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FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

AQUACULTURE UK - SPECIAL SHOW EDITION

International Aquafeed - Volume 21 - Issue 05 - May 2018

- Aquaculture UK show guide and related content - Pancreas disease in farmed salmon - The Monaco Blue Initiative 2018 - Special report - Robotic net cleaning - A cutting-edge recirculating aquaculture system - Expert topic - Salmon Proud supporter of Aquaculture without Frontiers UK CIO

May 2018

www.aquafeed.co.uk


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THE EDITOR

Croeso - welcome

both undergraduate students and also postgraduates studying for their Masters he summer is upon us and of Doctoral programmes. This has taken it’s always nice to look some time and much investment, but forward to the warmer it is my intention to primarily engage weather in the Northern with companies who do not have such Hemisphere and longer facilities and are keen to work with days especially for our a leading university such as mine for Nordic friends. It is also the beginning project development at the highest level of of the main conference season and I am greatly looking forward to the WAS 2018 academic input. meeting in Marseilles, France in August. Far too often a ‘going it alone’ strategy Professor Simon Davies may provide useful internal information There will be various other meetings Editor, International Aquafeed for large companies but there are obvious and symposia where scientists can discuss restrictions to the wider dissemination of the many ideas underpinning aquaculture results and findings, and the independent and associated technology, especially at validation universities can offer as well as the mechanism of Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland at the end of this month. producing scientific papers. A large number of the International Aquafeed team will be in It is somewhat ironic that I am often asked by a number of attendance, so be sure to come and say hello to us on stand 115! The International Symposium on Fish Nutrition and Feeding in Las companies if I have any good students coming through the system for job considerations. I think that investment in the next generation Palmas Grand Canaria is for me the most important in the calendar in terms of bursaries and scholarships is poor apart from a few and marks 40 years of officially recognised aquaculture research sponsors. The aquaculture industry often thinks that such talent can from a truly academic perspective. This will be free from razzmatazz be harvested at will and taken for granted. You have to on- grow and we can discuss robust scientific developments in a beautiful prospective students and commit to their future if you wish to seek a setting, with research hopefully destined towards publications in work force trained for the future. peer-reviewed scientific journals and no doubt endless discussions Many should find this to be a profitable way to guarantee their with the world’s top scientists in fish nutrition in front of the ocean. standing in the industry and I would welcome a more consistent This year marks 32 years for me as a university-based professor move towards these goals. I know some companies offer support and it’s a great privilege to have met with some of my previous for students keen in aquaculture, but major feed companies can and students recently in Scotland, Wales and Ireland where they make should do more in this direction and also provide work placements invaluable contributions to the industry. It is in Carna the marine and internships! facility of NUIG (National University of Ireland, Galway), where On the topic of training and learning new skills, here at I had such a high impression of activity and with their prestigious International Aquafeed we will be hosting two extrusion short Martin Ryan Institute for seaweed and marine ecological work. I am courses for fish feed in the coming year. They are being organised positive of wonderful opportunities in the future for a new platform with the help of Dr Mian Riaz, Head of Extrusion Technology at on the western front on the Atlantic coast. Texas A&M University. It was also a real pleasure to make a short visit again to Edinburgh The first will be at VIV Europe in Utrecht on June 21st, 2018, where I had a meeting with a leading salmon producer regarding during the exhibition, this will be predominantly focused around novel feed ingredients to enhance the nutritional quality of salmon petfood and treats extrusion. The second will be hosted at SPACE and especially for the consumer in terms of healthier products. 2018, held in Rennes, September 11-14,2018, this is a livestock Indeed, it will be in Edinburgh next April that we host the second aquaculture session at the British Society for Animal Science (BSAS) exhibition that is getting heavily involved in the aquacultural industry. event. I do hope many will attend this meeting and its relevance to You can sign up for the daylong conference at VIV Europe through the Scottish salmon and trout farming industry. this link: bit.ly/petfoodextrusion. Meanwhile back on the home front, we are just on the verge of More will follow over the coming months on the SPACE inaugurating our new research facilities at Harper Adams University for fish nutrition trials with salmonids for a start and our RAS system exhibition, but please do not hesitate to email the team for more information in the meantime. will be operational for commercial work and for projects involving

AQUAFEED

FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

INGREDIENTS: Microbial-based solutions for sustainable shrimp farming- page24

RAS: A cutting-edge recirculating aquaculture system - page 54

SPECIES

FEED EQUIPMENT

EXPERT TOPIC: Salmon - page 38

ALGAE: International algae experts at one of the most important summits of the European algae world - page 58

Aquaculture’s biggest dilemma that has recently burst onto the front pages of mainstream media: The challenges of sea lice and their effects upon both farmed and wild salmon.

www.aquafeed.co.uk


Perendale Publishers Ltd 7 St George’s Terrace St James’ Square, Cheltenham, Glos, GL50 3PT, United Kingdom Tel: +44 1242 267700 Publisher Roger Gilbert rogerg@perendale.co.uk Editor Prof Simon Davies sjdaquafeed@gmail.com

May 2018 Volume 21 Issue 05

IN THIS ISSUE

FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

International Editors Dr Kangsen Mai (Chinese edition) mai@perendale.co.uk Prof Antonio Garza (Spanish edition) antoniog@perendale.co.uk Erik Hempel (Norwegian edition) erik@perendale.co.uk Editorial Advisory Panel • Prof Dr Abdel-Fattah M. El-Sayed • Prof António Gouveia • Prof Charles Bai • Dr Colin Mair • Dr Daniel Merrifield • Dr Dominique Bureau • Dr Elizabeth Sweetman • Dr Kim Jauncey • Dr Eric De Muylder • Dr Pedro Encarnação • Dr Mohammad R Hasan Editorial team Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson zashaw@perendale.co.uk Vaughn Entwistle vaughne@perendale.co.uk Alex Whitebrook alexw@perendale.co.uk International Marketing Team Darren Parris darrenp@perendale.co.uk Tom Blacker tomb@perendale.co.uk Latin America Marketing Team Iván Marquetti Tel: +54 2352 427376 ivanm@perendale.co.uk New Zealand Marketing Team Peter Parker peterp@perendale.co.uk Nigeria Marketing Team Nathan Nwosu nathann@perendale.co.uk Design Manager James Taylor jamest@perendale.co.uk Circulation & Events Manager Tuti Tan tutit@perendale.co.uk Development Manager Antoine Tanguy antoinet@perendale.co.uk

REGULAR ITEMS 4

Industry News

38 Expert Topic - Salmon 58 Industry Events

56 The Market Place

66 The Aquafeed Interview 68

Industry Faces

COLUMNS 4 Antonio Garza de Yta 6 Ioannis Zabetakis

©Copyright 2017 Perendale Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior permission of the copyright owner. More information can be found at www.perendale.com Perendale Publishers Ltd also publish ‘The International Milling Directory’ and ‘The Global Miller’ news service

11 Dr Neil Auchterlonie 12 Janice Spencer


FEATURES 16 AQUACULTURE UK SPECIAL 20 Pancreas disease in farmed salmon 24 Microbial-based solutions for sustainable shrimp farming

MONACO BLUE INITIATIVE 26 Monaco Blue Initiative comes to Edinburgh 28 “Stop taking the oceans for granted� 30 Protecting marine resources 36 Building relationships between Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and aquaculture

FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY 44 Is slaughter killing your fish farming investment? 48 Fish farms opt for robotic net cleaning to replace traditional onshore cleaning

THE BIG PICTURE Having formally completed its acquisition of a majority stake in fish farm pen manufacturer Fusion Marine last month (11th April 2018), Gael Force Group are developing a completely new fish pen and product review of the existing pen range. See more on page 8

52 High demands for high quality Norwegian workboats 54 A cutting-edge recirculating aquaculture system


Another stunning success for Ace Aquatec

Antonio Garza de Yta Fish in the Desert - Optimising towards the future

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ebanon, a country of contrasts, of incomparable beauty, a place where 17 religions and a greater number of ideologies merge. In this country where you can ski in the morning and bathe on one of its beaches in the afternoon the Phoenician culture was born, and today it is home to one of the clearest and most progressive visions of aquaculture worldwide.

Within the American University in Beirut, an institution founded in 1866, and the most important university in eastern Italy, Dr Imad Saoud works. Dr Saoud is not only one of the visionaries and experts (perhaps the most important) of Aquaculture in Arid Zones, but also a fervent believer (like many of us) that the blue revolution can not be postponed. The world needs the aquaculture of that great step to increase food production by 70 percent by 2050, in a world where there is no more fresh water or more land and the pressure for resources is increasing. Taking advantage of this visit I made to sign a collaboration agreement between the American University in Beirut and the Technological University of the Sea of Tamaulipas (UTMarT) for exchange and training, both for technical and administrative staff and for students, I would like to share with you a very brief review of what happens in this part of the world. First of all, I think it is important to emphasise that everything that I will describe later is done with very few resources, but with a very clear vision; In Mexico we have a lot to learn. Not only Dr Saoud and his team of collaborators have actively worked on the concept of Integrated Aquaculture and Agriculture and have cooperated with the trout producers of the region, but have also promoted the concept of “More Crop for your Drop. That is the maximisation of the harvest with the minimum of resources. It is not only about the reuse of water, but to minimise the environmental footprint, that is the great challenge - to avoid the degradation of increasingly limited resources. Of the jobs with the greatest potential for application at a productive level, they are undoubtedly those made with the waste from restaurant meals. Here we have sought to make an alternative diet that, in addition to eliminating organic waste and reusing it once processed, seeks to reduce the costs to small producers who carry out this activity in a complementary manner. The use of these foods as a sole source of nutrients or intercalated with commercial diets is analysed. One of the projects that we will probably start in Mexico in the future will be the reuse of the most efficient waste of the Mexican diet, tortillas, in alternative diets for species such as tilapia or catfish. Finally, I would like to comment on another of the studies that caught my attention and this was the use of bacteria to transform omega 6 fatty acids into omega 3 fatty acids. This would undoubtedly be one of the greatest discoveries for aquaculture, since it would allow us to increase the content of the latter (mainly DHA and EPA) in the diets of freshwater fish and would give them a competitive advantage that they do not have today, besides that it could compensate the disadvantage of feeding marine fish with proteins and oils of terrestrial origin. We will be very aware of the results of these studies. As you can see, it does not take a big budget to achieve significant things; to have impact. The future of aquaculture can not only be conceived in large universities worldwide. I am convinced that institutions like UTMarT can be the engine of change. It’s about having vision, and as always... passion and perseverance.

Antonio Garza de Yta, Ph.D in Aquaculture from Auburn University, President of Aquaculture Global Consulting, Director World Aquaculture Society and creator of the Certification for Aquaculture Professional (CAP) Program. He is currently Rector, Universidad Tecnológica del Mar de Tamaulipas Bicentenario. 4 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed

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qua-electronics supplier Ace Aquatec is shocking the industry with a continuing string of successes. At Aquaculture UK 2016, the company won the inaugural Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC) award. In 2017, the Dundee, Scotland-based company won the Innovation Award at Aqua Nor in Trondheim for its technology which humanely stuns fish before slaughter. Now Ace Aquatec is in the news again, this time for being granted the prestigious Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the innovation category for their seal deterrent system. The award is specifically for growth and innovation in seal deterrent systems, recognising significant investment in R+D and benefits to the aquaculture industry from those developments. In particular it recognises the importance of innovation for growth in the economy and reduction in conflicts with farms as a result of our cutting edge technology. Ace Aquatec are the first Queens Award winner from the city since a University of Dundee research team in 2004. The CageGuard seal deterrent systems use innovative sound wave patterns to increase long-term effectiveness against predators while also protecting the hearing of those predators. “It’s a great honour to receive the Queen’s Award", said CEO Nathan Pryce-Carter. “We were recognised for the technology innovation of our seal deterrents, and also for the role our research and development has played in the growth of the Scottish economy. Animal welfare is an incredibly important issue, and we’re proud to be playing a part in helping our aquaculture customers excel in this area with a more humane approach to predator deterrence.” This latest honour allows the Scottish firm to display the Queen’s Award flag at its main office and use the emblem on all marketing materials. The awards are valid for five years. Award winners are invited to a reception at Buckingham Palace to be held later this year. You can visit Ace Aquatec at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 155.


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t has been announced that Pacific Trading Aquaculture has changed their company name to the shortened version, PT Aqua. This change will affect all of their branding. There are no structural or physical changes to the company’s activities or products other than the new rebranded name. Head offices will remain in Ireland with operational hubs in Norway, Germany and Greece. Having traded as Pacific Trading Aquaculture for nearly a decade, it was decided that as the company continues to expand into new territories and emerging markets, that a shortened and more recognisable brand name would be in keeping with their tremendous growth and evolving business model. Having previously traded in marine hatchery nutritional products from select high quality manufacturers around the world, PT Aqua has this year additionally begun producing their own range of species specific larval feeds in the EU. These feeds have received widespread success specifically in the cleaner fish production sector in north west Europe and PT Aqua are now looking at replicating this success in the development of species specific feeds for other international markets. The development and manufacture of these feeds is done in close cooperation with Coppens International

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Ireland based aquaculture feed company rebrand

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(an Alltech company) who manufacture PT Aqua’s range of feeds in Germany under licence agreement to them. The combination of the R&D and years of experience from Coppens International and Alltech, coupled with the company’s extensive market penetration and close understanding of established and developing markets is one of our strengths which we will continue to develop. In previous news, the company developed a new health-focused lumpfish feed, called Atlantic Gold. “Two key ingredients added are “Aquate” and “Biomos” from Alltech, which have been proven to benefit fish health both internally optimising digestive function, improving FCR, supporting immune response, optimising growth and externally contributing to muocus barrier protection, which is the primary defence mechanism of an aquaculture species,” explained Ian Sutton, Director. The feed is slow sinking and RAS compatible, it also has cleanliness and performance characteristics in the tanks. Mr Sutton continued, “The feed is manufactured in Europe under licence to us and the factory is Global GAPapproved also. The feed is in stock in Oslo for immediate delivery and is receiving high praise in the cleaner fish production community.” You can visit PT Aqua at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 81.

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New markets support BioMar in quarter one

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Ioannis Zabetakis Sustainability and functionality

he news: “Retailer Holland and Barrett have bowed to Greenpeace pressure and removed krill products from its shelves after being warned they were stealing food from penguins” (Telegraph, March 23, 2018). According to NGO Greenpeace, the krill-fishing industry, which involves catching the tiny shrimp-like creatures for products such as Omega-3 tablets, has threatened wildlife in Antarctica. For the environmental group, this activity depletes food from penguins, seals and whales in the fragile region. The environmental campaign group accused Holland & Barrett of stocking products which put species that depend on the krill for food at risk. Supporters have sent 40,000 emails to the company’s chief executive on the issue in 24 hours and stores across the UK have seen krill products labelled with stickers about their impact on the environment. Separately, a polling of 2,024 adults by YouGov for Greenpeace has revealed almost two-thirds of people (65%) think retailers should not be stocking krill products fished in areas being considered for protection in the Antarctic Ocean. A recent report from Greenpeace warned that tracking of ships targeting krill in Antarctica has revealed vessels close to wildlife feeding grounds and suggests some are anchoring near existing protected areas. Greenpeace is calling for all vessels krill fishing in the region to stay out of all Antarctic areas which are being proposed as marine sanctuaries and for businesses which buy krill to avoid those that continue to fish in those places. Holland & Barrett’s chief executive Peter Aldis said all the krill-based supplements it sold were certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council, but the company shared the concerns raised in the Greenpeace report. He said, “Protecting the oceans is important to us, which is why we were the first retailer to offer a beauty range that is completely microplastics free before it became law. We have therefore decided today to remove all krill-based products from sale over the next few weeks.” He said the company would be replacing krill-based supplements with algal oils to ensure customers had continued access to important diet supplements. Our comment: We need to be careful and cautious on creating nutraceuticals on a sustainable and functional way. There is no scientific doubt that polar lipids in fish and krill have strong anti-inflammatory bioactivities that can be of great benefit for humans and there is a clear market gap after the unlinking of omega-3 oils to cardiovascular diseases. Current academic and marketing research in our group focuses on fulfilling this gap.

Further reading

Book: Marine Oils (From Sea to Pharmaceuticals); Nova Science; editor Ioannis Zabetakis Paper: Phospholipids of Animal and Marine Origin: Structure, Function, and Anti-Inflammatory Properties http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/22/11/1964 e: ioannis.zabetakis@ul.ie

@yanzabet

Currently working on Food Lipids at the University of Limerick, Ireland, focusing on feeds, food and nutraceuticals against inflammation, Ioannis is a co-inventor in two patents, has edited a book on marine oils, and has published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles (h-index 19). He is currently writing a book on "The Impact of Nutrition and Statins on Cardiovascular Diseases" for Elsevier.

he first quarter of 2018 underlines that BioMar Group has entered into new markets and species, creating viable business growth. The financial results are support by solid yield from the new investments while weather conditions and a competitive scenario hit the company’s salmon division. Overall, the company delivered a lower result than expected in Q1 2018, but does not adjust the expectations to the full year results. Sales volumes have increased compared to Q1 2017, which mainly reflects the contribution from the acquisition of Alimentsa in Ecuador. While BioMar, in the salmon markets has been challenged by lower volumes and a continuous

competitive situation, market share stays at the level obtained in 2017 keeping the company on par with main competitors. Carlos Diaz, CEO, BioMar Group explained, “We see the achieved market share in 2017 at the salmon markets and especially in Norway as situation which the market will need to get used to. It has been a tough competitive scenario with pressure on margins, but we expect it to improve during the year. In Q1 we concluded negotiations with key customers in the UK and we are confident that 2018 will turn out to be another good year, where we will push innovations to the market, setting the agenda in the industry.” While the core markets have experience a challenging first quarter due to tough weather conditions hitting mainly Europe, the new markets have been flourishing. Innovative products brought to the markets combined with what the company calls “anchored local agility” have enable them to create a good foothold within Ecuador as well as Turkey and China. Carlos Diaz continued, “We believe in creating anchored local agility in our new business unit as well as for our existing units. The philosophy is to make sure the local units can impact the global centres of excellence and tap into the global innovation resources within raw materials, sustainability, nutrition and health; at the same time being agile in the cooperation with the customers.” You can visit BioMar at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland at stand 31.

