བཟང་སྦྱིིན་པ། མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། སྙིང་དཀར་བཀྲ་ཤིས་། སྙིང་ཅགས་འབུམ། མཁའ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ། ཏིང་འཛིན་སྒྲོལ་མ། ལྕགས་མོ་སྐྱིད། གསང་བདག་ཚེ་རིང་། དབང་ཆེན་ནོར་བུ། དོན་གྲུབ་ཚེ་རིང་། ཀླུ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ་། རྟ་མགྲིན་སྐྱབས། རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། སངས་རྒྱས་སྒྲོལ་མ། དབང་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་རིང་། མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། སྐལ་བཟང་སྐྱབས། སངས་རྒྱས་བཀྲ་ཤིས། བན་དེ་མཁར། ཚེ་རིང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། གཟུངས་འདུས་སྐྱབས་། བློ་བཟང་དགེ་འདུན། དཀོན་མཆོག་འཕེལ་རྒྱས། པདྨ་རྡོ་རྗེ། པན་ཆེན་སྐྱིད་། ཚེ་རིང་བཀྲ་ཤིས། གྲུབ་མཆོག། དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། བློ་བཟང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། Tamdrin Tso འབྲུག་པ་མཁར། གནམ་ལྷ་ཚེ་རིང་། བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། རིན་ཆེན་། ཕག་མོ་དོན་གྲུབ། ཚེ་གཟུངས་སྐྱབས། གསང་བདག། དཀོན་མཆོག་དབང་མོ། བློ་བཟང་ཐོགས་མེད། སྐལ་སྐྱིད། ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། དཀོན་མཆོག་བསྟན་འཛིན། ཕྱུག་མཚོ། བློ་བཟང་ཟླ་བ། དཀོན་མཆོག་འོད་ཟེར། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཤེས་རབ། དབང་ཆེན་སྒྲོལ་མ། དཀོན་མཆོག་བསོད་ནམས། ཞི་ཆུང་། ཚེ་རིང་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་བརྟན། ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ། འཕགས་མོ་བསམ་གྲུབ། བློ་བཟང་རྡོ་རྗེ།

Burning for Freedom in Tibet

Since 2009 at least 131* Tibetan have set themselves on fire in Tibet, including over 20 teenagers, a highly respected Tibetan lama, a youth leader and seven mothers. The following case studies illustrate just a few of these Tibetans, highlighting the spread and diversity of the individuals who have chosen to resist in this way since February 2009.3

43-year old Tibetan writer, Gudrub, died in October 2012 after setting himself on fire in Nagchu county, Central Tibet (Ch: TAR). Gudrub shouted slogans calling for Tibetan freedom and for the return of the Dalai Lama. In an article called The Sound of a Victorious Drum Beaten by Lives, Gudrub wrote “[Tibetans] are sharpening our nonviolent movement … declaring the reality of Tibet by burning our own bodies to call for freedom in Tibet.”

Highly educated and well respected Tibetan monk, Tsultrim Gyatso, died in December 2013 after he set light to himself Amchok, eastern Tibet (Ch: Gansu). He died instantly. Tsultrim Gyatso left behind a note, in the form of a poem. Describing his anguish that the suffering of the Tibetan people was not being heard or addressed, he wrote, “To whom should the sufferings of the six million Tibetans be conveyed?”

Ngawang Norphel, 22, and Tenzin Khedup, 24, set themselves on fire in a joint protest in Dzatoe town, Jyekundo, Amdo (Ch: Qinghai). The two young Tibetan men carried Tibetan flags and called for Tibetan independence as they burned in protest against China’s occupation of Tibet. Before their protest they wrote a joint note outlining how they felt they were unable to contribute to their religion or culture because of the conditions of life under Chinese rule. Tenzin Khedup, a former monk, died shortly afterwards; Ngawang Norphel sustained serious injuries and died a month later. A heavy paramilitary presence was reported in the area after the protest, and friends and relatives of both young men were detained and interrogated by police. When Ngawang Norphel’s father visited his son in hospital before he died he was warned by police not to discuss his son with the media or he would “pay the price” 4

The 23-year old mother of a six-year old boy set her body on fire and died in Rebkong, eastern Tibet in November 2012. Using petrol siphoned from a motorbike, Tamdin Tso set fire to herself in the family’s winter pasture. She died at the scene and her body was taken to her family home. Hundreds of local people gathered at the site of her protest, with many of them calling for the long life of the Dalai Lama and for him to return home. Tibetan sources in exile said: “People from far away and monks went to Tamdrin Tso’s village to pay their respects and offer condolences. People said that there were over 300 vehicles at the spot of self-immolation.”

