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best of kitchen & bath in partnership with NKBA


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12.20 BEST OF KITCHEN & BATH IN PARTNERSHIP WITH NKBA

ON THE COVER In a Tel Aviv loft by Axelrod Architects, the cloudy gleam of twin brushed-stainless-steel kitchen islands reflects the surrounding concrete, joining a Marc Krusin table and a wire-frame chair by Charles and Ray Eames. Photography: Amit Geron.

best of kitchen & bath 14 HARKING BACK by Michael Lassell

Mark Zeff gives new life to a 19th-century town house in New York’s West Village. 20 FROM THE OUTSIDE IN by Georgina McWhirter

In rural Quebec, Tux Creative Co. recasts country living in a more glamorous light. 26 STEP INTO THE LIGHT by Tate Gunnerson

dSpace Studio and Ruth Johnson Interiors transform a Chicago penthouse with killer views into an artfully sculpted home for an architecture buff.

32 ROUND THE BEND by Edie Cohen

In California, John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects composes rhythmic curves for a Santa Monica house. 38 WELL-SEASONED by Georgina McWhirter

Designers cook up a storm in a quartet of residential kitchens with style to spare. 48 SAFE AND SOUND edited by Rebecca Thienes

From touchless tech and easy-clean finishes to cocooning luxuries for staying at home. 56 THE STYLE FILES edited by Rebecca Thienes

CHRISTOFFER REGILD/LIVING INSIDE

Taking inspiration from a trio of imaginative projects channeling industrial chic, dreamy surrealism, and flatout luxe, we sourced likeminded kitchen and bath finds to suit any space.

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Deep Impact

How Current Lifestyle Dictates Home Design Text: Dianne M. Pogoda; Research: Tricia Zach

H

Kitchen Design by Sarah Robertson, AKBD, Photo by Adam Kane Macchia Photography.

ADVERTORIAL

ome design is evolving fast, heavily influenced by life stages and the modern lifestyle. The National Kitchen & Bath Association conducted extensive research to determine what’s behind certain

design elements, with a deeper dive into how functional and emotional needs of homeowners impact design, and why kitchens and baths are headed in various directions. Here’s how the four macro themes

revealed by NKBA’s “Living Impacts Design” study are inf luencing home design.

Click here to learn more about the NKBA Living Impacts Design Study, and to receive a special discount on the full report. Methodology: A total of 759 designers, manufacturers, kitchen and bath specialists, dealers, showroom professionals and remodelers completed surveys about what their homeowner clients are requesting; 77 percent of respondents were NKBA members.


ADVERTORIAL

Connected Living

Simplified Living

What it means: It’s not just about connected devices. It also means connection among people, and spaces that promote human interaction, with tech designed to serve that end. Open-plan kitchens are inviting, cozy and warm — just right for engaging family and friends.

What it means: Let’s face it — most of us have too much stuff. No matter how much we purge, we still need plenty of storage to keep spaces clean and clutter-free. Forget the tchotchkes — especially for Millennials, who far value experiences over “things.”

Fast Facts:

Fast Facts:

+ 82% value inclusion and visibility with open kitchen layouts and sight lines to other parts of the living space. + 75% prioritize an inviting entertaining area. + 64% want multifunctional kitchens for different activities. + 57% emphasize great Wi-Fi and Internet connection to call up recipes, cooking inspiration and instruction. + 58% say materials like natural stone countertops and tile make a connection with the environment and nature, and provide a sense of well-being.

+ 35% express a desire to live with less, only with things they love. + 76% say homeowners want targeted storage for specific items, like pots and pans, odd-sized trays, utensils, spices, bathroom products and accessories — meaning there’s a place for everything. + 51% of Millennials crave well-organized spaces, minimal clutter and a sense of organization. + 48% opt for commercial finishes and fabrics as easyclean, low-maintenance material choices.

Living In Place

Healthy Living

What it means: Making spaces safe, comfortable and accessible for anyone — regardless of age, physical challenges or life stage — is the cornerstone of Living In Place. Uncongested f loorplans, handles and faucets that are easy to operate and low-maintenance materials make life easier for everyone.

What it means: Make life healthier through a deeper connection with nature, maximizing outdoor views, balancing circadian rhythms with lighting, selecting natural materials like wood and stone, earthy tones, and quite significantly, healthy eating, storing and preparing fresh foods.

Fast Facts:

Fast Facts:

+ 67% of specifiers focus on the desire to remain in the family home as the top factor inf luencing Living in Place design. + 86% of respondents cite non-slip flooring or tile in the bathroom, tub and shower as a top design solution. + 84% say minimal or no grout lines keep the look sleek and maintenance low. + 73% specify zero-clearance shower entry or no doors, wider doorways, and attractive, noninstitutional-looking grab bars. + 78% cite non-congested layouts that allow for meal prep and clean-up by multiple people at the same time.

+ 70% request more refrigerator space to accommodate fresh produce, meats and dairy. + 60% choose giant sinks to clean more produce; integrated areas to cut and prep, recycling and composting centers. + 53% say f lexible cool drawers can customize food storage as needed. + 43% point to UV filters/light to remove toxins from the air and minimize microbe growth. + 42% say shower body sprays, jets and shower panels add therapeutic benefits.


ADVERTORIAL

Kerrie Kelly Creative Director, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab, Sacramento, CA

Connected Living “Our world has become so ‘connected’ in the technology sense, but it’s so important to emphasize the connection among people. Homeowners want their kitchens to promote human interaction — and the connected devices, appliances and systems will be in place to serve that end. Open-plan kitchens will be inviting, cozy and warm. Perhaps this is a way to take the edge off all the tech!”