6 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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New investment in aquaculture supply chain catches attention of cabinet secretary

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aving formally completed its acquisition of a majority stake in fish farm pen manufacturer Fusion Marine last month (11th April 2018), Gael Force Group are developing a completely new fish pen and product review of the existing pen range. Earlier this year, Gael Force announced it was embarking on a £1m investment programme to increase capacity and develop new value added products and services for aquaculture producers, while meeting the important opportunities for innovation in the sector. The investment to create a Scottish company of scale within the aquaculture supply chain has caught the attention of Cabinet Secretary for the Rural Economy and Connectivity in Scotland, Fergus Ewing MSP, who praised the ambition of Gael Force Group and Fusion Marine, commenting, “I welcome this investment by Gael Force. Innovation has a key role to play in the sustainable growth of our aquaculture sector and this research and development has the potential to provide a real boost to our rural economy, not least through the provision of highly skilled STEM job roles. “Companies like Gael Force have a key role to play in maintaining Scotland’s reputation for quality produce and enhancing our position on the global finfish production stage in an industry which contributes £2 billion annually”. The Cabinet Secretary’s comments come on the back of

his speech at Seafood Global Expo in Brussels last week where he gave his strong support for the industry’s target to double production by 2030. Both Gael Force and Fusion teams are preparing for their largest combined presence at Aquaculture UK over two exhibition stands next month, with a range of exciting product launches over 120 square metres of exhibiting space, including SeaFeed Pellet Detection Software, SeaFeed Steel Barges, SeaGuard 2-channel seal deterrent, plus a preview of the new fish farm pen development. You can visit Gael Force at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 69. You can visit Fusion Marine Ltd at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore Scotland on stand 315.

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10 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


A complete integrated farming solution

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ollaboration between AKVA group and Egersund has reached a new level with the news that AKVA group will now represent all Egersund Net products in its export markets outside of Norway. The addition of the products, including Nets, Moorings, Cleaner Fish and Sea Lice prevention units, significantly expands the existing group portfolio. Strengthening the company’s strategy to offer a completely integrated farming solution from the seabed to the farm gate, providing excellence in its customer service and the continual supply of innovative, high-quality products. David Thorburn Tom Asbjørn Hatleskog

Key to this alliance is the addition of Egersund Export Sales Manager, Tom Asbjørn Hatleskog and Jonny Invaer, Sales Manager, Egersund Trading to the AKVA group team. Tom is a well-known face to Scottish Farmers and noted for his enthusiasm and net expertise. Jonny brings over 20 years’ experience farming in Norway including the design, construction and assembly of moorings. “Jonny and I are excited at the prospect of working together with the AKVA group team in Scotland to help provide the customers with a total farming solution from one partner,” added Tom. Egersund’s operating philosophy is similar to AKVA group; focussing on fine tuning operations to increase profitability, while sharing the technical load with a reliable partner with the right people, the right technology and the right knowledge to achieve excellence. Creating partnerships grounded on strong values is a core element in both companies. David Thorburn, AKVA group Head of Export explained, “This inciteful collaboration opens the door for more exciting joint ventures, knowledge sharing, and will bring increased business and job opportunities to Scotland.” You can visit AKVA at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 157

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Dr Neil Auchterlonie Establishing credibility for engagement

pril was an important month for IFFO, as one of our two important annual meetings occurs then. Colleagues have recently returned from our 2018 Members Meeting, held this year in Miami over April 9-11. With an attendance of 150 IFFO members, it is somewhat smaller than the annual conference which usually sees approximately 400 delegates, but the programme for the event is equally comprehensive. Information exchange is at the heart of both the Meeting and the Conference, and, as always, a series of presentations covers the prospects for the volume of supply and demand in the market for the coming year. The Technical Session, held on the Tuesday afternoon, provided the attendees with an opportunity for an update of the ever-lengthening list of IFFO technical project work. The investment in science by IFFO, guided in priority and direction by the IFFO board, is crucial in establishing credibility for engagement with the many international and national organisations that are IFFO’s stakeholders, and is fundamental to the evidence-based nature of our work. An overview of a very diverse programme of projects was provided, spanning subjects including fishery management, raw material supply, antioxidants, and production of fishmeal and fish oil. The highlight of the afternoon for many was the keynote presentation given by Prof Dominique Bureau of the University of Guelph in Canada. I am sure that readers of International Aquafeed will be very familiar with Prof Bureau’s expertise in fish nutrition, and the IFFO technical audience were treated to a summary of more than 30 years of scientific research describing the reality of fishmeal replacement in aquafeeds. Dom’s work covers a whole range of aquatic species in both temperate and tropical waters, including shrimp as well as fish. The take-home message was that fishmeal replacement is far from easy or straightforward mostly due to the complexity of aquatic animal nutritional requirements, and the ease with which they are met by fishmeal. Low fishmeal inclusion diets (5%-15%) are possible but they are reliant on a partial substitution of fishmeal with high quality ingredients, to minimise any nutritional impacts that may occur through the loss of some of the vital micronutrients supplied by fishmeal. Those substitutions carry additional expense to feed formulations, and in practical terms fishmeal is still very much needed in fish feeds in order to provide a cost-effective nutritional balance for farmed fish and shrimp. Delegates were also provided a presentation by Allan LeBlanc of Calysta on the company’s new product “FeedKind”, a methane-substrate based material seen as a complement to fishmeal in aquafeeds. Allan’s presentation aligns nicely with the approach of IFFO: novel ingredients are supplemental to the global fishmeal supply, rather than replacements. Prof Bureau also contributed to a panel discussion, alongside Kristoffer Lunde of Cargill Inc., and Odd Eliasen of Havsbrún in the Faroe Islands. A series of questions from the audience prompted an interesting exchange of views on the importance of fishmeal in relation to health, welfare and quality of the aquaculture end product. With the 2018 Members Meeting now completed, the focus of the IFFO team moves very quickly to our annual conference to be held this year in Rome, October 15-17, 2018, where we look forward to an even more detailed technical event. Dr Neil Auchterlonie is the Technical Director at IFFO. He has managed aquaculture and fisheries science programmes in both public and private sectors. Academically he holds a BSc in Marine and Freshwater Biology from Stirling University, a MSc in Applied Fish Biology from the University of Plymouth, and a PhD in Aquaculture (halibut physiology) from Stirling University.

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Janice Spencer Training, knowledge and technology

he NAC, which is joint owner with the Charity Aquaculture without Frontiers, has recently joined up with Hull University as its academic partner, and is housed in the Humber Seafood Institute (HSI) building on Grimsby’s Europarc in this once great fishing port situated in Lincolnshire in the UK. With the shortage of domestic fish catch and EU regulations, Grimsby fishing folk took to developing their fish processing and it is now a thriving industry, with many countries sending fish there to be processed before marketing. The HSI building was constructed with funds provided by the Yorkshire Forward Regional Development Agency for support of the fishing industry and it for instance houses three superior bio- laboratories. The building also houses a 100-seat conference centre along with numerous offices, plus a large kitchen and preparation area equipped to deal with the culinary development of sea food. The UK fishing industry Levy Board occupies one wing of the HSI building. The NAC along with its academic partner Hull University chose this site as it was a logical place to be situated for researching all things regarding fish. A shellfish laboratory will be installed at the HSI and it is intended that short courses will be offered to students to help them better understand Aquaculture and all it entails. The Michael New Library and Research Centre, named in honour of AwF’s founder will soon begin to function to provide research facilities for supported researchers who have an interest in Aquaculture. Our charity Aquaculture without Frontiers will work alongside the NAC which it co-owns, to promote and help those in need in the practice of aquaculture around the world. The NAC and Aquaculture without Frontiers will for instance support and study health and wellbeing along with human food nutrition, and food security associated with fish. Indeed, it is a well reported fact that developing countries suffer from a lack of Protein in their diet, with supply being very poor and this deficiency causing health problems particularly in the very young and also pregnant mothers. Getting enough protein in the diet is not negotiable in terms of basic health, but it is often hard to source that daily amount while avoiding unhealthy saturated fats or eating more calories. Smallholder fish farmers in underdeveloped countries often do not have the money to buy high quality fish feed so they tend to just throw in to their ponds anything that they think the fish will eat to make them grow, and this can even include items like harmful debris. Training and knowledge along with technology is badly needed to produce better and healthier fish. The NAC and the charity Aquaculture without Frontiers will transfer that

knowledge to developing countries to help them obtain their much-needed protein. 3.1 billion people depend on fish for at least 20 percent of their total annual protein intake, and a further 1.3 billion people for 15 percent of their annual protein intake. These figures are increasing, as in 1961 it was 9kgs per capita and today it’s stands at 20kgs per capita consumption. This figure is expected to reach 21.5 per capita consumption by the year 2024. 30-70 percent of fish head and backbone is especially high in micronutrients and much of this is thrown away or exported. Seafood is in practice the only source of iodine, which is crucial to purposes like aiding thyroid functions and the essential neurodevelopment of children. There is much debate about caught fish and farmed fish. However, the oceans are being overfished and farmed fish should supplement wild caught fish to help the environment. So, it is always best to know the source of your fish before you buy and in my home country of the UK for instance suitably trained staff at the fish counter should know and be able to tell you about origin. Farmed fish also helps keep up with availability, consistency and variety and in the developed markets the trick is to keep the consistency of the product for the customers. Fish is a superfood and provides the same amount of complete protein as meat but with about one fourth of the total fat. It is also very rich in vitamin D and calcium. Most fish are a good source of dietary protein whilst also supplying essential minerals and the associated heart health Omega 3 fatty acids. Eating fish actually contributes to lowering risks of heart attacks and strokes, has anti-aging properties and helps reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s and reduces the chance of suffering Arthritis. Also, fish that are known to boost brain power contain the most Omega 3 fatty acids. These fatty acids all help boost cognitive functions and working memory and a diet rich in fish can prevent the onset of depression with the Omega 3 fatty acids even helping anti-depressant drugs be more effective. In addition to building and repairing tissues in the body, protein is an essential component to enzymes, hormones and antibodies. Protein stores iron and makes muscles move and on average men need 56 grammes of protein daily and women 46 grammes. Fish in the diet is something the NAC will be studying, and my special interest in the preparation of food from fish and food security for healthy development in children will be high on its agenda. Fish, apart from being nutritious is one of the easiest foods to digest in the human body, is very easy to eat as well as prepare and provides a complete and unique source of macro and micro nutrients required for a healthy human diet.

Janice Spencer joined the Board of Directors for Aquaculture without frontiers in April 2016. She currently serves as the Chief Financial Officer. 12 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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nternational Aquafeed will be hosting a “Petfood Extrusion and Treats Conference” as part of VIV Europe, June 2022, 2018 in Jaarbeurs, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Organised by Dr Mian Riaz, a Professor at Texas A&M University and Head of the Extrusion Technology Programme, the conference will be on June 21, and run from 1300-1700. The timetable of the full programme can be seen on the right. Pet food and treats are growing rapidly all over the world due to the sharp rise in pet humanisation and with increasing disposable income within families. According to one report, the US pet food market was valued at over USD 24.6 billion in 2016, and is expected to reach above USD 30.01 billion in 2022, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of slightly above 3.36 percent between 2017 and 2022, and global pet care market sale reached US $110 billion

in 2017 (petfoodindustry.com). The top 10 in largest in the pet food global market are: The USA, Brazil, Japan, France, UK Germany, Italy, Russia, Canada and Australia. Focus on health and wellness is a major driver of pet treats using functional and other ingredients promising benefits, clean label movement, limited ingredients, safety concerns, natural pet food, grain free, high meat and novel protein. Extrusion of pet food is an art and science which require knowledge about raw material, hardware and processing requirements. There are different options available to pet food companies to use either single or twin-screw extruders with very special die design such as multi-colour and multi shape die. In this half day conference, speakers will talk about pet food and treat trends, extrusion of pet food and treats with single and twin-screw extruders; advanced single screw extrusion for companion animal food, speciality, treats and supplements; extruded pet food quality management; relations between technology and extruded pet food quality and pet food quality optimisation and palatability. 

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Petfood Extrusion and Treats Conference to be hosted at VIV Europe

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News

IFFO achieve ISEAL Associate Membership

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ollowing a decision from the ISEAL Board, IFFO RS has achieved ISEAL Associate Membership. ISEAL is a global membership association for standards that allows members to demonstrate credibility and accessibility through transparency, robust systems and continuous improvements. Achieving membership consists of a learning pathway and checks of compliance with the organisation Codes of Good Practice, which ensure that standard-setters have wellfunctioning systems in place that embrace credibility and effectiveness. Upon the success of gaining Associate Membership, IFFO RS must now work towards full compliance with the standardsetting code (i.e. baseline and improvement clauses) within the first year of gaining associate membership in order to attain full ISEAL Membership in mid-2019. The following two years will then focus on maintaining full membership by reaching full compliance with the Assurance code after two years of gaining associate membership and Impacts code within three years.

COMPLETE FISH FEED PLANTS KAHL fish feed plants are equipped with the latest process technology, the core of which is the extrusion system with the extruder OEE and the process control system ESEP. In the production process, the raw materials undergo the process steps of weighing, fine grinding, mixing, extrusion, drying, vacuum coating, cooling and packaging. AMANDUS KAHL GmbH & Co. KG Dieselstrasse 5–9 · 21465 Reinbek Hamburg, Germany +49 (0) 40 72 77 10 info@akahl.de · akahl.de

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 13


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ANALYSIS: Most microplastic harm done at lowest levels of food web

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Microplastics, bits of plastic that have found their way into waters in and around every continent on Earth, have a range of impacts on aquatic life, according to a meta-analysis led by Purdue University’s Thomas Höök. Most negatively affected are zooplankton and larval fish. (Purdue Agricultural Communication photo/Tom Campbell)

puts all the current, applicable research into perspective. “Our results most strongly support the notion that exposure to microplastics leads to negative effects on consumption of aquatic organisms, with less compelling and consistent evidence that growth, reproduction or survival of aquatic organisms is negatively affected by exposure to microplastics,” the authors find. Carolyn Foley, a research associate in Purdue’s Department of Natural Resources and research coordinator for Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, said few of the studies analysed included microplastic fibres, the small pieces of plastic that break away from larger pieces. That might be an area to focus future research. She also suggested that while the effects on upper-level functions, such as reproduction and survival, were highly variable, there isn’t a similar summary of research examining how microplastics might be altering aquatic life in less perceptible ways. “If microplastics aren’t having immediate effects on these upper-level functions, maybe there are less-obvious and cumulative negative impacts,” said Foley, who is the lead author of the paper. “It may be more important to look at finer-level effects, including molecular-level effects.” The Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program and Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources funded the research.

MOBILE

Download the App using this QR code

urdue University scientists led a comprehensive analysis of research concerning the effects of microplastics on aquatic life, with the results showing widely different impacts among different types of animals. Strong negative effects were particularly apparent for small animals, such as larval fish and zooplankton, a source of food for many species, suggesting serious potential consequences that could ripple throughout the food web. Tomas Höök, an associate professor in Purdue University’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and director of the Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program, led a team that designed a meta-analysis of research related to the effects of microplastics on aquatic life. The analysis, published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, used results from 43 other studies that each considered the effects of microplastics on consumption of food, growth, reproduction, and/or survival of aquatic animals. The analysis mathematically calculated one or more effect size(s) for each study, then those effects were combined statistically to understand the big-picture effect on animals. The animals included in this study were all aquatic but ranged from fish to mussels to sea urchins to worms. The most significant findings included: Considering all effect sizes together, on average, exposure to microplastics negatively affects consumption, growth and survival of aquatic animals. However, the results are highly varied and not all groups of animals were affected in the same ways. Microplastics significantly reduced growth, reproduction and survival of zooplankton. When exposed to microplastics, larval and juvenile fish see negative effects on natural consumption of other foods. “One of the types of organisms that seems to be affected is crustacean zooplankton, which are the main prey for many small fishes,” said Höök, whose findings were published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. “The fact that these very small organisms are consuming these microplastics, altering their growth, reproduction and survival, means there could be consequences up the food web. If zooplankton numbers decline, there may be less food available for organisms at higher trophic levels.” Microplastics, small pieces of the material less than five millimetres in size, have been found in waters and soils in and around all seven continents. They come from a wide variety of sources, including broken-down food and drink containers, fibres from synthetic clothing, industrial waste and some beauty products. Many organisations and governments have tried to reduce the amount of plastic pollution reaching water and wildlife, but the effects these microplastics are having on the range of aquatic life hasn’t been clear. Purdue’s meta-analysis

14 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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Offshore

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News

Asia2018

MARICULTURE Conference In association with:

Supported by:

EXPLORING OFFSHORE MARICULTURE OPPORTUNITIES IN ASIA FOR THE FIRST TIME

Offshore Mariculture expands into Southeast Asia! The perfect meeting place for learning about and investing in industrial marine fish farming operations.

15 MAY Marina Mandarin 17 2018 Singapore

S P E C I A L I S T I N S Q U A R E S I L O S

TO

To book contact the events team: +44 1329 825335 or email conferences@offshoremariculture.com www.offshoremariculture.com/asia

Organiser :

Media partner :

WORLDFISHING & AQUACULTURE INFORMING THE GLOBAL FISHING INDUSTRY SINCE 1952

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 15

www.ts c -s i l os .c om


SPECIAL FEATURE

AQUACULTURE

A

by Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson, Production Editor, International Aquafeed

The best of British aquaculture: Aquaculture UK is the most important aquaculture exhibition and conference held in the British Isles

AKVA Group (Stand 157/OS48) recently signed its largest boat order to date as Bremnes Seashore, one of Norway’s largest privately-owned salmon businesses, ordered two Polarcirkel 1050 Cabin and two Polarcirkel 845 Cabin at once - see more on page 52

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16 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed

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Aquavation: The Ripple Sessions, a breakdown

10:00 - Welcome, coffee and snacks 10:30 - Hear from Dr Tom Ashton, Operations Director and Co-founder of Xelect Ltd to discuss the findings from SAIC co-funded project, along with UHI and Xelect, to optimise molecular tools for shellfish selective breeding. Dr Ashton is co-inventor of the Xelect genetic markers and of the tensile method of texture analysis. He has broad experience in marine biology, aquaculture and molecular biology. He obtained a PhD from the University of St Andrews in 2011, with a thesis entitled “The genetic basis of flesh quality traits in farmed Atlantic Salmon”.

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quaculture UK, the biannual fish farming event held in Aviemore, Scotland, between May 23-24, 2018, is set to attract the biggest and widest array of visitors in recent years. Hosted by Benchmark Holdings PLC, who are “a pioneering, innovation company operating in the aquaculture, agriculture and animal health sectors”, the show will cover every aspect of aquaculture and boasts to provide the best commercial and technical advice for fish farmers, farm managers and aquaculture professionals. In this edition of International Aquafeed you will see numerous news stories and features, especially surrounding technology where a line has been added in blue depicting where that company will be hosting a stand at the show. We have also featured a main focus interview with prominent show organiser Matthew Colvan as our main interview spread this month, where he talks about his history and the work that has gone into organising this year’s show. You will see included in this preview a floor plan supplied by Aquaculture UK, which you will be able to use to find the necessary stands to expand your professional network. On the final page of this article you will also see that we have included exhibitors in an easy to use A to Z. More content related to the show appears thoughout this edition of International Aquafeed and is highlighted on the map. At the show, International Aquafeed will be at stand 115, where we will have a number of magazines available and also the opportunity to speak with the team in regard to possible collaborations or editorial suggestions you may have for featuring any products or research you’re involved in in the magazine. The timetable of the two days is as follows, between 10001700 in the Conference Tent in the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre there will be “Aquavation – the Ripple Sessions”, where SAIC will discuss how they’ve brought together industry and research to drive innovative solutions to industry-defined challenges within Scottish Aquaculture.