*Correct at date of publication – 21 May 2014

3. See 1. 4. International Campaign for Tibet, December 2012, ‘Storm in the Grasslands: Self-immolations in Tibet and Chinese policy’, pg 148.


བཀྲ་བྷེ། ཕུན་ཚོགས། ཚེ་དབང་ནོར་བུ། བློ་བཟང་དཀོན་མཆོག། བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། སྐལ་བཟང་དབང་ཕྱུག། མཁའ་དབྱིངས། ཆོས་འཕེལ། ནོར་བུ་དགྲ་འདུལ། བསྟན་འཛིན་དབང་མོ། ཟླ་བ་ཚེ་རིང་། དཔལ་ལྡན་ཆོས་མཚོ་། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཕུན་ཚོགས། བསྟན་ཉི་། ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་བསོད་བྷ། བློ་བཟང་འཇམ་དབྱངས། རིག་འཛིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། བསོད་ནམས་རབ་ཡངས། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཆོས་སྒྲོན། བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ། དམ་ཆོས་བཟང་པོ། སྣང་གྲྲོལ། ཚེ་རིང་སྐྱིད་། རིན་ཆེན། རྡོ་རྗེ། དགེ་བྷེ། འཇམ་དབྱངས་དཔལ་ལྡན། བློ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། བློ་བཟང་ཤེས་རབ། བསྟན་པ་དར་རྒྱས། འཆི་མེད་དཔལ་ལྡན་། སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་ཨ་ཐུབ། ཨ་ཚེ། ཆོས་འཕགས་སྐྱབས། བསོད་ནམས། རྡོ་རྗེ་ཚེ་བརྟན། དར་རྒྱས། རི་སྐྱོ། རྟ་མགྲིན་ཐར། བསྟན་འཛིན་མཁས་གྲུབ། ངག་དབང་ནོར་འཕེལ། བདེ་སྐྱིད་ཆོས་འཛོམས། ཚེ་དབང་རྡོྲོ་རྗེ། བློ་བཟང་བློ་འཛིན། བློྲོ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། སྒྲོལ་དཀར་མཚོ། གཅོད་པ། བཀྲ་ཤིས། ལུང་རྟོགས། བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། དམ་ཆོས། པ་སངས་ལྷ་མོ། གཡུང་དྲུང་། དགུ་འགྲུབ། སངས་རྒྱས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་། རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། དོན་འགྲུབ། རྡོ་རྗེ་རིན་ཆེན། ཚེ་སྤོ། བསྟན་འཛིན། ལྷ་མོ་ཚེ་བརྟན། ཐུབ་དབང་སྐྱབས། རྡོ་རྗེ་ལྷུན་གྲུབ། རྡོ་རྗེ་། བསམ་གྲུབ། རྟ་མགྲིིན་མཚོ། རྡོ་རྗེ་སྐྱབས་། ཚེ་རྒྱས། སྐལ་བཟང་སྦྱིིན་པ། མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། སྙིང་དཀར་བཀྲ་ཤིས་། སྙིང་ཅགས་འབུམ། མཁའ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ། ཏིང་འཛིན་སྒྲོལ་མ། ལྕགས་མོ་སྐྱིད། གསང་བདག་ཚེ་རིང་། དབང་ཆེན་ནོར་བུ། དོན་གྲུབ་ཚེ་རིང་། ཀླུ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ་། རྟ་མགྲིན་སྐྱབས། རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། སངས་རྒྱས་སྒྲོལ་མ། དབང་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་རིང་། མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། སྐལ་བཟང་སྐྱབས། སངས་རྒྱས་བཀྲ་ཤིས། བན་དེ་མཁར། ཚེ་རིང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། གཟུངས་འདུས་སྐྱབས་། བློ་བཟང་དགེ་འདུན། དཀོན་མཆོག་འཕེལ་རྒྱས། པདྨ་རྡོ་རྗེ། པན་ཆེན་སྐྱིད་། ཚེ་རིང་བཀྲ་ཤིས། གྲུབ་མཆོག། དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། བློ་བཟང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། འབྲུག་པ་མཁར། གནམ་ལྷ་ཚེ་རིང་། བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། རིན་ཆེན་། ཕག་མོ་དོན་གྲུབ། ཚེ་གཟུངས་སྐྱབས། གསང་བདག། དཀོན་མཆོག་དབང་མོ། བློ་བཟང་ཐོགས་མེད། སྐལ་སྐྱིད། ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། དཀོན་མཆོག་བསྟན་འཛིན། ཕྱུག་མཚོ། བློ་བཟང་ཟླ་བ། དཀོན་མཆོག་འོད་ཟེར། བསྟན་འཛིན་ཤེས་རབ། དབང་ཆེན་སྒྲོལ་མ། དཀོན་མཆོག་བསོད་ནམས། ཞི་ཆུང་། ཚེ་རིང་རྒྱལ། དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་བརྟན། ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ། འཕགས་མོ་བསམ་གྲུབ། བློ་བཟང་རྡོ་རྗེ། From top: Troops and trucks in Rongwo Town February 2013; PAP at Shoton Festival August 2013; PAP in Ngaba Town February 2014. © Free Tibet