Jonas Carnemark, CKD, CLIPP Principal, Carnemark design + build and KONST Siematic, Bethesda, MD

Living In Place

“Designing with the future in mind makes the house ready when the people who live there need it… like installing supports behind the walls for future grab bars, ensuring 36-inch clearance areas for mobility devices, non-slip flooring, touchless or voice-control faucets, pivot doors, zero-threshold doorways and shower entries and uncongested layouts that promote smooth flow throughout the space.”


ADVERTORIAL

Sarah Robertson, AKBD Founder and Principal, Studio Dearborn, Mamaroneck, NY

Simplified Living

“One key to serenity in uncertain times is rooted in an organized space. Design solutions that help keep spaces clean and clutter-free with customized storage, especially in the kitchen and bath, are essential to simplified living. Easy-to-clean, antimicrobial surfaces and materials are key. We’re all too busy to spend precious weekend hours cleaning and straightening. The design should help do that.”

Laurence Carr CEO and Creative Director, Laurence Carr Design, New York

Healthy Living “A healthy home promotes emotional, physical and environmental health. Our environment has a great impact on stress levels. A connection with nature and minimalist design reduces stress, with clean, uncluttered spaces, well-organized cabinetry and targeted storage. Air and water filtration/purification help our physical wellbeing. Sustainability helps the environment with integrated recycling/composting and energy efficiency.”


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best of k & b

Dive into inspiration

TONY SOLURI

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t w i s t on t r a d i t i o n

harking back Mark Zeff gives new life to a 19th-century town house in New York’s West Village text: michael lassell photography: eric laignel

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While Manhattan apartment towers climb ever taller, some New Yorkers still yearn for a singlefamily town house on a tree-lined lane. A financial executive and his wife found their dream home on one of the West Village’s best-preserved streets. The property itself, however, was a diamond in the rough. One of five identical brownstones built in 1869, it was nearly moribund, chopped up into eight studio apartments. Any original architectural details had been stripped off decades ago. After buying this fractured piece of history, the couple hired Mark Zeff to transform it into a comfortable home for themselves and their two children. His firm, known as Markzeff, had already remodeled several projects on the same landmark-protected block. Conjuring up a contemporary interpretation of a classic town house took three years—much of it spent applying for permits from the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, then appealing its decisions. While there was no problem getting a permit to restore the front stoop, there was some pushback on Zeff’s proposal to add 4 feet of depth to the back of the house. Ultimately, he prevailed. The next steps were the demolition of all four existing levels—save for the landmarked facade—and the excavation of the cellar for a more livable amount of headroom. “We made the house work for a young family living in the 21st century,” Zeff says. Row houses are notoriously dark, since sunlight enters only at the front and back. On the street-facing facade, Zeff was restricted to installing period-appropriate sash windows. The rear addition is another story. For each level, he designed a window so large that it basically amounts to a glass wall. Eschewing a traditional standalone dining room, Zeff opened up the parlor floor, now clad in 12-inchwide oak floorboards, into living and dining areas that flow straight into the kitchen. “I like wood floors in kitchens,” he says. “I don’t like breaking up an open space with a lot of different flooring materials. That only makes the space look smaller.”

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Previous spread: In a 1869 New York town house renovated by Markzeff, a custom walnut table in the dining area is anchored by a Mark Sheinkman mixed-media work and a C. Jeré pendant fixture, while the kitchen cabinets beyond are topped in Calacatta gold marble. Bottom: Zeff forswore typically Victorian plaster flourishes, instead opting for unfussy neoclassical crown molding and high-gloss Venetian plaster on ceilings to amplify natural light. Opposite top, from left: Iron frames the kitchen’s window wall. In the living area, a Jacques Quinet table meets a custom sectional, covered in an acrylic-polyester blend velvet, beneath a photograph by Eve Sussman. In the children’s lounge, a Jonathan Adler pillow sits on a custom linen-covered sofa. Opposite bottom: The front of the brownstone’s parlor floor became the living and dining areas; the marble mantelpiece is a French 19thcentury design.

t w i s t on t r a d i t i o n


“The kitchen window frames have a retro commercial feel, recalling the 1920s”

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t w i s t on t r a d i t i o n Bringing the house’s total square footage to 4,000, the excavated cellar now holds a laundry room and other practical necessities. The garden level, directly above, retains its street entrance, after which come a mudroom, a family room, and a media room that can function as an office or a guest room. The first bedroom level, below the children’s quarters, is given over to the master suite. There, the bathroom is dominated by cement floor tile made using a 19th-century technique in which the floral pattern is poured into the framework before drying. SOURCES FROM FRONT TIGER LEATHER: BENCH UPHOLSTERY (DINING AREA). THROUGH ARTDECOCOLLECTION.COM: CHAIRS. BESPOKE FURNITURE: CUSTOM TABLE (DINING AREA), CUSTOM STOOLS (KITCHEN). FOURNEAUX DE FRANCE: RANGE (KITCHEN). BRASS CENTER: CUSTOM PULLS, SINK FITTINGS. O’LAMPIA STUDIO: SCONCE, PENDANT FIXTURE. ARCHITEX INTERNATIONAL: BENCH FABRIC. THROUGH OLDE GOOD THINGS: MANTEL (LIVING AREA). CAMPBELL IRONWORKS: CURTAIN ROD. ANGELA BROWN: CURTAIN FABRIC. THROUGH PALM BEACH VINTAGE: COCKTAIL TABLE. SCHUMACHER & CO.: PILLOW FABRIC. KRAVET: SOFA FABRIC. JONATHAN ADLER: PILLOW (CHILDREN’S LOUNGE). OSBORNE & LITTLE: HEADBOARD FABRIC, WINDOW SHADE FABRIC (GIRL’S ROOM). POTTERY BARN: BEDDING. WATERWORKS: TUB (BATHROOM). LEFROY BROOKS: TUB FITTINGS. URBAN ARCHAEOLOGY: CUSTOM SINKS. MOSAIC HOUSE: FLOOR TILE. CIRCA LIGHTING: SCONCES. THROUGHOUT LV WOOD: FLOORBOARDS. BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.: PAINT. P.A. COLLINS P.E. CONSULTING ENGINEERING; RODNEY D. GIBBLE CONSULTING ENGINEERS: STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS. PRECISION WOODWORKING: WOODWORK. NY CUSTOM FURNISHINGS: UPHOLSTERY WORKSHOP. SHRI’S DRAPERY: DRAPERY WORKSHOP. THAMES BUILDERS: GENERAL CONTRACTOR.