Exhibitor Exhibit Parkin Parking

Aqualine (Stand 145) - SealFence is an intelligent acoustic deterrent system designed to deter seals and sea lions from attacking your farm. Using a unique ultrasonic transmission developed by OTAQ, SealFence creates an acoustic “fence” of protection around your cages. - see more on page 57


FEATURE

10:50 - Professor Brian Quinn shares insights from the collaborative project with Kames Fish Farm, working towards a cheaper faster method of monitoring and informing fish health practitioners on the health and welfare of their fish. Professor Quinn is an ecotoxicologist/environmental toxicologist investigating the effects of novel pollutants on both

invertebrates and fish exposed in the aquatic environment. Currently a lecturer in Ecotoxicology in the University of the West of Scotland, his research is investigating the potential impact of microplastics in the marine and freshwater environment.

tor ng

23-24 May 2018, Aviemore, Scotland

Vonin (Stand 223) - Referring to the cage nets that they produce, cage net manufacturers Vónin explained, “We have for decades, designed, developed and manufactured cage nets for the aquaculture industry. The experience we have accumulated through this time, has enabled us to supply the fish farmers with high quality nets which are certified according to NS9415.” - see more on page 56

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Come and meet the International Aquafeed team at stand 115

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3

9

337 INTER AQUA ADVANCE / (Pavilion of Denmark)

3

12

Aqualine (Stand 129) - Midgard Predator Net Solution: “Double net systems are not new to the aquaculture industry; however a key issue has always been in maintaining adequate separation between the predator and the fish net - see more on page 56 Ace Aquatec (Stand 155) - The majority of production cost in aquaculture (up to 60-75% in many cases) is on feed, and with such a big focus on that part of the operation it can be easy to forget that the slaughter process can have just as big an impact on the end product. - see more on page 44

Badinotti Group (Stand 129) The manufacture of nets for the aquaculture and fishing industry is the oldest activity Badinotti performs, according to their website. - see more on page 56

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 17


FEATURE

11:10 - Dr Bruce McAdam will present the collaborative project with the Fish Vet Group innovating for Health and Welfare of Lumpfish in Hatcheries and Salmon Cages. He is an ecologist with an interest in numerical methods for analysing unusual data sources, ranging from long term historic data to archival tag data. 11:30 - Ronnie Soutar, now head of veterinary services at Scottish Sea Farms talks about the project he worked on in his previous role at Aqualife, working with Professor Jimmy Turnbull at the University of Stirling, they collaborated to improve cleaner fish vaccination methodology and technology. These morning sessions will showcase some of the projects SAIC has funded, demonstrating what can be achieved when academia and industry join together with a shared aim. These are referred to as the “Case Studies” and the audiences will have the opportunity to ask questions at the end of each case study.

Innovation and Commercialisation

This will be followed by “Innovation and Commercialisation”, this is the afternoon session which will start off with advice from the organisations offering funding on how to navigate and access grants and support. This will be followed by a session on how to protect intellectual property in the market and a panel discussion with the expert voices – “You’ll leave tooled up to take projects to the next level,” say Aquaculture UK. The organisers explain, “And finally, we’ve supported ARCH UK to give them a platform to share some of their projects with conference audiences. They will cover six topics; Health robustness in sterile triploid Atlantic salmon (Dr Lynn Chalmers, University of Stirling), Social licence for aquaculture in Scotland (Dr Suzannah-Lynn, SAMS), Screening for genetic resistant viral disease in Atlantic salmon (Dr Remi Gratacap, Roslin Institute), Cleaner fish (Dr Adam Brooker, University of Stirling), Showcasing lipidomics for mussel hatchery production (Alessandro Laudicella, PhD student) and The future of seaweed farming in the UK (Dr Karen Mooney, Queen’s University).

DAY TWO:

The timetable and inclusion for the second day also hosted in the conference tent: 08:30 - 10:00 - The Fish Site 'Women in Aquaculture' Breakfast 10:15 - 11:15 - Benchmark Animal Health; 10:15 - 10:45 - ‘Rapid diagnostics tools in aquaculture’ delivered by Simon Mason, Head of BioSystems, Fish Vet Group. FVG will present their new range of rapid and portable diagnostics tools to help monitor disease outbreaks and bio-security in an on-farm environment. 10:45 - 11:15 - ‘CleanTreat’ – innovative, effective and ecofriendly sea-lice treatment’ delivered by Matt Haslam, Head of CleanTreat, Benchmark. The discharge of medicines into the sea post-treatment represents one of the biggest challenges to the global salmon aquaculture industry. CleanTreat by Benchmark solves this challenge by purifying treatment water prior to discharge. CleanTreat allows the continued use of high

welfare medicines and therefore enables the development of new, more efficacious medicines whilst still safeguarding the environment. 11:15 - 12:15 - Scientific Production Association IMMID Aquaculture as delivered by Alexander Trusov.

12:30 -14:00 - Session two – Cleaner Fish

12:30 - Introduction to the session by Chair Jim Treasurer 12:40 - Question and answer session with panel members: Carolina Gutierrez Rabadan, Marine Harvest Scotland; Sonia Rey Planellas, Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling; Chris Hempleman, Scottish Sea Farms; Richard Prickett, Dorset Cleaner Fish Ltd; Andrew Davie, Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling; Allan MacMaster, FAI Aquaculture, Aultbea Hatchery. The question and answer session will be structured into four parts, as follows; Cleaner fish hatchery operations, best practices in cleaner fish deployment, health, vaccination and welfare and technical and research – including nutrition, genetics, etc. There will also be an opportunity to purchase signed copies of the book edited by Jim Treasurer: Cleaner Fish Biology and Aquaculture Applications (2018).

14:00-14:30 - Session two – New training courses for the aquaculture industry

Benchmark Knowledge Services will showcase their new training courses for the aquaculture industry. There will be a demonstration of modules from the course: Health and Welfare of Atlantic Salmon and advance information on our course Cleaner Fish. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss their companies’ training requirements and to preregister for places on either the online or face-to face versions of these courses. 14:30 - Intro 14:40 - 15:00 - Professor. Dr Thorsten Stoeck from the Faculty of Biology, Ecology Department, University of Kaiserslautern Environmental DNA metabarcoding is a rapid, accurate and inexpensive tool to monitor the benthic footprint of salmon farms. 15:00 - 15:20 - Lars Rohold will be talking about Scanship AS asking the question “Will dried sludge from fish farming become a contributor or competitor to the utilisation of municipal sludge? 15:20 - 15:40 - Joanna Gosling, ARCH-UK Cordinator, Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling ARCH-UK: Opportunities for UK-wide collaboration, networking and ECR training in the field of aquaculture. 15:40 - 16:00 - Ana Rita Sancho Silva from Elanco Animal Health, will be discussing CLYNAV, the fresh hope in the fight against PD. www.aquacultureuk.com

Don’t forget you can visit International Aquafeed / Fish Farming Technology magazine at stand 115 and we look forward to discussing all the latest trends in the aquacultural industry with you!

18 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


2018 EXHIBITOR LIST

B

A-Consult Ltd  Aas Kystservice AS  Abdie Solutions Ltd  Ace Aquatec Ltd  Acta Marine  Addfield Environmental Systems Ltd  Advanced Aquacultural Technologies, Inc  AFE  Aggreko  Airmac-Gdi Limited  AKVA Group Scotland Ltd.  Akvaforsk Genetics  AMPCS LTD/td  Aqua EcoSystems UK Ltd.  Aqua Farming Solutions BV  Aquaculture Directory  AquaGen Scotland Ltd  Aqualine AS  Aquamoor  Aquatic Hygiene Ltd / Aqua Pharma Ltd.  Arklow Marine Services  Association of Scottish Shellfish Growers 

121 37 171 155 100 311 231 65 253 21 157/OS48 75 116 165 280 131 25 129 319 147/OS18 23 321

Badinotti Group SPA  Benchmark Animal Health  Benchmark Breeding and Genetics  BioMar Ltd  BORIS NET CO LTD  Botngaard AS  Brimmond Group  Buccaneer Ltd 

191 75 75 31 255 167 105 33

C Calysta  Center for Aquaculture Technologies  CleanTreat by Benchmark  CM Aqua Technologies  Coastal Workboats Ltd  Concept Life Sciences  Crosby Europe  D

UC12 265 OS8 209 OS6 117 221

Damen Shipyards Group  Danish Fish Tech Group c/o Danish Export Association  Deep Trekker Inc.  DESMI A/S  DHI  Dual Pumps 

E Egersund  Elanco  EnviroMonitors  Europharma Scotland Ltd  Evolution Aqua  EWOS 

OS48 261 279 307 UC11 101

F

FAIVRE SAS  Feeding System SL  Ferguson Transport & Shipping  Fish Farmer Magazine  Fish Farming Expert  Fish Vet Group  Flatsetsund Engineering AS/Pure Shipping AS  Flexi Panel  Food Innovation AS  Fusion Marine Ltd 

G

Gael Force Group  Gardner Denver  Grundfos Pumps  Guy Cotten (UK) Ltd 

H

Hatchery International  Helm & Evonik, New Partners to fight Sea Lice  Hercules Hydraulics  Highland Waste Services/Rock Highland  Highlands and Islands Enterprise  HL.SKJONG UK LTD  HPC KAESER Portable Compressors & Accessories  HS Marine  Huvepharma NV  Hvalpsund Net A/S  Hydrotech AB 

I

IAS Products  Institute of Aquaculture  Inter Aqua Advance – IAA A/S  International Aquafeed – Fish Farming Technology  IntraFish Media  INVE Aquaculture  Inverlussa Marine Services  IRAS A/S  iTecSolutions Systems & Services as 

J K

233 337 211 337 337 133

77 175 45 7 UC15 75 UC3 199 UC8 315 69 273 237 107 63 331 183 47 151 287 277/OS11 2/OS2 29 203 143 207 27 337 115 41 75 177 337 UC17

JT Electric  JX Nippon ANCI Inc. 

333 309

Kaycee Veterinary Products Limited 

109

L

KJ  KSK Aqua ApS 

163 337

La Tene Maps  Laboratorios Hipra S.A.  Landia A/S  Lift Up AS 

205 293 337 67

M M-Div  201 MacDuff Shipyards  13 Maiaplas, Plásticos Técnicos, LDA  53 Mainstay Marine Solutions Ltd  313 Malin Group  OS36 Marine Supplies (International) Ltd  UC4 Maritime Aqua/Tenfjord  3/OS3 Maskinfabrikken APOLLO A/S – IMPEX AGENCY A/S  327 Matparts Limited  222 Meercat Workboats Ltd  91 Migdale Transport Ltd  161 Migdale Transport Ltd  OS90 Moen Marin AS  281 Mørenot Aquaculture AS  111 MSD Animal Health  169 Multi Pump Innovation AS  35/OS30 N

Nauplius Workboats  Navalu  Neptune Shipyards  Norseaqua AS  Nortek  Northwards Ltd  Nutri-Ad International N  NWP Aquaculture 

O

OceanTools Aquaculture Ltd / OTAQ 

P

Pacific Trading Aquaculture Ltd  Palintest Ltd  PCI Gases  PHARMAQ Ltd  Processplus Ltd  Proteum Limited  Pulcea  Pump Supply AS 

Q

Qingdao Wancheng Anchor Chain Co.,Ltd 

R

R N T Tanks & Silos Ltd  Realtime Aquaculture  RIAWATECH AS  Riverdale Mills  RSPCA Assured 

100 UC16 197 299 11 179 UC5 249 145 81 295 235 99/OS10 217 43 141 271 78 181 193 282 UC7 180

S SAIC  182 Salling Plast A/S  79 SalmoBreed  75 Scientific Production Association IMMID AQUACULTURE  248 Scottish Environment Protection Agency  283 Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation  123 Seafish  289 Seneye  UC19 Sentronic GmbH  185 Shellfish Hatchery Systems  UC20 Skretting  139 Spring Genetics  75 Steen-Hansen AS  55 Steinsvik UK Ltd  153 Sterner AquaTech UK  89/OS4 StofnFiskur  75 Sunderland Marine Insurance  17 T

Technical Retail Services / TRS Refrigeration  TheFishSite / 5m Publishing  Thistle Marine (Peterhead) Ltd  Tideman Boats BV  Tideman Boats BV  Tom Morrow Tarpaulins (Inverness) Ltd  Trane  Trimara Services UK Ltd  Turfopes 

195 285 9 OS28 OS58 51 OS44 263 219

U UCO  University of the Highlands and Islands  Unst Inshore Services Ltd / Fluggaboats 

OS9 323 213

V Vaki  VARD Aqua Scotland Ltd.  Vaxxinova AS  VEGA Controls Limited  Vogelsang  Vónin 

149 159 25 187 UC1 223

W

W & J Know Ltd 

X

Xelect Ltd 

173

Y

Yamaha Motor Europe N V Branch UK 

215

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 19

59

AQUACULTURE UK 2018 EXHIBITOR LIST

A


FEATURE

M by MSD Animal Health, UK

SD Animal Health has undertaken a comprehensive survey of pancreas disease in farmed salmon in Scotland. One of the key findings of the Scottish Pancreas Disease (PD) Mapping Project is that blanket vaccination appears to have resulted in a significant reduction in positive results. The results of the project also suggest that herd immunity and improved husbandry practices may also be proving effective as pancreas disease has now fallen down the list of most prevalent diseases found in farmed salmon, however remains a continued risk. The year-long study by MSD Animal Health, working in collaboration with producers of farmed salmon in Scotland, Figure 1

undertook survey work across 96 sites in Scotland, covering the Western Isles, Orkney and Shetland (the Northern Isles) and along the West coast. The survey covered both vaccinated and unvaccinated populations to evaluate vaccine efficacy comparing comprehensive historical data collected since 2008 and a similar mapping project completed in 2015 with the recent findings. For the PD Mapping Project 2018 the methodology used was similar to that of the 2015 project, which was to assess the prevalence of Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and neutralising antibodies, which indicated a challenge has been present. Where positive SAV was identified, the virus was subtyped to determine which of the six subtypes of SAV were found. This has enabled the mapping project team to provide the most comprehensive view yet of the geographical distribution of SAV subtypes. Results of samples can highlight the following: • Negative virus and antibody: No exposure to the site to PD at that precise moment in time; Figure 2

Figure 1 illustrates the findings from the project in 2015. SAV 2 was dominant in the Northern Isles and Northern Region and SAV 1, 4 and 5 in the South West indicating a North/South divide between subtypes

20 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FEATURE

• Positive virus: Active, circulating viral infection; • Positive antibody and positive virus: Mid to late stage infection; • Positive antibody only: Previous infection. Serology samples were the predominant diagnostic method used during the survey. Samples were taken at key periods during the production cycle when the SAV infection pressure is likely to be most present. The results from the recent project compared with the 2015 data shows huge geographical changes regarding PD spread and SAV subtypes. When looking back at Shetland Isles for example, along with SAV 2, subtypes 1 and 5 are now present. West Coast regions are being exposed to all 4 subtypes as shown in Figure 2.

The Northern Isles (Orkney and Shetlend)

Figure 3 shows an excellent example of the reduction in positive results in the Northern Isles comparing historical data. With Orkney and Shetland being a proven hotspot for PD, it is clear to see the benefits of a blanket vaccination approach leading to herd immunity and driving down the viral loading on sites. The results show the effect of long-term blanket vaccination shows evidence of a significant reduction in the viral load with a reduced amount of positives. It shows that the virus is being kept at a level that is not causing any significant level of clinical

disease. In the sites surveyed, there was no evidence of any SAV subtypes being found. These results may also be influenced by improved fish husbandry practices and the effect of “herd immunity” amongst the fish.

Other results: The Western Isles

The PD Mapping project detected SAV 1,4 and 5 in positive samples; Antibodies were found on a number of sites where fish had been vaccinated.

West Coast Mainland

Antibody positive and negative virus returns were found on vaccinated sites; SAV 1,2 and 5 positive samples were detected on unvaccinated sites;

LET’S GROW

TOGETHER

SUMMER EDITION THE SUMMER EDITION HELPS REDUCE OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FISH AND SUPPORTS IT TO COPE WITH HIGH WATER TEMPERATURES. THUS, THE SUMMER EDITION PROMOTES EFFICIENT FEED CONVERSION AND GOOD FARMING RESULTS EVEN DURING CHALLENGING SUMMER TEMPERATURES.

Aller Aqua A/S · Allervej 130 · DK-6070 Christiansfeld · Denmark · Tlf. +45 70 22 19 10 · info@aller-aqua.com WWW.ALLER-AQUA.COM International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 21


FEATURE

One company which has adopted blanket vaccination since 2010 which has resulted in a zero return for detection of PD in the recent survey time points. Liam Doherty, Aqua Technician at MSD AH commented, “MSD AH is grateful to all those across the three regions in Scotland who worked with us to conduct our major PD Mapping project over the past year. “The results have enabled us to produce the most comprehensive mapping of PD subtypes across 96 sites covering both vaccinated and unvaccinated populations. “The data we have received and been able to compare with historical data collected since 2008 strongly suggests that blanket vaccination is proving effective in limiting outbreaks. “We have detected positive antibodies in fish populations where vaccination has taken place suggesting that herd immunity is developing. This combined with better husbandry practices is providing positive outcomes for farmers in terms of the impact that PD causes. “It is important never to be complacent with regard to Pancreas Disease and MSD Technical Services and AQUAVAC Monitoring Services provide a solid platform in which to monitor the

40 YEARS

movement of SAV subtypes around sites and regions.”

About MSD Animal Health

For more than a century, MSD, a leading global biopharmaceutical company, has been inventing for life, bringing forward medicines and vaccines for many of the world’s most challenging diseases. MSD Animal Health, a division of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, N.J., USA, is the global animal health business unit of MSD. Through its commitment to the Science of Healthier Animals™, MSD Animal Health offers veterinary surgeons, farmers, pet owners and governments one of the widest range of veterinary pharmaceuticals, vaccines and health management solutions and services. MSD Animal Health is dedicated to preserving and improving the health, well-being and performance of animals. It invests extensively in dynamic and comprehensive R&D resources and a modern, global supply chain. MSD Animal Health is present in more than 50 countries, while its products are available in some 150 markets. You can visit MSD Animal Health at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 169.