China’s Merciless Crackdown For over six decades the Tibetan people have had their human and political rights violated at the hand of their Chinese oppressors, yet their resistance is stronger than ever. China’s response is brutal, using military force to break-up gatherings and detain Tibetans who demonstrate, regularly injuring and killing peaceful protesters. Since Xi Jinping became President in 2013, China’s grip on Tibet has tightened even further, with a renewed clampdown including mass detentions and an increase in violent military responses to demonstrations. Family and friends of protesters who burned their bodies have been threatened, punished, and turned into “criminals”, a large number receiving severe prison sentences. Among the death sentences passed is the case of Dolma Kyab convicted of the “murder” of his wife, who is understood to have self-immolated.5

Villages and monasteries where self-immolations occur are branded “untrustworthy” (according to measures published in the county of Dzoege in 2013), and face penalties including the withdrawal of government assistance, freezing of land and pasture rights, and payment of an “anti-self immolation guarantee of up to 500,000 yuan (US$81,978).6

The intensified crackdown has increased the risk of greater instability in Tibet and created an extreme and volatile situation. The international community should not expect Tibetans to live under such political and religious repression, which affects their everyday lives. China’s unacceptable policies in Tibet include interference in religious practice, vilification of the Dalai Lama, use of Patriotic “reeducation” campaigns, restrictions on education in the Tibetan language and the removal of Tibet’s nomads from their ancestral grasslands.

5. International Campaign for Tibet, August 2013, ‘Death penalty for Tibetan after death of wife in Ngaba’ 6. Radio Free Asia, February 2014, ‘New Rules to Prevent Tibetan Burning Protests in Sichuan County’


May 2014

Unite for Tibet: Recommendations There is a diplomatic solution to this crisis. By standing together, governments can jointly pressure China to end its dangerously provocative policies in Tibet, and send a clear signal that China’s bullying behaviour, in which it plays divide and rule with individual nations that support Tibet, is unacceptable. We call on like-minded governments, including the US, UK, EU, Canada, Germany, Australia and France, to hold regular meetings to discuss Tibet policy, and seize all opportunities to work together to help Tibet, for example: • G7 Foreign Ministers make a joint statement of concern • To call on China to urgently agree dates for a visit to Tibet by the current UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ms Navi Pillay before the end of her term. If this does not take place it will be the first time since X that a High Commissioner has NOT visited China. • Hold Tibet-specific discussions the next time countries with bilateral human rights dialogues meet. • Agree collectively to express deep and consistent concern about Tibet directly to China’s President Xi Jinping during the G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia, in November 2014. Tapey བཀྲ་བྷེ། Phuntsog ཕུན་ཚོགས། Tsewang Norbu ཚེ་དབང་ནོར་བུ། Lobsang Kunchok བློ་བཟང་དཀོན་མཆོག། Lobsang Kelsang བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། Kelsang Wangchuk སྐལ་བཟང་དབང་ཕྱུག། Khaying མཁའ་དབྱིངས། Choephel ཆོས་འཕེལ། Norbu Damdrul ནོར་བུ་དགྲ་འདུལ། Tenzin Wangmo བསྟན་འཛིན་དབང་མོ། Dawa Tsering ཟླ་བ་ཚེ་རིང་། Palden Choetso དཔལ་ལྡན་ཆོས་མཚོ་། Tenzin