Left: Polyester-viscose upholsters the custom headboard in the daughter’s room. Right: Clear acrylic seating fosters a sense of spatial airiness at a vanity. Bottom: Hand-poured cement tile covers the master bathroom’s floor.


topp i c k s

a fine balance Classical meets au courant, the kitchen edition

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1. Duncan Kitchen Bridge faucet in solid brass with polished chrome finish by

Newport Brass. www.newportbrass.com 2. Portrush 6-mm extra-thin quartz surfacing by Cambria. www.cambriausa.com 3. Barcelona 2 tub in matte-white Englishcast volcanic limestone–resin composite by Victoria + Albert. www.houseofrohl.com 4. Geotzzo Ribbon Black honed marble terrazzo tile by Artistic Tile. www.artistictile.com 5. Stellar Frame Blue glazed white-body wall tile by Nemo Tile + Stone. www.nemotile.com 5

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text: georgina mcwhirter photography: maxime brouillet

from the outside in

In rural Quebec, Tux Creative Co. recasts country living in a more glamorou

r u r a l redux


us light

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“The house is the sum of my professional experiences, my childhood, and everything I love”

Laurent Guez once harbored dreams of being an architect in Paris. But after studying industrial design at the city’s École des Arts Appliqués, life led him to Montreal, where he opened branding agency Tux Creative Co. That was 10 years ago. Since then, Guez has steered nationwide advertising campaigns, designed retail pop-ups, even dabbled in music videos. The studio’s first residential project—and first foray into interior design and architecture proper—is Guez’s own home, a ground-up build in the rural village of Abercorn, near the Quebec-Vermont border, completed with a technical assist from local architect Guillaume Kukucka. The four-bedroom home (Guez also keeps a pied-à-terre in Montreal for work) comprises a quartet of interconnected, offset volumes overlooking a workshop and a swimming pool on a graded, boulder-strewn site. It’s intentionally reminiscent of a farm, with a central courtyard and outbuildings. Inside and out, Guez used materials traditionally applied to barn exteriors, like corrugated sheet metal and seamed aluminumcomposite panels. (“Think of a pig barn!” he told suppliers, who’d look suitably shocked.) With this flipped outside/inside approach, he explains, “you get the same effect as camping: feeling a part of nature yet protected.” That’s not to say there’s no glamour. Some walls are metallic—undoubtedly the first time his contractors had ever specified siding in standard RAL gold. “To me, gold is a neutral,” Guez demurs. The rippling corrugation throws shadows in the concaves, lending depth. Other seamed metal walls are a contrasting black, framing views as landscape paintings. For the placement of windows, Guez analyzed the trajectory of the sun across the day and throughout the seasons, modelling the way it danced sunbeams inside. He compares the effect to “graphic design on walls,” an apt metaphor considering Tux’s stock in trade. The floor plan, meanwhile, derives from M.C. Escher’s dizzying drawings of “impossible constructions.” With its open gallery that rises though all levels, mezzanine catwalks, split-level configuration, and mash-up of doors that range from 6 to 11 feet high, the architecture unfolds as a succession of volumes and perspectives. “Every element encourages connection and progressive discovery,” the designer notes. His love of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window sparked a play with sight lines. From a dining room window, for instance, one can see into the kitchen volume through its fenestration. (Instead of James 22

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Previous spread: For the dining room walls of his residence in Abercorn, Quebec, Laurent Guez specified corrugated siding common to local outbuildings but in an unexpected gold that appears antiqued in corner shadows while glimmering in direct sunlight. Opposite top: The house sits on a graded site overlooking a bucolic rural landscape. Opposite bottom: The placement of skylights and windows punctuating the offset volumes is modelled on the trajectory of the sun throughout the day and across seasons. Left: Barber Osgerby glazed porcelain tiles animate the kitchen floor. Bottom left: Custom light fixtures and seating bedeck the entry. Bottom right: A cafĂŠ-style countertop swoops around a kitchen corner below picture windows.

r u r a l redux

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Stewart spying on the neighbors, though, the voyeurism is reflexive, a circularity Escher would surely have enjoyed.) Guez painted a salvaged freestanding tub his beloved International Klein Blue; its clear plastic shower curtain the perfect low-fi addition. In the master suite, convention is subverted as one enters via the walk-in closet and bathroom, which then leads to the sleeping area. As for the kitchen, its open plan is organized restaurant-style around professional islands topped in stainless steel. Materials are industrial, with black steel prevailing. A café-style counter swoops around a corner below window walls, and an inset swath of Barber Osgerby Puzzle tile defines the floor like a patterned area rug. The kitchen has become the central gathering place when friends visit from his native France. That is, when it’s not in use as a sought-after photo shoot location for chichi Canadian fashion and housewares brands. SOURCES GUILLAUME KUKUCKA: ARCHITECT OF RECORD. LUMINAIRE AUTHENTIK: LIGHTING DESIGN. CÉRAGRÈSLES-BAINS: BATHROOM SUPPLIER. MUTINA: FLOOR TILE (KITCHEN).