VIV EUROPE 2018 JAARBEURS, THE NETHERLANDS Amsterdam 30 min

JUNE 20-22

WORLD EXPO FROM FEED TO FOOD WWW.VIV.NET 22 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FEATURE

Latin American & Caribbean Aquaculture 18 October 23 - 26 Bogota - Colombia All info: www.was.org for trade show & sponsorship: mario@marevent.com

The annual meeting of

The joined meeting of the European Aquaculture Society and World Aquaculture Society

All info: www.was.org Trade show & Sponsorship: mario@marevent.com

For more info on the TRADESHOW : mario@marevent.com For more info on the CONFERENCE : www.was.org and www.aquaeas.eu International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 23


FEATURE

Microbial-based solutions for sustainable shrimp farming

A

by Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Blagnac, France

t the latest Asian-Pacific Aquaculture 2018 conference (APA 18) in Taipei, Taiwan, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, shared the results of new studies conducted in partnership with ShrimpVet Laboratory at Nong Lam University. These studies encompass the development and evaluation of functional feed ingredients to help address important shrimp health issues such as Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) challenge, or white feces syndrome (WFS), as well as the development of integrated bioremediation strategies for pond water management. They suggest different approaches to answer important issues of shrimp health, nutrition and management in a sustainable way.

Microbial-based functional ingredients for aquafeed: New perspectives

EHP is an intracellular parasite that targets the shrimp hepatopancreas and gut epithelial lining, causing stunted growth. It generates severe losses across Asia, either directly or in association with other pathogens. The trial results were presented by Eric Leclercq, Ph.D., Aquaculture R&D and Technical Support Manager with Lallemand Animal Nutrition. The trial was conducted at ShrimpVet Laboratory in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on EHPchallenged juvenile whiteleg shrimp. It evaluated a multi-strain yeast-based additive developed by Lallemand Animal Nutrition — YANG — with enhanced immune-modulating properties and binding activities against undesirable bacteria. YANG was fed for 14-days prior to the disease challenge and during the challenge period. “With YANG, the pathogen load in the hepatopancreas, measured by qPCR, was reduced at all time points and by up to 64 percent at the peak of infection. As a result, the body weight of challenged shrimp was 7.9 percent higher thanks to, interestingly, a much-reduced prevalence of severely compromised animals” Dr Leclercq explained. “YANG, applied preventively and over an EHP challenge period, can thus help contribute to reducing the severity of the EHP outbreak and related loss of growth. Importantly, ‘runt’ shrimp typically act as disease reservoir, so reducing their prevalence can help safeguard the crop to harvest,” he concluded.

As with EHP, White Feces Syndrom (WFS) is a pathology that strongly affects shrimp growth and FCR, but also survival. The infectious nature of the disease, and development of a challenge model, were only recently described by Professor Loc Tran from ShrimpVet Laboratory. The trial presented at APA 2018 aimed at assessing the potential of YANG to help mitigate the severity and impact of the syndrome, using the recently available WFS challenge model. Results indicated a lower prevalence of gross syndromes at the peak of infection, a lower loss of body-weight and a clear trend towards a higher survival. This highlights for the first time, thanks to YANG unique properties, the potential of a microbialbased solution as part of an integrated management program to support good health and performance under these conditions.

Bioremediation approach

Bioremediation is defined as: “The treatment of pollutants or waste by the use of microorganisms (such as bacteria) that breakdown undesirable substances.” The concept has been applied to aquaculture for decades with the goal of facilitating the management of organic matter accumulation and nitrogen compounds in ponds. Bioremediation can be powerful but is also a complex technology requiring informed management attuned to local conditions and targets. Based on in vitro, pilot-scale and field trials, Dr Leclercq discussed some key factors of success in the selection and deployment of an effective bioremediation strategy for shrimp farming. Distinct microbial solutions are available, each addressing specific aspects of the pond system. When properly applied and combined, bioremediation solutions can become powerful tools to secure and increase the capacity of the pond to carry a healthy crop to harvest.

About the company

We are committed to optimising animal performance and well-being with specific natural microbial product and service solutions. Using sound science, proven results and knowledge, we develop, produces and markets high value yeast and bacteria products - including probiotics, silage inoculants and yeast derivatives. We offer a higher level of expertise, leadership and industry commitment with long-term and profitable solutions to move our partners Forward. Lallemand Animal Nutrition is Specific for your success. www.lallemandanimalnutrition.com.

24 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FEATURE

AQUACULTURE WITHOUT FRONTIERS (UK) Aquaculture Without Frontiers (AwF) is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO) that promotes and supports responsible and sustainable aquaculture and the alleviation of poverty by improving livelihoods in developing countries.

Registered charity No. 1165727

aquaculturewithoutfrontiers.org.uk International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 25


FEATURE

THE MONACO

BLUE INITIATIVE

The Athens of the North Monaco Blue Initiative comes to Edinburgh As told by Professor David Munro, Former Director of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

On April 8-9, 2018 the 9th Monaco Blue Initiative conference was held in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland. Why MBI should select Edinburgh is explained by Professor David Munro, who is the former Director of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

T

he reason why delegates gathered in Edinburgh to attend the 2018 Monaco Blue Initiative conference can be traced back to a chance encounter during the last week of July 1898 when two ships coincidentally set anchor side-by-side in the port of Tromsø in northern Norway. The first ship to arrive was the Princess Alice II, the research vessel of the ‘sailor prince’ HSH Prince Albert I of Monaco, who was making his first voyage northwards into Arctic waters to undertake oceanographical research. The second ship, owned by the thread-making magnate Andrew Coats from Paisley in Scotland, was the private yacht Blencathra, heading southwards after a sporting voyage to Novaya Zemlaya. On board this ship was the Scottish naturalist, oceanographer and polar explorer William Speirs Bruce who had been offered the opportunity to undertake air and sea observations on his third voyage into polar waters. Bruce could not believe his good fortune when the Prince invited him to join his northern cruise to Svalbard. This, as they say, was the beginning of a beautiful friendship, but not only that, it was the beginning of a fruitful scientific collaboration that was to last the rest of their lives. They made several subsequent visits to Svalbard together and the Prince supported Bruce’s 1902-04 Scottish National Antarctic Expedition by supplying scientific instruments to assist with oceanographical studies in the South Atlantic. Attracted to Edinburgh as a student in 1887 by the opportunity to study at the marine laboratory on the Firth of Forth and to work on the scientific data brought back to Edinburgh by the Challenger Expedition (1872-75), Bruce was eventually to establish his Scottish Oceanographical Laboratory at Surgeons’ Hall in Edinburgh, a facility that was officially opened by Prince Albert I in January 1907.

A collaborative relationship

Fast forward to 2002-04 and the Royal Scottish Geographical Society found itself taking the lead in rolling out a centenary programme celebrating William Bruce’s scientific expedition to Antarctica. It seemed appropriate to re-establish the strong link that had existed a century earlier between Monaco and Edinburgh and Crown Prince Albert accepted the invitation to be a royal patron of the centenary. Later, as Sovereign Prince of Monaco, Prince Albert II invited Professor David Munro to join the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee of the newly established Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. It was in this position that Professor Munro was able to assist in identifying world class organisations to engage with. One of these was the School of GeoScience at the University of Edinburgh, a research establishment with a strong track record in the field of marine science. A close relationship between the Foundation and the University of Edinburgh was to develop following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding in 2015 and a decision was made in 2017 to hold the next Monaco Blue Initiative in Edinburgh. A passion for studying and protecting the oceans had brought Prince Albert I and William Speirs Bruce together in 1898. That same passion has been reignited a century on in a new collaborative relationship between Monaco and Edinburgh.

26 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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FEATURE

THE MONACO

BLUE INITIATIVE

“STOP TAKING THE OCEANS FOR GRANTED” The University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences hosted the ninth Monaco Blue Initiative. Here, International Aquafeed reports a slightly abridged opening presentation by His Serene Highness Prince Albert II, Prince of Monaco. The one-day conference drew 100-plus invited delegates from 15 countries and was held in the University’s Old College ‘Playfair Library’ in the centre of Edinburgh, Scotland. “The Monaco Blue Initiative aims to help change our approach to the oceans by prioritizing specific, collective operational solutions. In this respect the Initiative was created as a result of an observation, a requirement and an aim. “There is great complexity of the subjects related to the conservation of our oceans, which require different levels of action, technical expertise and complementary aims. “We need to act in line with multiple rational taking into account sometimes contradictory requirements, reconciling the needs of man with those of nature as well as current crises and our duties to the future.

“But we need to act swiftly, because the requirement is to progress rapidly in the face of the dangers we face each year becoming increasingly specific and increasingly alarming. “Whilst there is still time we must do everything we can to avoid irreversible tragedy; tragedies that we can already see looming on the horizon with the deterioration of our precious, fragile eco systems, the spread of plastic pollution, the daily disappearance of different plants and animal species. “In order to reverse the cycle of this decline, we must adopt a new approach that is respectful. “We must stop taking the ocean for granted and believing that it

28 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FEATURE

is permanent that we can take from it and that we can pour into it anything and everything without consequences.”

Acting together

“Our aim is to bring together the skills and means that are all too often dispersed, to encourage dialogue between experts and to mobilise concerted action. “We must act together otherwise we will not be able to progress in the right direction. Acting alone we will run out of ideas; acting alone we will run out of means; acting alone we will run out of determination and acting alone we would find we would be less efficient. “We must never forget the multiple demands and their complexity which must be addressed in order to make a real difference. We must never forget the reality of the situation. As David Hume one of Scotland’s finest son once wrote, ‘Be a philosopher; but, amidst all your philosophy, be still a man.’ “Indeed, being a man is precisely looking at different aspects of a problem and trying to reconcile them. That is why we need to work altogether. “Today I would like to extend a welcome to Peter Thompson, the United Nation Special Envoy of the Oceans. Through his work he embodies a collective commitment by the nations of the world to the oceans and their importance to humanity. “His appointment shows a new awareness by the international community which like him is equipped with remarkable skills and new means.

On conservation action taken in recent years

“These changes are absolutely essential, they are essential not only because of the progress they allow but above all they demonstrate a spirit of collective responsibility. “Today this spirit has to be extended beyond diplomatic and political circles. It must be shared with economic players, it must be introduced into civil society. This is why we are here today. This is why year-after-year, and after nine years now, the Monaco Blue Initiative promotes dialogue and reflection. “The issue of Blue Growth and its potential, the problem effecting Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) which are occurring at increasing frequency across the global and the increase in aquaculture is so essential to our collective future. “This is an essential requirement and one we have come together to focus on today.” International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 29


FEATURE

THE MONACO

BLUE INITIATIVE

PROTECTING MARINE RESOURCES

Seeking a shared vision, a collaborative framework and finding synergies

A

by Roger Gilbert, Publisher, International Aquafeed Edinburgh’s elite in terms of its experts in climate change, marine sciences, geo-science and conservation turned out on a warmish early-April Sunday evening in the heart of the city to welcome HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco and the ninth Monaco Blue Initiative (MBI).

ddressing delegates at an opening reception at the National Museum of Scotland, prior to the one-day conference, were Bernard Fautrier and Robert Calcagno, the vicepresident of the Price Albert II of Monaco Foundation and the CEO of the Oceanographic Institute, respectively. In ‘Icebreaker’ comments, Robert Calcagno, noted that “on one side is aquaculture, the fastest growing marine activity worldwide” and which inevitably is a cause of pollution for the sea while on the other side, Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are proving to be “the main framework to organise our activities for the sea while giving marine life central attention.” He explained that 100 centuries after humans turned from hunting and gathering to growing and breeding animals on land we have turned our attention to marine species and the seas. “When aquaculture happens in an ocean already under high pressure the challenges are really high. “To meet this challenge tomorrow we must recognise how lucky we are to have an outstanding panel of highly experienced and talented people attending this year’s MBI in Scotland" he added. He made special note of how critical it is to add a new generation of postgraduate students and young professionals to the meeting and he thanked them for their participation. “Transferring and fostering a passion for the sea is of utmost importance. “The purpose of the MBI is to bring together various generations, backgrounds and disciplines to build a shared vision and a collective framework for action,” he added.

From father to great, great grandson

Professor Peter Mathieson, the principle and vice-chancellor of the University, who has been in post for just two months, was “thrilled and honoured” that the University had been chosen to host the ninth edition of the MBI and which “brings us together in friendship and cooperation” with regard to marine sciences.

Edinburgh and its university has a long and distinguished relationship with Monaco and the Monaco Oceanographic Institute and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. “In the late 19th Century His Serene Highness Prince Albert I of Monaco established an important research centre for the Scottish scientific community particularly in the field of ocean research and made several trips to Edinburgh. In 1907 he opened the Scottish Oceanographic Laboratory having been awarded an honorary degree by the University earlier that year. “It was therefore a wonderful and poignant moment for the University to bestow that same honour onto his great, great grandson, His Serene Highness Prince Albert II in 2016,” he added. Today’s activities at the University, supported by the Prince’s Foundation, includes a project that allows students in countries most affected by climate change to learn about climate change online. The University is also excited about the second project on how community-based aquaculture can help protect the marine environments. He pointed to his personal experience from Hong Kong, which has “a spectacular marine environment of coral and enormous bio-diversity among plants and animals in an environment - right next door a most industrial delta.” He suggested that this might be the place to study the interaction between the human race and the marine environment.

Opening the ninth Monaco Blue Initiative

The Professor of Climate Studies at the University of Edinburgh, Professor Alexander (Sandy) Tudhope introduced HSH Prince Albert to the FairPlay Library in the Old College on the conference day by recalling that the library was completed in the 1830s, around the time Charles Darwin attended the University to study medicine but who quickly turned his attention to the new study of natural history and the oceans only to leave on the Beagle for a one-year exploration voyage of discovery in 1831. But why should the 9th Monaco Blue Initiative be hosted in Edinburgh by the University today? That was a question Professor Tudhope had little hesitation in answering. “Scotland and Monaco share the fact they were both pioneers in the development of modern-day oceanography. And there are several aspects of these past expeditions that are relevant today; they required courage and ambition, to think beyond simple elements of the system and to how the oceans work. They required people to take distinctive action and relied heavily on

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collaboration between disciplines, between individuals and between countries. “To me that espouses the values we place on the MBI today decisive action around the oceans in collaboration.” He says the University of Edinburgh, the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco and the Foundation are very much sharing when it comes to trying to find creative ways of thinking, of research and action “to support the protection and recovery of our oceans.” His final point was the northern seas perspective. “By coming to Edinburgh, the MBI has an opportunity to look north. The northern seas are among those that are most impacted by climate change, where changes are happening most rapidly. There is also a very long and distinctive cultural and social connection of their peoples with the sea and a long history of exploitation or even over-exploitation, but also a creative way of finding solutions and conservation - the oldest conservation area in the UK is just down the coast at St Ann’s,” he pointed out. “We very much value the opportunity to have the MBI here”, especially the University’s 12 master’s degree students who come from eight different countries among the delegates", he concluded.

STRONG ENOUGH TO FACE EVERYTHING!

The sessions

The day itself, attracted just over 100 invited attendees bringing together the leading marine and related conservationists from organisations such as the World Wildlife Fund, the Marine Conservation Society, Global Fishing Watch, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Conservations International among others with diverse groups such as the Sargasso Sea Commission, the Oceano Azul Foundation and the Blue Marine Foundation as well as a number of European political institutions and other universities and representatives from various groups and governments from around the world. All with a keen interest in protecting marine environments. In all 15 countries were represented. Following the opening address of HSH Prince Albert II (which is quoted here in detail), the programme presented two keynote presentations, three panel sessions, and an Oceans Update. Peter Thompson the UN’s Special Envoy for the Oceans and the Honorable Dominic LeBlanc the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard made notable speeches which International Aquafeed (IAF) will report on in subsequent issues. The Ocean Update was delivered by the Ambassador for the Oceans in the French Government, Serge Segura, followed by Carl Gustaf Lundin, the Director of Global Marine and Polar Programme for IUCN and concluded by Felipe Paredes Vargas, of the Department of Protected Areas for the Ministry of Environment, Chile. The three panel sessions, which presented specialists overseen by a moderator each addressed: ‘Blue Growth in our Changing Northern Seas’; ‘Marine Protected Areas and Climate Change’ and ‘Marine Protected Areas and Aquaculture’. The closing remarks was given by HRH Princess Royal who is the Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh. Rolex, with its longstanding and historic sponsorship of the HSH Prince Albert of Monaco Foundation and of the Monaco Blue Initiative in addition to the ‘Our World Underwater’ Scholar Awards, sponsored this event.

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the salient point that the earth itself was a 'closed system’ – or recirculation system if you will - and that we needed to do everything possible to protect it.

Protecting the oceans

From left to right: Dr. Thierry Chopin, IMTA expert and Professor of Marine Biology at the University of New Brunswick, Canada; His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco; and The Honorable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

‘Marine Protected Areas and Aquaculture’

It was obvious right from the welcoming addresses that aquaculture was to be a central platform for discussion at this year’s gathering, and how it is impacting the oceans in general and the marine environment in coastal areas in particular. While salmon farming, particularly in Chile, came in for open criticism, it was clear from the various panelists and session moderators that there is a clear understanding that many coastal communities depend not only for their livelihood but for their very survival on aquaculture activities. Session Three, which focused on Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and Aquaculture, concluded with an impassioned response to the question and answer session from Sylvia Earle, the founder and chairperson of Mission Blue, on whether we should be farming carnivorous fish for our food supplies or whether we should be continuing to grow and eat meat as we do, or look at alternatives. While this proposal might be considered extreme, she made AAT18_Milling & Grain Ad-W210xH148mm_May.pdf 1 2018/4/13 下午 03:42:26

Since 1993 when the Convention entered into force the area of MPAs of the world’s oceans and coastal waters has increased more than 20-fold. Starting in Australia in 2005, MPAs were just one percent. Today, that has gown to 6.8 percent and is on coarse to achieve 10 percent of the globe’s marine areas by 2020. This target was agreed by all parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2010 and was also adopted by members states of the UN as a part of Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14). In the past conservationists appear to have wanted to identify a culprit, such as aquaculture, for the ongoing and dramatic reduction in marine bio-diversity, but there has been little research to support this speculation, given that much of the accusations are based on assumptions - such as the fate of a pod of whales in South America, adjacent to high-intensity fish farming operations. Another accusation raised and discussed openly at the MBI was the “death of fjords” in southern Chile and Patagonia due to poor salmon farm management and antibiotic contamination along its coastline. Delegates also heard of the disappearance of traditional oyster beds in Scotland over the recent past, and that today support very few fishermen with few if any young people wanting to join that industry. Countering that is a programme being undertaken by the Marine Conservation Society, Heriot Watt University and the single-malt distiller Glenmorangie which is engaging industry and conservationists in the successful restoration of the

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6000-year-old European flat oyster in the Dornoch Firth. The project is called DEEP, the Dornoch Environmental Enhancement Project. Peter Nelson, operations manager at The Glenmorangie Company and team leader of the DEEP Project told IAF that working together with conservation complemented its news anaerobic digestion system with its high-tech membrane filtration which ultimately provides energy back to the distillery while relieving pressure on coastal water. This project was necessary to show our high-quality discharge water from the distillery was clean enough for the Dornoch, he says. But it is also a risk given that companies place great value on their brand and their reputations. Success for the restoration is in sight. “We must get this right, there is no room for failure,” he added.