Phuntsok བསྟན་འཛིན་ཕུན་ཚོགས། Tennyi བསྟན་ཉི་། Tsultrim ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། Lama Sopa སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་བསོད་བྷ། Lobsang Jamyang བློ་བཟང་འཇམ་དབྱངས། Rinzin Dorjee རིག་འཛིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། Sonam Rabyang

བསོད་ནམས་རབ་ཡངས། Tenzin Choedron བསྟན་འཛིན་ཆོས་སྒྲོན། Lobsang Gyatso བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ། Damchoe Sangpo དམ་ཆོས་བཟང་པོ། Nangdrol སྣང་གྲོལ། Tsering Kyi ཚེ་རིང་སྐྱིད་། Rinchen རིན་ཆེན། Dorjee རྡོ་རྗེ། Gyepe དགེ་བྷེ། Jamyang Palden འཇམ་དབྱངས་དཔལ་ལྡན། Lobsang Tsultrim བློ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། Sonam Dhargye བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། Lobsang Sherab བློ་བཟང་ཤེས་རབ། Tenpa

Dhargyal བསྟན་པ་དར་རྒྱས། Chime Palden འཆི་མེད་དཔལ་ལྡན་། Thubten Nyandak Rinpoche སྤྲུལ་སྐུ་ཨ་ཐུབ། Atse ཨ་ཚེ། Choephak Kyab ཆོས་འཕགས་སྐྱབས། Sonam བསོད་ནམས། Dorjee Tseten

རྡོ་རྗེ་ཚེ་བརྟན། Dhargye དར་རྒྱས། Rikyo རི་སྐྱོ། Tamding Thar རྟ་མགྲིན་ཐར། Tenzin Khedup བསྟན་འཛིན་མཁས་གྲུབ། Ngawang Norphel ངག་དབང་ནོར་འཕེལ། Dickyi Choezom བདེ་སྐྱིད་ཆོས་འཛོམས། Tsewang Dorjee ཚེ་དབང་རྡོོ་རྗེ། Lobsang Lozin བློ་བཟང་བློ་འཛིན། Lobsang Tsultrim བློོ་བཟང་ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས། Dolkar Tso སྒྲོལ་དཀར་མཚོ། Choepa གཅོད་པ། Tashi བཀྲ་ཤིས། Lungtok ལུང་རྟོགས། Lobsang

Kelsang བློ་བཟང་སྐལ་བཟང་། Damchoe དམ་ཆོས། Passang Lhamo པ་སངས་ལྷ་མོ། Yungdrung གཡུང་དྲུང་། Gudrub དགུ་འགྲུབ། Sangay Gyatso སངས་རྒྱས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་། Tamdin Dorje རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ།

Lhamo Kyab ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། Dhondup དོན་འགྲུབ། Dorjee Rinchen རྡོ་རྗེ་རིན་ཆེན། Tsepo ཚེ་སྤོ། Tenzin བསྟན་འཛིན། Lhamo Tseten ལྷ་མོ་ཚེ་བརྟན། Thupwang Gyab ཐུབ་དབང་སྐྱབས། Dorje Lhundrup

རྡོ་རྗེ་ལྷུན་གྲུབ། Dorjee རྡོ་རྗེ་། Samdup བསམ་གྲུབ། Tamding Tso རྟ་མགྲིིན་མཚོ། Dorjee Kyab རྡོ་རྗེ་སྐྱབས་། Tsegyal ཚེ་རྒྱས། Kalsang Jinpa སྐལ་བཟང་སྦྱིིན་པ། Gonpo Tsering མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། Nyingkar