Top, from left: Dimensional white tile backs a bathroom vanity, the mirror echoing the shape of the bath mat. Plywood, concrete, and ceramic tile mix in a chicly industrial shower stall. Bottom: One must pass through the airy bathroom to access the master suite.

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in the mix Natural materials, blackened metal, plus a pop of color 1. Lex Pott’s Figurati porcelain tiles by Ann Sacks. www.annsacks.com 2. Gumdesign’s Borghi sinks with resin basins and cork pedestals

by Antoniolupi. www.antoniolupi.it 3. Russell Adams’s Mallory tub of proprietary stone-resin composite in blue by MTI Baths. www.mtibaths.com 4. Bake Off From Primary Objects oak kitchen island by Henrybuilt. www.henrybuilt.com

5. Odin pull-down kitchen faucet with square spout in matte black

by Brizo. www.brizo.com 6. 30-inch refrigerator column in saffron by True Residential. www.true-residential.com

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s t a t e m e n t minimalism

step into the light dSpace Studio and Ruth Johnson Interiors transform a Chicago penthouse with killer views into an artfully sculpted home for an architecture buff text: tate gunnerson photography: tony soluri BESTOFK&B.20

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Previous spread: A quartz island and porcelain backsplash distinguish the open-plan kitchen of a Chicago penthouse by dSpace Studio. Top: A simple sectional and a leather sling chair by Frank Voznak furnish the sitting area. Bottom: Paint in My Head Number 10, an oil on canvas by Eloy Morales, punctuates the study, and built-in steel shelving augments custom oak cabinetry. Opposite: European oak flooring in the kitchen (and throughout) is laid in a large-scale herringbone pattern; the cabinetry wraps around the corner to serve as a buffet in the dining area, with Philippe Starck shell chairs.

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Jim Gearen is surprisingly low-key for someone who inhabits such posh digs. “I call it the attic,” the retired real estate exec says. Actually, it’s a 38th-floor three-bedroom penthouse in the tallest structure in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. Tucked into the building’s mansard roof, the 4,000square-foot space sports loftlike vaulted ceilings and arched windows and doors that frame jaw-dropping vistas of the lake plus five outdoor balconies. Always on the lookout for new projects (he has built or renovated six spaces over the past two decades), Gearen bought the penthouse unfinished and commissioned dSpace Studio to make it a home. “We wanted the interior and the views to take

center stage, so this was an exercise in restraint,” explains founder and principal architect Kevin Toukoumidis, who collaborated with principal Tom Hagerty. “The space just flows, and that’s because it’s so edited and carefully thought-out.” The design team embraced the arched windows and existing vault details, for example, mimicking the sweeping lines throughout. Gearen weighed in on every aspect of the design, including the wall color used throughout: a white that contains both brown and black undertones so it pairs equally well with warm and cool colors. The European oak flooring, laid in a large-scale herringbone, does the same. Its pinkish hue brings out the warmth in the blanched walls

and complements the steel shelving the architects recessed into arched niches in the living area and the study. “You see the manufacturing process in the texture of the steel, and that was important to all of us,” Hagerty explains. “The overall design is pretty minimal, so we selected materials that provide a sense of depth.” Custom European oak cabinetry in the open kitchen provides a rich counterbalance to the waterfall-style quartz island and gray-veined porcelain backsplash. The same material palette distinguishes three of the unit’s four bathrooms, most notably the master, a serene space built around a soaker tub with front-row skyline views. “There’s a feeling of balance and harmony in every

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room,” explains Minneapolis-based interior designer Ruth Johnson, who has worked with Gearen on many projects. One evening, late in the project, Gearen and the architects met at the space and, over Mediterranean takeout, tested some of the many new cutting-edge LED products on the market. A design by iGuzzini made the cut; it projects an LED “blade” that crisply frames each window with no glare. “The scheme creates layers of light that perfectly showcases the architecture’s complex geometry,” Toukoumidis concludes. SOURCES FROM FRONT HOLLY HUNT: PENDANTS (KITCHEN). CAESARSTONE: COUNTERTOP. BERTAZZONI THROUGH ABT: STOVE. AVENUE METAL CO.: CUSTOM VENT HOOD. FIANDRE THROUGH TRANSCERAMICA: BACKSPLASH (KITCHEN), FLOORING (BATHROOMS). RH MODERN: SECTIONAL, RUG (SITTING AREA). PERENNIALS: SECTIONAL FABRIC. KNOLL: TABLE. BOLT & HIDE THROUGH SCOUT: CHAIR. VERPAN: PENDANT FIXTURE (STUDY). KNOLL: TABLE. HERMAN MILLER: CHAIRS. VECTOR CUSTOM FABRICATING: CUSTOM STEEL SHELVING. CASSINA THROUGH WPA CHICAGO: CHAIRS (DINING AREA). INTERIOR GLASS DESIGN: CUSTOM GLASS PARTITIONS. CAESARSTONE: COUNTERS. TOTO: SINKS. AYRE ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING: SCONCES. HYDROLOGY: BATH FIXTURES SUPPLIER. FANTINI: FAUCETS. THROUGHOUT SHERWIN-WILLIAMS: PAINT. EXQUISITE SURFACES: WOOD FLOORING. UNITED WOODWORKING: ARCHED DOORS. CRESCENT ELECTRIC SUPPLY COMPANY: LIGHTING SUPPLIER. TECH LIGHTING: DOWNLIGHTS. IGUZZINI: WINDOW LIGHTING. ECOSENSE LIGHTING: IN-FLOOR LIGHTING. HOMERUN TECHNOLOGY: AUDIOVISUAL. GOODFRIEND MAGRUDER STRUCTURE: STRUCTURAL ENGINEER. MC GUIRE ENGINEERS: MEP. SOUNDSCAPE ENGINEERING: ACOUSTICAL ENGINEER. STEVEN CABINETS: WOODWORK. NU TILE & MARBLE: STONEWORK. NORCON: GENERAL CONTRACTOR.