Industries role

It is this attitude that several speakers from the podium referenced industry – to not only provide the funding that projects needs but to also oversee them and to take responsibility for their use of marine resources by understand the linkages within the complex nature of life in the seas. This combined with the summary wording from the first session – ‘Blue Growth in our Changing Northern Seas – Achieving Synergies' - now opens the way more clearly for engagement between industry and conservation groups. Words such as: collaboration, transparency, integration, innovation and achievement (not just talk but walking-the-walk) were just some of the ways conservationists need to engage with all stakeholders. While it cannot be denied that aquaculture does have negative impacts on bio-diversity and more control is needed, especially where fish feeds are being used in non-enclosed marine systems

The closing address was given by Her Royal Highness, The Princess Royal - Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh

to minimise environmental impact, it is clear that this meeting of the MBI in Edinburgh is more conciliatory and more willing to work with stakeholders and industry particularly in order to address critical issues. For example, much is being done within recirculation systems to ensure any outfall is environmentally acceptable, while feeding fish in nets in open waters do not fully appreciate the negative impact their actions may be having on bio-diversity, not just within their immediate location but further afield. In fact, the discussion about the type and quality of feeds used in aquaculture operations was largely by-passed during the conference and only addressed in Session Three by Iain Pollard of the Aquaculture Stewardship Council who showed how well some fish farming operations in Southern Ireland were working well within an MPA and that by monitoring and controlling feed quality the environmental impact was acceptable. This being due to standards set and maintained by ASC, which meet the needs of the marine environment while

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supporting the co-location of MPAs and aquaculture. Session Three emphasised the value of aquaculture systems focused on non-fed organisms, such as seaweeds (absorbing inorganic nutrients) and organic particle suspension- and depositfeeding invertebrates (bivalves and sea cucumbers). Elsewhere in the conference references to aquaculture focused on non-feeding systems such as growing and harvesting seaweed, bivalves and filter feeders. While this is vitally important to the significant numbers of people and communities relying on the immediate oceans for their livelihoods, it does not address the fact that there is over 40 million tonnes of formulated, industrially-produced aquafeeds being sown in waters, both fresh and marine, to feed fish annually. Other practices, such as Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA), could provide a solution in which wastes/by products become co-products to grow complementary crops. The willingness of the MBI to engage with stakeholders – aquaculture being the most dominant – is a good sign for future AQ18_Aquafeed 下午 02:43:11 projects on aAd-W210xH148mm_Apr.pdf scale that will make1 a2018/3/16 significant difference.

A royal thank you to Prince Albert

In her closing remarks HRH The Princess Royal told the gathering that, “This is a hugely integrated subject which is really difficult to get a grip of as all things have an impact on each other. “And what you do through this initiative is an extraordinary attempt to bring all those strands together so I can only offer you my thanks for your attempts in this area. I’m particularly thankful that Prince Albert has been one of the key leaders in this. His partnership with the University, his Foundation and the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco is also an enormous bonus for us. “And this partnership has supported some very highly motivated talented and international students, to become the next generation of practitioners, researchers and stewards of our oceans. “I have no doubt that the various perspectives that are here in this room are a very important part of solving this problem in the future,” concluded HRH The Princess Royal.

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THE MONACO

BLUE INITIATIVE

I

Building relationships between Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and aquaculture

The panelists of Session 3 with Thierry Chopin making the case for the Turquoise Economy, a ‘greener’ version of the Blue Economy

by Thierry Chopin, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, Canada, and panelist in Session 3 Monaco Blue Initiative 2018

n Canada, it is becoming apparent that the wonderful, land-based, National Parks of the 19th and 20th centuries are sometimes not large enough, and are especially lacking buffer and transition zones and corridors for migratory populations. We need to transfer this management knowledge to the marine environment. A mosaic of little MPAs will not be the solution. Experiences from several parts of the world involving MAPs and aquaculture were given at the recent Monaco Blue Initiative 2018 held in Edinburgh, Scotland. Panelists in Session 3 on MPAs and Aquaculture touched on the following: • Paul Tett, Coordinator of the European project AQUASPACE, Scottish Association for Marine Science, mentioned that in Scotland marine spatial planning, zoning and interactions between aquaculture and MPAs are regulated by law and gave the example of Loch Creran where salmon, mussel and oyster farming are taking place along recreational and commercial boating and the designation of a MPA. • Rory Moore, Project Manager, Blue Marine Foundation, gave the example of Chile, where salmon aquaculture and nature conservation are experiencing difficulties finding common ground, whereas, in the Caspian Sea, aquaculture has been crucial for the protection of sturgeon. • Kitty Brayne, United Kingdom Conservation Programme

The need for synergies

There is a need for synergies between MPA governance and the development of sustainable aquaculture, and this is even more important in developing countries, says Francois Simard, Deputy Director, Global Marine and Polar Program, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)] when highlighting key points for Session 3. He said: • In 2010, under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, the Aichi Target 11 was aiming at 10 percent of the oceans being protected by 2020 (with an intermediate target of five percent by 2017) • There is a need to reconcile nature conservation and sustainable development

• The IUCN Resolution of 2016 is aiming at 30 percent of the oceans being strongly protected by 2030 • In 2014, seafood supply from aquaculture operations exceeded that provided by capture fisheries

• The time has come to identify potential opportunities and synergies that can enable aquaculture and conservation to work together more effectively through an integrated management framework

Manager of Blue Ventures, reported on two beneficial cases for both the ecosystems and local populations: the cultivation of seaweeds in Indonesia and of sea cucumbers in Madagascar. • Iain Pollard, Standards Coordinator, Aquaculture Stewardship Council, reported on the successful certification of salmon aquaculture operations in southern Ireland, which, by controlling the quantity and the quality of the feed used, were having an acceptable environmental impact.

Evolving from simple ‘no touch zones’

As the Scientific Director of the Canadian Integrated MultiTrophic Aquaculture Network, and having just returned from a trip to Brazil to establish a cooperation with Janaina Mitsue Kimpara - who was a panelist during the 7th MBI in São Paulo in 2016 – I was struck by the fact that MPAs in the western world are still largely based on a principle that excludes other activities and are pretty much “no touch zones”. In Brazil, and other developing countries, there is more an adoption of the IUCN approach with seven types of reserves, of which types V and VI allow some activities; they are the Reserva Extrativista Marinha. There is a need for intermediate situations between these two extremes, which would allow some sustainable activities within the MPAs framework, such as Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA), which is a type of sustainable aquaculture compatible with the MPA targets. All the panelists agreed that the aquaculture of seaweeds (absorbing dissolved inorganic nutrients), shellfish (suspensionfeeders filtering small organic particles in the water column), and other invertebrates (deposit-feeders, such as sea cucumbers or sea urchins, recapturing larger organic particles on the bottom) was an excellent idea, independently or combined in IMTA systems. The aquaculture of these organisms could be highly recommended, in particular in regions where overfishing has occurred. New cultivation technologies, in particular hatchery technologies, will need to be developed. IMTA is much more than looking at protein sourcing. As

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Aquaculture facts

• 95.6 percent of the world’s seaweed supplies come from seaweed aquaculture. Seaweeds were the first group of organisms to pass the 50 percent farmed/wild harvest threshold more than four decades ago (in 1971)

• 89 percent of the world’s mariculture production is not fish: 47.5 percent is seaweeds, 28.0 percent is mollusks, 12.0 percent is crustaceans and 1.5 percent is other organisms. Finfish mariculture represents only 11 percent.

emphasised by the FAO in recent years, it is not only about food security, but also about nutritious food security. A nutritious diet comes from diverse food sources. So, we have to grow and eat more than fish. To calculate IMTA’s full value, extractive species (seaweeds and invertebrates) need to be valued for not only their biomass and food trading values, but also for the ecosystem services they provide, along with the increase in consumer trust and societal/ political license to operate that they give to the aquaculture industry. The value of the ecosystem services provided by the extractive components of IMTA systems will have to be recognised, accounted for and used as financial and regulatory incentive tools (e.g. development of nutrient trading credits).

Sustainability

Designing the sustainable and responsible food production systems of the future is linked to the understanding of the circular economy principles.

Marine spatial planning should be used as a tool, as it will support the identification of opportunities and synergies between MPAs and aquaculture activities. Certification will be important for ensuring aquaculture sustainability. Fishmeal/fish feed can still be an issue; however, their careful monitoring should address concerns. Local communities should be strongly involved in local development and in local nature conservation. If having MPAs means displacement or no work for local populations, to allow for high-class tourism for short periods of time and limited local economic return, it will not work. Sustainable forms of aquaculture and fisheries should bring food security, poverty alleviation and economic resilience to local communities near MPAs. During the conference, a lot was said about the Blue GrowthBlue Economy-Blue Revolution, but participants also recognised that it needs to become ‘greener’. It is, consequently, time to talk about the Turquoise Growth-Turquoise Economy-Turquoise Revolution.

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International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 37


EXPERT TOPIC SALMON

INTRODUCTION SALMON EXPERT TOPIC

Salmon (salmonids) are one of the most important species of fish in aquaculture. In the US, Chinook salmon and rainbow trout also are most commonly farmed salmonids for recreational and subsistence fishing. In 2007, the aquaculture of salmonids was worth US$10.7 billion globally. The production has grown 10-fold during the 25 years from 19822007 and has continued to rise exponentially ever since. A challenge that the industry is working together to overcome at the moment is the problem of sea lice. This month’s ‘Expert topic’ examines the relationship between the most commonly farmed fish and the parasite that is threatening to decimate entire stocks of the fish from farms all over the world from Norway to Chile to Scotland. The lice attach themselves to the fish and feed on them, similarly to ticks or nits on humans, this action however kills the stock or renders them unsuitable for sale to consumers. The lice can grow to roughly the size of a pea and lay thousands of eggs in their brief lifetime. When in the wild, diseases and parasites are normally at low levels and kept in check by natural predation. However, in crowed pens they can easily become epidemics. These diseases and parasites also are known to transfer from farmed to wild salmon. According to “It’s all about salmon – Salmon Aquaculture”, by the Seafood Choices Alliance, Spring 2005, described links between the spread of parasitic sea lice from river salmon to wild pink salmon in the same river, the study was performed in British Columbia. In 2002 the European Commission (2002) concluded, “The reduction of wild salmonid abundance is also linked to other factors but there is more and more scientific evidence

by Zasha Whiteway-Wilkinson, Production Editor, International Aquafeed establishing a direct link between the number of lice-infested wild fish and the presence of cages in the same estuary. Finally, it has also been reported that wild salmon on the west coast of Canada are being driven to extinction by sea lice from nearby salmon farms (“Declining Wild Salmon Populations in Relation to Parasites from Farm Salmon”). These predictions however were disputed by other scientists and recent harvests have indicated that the predictions were in error. In 2011, Scottish salmon farming introduced the use of farmed wrasse for the purpose of cleaning aquacultured salmon of the ectoparasites. Wrasses are a family, Labridae, of marine fish, many of which are brightly coloured. The family is large and diverse with over 600 species in 82 genera, which are divided further into nine subgroups or tribes. They are typically small fish, most of them less than 20cm (7.9 inches) long, although the largest, the humphead wrasse can measure up to 2.5m (8.2ft). They are efficient carnivores, feeding on a wide range of small invertebrates. Many smaller wrasses follow the feeding trails of larger fish, picking up invertebrates disturbed by their passing. The initial method of dealing with the lice on salmon problem was by feeding fish a pesticide with the active ingredient of emamectin benzoate, but around 2009 the lice appeared to develop a resistance to the chemical and have spread globally since. More recent methods of control include using new closed in pens that resemble eggs to standard mesh, another is a device known as a Thermolicer to warm the water and detach the lice, there are also of course a technology known as “Optical delousing”, which shoots the sea lice with a laser gun to kill the parasite. You can read more on this method and others on the next page in “Lice and laserbeams” written by Vaughn Entwistle, Features Editor at International Aquafeed.

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SALMON

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EXPERT TOPIC SALMON

SALMON

EXPERT TOPIC Lice and laserbeams

by Vaughn Entwistle, Features Editor, International Aquafeed

A

quaculture’s biggest dilemma that has recently burst onto the front pages of mainstream media: The challenges of sea lice and their effects upon both farmed and wild salmon. Sea lice (despite the insect name they are actually a small crustacean) are marine parasites that latch onto fish such as salmon and feed upon the mucus, tissue and blood of the host fish. Sea lice infestations have been implicated in the decline of wild salmon and sea trout stocks. Moreover, it is a global problem that is impacting all the major salmon farming nations: USA, Canada, Scotland, Norway and Chile. A particular species of sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is often found on farmed and wild Atlantic salmon, while another species (Caligus rogercresseyi) has become a major concern in Chilean salmon farms. Sea lice have colonised nearly every aquatic environment on earth. They have been around for millions of years and have adapted to live on salmonids (fish of the salmon family, which includes salmon, trout, grayling and whitefish), feeding on the fishes’ skin and blood to survive. The lice have a short, freeswimming larval phase, when they need to find and attach to a fish host. The sea louse’s life cycle consists of a series of molts— at the ‘napulii’ stage the sea louse is free swimming, relying on its own internal yolk reserves. But at its intermediate copepod stage, the lice use their hooked antennas and frontal filaments to attach themselves to fish. At this stage they are still too small to cause any real damage as they feed on the young salmon. However, as the lice near the adult stage, they attach to the fish by suction and can become

40 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


EXPERT TOPIC lethal. They’re able to move around on the host fish's body, specifically targeting the head, back and perianal areas, preferring to feed on mucus, blood, and skin. The lice can grow to about the size of a pea and lay thousands of eggs in their brief lifetime. When salmon are infested with very high levels of sea lice, their health can be severely impacted, which might even prove fatal – especially if the salmon are juveniles. But while they are a serious threat, Atlantic salmon have survived alongside sea lice in the wild for centuries, and fish farmers have learned how to counter the parasite in aquaculture environments for many years.

Sea lice damage

Unfortunately, our knowledge of sea lice interactions with wild salmon is limited, and most of our information about sea lice comes from farmed salmon in open net-cages. The fear is that sea lice from farmed fish are latching onto wild fish and contributing to a collapse of stocks. Sea lice cause physical and enzymatic damage at their sites of attachment and feeding, which results in abrasion-like lesions that vary in their nature and severity depending upon a number of factors, including host species, age and general health of the fish. It is not clear whether stressed fish are particularly prone to infestation. Sea lice infection causes a generalised chronic stress response in fish since feeding and attachment cause changes in the mucus consistency and damage to the epithelium resulting in loss of blood and fluids, electrolyte changes, and cortisol release. This can decrease salmon immune responses and make them susceptible to other diseases while reducing growth and performance. The degree of damage is also dependent on the species of sea

SALMON

lice, the developmental stages that are present, and the number of sea lice on a fish. There is little evidence of host tissue responses in Atlantic salmon at the sites of feeding and attachment, regardless of the development stage. But the biggest concern for fish farmers is that sea lice exposure often damages the fish and makes them unmarketable.

The problem of sea lice in salmon farms

In the open ocean, lice infestation usually occurs in adults whilst they are at sea. But when adult salmon return to their freshwater spawning streams, any attached sea lice cannot survive in fresh water, so they fall off, or die. The problem for farmed salmon is that they are confined to a limited area. If a louse originating from a wild salmon infects a farmed salmon, the farmed salmon never migrates to freshwater and so can’t shed the lice. Also, farmed salmon are typically kept in high densities, and so the lice population can easily increase to levels not normally experienced in the natural environment. When wild salmon swim past these infested farms, the lice from the farms easily infect the wild salmon—and at higher rates than the wild salmon would normally experience. Since many salmon farms are located on migration routes, wild juvenile salmon, who would not normally encounter high levels of sea lice, also become infested. A single salmon farm could increase sea lice pressure on salmon migrating past by as much as 73 times above ambient levels. As the juveniles continue their migration out to sea, the lice carried with them reach maturity, reproduce, and re-infect, potentially spreading to other wild salmon that may have never encountered the original farm. Just as infestation rates proliferate in individual farms because of the high stocking density of the salmon, infestation rates

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EXPERT TOPIC

SALMON

between farms and wild salmon also increase as the density of farms increases and when farms are located near fish holding facilities. A simple response might be to spread salmon farms out, though this may not necessarily be realistic for aqua-culturalists or even possible given how busy some areas of the ocean are now becoming. Spreading farms out may also simply spread sea lice and other infections to other parts of the ocean. Within farms themselves, the question of how many salmon is too much from an environmental and animal welfare point of view is a subject of often fierce debate.

The chemical solution

One of the most common treatments for salmon lice involves the use of harsh chemicals. Although this treatment has been effective in managing sea lice outbreaks, it also has negative effects on the fish, often reducing appetite and growth. More importantly, from the salmon farmer’s perspective, the fish can’t be sold for several weeks after a treatment. Over time, sea lice have built up a resistance to the three major classes of chemical being used, as evolution continues to outpace technology. There is, however, another chemical approach. Being crustaceans, salmon lice must shed their exoskeleton to grow. So a new tactic is a treatment that halts this moulting cycle. However, successfully employing a moult inhibitor requires knowing the right number of moults in order to choose the optimum time to treat the salmon. Although moult inhibitors appear to be an ideal solution to the salmon lice problem—as they don’t negatively affect the fish—they are not popular because of this timing issue.

A wash and scrub up

A mechanical approach to sea lice control involves the use of hydrolicers that wash the lice off the salmon and/or thermolicers that pump the fish through water heated to more than 30C, a temperature change that makes the lice let go and fall off their hosts. These techniques can yield dramatic results in greatly reducing sea lice levels but both methods are expensive— operating a thermolicer costs more than £5m a year — and fish can be killed by the process of corralling and pumping them through the machines.

Cleaner fish: A natural solution

Some farms are turning to the use of so-called “cleaner fish”. The most effective species are ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta) and the lump fish (Cycloptus lumpus). Cleaner fish eat any parasites, such as sea lice, which may have settled on farmed salmon (in much the same way that ladybirds control aphids on commercially grown plants). This provides a natural and less expensive way to control sea lice infestations. Under the right conditions, the use of cleaner fish represents an effective form of biological delousing without putting chemicals into the environment. This not only saves money for the farmer, but also provides a highly effective and sustainable method. However, to further complicate matters, cleaner fish seem to work better at some locations than at others. For example, they tend to be more efficacious in Norwegian fish farms than in Scottish fish farms and although cleaner fish help, they are not necessarily a 100 percent solution to the problem, so farms may still need to treat salmon stock with other methods to fully control the lice. But by reducing the number of chemical

treatments, the knock-on effects (such as resistance) are reduced.