Tashi སྙིང་དཀར་བཀྲ་ཤིས་། Nyinghchag Bum སྙིང་ཅགས་འབུམ། Kharbum Gyal མཁའ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ། Tenzin Dolma ཏིང་འཛིན་སྒྲོལ་མ། Chagmo Kyi ལྕགས་མོ་སྐྱིད། Sangdag Tsering གསང་བདག་ཚེ་རིང་། Wangchen Norbu དབང་ཆེན་ནོར་བུ། Tsering Dundrup དོན་གྲུབ་ཚེ་རིང་། Lubhum Gyal ཀླུ་འབུམ་རྒྱལ་། Tamdrin Kyab རྟ་མགྲིན་སྐྱབས། Tamdrin Dorjee རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ། Sangay Dolma སངས་རྒྱས་སྒྲོལ་མ།

Wangyal དབང་རྒྱལ། Kunchok Tsering དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་རིང་། Gonpo Tsering མགོན་པོ་ཚེ་རིང་། Kalsang Kyab སྐལ་བཟང་སྐྱབས། Sangay Tashi སངས་རྒྱས་བཀྲ་ཤིས། Wande Khar བན་དེ་མཁར། Tsering

Namgyal ཚེ་རིང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། Kunchok Kyab དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། Sungdue Kyab གཟུངས་འདུས་སྐྱབས་། Lobsang Gedun བློ་བཟང་དགེ་འདུན། Kunchok Pelgye དཀོན་མཆོག་འཕེལ་རྒྱས། Pema Dorjee

པདྨ་རྡོ་རྗེ། Wangchen Kyi པན་ཆེན་སྐྱིད་། Tsering Tashi ཚེ་རིང་བཀྲ་ཤིས། Drupchok གྲུབ་མཆོག། Kunchok Kyab དཀོན་མཆོག་སྐྱབས། Lobsang Namgyal བློ་བཟང་རྣམ་རྒྱལ། Drugpa Khar འབྲུག་པ་མཁར།

Namlha Tsering གནམ་ལྷ་ཚེ་རིང་། Sonam Dhargye བསོད་ནམས་དར་རྒྱས། Rinchen རིན་ཆེན་། Phagmo Dhondup ཕག་མོ་དོན་གྲུབ། Tsesung Kyab ཚེ་གཟུངས་སྐྱབས། Sangdak གསང་བདག། Kunchok

Wangmo དཀོན་མཆོག་དབང་མོ། Lobsang Thogme བློ་བཟང་ཐོགས་མེད། Kalkyi སྐལ་སྐྱིད། Lhamo Kyab ལྷ་མོ་སྐྱབས། Kunchok Tenzin དཀོན་མཆོག་བསྟན་འཛིན། Chugtso ཕྱུག་མཚོ། Lobsang Dawa

བློ་བཟང་ཟླ་བ། Kunchok Woeser དཀོན་མཆོག་འོད་ཟེར། Tenzin Sherab བསྟན་འཛིན་ཤེས་རབ། Wangchen Dolma དབང་ཆེན་སྒྲོལ་མ། Kunchok Sonam དཀོན་མཆོག་བསོད་ནམས། Shichung ཞི་ཆུང་། Tsering

Gyal ཚེ་རིང་རྒྱལ། Kunchok Tseten དཀོན་མཆོག་ཚེ་བརྟན། Tsultrim Gyatso ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ། Phagmo Samdrup འཕགས་མོ་བསམ་གྲུབ། Lobsang Dorje བློ་བཟང་རྡོ་རྗེ།

The International Tibet Network is a global coalition of 190 Tibet groups dedicated to campaigning nonviolently to restore the rights that Tibetans lost when China occupied Tibet sixty years ago.

www.tibetnetwork.org

Flames in Tibet: Five Years of Resistance and Repression  

On 27 February 2009 Tapey, a young Tibetan monk, walked out into the street in Ngaba carrying a home-drawn Tibetan flag and a photograph of...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you