Left: Porcelain faux marble paves the master bathroom, with freestanding tub. Right: In another bathroom, deep window dormers have sexy curves.

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quiet time

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Foster inner calm with bathroom finds both spare and tranquil 1. Patternity’s Liquid Sky and Liquid

Shell surfacing in Dekton sinterized quartz, porcelain, and glass composite by Cosentino. www.cosentino.com 2. Michael Anastassiades’s AA/27 single-hole high basin mixer in brushed stainless steel by Aboutwater by Boffi and Fantini. www.aboutwater.it 3. Gachot Studios’s Bond Tandem Series gooseneck lavatory faucet and lever handles with linear guilloche etchings in nickel by Waterworks. www.waterworks.com 4. Scala marble slab by Ann Sacks.

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www.annsacks.com

5. Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec’s Rombini

ceramic tiles by Mutina through Stone Source. www.stonesource.com

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f u t u r e modern

round the bend In California, John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects composes rhythmic curves for a Santa Monica house

text: edie cohen photography: benny chan/fotoworks 32

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John Friedman and Alice Kimm are thoroughly modern architects. That said, Friedman sounds a caveat about contemporary residential design: “I’m tired of boxy, stacked architecture,” he says firmly. He and Kimm— married co-principals of John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects—were waiting for what she calls “simpatico clients who would let us explore the curved forms we’ve used in more institutional projects.” That’s precisely what they got when a couple with multicultural heritages commissioned a new house in Santa Monica, California. The clients’ respective backgrounds factored strongly in JFAK’s process: Born in L.A. and raised blocks from the present site, the

husband has European-Moroccan roots; the wife, a Brazilian, grew up in Rio de Janeiro, where her parents moved often, building homes along the way. Play a word-association game with those givens, and thoughts of colorful tile work and graceful buildings redolent of the samba, Brazil’s insinuating national dance-rhythm, spring to mind. But before the architects let such seductive imagery flood their imaginations, they had to establish a floor plan. The house needed to be large—there were two young daughters to accommodate—but not overwhelming. JFAK determined that a two-story building of just under 4,000 square feet would be perfectly scaled for the suburban neighborhood.

JFAK located the family’s everyday quarters at the rear of the house, where the kitchen, den, and dining area conjoin to create a convivial hang-out space that opens up via stacked sliding doors to the backyard. A double-height living room at the front of the residence provides for less casual entertaining. Upstairs, the master suite and terrace face the backyard; the children’s bedrooms and baths look out to the front and side. With the plan largely in place, the architects could concentrate on what the house would look like. “Our decision not to put a second floor over the living room gave us freer rein in manipulating exterior and interior forms,” says Friedman, who was able

“The curved volumes are not frivolous forms but relate to movement—there’s something joyful about them”

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f u t u r e modern

Previous spread: At a Santa Monica, California, residence by John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects, the exuberant rear portion of the house is open and curvilinear, contrasting with the more sober and rectilinear front facade. Opposite: Flooring throughout is gray-stained oak or look-alike porcelain-tile planks. Top: There’s no conventional front door, just a side entrance gate painted the same citrus yellow as the garage. Bottom left: In the doubleheight living room at the front of the house, a teak-topped wall-mount cabinet and free-form acrylic coffee table, both custom, are joined by a Charles and Ray Eames rocker. Bottom right: A custom table of granite and teak—the same wood as the base of the island—and Karim Rashid’s Oh chairs furnish the open kitchen area. BESTOFK&B.20

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Top: In an oblique nod to Brazil’s national sport, the cement-tile pattern in a child’s skylit bathroom suggests soccer balls. Bottom: In the master bath, terrazzo-tile flooring joins walls tiled in a wave motif based on mosaic paving at Copacabana Beach.

f u t u r e modern

to show the clients a number of options. When the most biomorphic scheme was revealed—an undulating wood shell finished in brilliant white plaster—the wife zeroed in on it “with a huge smile,” Kimm reports. The house presents a mostly rectilinear face to the street, where a picture window protrudes from the facade like an enormous TV monitor. If the curves are restrained at the front, they explode at the rear, where a plethora of sinuous lines, planes, and solids define, frame, and enfold the wide-open kitchen and family areas, creating an extraordinary degree of indoor-outdoor integration. A deep, free-form soffit looms above an amoebashape granite-top table in the kitchen area. Finishes and furnishings are mostly subdued. However, the architects went for full tropical splendor in the bathrooms. The master bath is especially exuberant, its walls tiled in a blue-and-white wave pattern based on the mosaic that paves Copacabana Beach’s famous oceanfront promenade. SOURCES FROM FRONT IKEA: TABLE (TERRACE), STOOL (KITCHEN). KNOLL: CHAIRS (TERRACE). JOHN DUNNE: CUSTOM PERGOLA. UMBRA: CHAIRS (KITCHEN). WOLF: STOVE, OVEN. JOHN DUNNE: CUSTOM TABLE. AVENUE LIGHTING: CEILING FIXTURE. LA OVERHEAD GARAGE DOORS: CUSTOM GARAGE DOOR (EXTERIOR). CISCO HOME: SOFA, ARMCHAIRS, POUF, ACCENT TABLE, RUG, PILLOWS (LIVING ROOM). RONNIE FUJINAMI AND ACRYLIC SPECIALTIES: CUSTOM COFFEE TABLE. ISAMU NOGUCHI: FLOOR LAMP. HERMAN MILLER: ROCKING CHAIR. ZUMA COLLECTION: TUBS (BATHROOMS). CALIFORNIA FAUCETS: SHOWERHEADS. KOHLER CO.: SINKS. GROHE: FAUCETS. CLÉ: WALL TILES. APAVISA: FLOORING (CHILD’S BATHROOM). TOTO: TOILET. TREND USA: FLOOR TILES (MASTER BATH). THROUGHOUT MARINA WOODCRAFT: CUSTOM CABINETRY. SUGATSUNE: CABINET HARDWARE. FLEETWOOD WINDOWS & DOORS: WINDOWS, GLASS AND SLIDING DOORS. BRISTOLITE: SKYLIGHTS. ITALGRANITI GROUP: FLOOR TILES. BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.: PAINT. GRACESCAPES DESIGN: LANDSCAPE CONSULTANT. FRANCESCHI ENGINEERING: STRUCTURAL ENGINEER. JMC2 CIVIL ENGINEERING + SURVEYING: CIVIL ENGINEER. MARINA WOODCRAFT: WOODWORK. BONOMO DEVELOPMENT: GENERAL CONTRACTOR.