Laser beams and other high-tech solutions

One of the most esoteric sea lice solutions involves a camera system linked to a laser which fires a green laser beam. The laser is installed into a barrel-like casing that is submerged directly into the netted fish pens. When the salmon swim past the device they are scanned by a complex camera system. Whenever the outer shape of the sea lice is identified on a salmon’s skin, a short laser impulse is delivered that destroys the tissue of the parasite without damaging the fish. The reaction is enabled by real time software that has been specifically adapted for this purpose. The system is controlled and monitored online which allows this technology to be used permanently. Another preventative method with low environmental impact is the use of innovative snorkel sea cages, which reduce infestation by keeping salmon at lower depths than sea lice larvae. The nets are equipped with a snorkel-like tube that allows the salmon to reach the surface to refill their swim bladder before diving back down. Keeping the fish in underwater, roofed spaces has also been found to reduce infestations. Lice larvae are mostly found near the surface of the water, so keeping the salmon in deeper water lessens the opportunities for contamination. Keeping salmon farms out of the ocean alltogether perhaps is the ultimate solution and a number of land-based farms employ Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS). In these systems, water in the fish tank is taken through a series of filtration processes to remove waste, and then onto a detoxifying treatment area. The resulting clean water is pumped back into the fish tank. Apart from the initial input of water, only small additions are required to maintain the process. Another highly effective approach is to produce hardier salmon. Thanks to years of R&D by a number of feed companies, there are now innovative formulations of fish feed providing antibioticfree solutions to create healthier salmon with heightened resistance to sea lice and other infections.

The rise of farming technology

However, farm infestations cannot always be contained, putting wild species at risk. Salmon travel between salt water and freshwater to breed, and some have to migrate past farms to do so. This gives the infective larvae an opportunity to transfer from the captive salmon’s nets to the wild fish swimming by. Currently, one third of the world’s population relies on fish as a source of protein and expanding fish farming is going to be increasingly vital to meet the demand of a growing population. While issues such as sea lice are serious problems, modern salmon farming has only been around for four decades, and in that time the industry has proven remarkably resourceful. Thanks to modern technology, with companies from around the world working on diverse solutions, the industry has been able to adapt more quickly than traditional agriculture, which also faces issues of sustainability, environmental impact, etc. While issues remain, aquaculture is the focus of a lot of the best minds, working at some of our most innovative companies, as scientists, engineers, and a host of talented people are working to solve these problems while ensuring that aquaculture remains one of the most productive and sustainable methods for feeding the world.

42 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

#1

Is slaughter killing your fish farming investment? by Ace Aquatec, Dundee, Scotland

“It can take 20,000 hours of careful attention to produce a farmed fish of 3-5kg, and less than one hour to reduce that investment to well below cost by “saving” on processing technology.” This is a problem Alastair Smart, Managing Director of aquaculture advisory group SmartAqua, says he’s seen again and again over the years as many companies fail to put appropriate focus on the slaughter process. He highlights the harvesting handover from farm to processing as a weak spot that can have a big impact on fish quality.

The majority of production cost in aquaculture (up to 60-75% in many cases) is on feed, and with such a big focus on that part of the operation it can be easy to forget that the slaughter process can have just as big an impact on the end product. A stressful slaughter process can lead to reduced taste quality and shelf-life, quickly eroding the return on that feed investment. Research published in the Journal of Food Science in 2016 proved that the more humanely a fish is killed, the better it tastes. And yet despite progress in some areas, many processing sites still create a highly stressful environment for fish at the end of their lives.

Traditional approaches have evolved, but still have flaws

For decades asphyxiation and carbon dioxide (CO2) stunning were standard practice, and the industry has only relatively recently moved away from CO2 to more humane stunning methods that render fish fully unconscious prior to being bled or put on ice. Norway banned CO2 stunning 2010, and the major UK supermarkets have all signed up to humane slaughter standards, but some regions, such as Greece and Turkey, are still adjusting their farming practices to bring them in line with these new standards. Percussive stunning – a sharp blow to the head causing immediate unconsciousness – is now the most common slaughter method, but despite being an improvement over previous techniques it also carries inherent flaws impacting fish welfare and quality, operational efficiency, and staff safety. The fact that the fish are still in a highly stressed state when entering the percussive stunning process means fish welfare and quality levels are not ideal. And the high levels of handling required to guide stressed fish into the percussive stunner wastes a lot of time and creates higher than necessary levels of staff risk.

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FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY Newly perfected electric stunning technology provides an answer

The solution to these problems is to have a humane and high volume way of rendering fish unconscious directly before they pass through a percussive stunner, bleeder, or onto ice. Historically, electric methods proved difficult to perfect, but recent technology developments have seen electric stunning finally stand out as a reliable high quality alternative. The most challenging aspect of developing an electric system has always been the delicate balance between enough current to effectively stun the fish, but not so much that the fish is damaged. Previous attempts to bring electric stunning to market focused on dry electric stunning – electrodes making direct contact with the fish – but these systems have had inconsistent quality and stunning with some species. Water-based electric stunning is making big strides forward though, with Scottish aquaculture technology provider Ace Aquatec recently unveiling a water-based system that tackles the technological problems previously holding this method back. The biggest changes compared to other systems on the market are the inclusion of flexible electronics that are able to protect against fish damage and vary the power output by species. Integrating water-based electric stunning has a lot of other advantages in addition to being more humane. The flow is constant because the stunned fish flow smoothly through the system without bunching ahead of bleeding. Reduced handling improves fish quality as well as the working environment for staff. And reducing fish stress even further by keeping them in water during stunning, unlike dry electric stunners, has a positive impact on both quality and shelf life.

Branching out to lead the way in electric stunning

Ace Aquatec are better known for their predator deterrent systems, but have been quietly developing electric stunning technology in their research labs for the last 10 years. This work culminated in the successful launch of their Humane Stunner

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 45


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY Universal (HSU) system last year and winning the Aqua Nor Innovation Award for 2017. CEO, Nathan Pyne-Carter, explained that timing and reliability have been key to guaranteeing the Humane Stunner Universal’s success. “You only have one chance to make a good impression, so we waited until we had a fully tested robust system that offers efficiency, safety and fish quality improvements over existing systems.” The development journey wasn’t without hurdles though. He encountered initial scepticism in the industry about whether electric stunning could work without damaging the spines or slowing down the slaughter process due to power issues or machines being restricted to just one species. The Ace Aquatec team responded by focusing on solving all of these problems before launch and ended up with a system capable of processing in excess of 100 tonnes per hour, with a 100 percent stun rate, and no damage. And their HSU system can be programmed via a touchscreen to process any species or size of fish.

Who’s already made the switch to electric stunning?

Since winning the Innovation Award, Ace Aquatec has seen global exports of their electric stunning system grow rapidly across Europe, APAC and the Americas; with Sanford, King Salmon, SSRAA, Musholm AS and Aquapri all integrating electric stunning at their processing sites. Aquapri purchased a mixed fresh/salt water machine and now have this fully integrated at their Danish factory. Jens Paag, the Aarøsund plant manager, was delighted with the versatility of their purchase, saying “We were looking for a machine that could

cope with fresh water trout and sea trout. Ace Aquatec’s machine has solved the problem for us and we find the machine easy to use with excellent quality results.” Another early adopter, Musholm AS, quickly saw the benefits of moving away from old technologies. One of their seafarm managers, Anders Lejbach, praised the HSU system for being “much better to work with than CO2, producing big improvements for our company, both in the quality of the product and in the working environment”. Their previous solution struggled with the vigour and size variation of trout, but the Ace Aquatec electric stunner system ensured all fish, regardless of size or species, flowed smoothly through the water tube. This guaranteed that 100 percent of the fish were humanely slaughtered.

What’s next?

Most countries have moved away from traditional practices of asphyxiation and carbon dioxide stunning but are still a long way from being truly 21st century farmers. We’ve seen a growing common desire to modernise and improve though, and technology has finally caught up. Adopting innovations like Ace Aquatec’s electric stunning system alongside existing percussive stunning techniques will be a big step in the right direction towards sustainable farming that meets modern consumer expectations of humanely farmed high quality fish, at an affordable cost to suppliers. www.aceaquatec.com You can visit Ace Aquatec at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 155.

46 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

#2 By 2050, the global population is expected to reach 9.7 billion, posing a tremendous challenge on adequate nutrition and food security and safety for all inhabitants.

Fish farms opt for robotic net cleaning to replace traditional onshore cleaning by Drs. Monique van Deursen, business writer for YANMAR Europe

Fish have become a most important source of nutrition and are increasingly supplied by aquaculture. The success and breeding quality in cage farming is highly influenced by the rearing conditions. So how does robotic net cleaning contribute to fresh clean water, the production of tonnes of healthy fish, and an easy operation?

Growth of aquaculture needed in order to keep up with increasing global fish consumption

Fisheries and aquaculture remain vital sources of food, nutrition, income and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people around the world. According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 50 percent of fish production will be from aquaculture in 2021, which makes aquaculture the fastest growing food sector right now. An indispensable factor for the quality and success of bred fish species, as opposed to wild caught fish, is the condition of the cage nets used in captive breeding. Nets submerged in seawater easily acquire a coating of algae, molluscs, fish food, fish secretions, and other biofoulings. The results of fouling can be disastrous for the production of fish. First of all, there is an increasing risk of disease or even death of fish because fresh seawater and oxygen cannot flow freely in and out of the nets. Fouled nets are also more prone to damage and tearing, causing fish to escape and expensive repairs to the nets. Furthermore, due to biofouling the nets become heavy, causing an extra load to the service vessel and its anchoring system.

48 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY Clean nets for healthy fish

Healthy fish breeding is inextricably linked to clean nets. The cleaner the nets, the better the condition and yields of fish. Efficient net cleaning removes biofouling organisms and prevents the proliferation of parasites on the nets, so that the use of antifouling chemicals and medicinal products for fish can be reduced. This means healthier fish, ensuring healthier nutrition. Similarly, the cages require less cleaning agents. Net cleaning also removes adhering shellfish, a common cause of harm to farmed fish. Another problem related to aquaculture is that not enough clean seawater is allowed to flow through the nets, causing a drop in oxygen levels inside the cages, which can halt fish growth, increase diseases and mortality rates. Clean nets allow fresh seawater to flow abundantly through the cages. Finally, efficient cleaning prevents biofouling to add excess weight to the nets and prevent damage and sinking of farming nets to the ocean floor.

This cleaner is a net cleaning robot that cleans fish farming nets underwater in situ, and is operated by only one person, who does not have to go into the water, but remains on the vessel. This unique technology is environmentally friendly, saves cleaning and labour costs, promotes farmed fish growth, and contributes to quality improvements in cultured aquatic products. Cleaning can be performed whenever it is needed without much effort or costs.

In-situ or onshore net cleaning?

Biofouling is the major reason why nets require periodic cleaning. With older technology this was achieved by removing and replacing the nets from the cage for onshore cleaning, which is a cost incurring and labour-intensive process. These setbacks have been overcome by the introduction of newer technology developed by Yanmar: the submergible, remote net cleaner.

Double Shaft Paddle Mixers (DPMA) The Wynveen double shaft paddle mixers, realizes high mixing capacity with a relative small mixer content. The mixer has a mixing time, depending on the product type and quantity, from 30 to 60 seconds. Features • Capacities available from 500 to 20.000 liters • Mixing accuracy of 1:100.000/C.V. < 5% • Short mixing time of approximately 30-60 seconds • Minimum filling degree will be 25% of the nominal content • Extra wide bomb doors.

www.wynveen.com International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 49


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY Robotic net cleaning with the Yanmar NCL-LX

Yanmar’s NCL-LX in-situ net cleaning robot

The Yanmar NCL-LX is an underwater net cleaner with an independent power supply. The guidance mechanism includes a high-pressure pump unit and is located on the service vessel, while the robot itself is placed in the water. The robot is guided and operated by operating the joysticks on the remote-control box. The NCLX has a wide cleaning width of 1910mm for use in large cages and travels fast, thus ensuring a top cleaning speed which is approximately four times higher than that of conventional models. With a maximum travel speed of 21m/ min and a cleaning speed of 2,200m2/h, large fish farming nets are cleaned in a shorter period of time. Crawler belts work in combination with wheels, thus riding over both vertical and horizontal lines and other irregularities of the aquaculture net with ease. Furthermore, the net cleaner is equipped with a propeller drive system that utilises nozzle reaction force and generates strong thrust, thus running stably at high speeds. The cleaning robot sticks to the net by neutral buoyancy; the reaction against the water jet pressure rotates the propeller and keeps the submersible cleaner on the net. Two CCD cameras with super-wide-angle lenses are mounted on the front and rear sides (one on each side), thus making it possible to confirm the cleaning range on a 24-inch monitor screen and ensuring ease of use with excellent visibility.

Customer satisfaction

The Yanmar net cleaner is earning its spurs out in the waters, for example at Leco Marine Ltd., a service company providing commercial diving and net cleaning services to the aquaculture industry. Leco Marine is using the Yanmar NCL-LX and has reached a very special milestone: they have operated the Yanmar net cleaner for one full year without unintended maintenance stops. This offers them a huge advantage in the market. “Our customers expect 100 percent clean nets delivered fast and securely. They are very pleased with our work and have confidence in us being able to carry out their net cleaning schedule as planned with minimal (none so far) downtime”, says David Skea, owner and managing director of Leco Marine Ltd. “1,400 operating hours under rough conditions without interruptions says it all, really!”

A number of notable features on this product can be seen below: Excellent current handling. A good location has good throughput of water and nutrients. The Yanmar net cleaner handles current well and will cause little or no downtime to finish the job as scheduled, even under tough conditions; Many net cleaners can work in tight nets, but only the toughest tackle difficult slack nets properly. Large contact surface with the net and a simple but genius concept for pressure against the net ensures great results; The Yanmar NCL-LX’s fuel consumption can be as low as 14 litres per hour (14 to 18 l/h in normal use), providing large annual savings. The average consumption of other cleaners is around 50-100 l/h; A very low cleaning pressure of 90-150 bar (150 only in cases of extreme fouling) due to a high-water flow, ensures large contact surface with the net, and a soft rubber belt without sharp edges safeguards the net from wear and tear; The net cleaner makes its way all around the net ensuring completely clean nets. It removes mussels, heavy fouling and cleans even the top of the net; The Yanmar NCL-LX has a proven track record and optimised technology. Minimal need for maintenance provides low operating costs and little or no downtime.

Yanmar net cleaner at Leco Marine

Based in Scotland, Leco Marine Ltd. is a service company providing commercial diving and underwater maintenance services to the aquaculture industry. Leco Marine has been using the Yanmar NCL-LX for one year in the breeding farm cages of Grieg Seafood Shetlands, which operates in Shetland and the Isle of Skye. The operation in Shetland has an estimated annual production capacity of around 22,000 tonnes gutted weight. Leco Marine managing director David Skea was already working with a competitor’s net cleaner, but had close contacts with Østerbø, Yanmar’s net cleaner distributor for Norway, Scotland and the Shetlands, who was very enthusiastic about its performance. They agreed that Østerbø would perform a demo with the Yanmar Net Cleaner NCL-LX so that David could experience the net cleaning robot himself. When the unit arrived, David was a bit surprised, “It is quite a large unit when compared to my other net cleaner and I was not sure if it would even stick to the net, let alone drive around the cage and clean it.” Once the Yanmar Net Cleaner was under water and started cleaning, David’s doubts quickly dissipated. “The cleaning robot comes with rollers on both the front and back and copes well with difficult or slack nets. It cleans very well in troublesome situations and also has a lower fuel consumption rate than many of the alternative cleaners. We have trialled the cleaner for a whole month and were very impressed with its performance. We decided to purchase a unit. And although it is quite an investment for a relatively small company like Leco Marine, we are convinced the Yanmar NCL-LX will increase our cleaning potential and be a valuable addition to the service we offer to our customers,” says David Skea. www.yanmarmarine.eu

50 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

#3 Robust and durable material, smart safety details and a pleasure to ride—these are just a few reasons why increasing numbers of fish farmers swear by Polarcirkel work boats.

High demands for high quality Norwegian workboats By AKVA Group, Norway

AKVA Group recently signed its largest boat order to date as Bremnes Seashore, one of Norway’s largest privately-owned salmon businesses, ordered two Polarcirkel 1050 Cabin and two Polarcirkel 845 Cabin at once. “We strongly believe in the material the boats are made from, which is very durable and robust,” said Technical Manager in Bremnes Seashore, Ernst Olav Helgesen. “This, combined with smart details ensuring the safety of our crew, made us decide on Polarcirkel. We’ve previously invested in a Polarcirkel 845 Cabin, which we’re very pleased with.”

Custom built

The Polarcirkel boats’ unique quality features are highly valued by customers all over the globe. Last year, the Fujian Provincial Law Enforcement Team of Ocean and Fisheries ordered five Polarcirkel 685 work boats to supervise the coastal fisheries in the Fujian province. “We receive up to 15 orders a year from Chinese customers, and have experienced an ever-increasing demand from customers in Scotland, Brazil, Africa and the Mediterranean countries,” says Sales Manager John-Atle Figenschau. “Having recently increased our production capacity, we’re now able to deliver up to 150 boats a year.” Fish farmers are not the only occupational group who have taken a liking to the Polarcirkel boats, the Sales Manager reveals. The boats are also used for preparedness by police and fire departments and by subsea contractors, the offshore industry, tourist industry and a wide range of private and public players. “As the boats are custom built and hand-welded, we can tailor the boats in ways others cannot,” Figenshau explains. “This way our customers will get the perfect boat for the tasks they are designed to perform. We develop anything from pretty standard workboats for aquaculture services to autonomous boats for detecting and removing mines in national waters.”

Safety first

The Polarcirkel boats are produced in the small town of Mo I Rana by the Norwegian company Helgeland Plast, a subsidiary of AKVA Group. Mo I Rana is situated near the Arctic Circle, which the brand name of Polarcirkel derives from. The boats’ hulls are comprised of locally produced, impact resistant PE plastics. With its unique buoyancy and hardy quality, PE plastics are an ideal building material for boats that are exposed to rough sea and extreme weather conditions. “We emphasise safety and stability on board in our designs,” Sales Manager Figenschau adds with great confidence, “which has resulted in smart details like self-adhesive tires and extra strong longitudinal hull ridges for stability. The boats are so solid that they can withstand a rough encounter with a submarine skirt and you can do a beach shovel almost everywhere.” www.akvagroup.com You can visit AKVA Group at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland on stand 157/OS48. 52 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

KOMPRESSOREN

Reliable & efficient compressed air & blower solutions

Aquaculture applications: • Cages

• Feeding systems

• Fish processing

• Barges

• Wellboats

• Feed manufacturing

• RAS

• Aeration

• Fish packing

Aquaculture UK Stand 227 & OS11 – 23-24 May 2018, Aviemore, Scotland HPC/KAESER are represented in Scotland by their industrial distributor, Kerr Compressor Engineers Ltd.

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 53

www.kaeser.com


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

#4

by Pedro Gómez, CEO of Apria Systems and German Santos Bregel at APRIA Systems

Apria Systems is a technologybased company with more than 10 years of experience specialising in consultancy and engineering services.

Photo 1

Photo 5

Photo 2

A cutting-edge recirculating aquaculture system With a determined sustainable and environmental commitment, Apria Systems are strongly focused on innovation to provide advanced efficient solutions –mainly based on membrane and advanced oxidation technologies– for the purification of industrial streams in the chemical and related industries to fulfill the environmental regulations. At present, one of the company’s most ambitious and innovative activities relates to the aquaculture sector. Over the last few years, the implementation of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) has increased worldwide. However, these systems are expensive to purchase and operate, and require high biomass culture densities, implying the fast accumulation of toxic metabolised compounds in low water volumes, and, hence, demanding significant volumes of fresh water. Thus, RAS end-users need cost-efficient technologies able to work under these conditions. The current solutions available on the market are mainly bio-filtration and ozone treatments. Unfortunately, they cannot properly work under these challenging conditions, showing efficacy fluctuations and start-up periods that increase the production stages and their costs. This framework encouraged APRIA Systems to develop a novel technology for the treatment and reutilisation of marine and brackish water in RAS: the ELOXIRAS System. The high innovative potential present in ELOXIRAS has been recognised by the European Commission through the Executive Agency for Small and Medium-sized enterprises (EASME), which awarded the development of the product through the Horizon 2020 funding program’s SME instrument call SFS-08-2014/2015 ‘Resource-efficient eco-innovative food production and processing’ (Grant agreement Nº 698494). It is based on electrochemical oxidation, generating a mixed oxidant without the addition of chemicals, purely by applying an electrical potential between two electrodes in the water to be treated. This technology achieves high removal rates of contaminants such as total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), nitrite, and organic matter, also presenting a high disinfectant efficacy. (Photo 1) The novelty of the treatment system is its ability to contribute to enhancing the productivity of different marine species and reducing the environmental impact: • Allowing higher culture densities. • Reducing new water intake consumption and, thus, proportional wastewater generation. • Removing whole key pollutants in an efficient way (> 90%). ELOXIRAS is a modular and versatile solution, which integrates three main steps in the treatment process: (i) pre-treatment by filtration of the water, (ii) main treatment by means of electrochemical oxidation reactors for the removal of pollutants and pathogens, and (iii) posttreatment for the removal of undesired byproducts. (Photo 2) The untreated water from the culture tanks flows by gravity. To guarantee the removal of solid particles in the main treatment, it is filtered by a drum filter with a minimum filtration level of 50 microns. Then, the water flows to a buffer tank that acts as accumulator, where the use of an auxiliary skimmer can contribute to enhancing the separation process of solid particles. As a final pretreatment stage, the water is pumped from the buffer tank to a security filter. In case the main treatment is not necessary, the water pretreated by the drum filter - and the skimmer - can be pumped directly to the culture tank, thus, saving on energy costs. The water flows then to the main treatment area, which is formed by ELOXIRAS electrochemical reactors comprised of electrode pairs coated with a special catalyst material. The oxidation reactions are promoted in the 54 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


FISH FARMING TECHNOLOGY

Photo 3

channels between the electrode pairs as the water flows through, removing TAN, nitrite, organic matter and pathogens. Once that the main treatment is performed, to secure an optimal water quality and remove potential undesired by-products from the electrochemical reactors, a post-treatment including active carbon is required. Afterwards, water is oxygenated through oxygen cones and CO2, CO, N2, and H2 are stripped out in degassing units by passing an air flow in the opposite direction of the treated water flow, which returns to the culture tanks by gravity. ELOXIRAS can include ‘on-line’ analysers for dissolved oxygen, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), TAN, temperature, and total chlorine, to monitor and ensure the demanded quality standards. Moreover, the total control and automation of the treatment system can be implemented together with a modern remote supervision tool. The technology was subjected to validation essays under real operating conditions in marine fish hatcheries and marine fish growing farms for one year to test the efficacy of the system in terms of pollutant remediation and to demonstrate its applicability to end-users. Accordingly, prototypes with sea bass, gilthead sea bream, and turbot fish species were validated. The most recent validation tests involved fingerlings of gilthead sea bream and sea bass with an initial size of approximately 10 g, a target biomass density in the range of 20 - 30 kg/m3, and a culture volume of 20 m3. (Photo 3) The removal of nitrogen compounds is based on electrochemical reactions rather than conventional biologic nitrification, which implies important advantages verified during field tests: TAN removal efficacy achieved per single pass was up to 93 percent, which exceeds overpass values obtained with conventional biofiltration. As a result, it was possible to reduce Photo 4

the recirculation rates, required to control TAN values below harmful levels, in a minimum of 30 percent compared with conventional biofiltration. The electrochemical reactions that reduce TAN values avoid the production of the typical nitrification by-products –nitrite and nitrate– to generate mostly N2 instead. Thus, during the conducted tests, the concentration of nitrites and nitrates at the outlet of the system were similar or lower than those observed at the inlet. Therefore, its accumulation in the system was avoided, despite a reduced water renewal rate below 240L of new water per kg of fish produced –corresponding to intensive RAS conditions. Additionally, other effects found as a result of the electrochemical treatment were: • Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy obtained per single pass was up to 40 percent. • Disinfection capacity achieved was of at least three logarithms, contributing to the stabilisation of the micro biota of the culture tanks. The sum-up of all these effects combined has enabled the possibility of working with biomass densities between 20 and 30 kg/m3, which are values higher than those attained with conventional treatments. Regarding fish growth, it is remarkable that ELOXIRAS allows users to obtain similar growth rates to those reported under similar culture conditions with a bio filtration-based RAS. In the case of the sea bream, the instantaneous growth rate observed was 0.88 percent/day, while for the sea bass this rate was 1.07 percent/day. Under these conditions, the size of the fish was within the range of 200 and 350g at the end of the culture cycle. (Photo 4) Nowadays, ELOXIRAS is under a commercialisation process through different market applications. Since it is a modular and versatile solution, it can be adjusted to different RAS facilities. ELOXIRAS MINI is the smaller version –from one to 20 m3 farmed water volume– design mainly for R&D institutions, or reduced operations, offering compactness and adaptable treatment capacity. ELOXIRAS HYBRID is ideal for new or existing large RAS facilities with typical culture volume capacities from 50 up to thousands of cubic meters, offering an increment of the productivity with lower water and energy use. Since it is easy to operate without efficacy fluctuations and start-up periods, ELOXIRAS LOGISTIC is ideal for typical truck or well-boat transport operations from hatcheries to growing facilities, providing major autonomy for long distances and larger biomass capacity to guarantee the best transport conditions. Finally, ELOXIRAS BIO is focused on quarantine and biosecurity facilities for any RAS scale, offering enhanced control of pathogens due to the disinfection capabilities and contributing to achieve high isolation levels. (Photo 5) www.eloxiras.com

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 55


TECHNOLOGY SHO

NETS & PREDATOR SOLUT Top aquaculture technology

NETS & PREDATOR SYSTEMS For this edition of the Technology Showcase we have focussed on different net and anti-predator products from a number of great companies. Appropriate and innovative solutions to stopping predators such as seals and sea lions coming and depleting fish stocks is an absolute necessity, the same goes for keeping the fish in. Though it may not seem like it to everyone, the technology that goes not only into products such as the SealFence, but also the technology going into making the ropes for the nets is incredibly impressive. This technology focus just shows a very small amount of a very large and awe-inspiring part of the industry.

Providing nets since 1910 The manufacture of nets for the aquaculture and fishing industry is the oldest activity Badinotti performs, according to their website. “Since 1910, with the opening of the first nets factory in Milan. Badinotti Group has three production plants, strategically located in different fibre types and characteristics are manufactured, according to the needs of the market and each one of our customers,” they explain. All Badinotti Group factories, both nets production, manufacturing and/or assembly, are equipped with quality laboratories, responsible for carrying out rigorous quality tests of the fibres used as raw material and testing our final products in their various production processes. These procedures are validated and certified under international standards such as the ISO 9001 standard and the Norwegian certification NS9415 standard. The main fibre types that the company uses for nets manufacturing are: • Nylon (PA) • Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) • Polyester (PES) • Polypropylene (PP) • High density polyethylene (HDPE) The net workshops are equipped to give shape to cages of different dimensions and characteristics, providing materials and elements to obtain a cage in optimal conditions to start operating, both for floating and submersible cages. You can visit Badinotti Group and find a full portfolio of their products at Aquaculture UK, Aviemore, Scotland between May 23-24 on stand 191. www.badinotti.com

Midgard Predator Net Solution “Double net systems are not new to the aquaculture industry; however a key issue has always been in maintaining adequate separation between the predator and the fish net – and maintaining sufficient tensioning on all nets, even in most challenging environmental conditions,” says Aqualine, who make custom made cage nets for the aquacultural industry. The company have said that their approach to identifying the Midgard Predator Net solution was based on five key principles: The cage, predator and fish nets, and sinker ring, designed as one integrated cage system (strength is paramount); The solution needed to work in even the most challenging

environmental conditions; The solution had to be fully adaptable and with capacity for customisation to suit site specifics; Prior to installation, all design functionality needed to be verified by computerised simulation and analysis; Complimentary operational systems required to ensure simplified handling and control of the inner fish net. You can visit Aqualine and find a full portfolio of their products at Aquaculture UK, Aviemore, Scotland between May 23-24 on stand 129. www.aqualine.no

High quality cage nets for safeguarded your fish stock Referring to the cage nets that they produce, cage net manufacturers Vónin explained, “We have for decades, designed, developed and manufactured cage nets for the aquaculture industry. The experience we have accumulated through this time, has enabled us to supply the fish farmers with high quality nets which are certified according to NS9415.” “Our cage nets design have been thoroughly tested to withstand the harsh conditions and strong currents of the North Atlantic,” they point out proudly. The nets they make are made from a few different types of material, including: Nylon, Dyneema, Polyester and Polyethylene. The cage nets are also tailor made to meet the specifications of the individual fish farmer. You can visit Vónin at Aquaculture UK in Aviemore, Scotland at stand 223. www.vonin.com

56 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


OWCASE

TIONS

SealFence SealFence is an intelligent acoustic deterrent system designed to deter seals and sea lions from attacking your farm. Using a unique ultrasonic transmission developed by OTAQ, SealFence creates an acoustic “fence” of protection around your cages. It is engineered to provide long term reliability on exposed marine aquaculture sites, the modular design of SealFence means there are no cables to run between cages; so both installation and fault finding are simple.

FEATURE

CROSS-CONTAMINATION SALMONELLA

INCONSISTENCY REGULATIONS

PATHOGENS

DOWNTIME

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM THE ELEMENTS PRODUCT CONSISTENCY PROCESS FLEXIBILTY VALIDATED KILL-STEP The product features an optional ACM (Active Condition Monitoring) system which checks and records that every module on site is working correctly 24 hours a day. With 100s of units in use protecting farms around the world, SealFence is a prove long term method of deterring seals. You can visit OTAQ and find a full portfolio of their products at Aquaculture UK, Aviemore, Scotland between May 23-24 on stand 145. www.otaq.co.uk

FOOD SAFETY VERIFIED EXTRUSION CERTIFICATION SANITATION CONTROL PLANT CERTIFICATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

P.O. Box 8 100 Airport Road Sabetha, KS 66534, USA Phone: 785-284-2153 Fax: 785-284-3143 extru-techinc@extru-techinc.com www.extru-techinc.com

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 57 ET-275C.indd 1

12/22/15 3:33 PM


Industry Events Events listing MAY

24 – 26/04/18 Seafood Expo Global 2018 Belgium www.seafoodexpo.com/global 29/05/18 – 01/06/18 IPACK-IMA 2018 Italy www.ipack-ima.com/en/

JUNE

03 – 05/06/18 PIX/AMC 2018 Australia http://pixamc.com.au 04 – 06/06/18 7th International Dietary Fibre Conference The Netherlands www.dietaryfibre.org/en/ 06 – 09/06/18 Bio Brazil Fair / Biofach America Latina Brazil www.biobrazilfair.com 19 – 21/06/18 Seafood Summit 2018 Spain www.seafoodsummit.org/ 20 – 22/06/18 VIV Europe The Netherlands www.viveurope.nl/en/Bezoeker.aspx

July

03 – 05/07/18 Seawork International 2018 UK www.seawork.com/ 04 - 06/07/18 Indo Livestock 2018 Indonesia www.indolivestock.com 09 – 13/07/18 Freshwater Crayfish 2018 USA www.freshwatercrayfish.org 11 – 13/07/18 Fi Asia China 2018 China www.figlobal.com/fi-asia-china/

The future is green: International algae experts at one of the most important summits of the European algae world In the run-up to the ‘8th European Algae Industry Summit’ which took place in Vienna from April 25-27,2018, 70 international algae experts took the opportunity to study the patented technologies of ecoduna. Silvia Fluch, COO ecoduna, and Johann Karmel, CEO ecoduna, gave a tour presenting the visiting experts the production site of the technology leader. Commodities of open-production plants from Asia and America have dominated the market – these ‘open-pound quality’ products, however, are often heavily contaminated due to their uncontrolled growing conditions. As a result, Asian goods, which in many cases do not meet the legal standards in Europe despite offering various quality certificates, are not suitable for being further processed into food products. The patented process allows the production of microalgae with a tremendously improved quality: ecoduna’s microalgae proliferate within a high-purity environment in a closed, largely contamination-free system – a crucial factor that is especially appreciated by demanding customers. The plant can produce various types of microalgae fitting the

15 – 18/07/18 IFT 18 USA www.iftevent.org/ 26 – 28/07/18 Livestock Taiwan 2018 Taiwan www.livestocktaiwan.com

For more industry event information - visit our events register www.aquafeed.co.uk 58 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed

respective customer requirements. 10 years earlier, neither algae as biomass nor products based on algae were a topic talked about. Trends around ingredients such as omega-3 fatty acids have also raised the awareness level in terms of algae. Today, microalgae are traded as coveted ingredients: from fertiliser, to animal feed, to additives for wastewater treatment – the variety of applications is already considerable. The main topics of the eighth ‘European Algae Industry Summit’ combined commercial, technical, and research perspectives with the needs of different final consumers. Verdelho sees a big difference between the needs of multinational corporations, start-ups, and smaller businesses, depending on the location, "Corporations in the U.S. are predominantly commercially driven, whereas European ones are more focused on research and technology. Compared with the Asian continent, which is very productrelated in its development, Europe is more oriented towards results from an academic environment and also pushes the idea of innovation."


23 & 24 May 2018 Aviemore, Scotland No other UK event provides aquaculture professionals with direct access to suppliers from all over the globe representing all aspects of the aquaculture industry. Over two days Aquaculture UK offers a valuable opportunity to network, discover new products and meet decision makers. The atmosphere is dynamic and exciting with open and friendly interaction between exhibitors and visitors.

DON’T MISS THE UK’S LARGEST AQUACULTURE EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE Aquaculture UK 2018 supported by

Visit www.aquacultureuk.com to register as a visitor


Industry Events

APA Taiwan 2018 Innovation for sustainability and food safety

Globally, the FAO considers the world will need to produce 70 percent more food by 2050 compared to what we produced in 2008. The World Economic Forum believes that this will come from aquaculture. “I believe so too!” said Dr Guillaume Drillet, the Immediate Past-President of the World Aquaculture Society’s Asian Pacific Chapter, when opening APA Taiwan 2018. The event, held in downtown Taipei, from April 26-28, 2018 and attracted just under 2000 participants to its range of concurrent seminars and conferences and to its compact by vibrant exhibition in the Taipei International Convention Centre. “Yet, we have to also take into account that for now, we are using more resources than the earth produces each year. We need to produce more with less and we need to do this sustainably and safely,” he explained to attendees at the opening ceremony for the Asian-Pacific Aquaculture 2018 ‘Innovation for Aquaculture Sustainability and Food Safety.’ “On that note, I am convinced that you will all appreciate that the title of this conference has been very well chosen. In the future, we will see further requirements for independent quality assurance testing of what we produce and how we produce. This is not just to access market in other continents but to ensure that we are producing it right, here, for our own people! “It would be naïve to think that we can enforce quality assurance programmes and standards, certifications on industries such as electronics, oil and gas and that we would only apply the minimum standards to the production and transformation industries preparing the food we eat. “Our industry must be exemplary!”

Adding value

To celebrate the opening of the Conference, the WAS has made available a collection of papers from the region on aquaculture, genetics and breeding in Chinese and published this special issue online. It is available to view for one month from the website of the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society. He added that the APA had created more value for its 60 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


Industry Events

membership in the past year with the addition of three events in India, two in Thailand, two in Singapore and one in Indonesia. “And we have more events in preparation in our pipeline. “We are now working toward building agreements with private companies interested in offering discounts for their products and services to our membership,” says Dr Drillet. This year’s event in Taiwan was hosted by the National Taiwan Ocean University (NTOU) and sponsored by Shen Long (Gold), Grobest (conference sponsor) as well as Blue Aqua International, Sonac, Tyson, Zeigler, MSD, Dabomb, Nutriad and Kemin (premier and sessions sponsors).

At APA an MOU that costs more

Dr Guillaume Drillet, the Immediate Past-President of the World Aquaculture Society’s Asian Pacific Chapter

Blue Aqua International Group of Singapore and a major shrimp producer in Indonesia, PT Maju Tambak Sumur, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at APA Taiwan 2018 in Taipei that paves the way for higher shrimp feed prices based on formulations that include quality products that the farmer wants, particularly with regard to sustainability. “Too often fish farmers are subjected to using feeds costing the least to produce that compromise fish performance,” says Dr Farshad Shishehchian, President and CEO of Blue Aqua International Group. International Aquafeed magazine was on hand to witness the MOU signing ceremony and interview both Dr Shishehchian and the CEO and owner of PT Maju Tambak Sumur, Frans Antony. Mr Antony’s farm produces over 5000 tonnes of shrimp per year. He says his shrimp production systems require specific feed ingredients that achieve certain outcomes that least-cost formulations do not address.