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pop dynamic Daring designs for the win

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topp i c k s 1. Kintsu wide-spread lavatory faucet with cross handles

in polished chrome by Brizo. www.brizo.com 2. Pietta Donovan’s Buderim Carnaby encaustic cement tiles by Walker Zanger. www.walkerzanger.com 3. 36-inch Platinum Series ranges in matte RAL 3022 salmon pink and RAL 6027 light green by BlueStar. www.bluestarcooking.com

4. Daniel Germani’s Elements outdoor kitchen in powder-

coated stainless steel by Brown Jordan Outdoor Kitchens. www.brownjordanoutdoorkitchens.com

5. Wavey encaustic cement tiles in Monet Powder by Aimée

Wilder. www.aimeewilder.com

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k i t c h e n sx4

well-seasoned Designers cook up a storm in a quartet of residential kitchens with style to spare

text: georgina mcwhirter See page 42 for this Scottish abode by Nathanael Dorent Architecture and Lily Jencks Studio.

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aidlin darling design site  Glen Ellen, California standout  Although the kitchen’s connection to terra firma is reinforced via budget-friendly concrete flooring, no expense was spared when it came to the subtly detailed cerused-oak cabinetry spanning a whole wall. Blackened-steel stools the owners found on Etsy pull up to an island with veined solid-surfacing that mimics Carrara marble. Since the kitchen only has glazing along one elevation, ADD cleverly mirrored its back wall to reflect sky and greenery and soak in the views. photography Matthew Millman

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kitchensx4

“The firm’s minimalist, highly detailed work manifests as a trio of glass-walled boxes with a treehouse feel”

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kitchensx4

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“Each layer is as different as possible: The impenetrable exterior, the soft interior—you could say it’s masculine and feminine”

nathanael dorent architecture and lily jencks studio site  Dumfries, Scotland standout The orthogonal exterior and fluid interior reflect the key characteristic of the surrounding countryside: the straight lines of stone walls cutting across rolling hills. Ancient granite walls—the ruins of an 18th-century farmhouse—surround a pitch-roofed box clad in conspicuously contemporary man-made black rubber. That envelope, in turn, contains a curvaceous white shell with CNC-cut plywood ribs. For insulation and acoustics as well as to achieve the sculpted form, Styrofoam blocks were shaped by hand and coated in glass-reinforced plastic painted bone white. photography Sergio Pirrone

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dash marshall site San Miguel, California standout  In redesigning a farmhouse for a pair of empty nesters, the firm preserved the existing 30-year-old exterior and renovated the interior piece by piece, like Theseus’s ship, until it was totally new. In the open kitchen, a perforated aluminum partition slides back to reveal what the architects refer to as a “super pantry.” The clients asked for agrarian references while also wanting a space that was fresh and contemporary. The primary wood species used throughout nods to the home’s site on an active walnut farm. Metalwork was executed by craftspeople who typically repair tractors and other equipment. The pantry’s door, meanwhile, is meant to evoke that of a barn. photography Bruce Damonte

kitchensx4

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“The home has all the charm of a farmhouse without any of the rustic materials implied by that concept”

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janson scuro site New York City standout The firm, when operating under its former moniker, Janson Goldstein, gutted and transformed a dark Park Avenue apartment for a Boston-based couple that needed a Manhattan pied-à -terre for business trips. Nonessential walls were reconfigured or replaced by massive sliding doors, and the rest were sheathed in bright and airy white paint or monolithic panels of pale rift-cut oak. Furnishings are equally streamlined, a mid-century modern and contemporary mix that includes pieces by Eero Saarinen, Yabu Pushelberg, Marcel Wanders, and in the kitchen, elegant waterfall stools by Shin and Tomoko Azumi. photography Scott Frances/Otto

kitchensx4

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“This neighborhood is typically crown moldings and oriental rugs, but that wasn’t what anyone involved in this project was interested in”

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safe and sound From touchless tech and easy-clean finishes to cocooning luxuries for staying at home 4

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1. Connoisseur Series stainless-steel wine/

beverage cooler by Vinotemp. www.vinotemp.com 2. Matthew Fulkerson’s SanitGrasp no-touch door pull in stainless steel coated in an antimicrobial finish by SanitGrasp. www.sanitgrasp.com 3. RS10 hands-free soap dispenser in brushed stainless steel by Vola through Hastings Tile & Bath. www.hastingtilebath.com 4. Crue touchless kitchen faucet in matte black by Kohler Co. www.us.kohler.com 5. Karu wood- and charcoal-fired pizza oven in stainless steel with ceramic-fiber insulation, baking stone, and optional gas-burner attachment by Ooni. www.ooni.com 6. Philippe Starck’s SensoWash I toilet with bidet function and bacteria-eliminating ceramic glaze by Duravit. www.duravit.us

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ADVERTORIAL

Lana Zepponi Meyers, AKBD


ADVERTORIAL

NKBA Research

TOP 10 KITCHEN & BATH TRENDS NKBA’s exclusive 2021 Design Trends report reveals the top directions in

design, from materials and colors to layout and tech. Several key trends directly

relate to issues surfacing during the pandemic, particularly the desire for health/ wellness, connected-home technology and dedicated spaces for new roles our homes are playing in everyday life. Here are 10 key takeaways: ALL TOGETHER NOW (left) Kitchen layouts are being designed with gathering in mind. L-shaped kitchens with large islands dominate. HOOK ME UP Dedicated areas for device charging, viewing screens or monitors topped all others as the most desirable kitchen technology going forward. THE GREAT OUTDOORS (right) 65% of designers surveyed said their volume of outdoor living area projects had increased, with three in four reporting they had designed or specified outdoor kitchens in the past year.

Destin Barkley


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RISING STYLE STAR (this page, top) Perhaps as part of a desire to connect with nature, Organic/Natural cracked the top three style categories, behind contemporary and transitional. It was the ninth most popular style in the 2019 study. Organic/Natural also placed 3rd behind contemporary and transitional for bath design, moving up from 7th in 2019. Reisa Pollard

BYE-BYE BATHTUB (this page, middle) The most popular layout trend for the primary bathroom, cited by 60% of respondents, is removal of the tub to allow for a larger shower. PRIMARY UPGRADE The most common spending range for the primary bathroom over the past 12 months was $20,000 to $30,000. SMARTS IN THE SPA 68% said bidets and/or smart toilets were the hottest new bathroom additions, while smart

Dalit Dray

temperature control for bathroom floors and showers also topped the list. CASH IN THE KITCHEN The majority of kitchen remodels in the past year were midsized, between 150 and 350 square feet, with the median expenditure between $40,000 and $55,000. For large kitchens over 350 square feet, 43% spent more than $100,000.

Madeleine Sloback


ADVERTORIAL

Sarah Robertson, AKBD

COLOR MY WORLD (this page, top) New colors — not neutrals but actual colors — especially deep and darker tones, are more popular, as are contrasting colors for islands. Black cabinetry is also a hot trend right now. LIGHTEN UP (left page, bottom) For countertops and backsplashes, quartz in light colors wins the day for next three years, as it does for bathroom vanities.

To get NKBA’s 2021 Design Trends Report, go here. Text: Dianne M. Pogoda;

NKBA Head Of Research: Tricia Zach; Market Research Analyst: Robert Isler


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ERIC LAIGNEL

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the style files Taking inspiration from a trio of imaginative projects channeling industrial chic, dreamy surrealism, and flat-out luxe, we sourced like-minded kitchen and bath finds to suit any space See page 58 for more on Tango House in Connecticut by Laura Bohn Design Associates and Carol Kurth Architecture.

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headline goes here Deck describing trend goes here describing trend goes here

designer: designer here project: project here site: site here

ERIC LAIGNEL

An Overman swivel chair and a cerusedoak side table—both dating from the midcentury—are among the furnishings on the living room’s Moroccan wool rug.

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luxury goods Sink into classical elegance with marbles and metallics designers: Laura Bohn Design Associates and Carol Kurth Architecture project: Tango House site: Connecticut Almost every room in Tango House has either multiple or arrestingly large light fixtures—a twist on scale and proportion, such as the sinuous stainless-steel mesh ceiling fixture by Thierry VidÊ that hangs over a custom cement tub in the master bathroom.

ERIC LAIGNEL

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1. Thermostatic valve in satin nickel–finish brass by Newport Brass. www.newportbrass.com 2. Fable glass slab by Sicis. www.sicisvetrite.com 3. Mark Zeff’s Rainey aged-brass bath fittings by Watermark Designs. www.watermark-designs.com 4. Archdale quartz surfacing by Cambria. www.cambriausa.com 5. Lido Beachcomber glass basin by Native Trails. www.nativetrailshome.com 6. Workshop/APD’s Argile tub in cast mineral-resin composite with decorative relief by Kallista. www.kallista.com

3: GARRETT ROWLAND

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BOTTOM RIGHT: ERIC LAIGNEL

A leatherized granite backsplash, textured metallic wallpaper, and backlit agate countertop animate a powder room in Tango House.

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AMIT GERON

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In a loft by Axelrod Architects, the cloudy gleam of twin brushed-stainless-steel kitchen islands—which read as blocky Donald Judd–esque sculptures—reflects the surrounding concrete, including existing steel columns now encased in the material.

concrete jungle Nail the industrial look with raw-meetsrefined finishes

firm: Axelrod Architects project: Bauhaus Loft site: Tel Aviv

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topp i c k s

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1. Avaa round concrete taps by Wood

Melbourne. www.woodmelbourne.com 2. Paprica P1 and P4 full-body-colored porcelain stoneware tiles by Marca Corona. www.marcacorona.it

3. Barber Osgerby’s Primavera unglazed

porcelain stoneware tiles in Grigio (wall) and Verde (island) by Mutina through Stone Source. www.mutina.it; www.stonesource.com

4. Knurled anodized-aluminum doorknob

in black by Buster + Punch. www.busterandpunch.com

5. Endeavor Wheel pull-down faucet in

chromed brass by Waterstone. www.waterstoneco.com

6. Spring resin, stone aggregate, and fiber-

glass dining table in Coal Stone finish by Zachary A. Design. www.zacharyadesign.com 7. Dunsmuir Institute Architects’ custom Canyon concrete sink by Trueform Concrete.