The role of Taiwan in aquaculture

“Taiwan has been a pioneering country in modern aquaculture and although production is limited today in Taiwan itself, the expertise of many companies and consultants play a key role in the development of aquaculture in International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 61


Asia and worldwide”, says Allen Wu, APAC Regional Manager Aquaculture with Nutriad, and based in Taipei. Nutriad selected APA18 as its platform for organising an aquaculture distributor meeting and a customer dining event. Also, Nutriad sponsored a scientific session on ‘Functional feed for health management.’ “Actively participating in a scientific session provides an excellent opportunity for our central and regional aqua team to interact with our partners and customers in APAC and jointly learn about current market developments and new findings regarding the application of our functional feed additives for fish and shrimp,” says Dr Peter Coutteau, Nutriad Business Unit Director - Aquaculture. The well attended session was chaired by Dr Coutteau and Dr Wang Han-Ching from the National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. Professor Lin from National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, presented a talk on ‘Nutritional Concept in Plant-Based Aquafeed: A brief Review for Cholesterol and Bile Salt,’ during which he presented innovative findings relating to the supplementation of bile salts in shrimp, to the role of molting hormones (ecdysteroids) and the enhanced expression of genes related to shrimp growth. Dr Isern i Subich, Nutriad’s Business development manager Aquaculture Health talked on ‘Effect of Novel Feed Additive on Performance and Health Indicators during Natural Thermal Fluctuations in Gilthead Seabream Sparus aurata in Cage Culture.’ Functional feed additives could prepare seabream better for stress suffered during the winter and spring in the Mediterranean region, as evidenced by better growth performance, as well as a better mobilisation of fat reserves from liver and enhanced plasma/liver indicators during the warm-up in spring. Dr Prakan Chiarahkhongman of CPF, Thailand, gave a presentation on ‘The 3C Strategy: Antibiotic-Free Health Management Practices for Shrimp Farming in Thailand’ during which he updated the audience on the current knowledge of the major diseases affecting shrimp farming in Thailand, that is: White spot syndrome virus (WSSV); Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND/ EMS); White faeces syndrome (WFS) and Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP). Furthermore, he explained the prevention strategies currently practiced by CPF group in Thailand.

Next year

Asian-Pacific Aquaculture is planned to be held in Chennai, India from June 18-20, 2019 and the booth spaces available are rapidly being booked up. 62 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


11-14 SEPT. 2018 RENNES - FRANCE

More than 1.440 exhibitors in 11 halls in 2017 and 250 booths outdoors. An exhibit area of 16 Ha. Free farm visits program.

More than 114.000 trade visitors, including 14.000 international from 128 countries. More than 70 conferences, Espace for the Furture and Innovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Space. > Obtain your free pass on: www.space.fr

THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION FOR ANIMAL PRODUCTION LE SALON INTERNATIONAL DES PRODUCTIONS ANIMALES

@SPACERennes #SPACE2018 +33 2 23 48 28 90 / international@space.fr


Tapco Inc +1 314 739 9191 www.tapcoinc.com STIF +33 2 41 72 16 80 www.stifnet.com

Welcome to the market place, where you will find suppliers of products and services to the industry - with help from our friends at The International Aquafeed Directory (published by Turret Group) Air products Kaeser Kompressoren +49 95616405883 www.kaeser.com

Westeel +1 204 233 7133 www.westeel.com

Evonik +49 618 1596785 www.evonik.com Liptosa +34 902 157711 www.liptosa.com Nutriad +32 52 409596 www.nutriad.com Sonac +31 499 364800 www.sonac.biz

Analysis Laboratorio Avi-Mex S.A. de C.V +55 54450460 Ext. 1105 www.avimex.com.mx R-Biopharm +44 141 945 2924 www.r-biopharm.com Romer Labs +43 2272 6153310 www.romerlabs.com

Amino acids Evonik +49 618 1596785 www.evonik.com

Bags Mondi Group +43 1 79013 4917 www.mondigroup.com

Bag closing Cetec Industrie +33 5 53 02 85 00 www.cetec.net

Bulk storage Bentall Rowlands +44 1724 282828 www.bentallrowlands.com Chief Industries UK Ltd +44 1621 868944 www.chief.co.uk Croston Engineering +44 1829 741119 www.croston-engineering.co.uk Silo Construction Engineers +32 51723128 www.sce.be Silos Cordoba +34 957 325 165 www.siloscordoba.com Symaga +34 91 726 43 04 www.symaga.com TSC Silos +31 543 473979 www.tsc-silos.com

Elevator & conveyor components 4B Braime +44 113 246 1800 www.go4b.com

Certification

Additives Chemoforma +41 61 8113355 www.chemoforma.com

VAV +31 71 4023701 www.vav.nl

GMP+ International +31703074120 www.gmpplus.org

Enzymes Ab Vista +44 1672 517 650 www.abvista.com

Conveyors Vigan Enginnering +32 67 89 50 41 www.vigan.com

JEFO +1 450 799 2000 www.jefo.com

Colour sorters A-MECS Corp. +822 20512651 www.a-mecs.kr Bühler AG +41 71 955 11 11 www.buhlergroup.com Satake +81 82 420 8560 www.satake-group.com

Computer software

Equipment for sale ExtruTech Inc +1 785 284 2153 www.extru-techinc.com

Extruders Almex +31 575 572666 www.almex.nl

Adifo NV +32 50 303 211 www.adifo.com

Amandus Kahl +49 40 727 710 www.akahl.de

Format International Ltd +44 1483 726081 www.formatinternational.com

Andritz +45 72 160300 www.andritz.com

Inteqnion +31 543 49 44 66 www.inteqnion.com

Brabender +49 203 7788 0 www.brabender.com

Coolers & driers Amandus Kahl +49 40 727 710 www.akahl.de Bühler AG +41 71 955 11 11 www.buhlergroup.com Clextral +33 4 77 40 31 31 www.clextral.com Consergra s.l +34 938 772207 www.consergra.com FrigorTec GmbH +49 7520 91482-0 www.frigortec.com Geelen Counterflow +31 475 592315 www.geelencounterflow.com Muyang Group +86 514 87848880 www.muyang.com Wenger Manufacturing +1 785-284-2133 www.wenger.com Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com

Elevator buckets Alapala +90 212 465 60 40 www.alapala.com

64 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed

Buhler AG +41 71 955 11 11 www.buhlergroup.com Clextral +33 4 77 40 31 31 www.clextral.com Ferraz Maquinas e Engenharia +55 16 3615 0055 www.ferrazmaquinas.com.br IDAH +866 39 902701 www.idah.com Insta-Pro International +1 515 254 1260 www.insta-pro.com Ottevanger +31 79 593 22 21 www.ottevanger.com Wenger Manufacturing +1 785-284-2133 www.wenger.com Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com Zheng Chang +86 2164184200 www.zhengchang.com/eng

Feed and ingredients Aliphos +32 478 210008 www.aliphos.com


PAYPER, S.A. +34 973 21 60 40 www.payper.com

Aller Aqua +45 70 22 19 10 www.aller-aqua.com APC +34 938 615 060 www.functionalproteins.com Jefo +1 450 799 2000 www.jefo.com

Silos Denis +33 2 37 97 66 11 www.denis.fr

Pellet binders

Muyang +86 514 87848880 www.muyang.com

Akzo Nobel +46 303 850 00 www.bredol.com

Tornum AB +46 512 29100 www.tornum.com

Pipe systems

SPAROS Tel.: +351 249 435 145 Website: www.sparos.pt

Jacob Sohne +49 571 9580 www.jacob-pipesystems.eu

TSC Silos +31 543 473979 www.tsc-silos.com

Used around

Hammermills

all industrial Plants sectors.

Dinnissen BV +31 77 467 3555 www.dinnissen.nl

Yemtar +90 266 733 8550 www.yemtar.com

BinMaster Level Controls +1 402 434 9102 www.binmaster.com

FAMSUN +86 514 87848880 www.muyang.com

FineTek Co., Ltd +886 2226 96789 www.fine-tek.com

Ottevanger +31 79 593 22 21 www.ottevanger.com

Moisture analysers

Wynveen +31 26 47 90 699 www.wynveen.com

CHOPIN Technologies +33 14 1475045 www.chopin.fr Doescher & Doescher GmbH +49 4087976770 www.doescher.com

Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com

Hydronix +44 1483 468900 www.hydronix.com

Yemtar +90 266 733 8550 www.yemtar.com

Seedburo +1 312 738 3700 www.seedburo.com

Zheng Chang +86 2164184200 www.zhengchang.com/eng

NIR systems Probiotics

Biomin +43 2782 803 0 www.biomin.net

Packaging CB Packaging +44 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

A-MECS Corp. +822 20512651 www.a-mecs.kr Cetec Industrie +33 5 53 02 85 00 www.cetec.net Ehcolo A/S +45 75 398411 www.ehcolo.com

Agromatic +41 55 2562100 www.agromatic.com

Training Aqua TT +353 1 644 9008 www.aquatt.ie/aquatt-services

Vaccines

Dinnissen BV +31 77 467 3555 www.dinnissen.nl

Level measurement

Palletisers

Andritz +45 72 160300 www.andritz.com

Clextral +33 4 77 40 31 31 www.clextral.com

Reed Mariculture +1 877 732 3276 www.reed-mariculture.com

Mondi Group +43 1 79013 4917 www.mondigroup.com

Aqualabo +33 2 97 89 25 30 www.aqualabo.fr

Buhler AG +41 71 955 11 11 www.buhlergroup.com

Hatchery products

Cetec Industrie +33 5 53 02 85 00 www.cetec.net

Amandus Kahl 40 727 710 www.akahl.de

Visit us! www.pipe-systems.eu+49

Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com

NIR-Online +49 6227 732668 www.nir-online.de

Sensors

Fr. Jacob Sรถhne GmbH & Co. KG, Germany Tel. + 49 (0) 571 95580 | www. jacob-pipesystems.eu

Lallemand + 33 562 745 555 www.lallemandanimalnutrition.com

Ridgeway Biologicals +44 1635 579516 www.ridgewaybiologicals.co.uk

Vacuum Dinnissen BV +31 77 467 3555 www.dinnissen.nl Wynveen International B.V. +31 26 47 90 699 www.wynveen.com Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com

Weighing equipment Parkerfarm Weighing Systems +44 1246 456729 www.parkerfarm.com Ottevanger +31 79 593 22 21 www.ottevanger.com Wynveen +31 26 47 90 699 www.wynveen.com Yemmak +90 266 733 83 63 www.yemmak.com

Yeast products

Research Imaqua +32 92 64 73 38 www.imaqua.eu

Safety equipment Rembe +49 2961 740 50 www.rembe.com

Second hand equipment Sanderson Weatherall +44 161 259 7054 www.sw.co.uk

International Aquafeed - May 2018 | 65

ICC, Adding Value to Nutrition +55 11 3093 0753 www.iccbrazil.com Lallemand + 33 562 745 555 www.lallemandanimalnutrition.com Leiber GmbH +49 5461 93030 www.leibergmbh.de Phileo (Lesaffre animal care) +33 3 20 81 61 00 www.lesaffre.fr


the interview Matt Colvan, Sales and Marketing Director, 5m Publishing The interview: Matt Colvan has worked within the events and publishing sector for nearly 20 years, experience which stood him in good stead when 5m Publishing acquired the UK’s biggest aquaculture trade show, Aquaculture UK. After a successful first exhibition in 2016, the biannual show is about to run again in 2018 and is fast becoming Europe’s one-stop-shop for professionals in the global industry. In the role of Sales and Marketing Director, a position he has held for nearly six years, Matt has been the driving force behind the show, which will be held in Aviemore, Scotland between May 23-24, 2018. Here, the De Montfort University graduate talks with International Aquafeed about the show which he says has “firmly established itself as an important and truly international trade event for the aquaculture industry.”

What has been your part in the organisation of Aquaculture UK? And what makes you the right person for such an exciting role?

Since we acquired the show in 2015 it’s been my aim to deliver the exhibition with the same professionalism and industry expertise that has allowed its reputation to grow over the years, and to increase its ambition. As we near our second round in 2018 I think we’re achieving this, with record delegate and exhibitor numbers and increasing interest from global, not just UK players. 2020 will be a huge year for us, as we build on the success so far. Delivering important industry events like this really is my passion. As well as the fun (and sometime frantic!) process of putting it all together, it’s an unparalleled forum for the finest minds in aquaculture to exchange ideas and do business – it really matters, and that’s a real thrill to be a part of.

Have you always been interested in aquaculture, how has your career led you to where you are now?

Before I joined 5m I worked as part of a team delivering clean power solutions to the energy sector – being involved in a better future for our planet seems only logical to me. The same is true of working in aquaculture – at the end of the day, everything I do is a contribution to a more sustainable world, no matter how small.

What can visitors look forward to especially this year at Aquaculture UK? What makes this show different to previous events?

This year, the show doesn’t stop in the exhibition tent. There’s also an action-packed conference programme including in-depth sessions from the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC), the launch of 5m Publishing’s indispensable new manual on cleaner fish, and an exciting first – the Women in Aquaculture networking breakfast, featuring senior speakers from industry and government, which we encourage all delegates to attend for a stimulating discussion on the importance of diversity in the workforce.

This show is attracting people from all over the world – why do you think people have decided to make the international travel for the event, and do you think it is poised to be one of the most important events in the industry?

The aquaculture industry is a young, dynamic one, rapidly changing and developing. This energy is reflected in the exhibition this year, which has expanded beyond salmon to include shellfish and other species, and has attracted suppliers from outside the UK. It’s also simply bigger, with 50 percent more indoor exhibitor space than 2016, with more on show and improved services, including catering and conference facilities on site. In the outside space, our extended reach supports demonstrations of equipment including CleanTreat by Benchmark, AKVA group Scotland, Tideman Boats and Migdale transport, to name but a few. We look forward to welcoming over 1,800 visitors over the two days. They’ll have the opportunity to view over 190 exhibitor stands, with 60 percent coming from the UK and Ireland and many from further afield, giving the show a truly international

profile. Exhibitors include businesses from North America, Norway, Denmark, Germany, France, India, Mauritius and China.

Focusing on Scottish aquaculture, it is quite the hub for salmon production, is salmon a major feature in this show in your opinion and what makes Scottish salmon an iconic product?

Salmon is absolutely the headline product, being second only to whisky in importance to Scotland’s economy. The UK aquaculture sector is also a world leader in terms of sustainability and welfare, and the quality of product we are able to produce as a result. But we’ve made great strides in representing other species of finfish and shellfish, as well as equipment providers, and I hope the show continues to develop to represent the industry more widely.

What can the exhibitors expect of the visitors, do you think there will be a dominance of a certain sector of the industry or a wide variety?

Our delegate profiles show a fantastic range of experts from all areas of the industry - from students to farm managers to academics and CEOs. I honestly believe that if you can think of role in UK aquaculture, it will be represented at this year’s show.

How do shows such as this help in the goal to create a sustainable food future for the world?

Our mission, as part of Benchmark Knowledge Services, is to create forums where the finest aquaculture research and products can be shared for the benefit of the industry, and Aquaculture UK is a perfect example. Representing a significant and growing sector of the economy – the second biggest Scottish export market after whisky – investment and innovation in aquaculture are vital both to the sustainability of the global protein supply and to a growing international network of people and businesses.

Aquaculture is recognised as the fastest growing industry in the world, why do you think this is and how do think industry professionals have a responsibility to ensure environmentally friendly and ethical farming?

The challenge of feeding the growing global population is well known, and doing so sustainably is at the core of our business. If the industry isn’t sustainable, it has no future – it’s as simple as that.

How is technology important to the future of the industry and how do you think we will continue to see its development?

There is already an extraordinary level of technological sophistication represented across the aquaculture industry, with cutting edge research represented everywhere at the show – Benchmark’s CleanTreat, for example, promises to revolutionise sea lice treatment while protecting the environment. The next big opportunity I can see is in data – we are only just beginning to understand how sharing and analysing what we can monitor between and across farms can do for the global challenges of biosecurity and sustainability.

66 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


THE INDUSTRY FACES Bridget Rinker joins AFIA

T

he American Feed Industry Association has announced Bridget Rinker as the new development assistant effective April 30, 2018. Ms Rinker will support AFIA President and CEO Joel G. Newman with managing programs and communications, as well as support of the AFIA Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

Bridget Rinker

She will also assist the Institute for Feed Education and Research’s executive director in the implementation of the overall strategic direction for the foundation, including managing the entire donor program from overseeing donor gift processing to donor stewardship. Ms Rinker holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Maryland University College.

Benchmark welcomes new Head of Nordics Carolina Faune has been announced as Head of Nordics for Benchmark Animal Health. Based in Bergen, Norway, Carolina will be responsible for commercial activity in the Nordic region, one of Benchmark’s key markets.

Carolina Faune

Originally from Chile, Carolina holds a veterinarian degree with an MBA from Universidad Austral de Chile and brings more than 18 years of experience working in the animal health industry with a special focus in Aquaculture. Before joining Benchmark, Carolina was the Innovation Leader for Aquaculture at Elanco, the Animal Health division of Eli Lilly. Commenting she said, “I have had the privilege to be a part of the highly dynamic Aquaculture industry during my entire career and at this stage of my life, I am delighted to join Benchmark and contribute to bringing new and innovative solutions together with dedicated colleagues and in cooperation with stakeholders and customers.”

Diana Aqua strengthens its technical support in Asia Pacific

D

r Fabio Soller has joined Diana Aqua asTechnical Director Asia Pacific.

Based in Bangkok, Dr Fabio Soller is the referent for fish & shrimp technical support for Aquativ activity in Asia Pacific and also provides scientific communication linked to the benefits of Aquativ products.

Dr Fabio Soller

Dr Soller received his PhD in Aquaculture Nutrition from Auburn University, USA in 2012. He has been involved in aquaculture through farm management, research, feed manufacturing support and teaching for 18 years. He started as Regional Manager and Technical Sales at Cargill, USA before taking the position of Director of the Aquatic Feeds & Nutrition Department at the Oceanic Institute in Hawaii.

Sunderland Marine CEO announces retirement

F

ollowing 39 years’ service with Sunderland Marine, Tom Rutter – Chief Executive Officer, will retire on 30 June 2018.

Tom started his career with Sunderland Marine in 1979 in claims and then marine underwriting before moving into the aquaculture team in the early 1990’s. He has been CEO of Sunderland Marine since 2015.

Tom Rutter

He commented, “After much consideration, I have taken the decision to retire in June, and I can do so with the comfort of knowing that the company is in safe hands under the North Group umbrella. I would like to acknowledge the support of my colleagues and board of directors throughout the time I was privileged to be CEO. The merger with North in 2014 delivered management skills and expertise of the highest order, which was instrumental in the efficient restructuring and strengthening of Sunderland Marine, ultimately for the benefit of our policyholders. This period has been the most challenging but rewarding of my career.” Tom will return to the company in August as a consultant for a further year, which will see him providing advice and support on a range of Sunderland Marine related matters including claims, underwriting, reinsurance and additional support for the overseas branch offices and subsidiaries.

68 | May 2018 - International Aquafeed


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Profile for Perendale Publishers Ltd

MAY 2018 - International Aquafeed magazine  

MAY 2018 - International Aquafeed magazine  

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