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BOTTOM LEFT: MEGHAN BOB/ TRUEFORM CONCRETE

www.trueformconcrete.com


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BOTTOM RIGHT: AMIT GERON

Axelrod selected Dada islands, a Marc Krusin Clay table, and a wire-frame chair by Charles and Ray Eames for the loft kitchen. A herringbone oak floor enriches the otherwise grayscale palette.

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CHRISTOFFER REGILD/LIVING INSIDE

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tickled pink Warming terra-cotta and blush mark a break from white-on-white firm: Studio Sabine Marcelis and Paul Cournet project: Marcelis and Cournet’s Coolhaven Loft site: Rotterdam, the Netherlands

CHRISTOFFER REGILD/LIVING INSIDE

The creative couple’s powder room is sheathed in ceramic tiles by Finnish artist Jonas Lutz whose salmon-pink embossed surface looks startlingly like cerebral matter. “Our friends call it ‘the brain room,’” Cournet says.

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1. Basis custom-painted MDF cabinet fronts with natural oak pulls by Reform. www.reformcph.com 2. Paola Vella and Ellen Bernhardt’s Nouveau tub in blush pink LivingTec resin composite by Ex.t. www.shop.ex-t.com 3. Angeletti Ruzza Design’s Bob basin in Keranium-finish Dekton composite and powder-coated steel vanity by Ceramica Globo. www.ceramicaglobo.com 4. Le Berre Vevaud’s Stool Barth New in glossy pink–lacquered linden by the Invisible Collection. www.theinvisiblecollection.com 5. Object & Totem’s Op-Eye Grid encaustic concrete tiles through Cooler Gallery and Concrete Collaborative. www.cooler-gallery.com; www.concrete-collaborative.com

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topp i c k s 4

BOTTOM: CHRISTOFFER REGILD/LIVING INSIDE

Also designed by Marcelis and Cournet is a bathroom in a rental apartment adjacent to the couple’s own residence. Its concrete tiling channels the quiet power of Brutalist architecture, while the eye-catching tinted mirror was repurposed from one of Marcelis’s commercial projects.

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KBIS2021 VIRTUAL | 2.9 – 2.12 Registration Opens December 7, 2020


New Product Showcase

ADVERTORIAL

Timber Niki Collection by Designer Doorware

The warmth of wood further accentuates Timber Niki pull handles and cabinet handles, which come in round or semi-circle versions, and are available in flat-face or dished design to create a beautiful Modernist style statement for any cabinet or entrance door. Learn more here.

FENIX in Rosso Jaipur by Formica

FENIX is created with a multi-layer coating of next-generation acrylic resins that are hardened through an Electron Beam curing process. The result is an extremely opaque material that features low-light reflectivity with a nonporous, soft-touch external layer and antifingerprint properties. FENIX is suitable for vertical or horizontal applications, including kitchen countertops and cabinets. Go here for more information.


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Signature Mobile Bars by Perlick

Perlick’s new Mobile Bars aren’t only perfect for bars and restaurants, they can also give homeowners a way to bartend in the comfort of their own homes. Serving drinks on the move is a great way to socially distance with your friends while still enjoying time together out on the patio, by the pool, or in your entertainment area. To learn more, go here.

Slot Linear Drain by Infinity Drain

Infinity Drain is introducing a new Slot Linear drain with a narrow 3/8-inch drainage gap that virtually disappears into its surroundings. Available in a range of finishes from Stainless Steel to Matte Black, they feature an easily accessible clean-out tray that simplifies the process of debris removal and servicing of the waste line. To learn more, go here.


ADVERTORIAL

48-Inch Pro Rangetop by Signature Kitchen Suite

Signature Kitchen Suite recently unveiled industry-frst dual-fuel prorangetops with built-in sous vide modality, along with two-zone induction and gas burners, to deliver ultimate precision cooking. Once limited to only Michelin-star restaurants, sous vide delivers precise temperature control within 1 degree of setpoint; this means at-home chefs can achieve professional-level results at home. Go here for more information.


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Custom Hoods by Bluestar

Every BlueStarŽ kitchen hood can be painted in over 1,000+ colors and finishes or built with 13 different metals. Handcrafted in the U.S.A., in the heart of Pennsylvania, with a dedication to quality and American craftsmanship that has been the company’s hallmark for 140 years. Go here to learn more about custom hood options.

Natufia Kitchen Garden by Natufia

A smart Garden in the heart of your kitchen that grows greens & veggies automatically all year around. Go here to learn more about this kitchen-to-table revelation.


ADVERTORIAL

Modo Vessel Sink by Hastings Tile & Bath

Hastings Tile & Bath’s new collection of pedestal, vessel and integrated sinks in a multitude of finishes and colors offers the ultimate in design flexibility and customization. Available in a Stoneor Marble- look Porcelain or HPL finish, the URBAN Modo Vessel Basins are elegance personified. For more details, go here.

True Residential New Saffron Hue by True Residential

The addition of the vivid new color— which is said to exude and boost positive energy—complements the brand’s expansive repertoire of offerings that follow both form and function. Go here to view all color options and hardware combinations.


LEGENDARY KITCHENS START WITH LEGENDARY APPLIANCES Learn about the unique features of Dacor appliances and start planning your new kitchen. Make a virtual or in-person appointment at one of our Dacor Kitchen Theaters. 150 E 58th St. Suite 602

222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, #142

18565 Jamboree Road Suite 100

646.756.4629 | nysr@dacor.com

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New York, NY 10155

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Irvine, CA 92612

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Interior Design Homes Best of Kitchen & Bath  

Interior Design Homes Best of Kitchen & Bath