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2015

HOUSTON METHODIST HOSPITAL FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT


2015

ANNUAL REPORT CONTENTS LETTER FROM CEO 2

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DAGM AR D O W D U N N INNOVATO R AWA R D 4 M E DICAL S C H O LA R S 10 R AP ID T B D E TE CTI O N A N D D I AG N O S I S 14 HO NO R IN G AN AC C LA I M E D N E U R O S C I E N TI ST 16

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C O L LA B O R ATI O N GOES VIRAL 22 T HE T R AC K TO D I S C OV E RY 24 DIS C OV E RY TO R E C OV E RY: T R AN SLATI O N A L R E S E AR C H I N I TI ATI V E 30 FIGHT IN G A LZ H E I M E R ’S 34 T HE S O C I E TY F O R L E A DIN G M E D I C I N E 36 R E NE WE D L IF E TH R O U G H C L INI CA L TR I A LS 38 FAIT H I N ACTI O N 40

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G I V I N G B AC K 42 GAL A & E V E N TS 46 Y E AR I N R E V I E W 50 LE A D E R SH I P 52 IN M E M O R I A M 53 - 54

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L E T T E R FR O M C H A I R M A N 55 houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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A GRADUATE OF THE WHARTON MBA PROGRAM AND BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, DR. MARC BOOM IS THE FIRST PHYSICIAN IN HOUSTON METHODIST’S NEARLY 100-YEAR HISTORY TO SERVE AS PRESIDENT AND CEO.

HOU STON M ETH ODIST’S STORY A LWAYS STA RTS W ITH OUR PAT IE N T S.

Legendary heart surgeon and medical pioneer Dr. Michael E. DeBakey said Houston Methodist Hospital was “a hospital with a soul,” and for good reason. Our medical professionals practice the science of medicine with the art of the patient relationship. Our expertise has a human touch, balancing innovation and technology with compassion and caring. and nurtured for nearly a century is guided by vision and faith and fueled by philanthropy. Our generous benefactors continue to provide the resources that make medical miracles possible. Last year, our physicians’ remarkable ability to solve problems and collaborate led to the world’s first scalp and skull transplant. In another first, a 20-year-old man with a lesion in his brain stem underwent subcortical neurosurgery that followed the natural pathways of his brain fibers and connections, allowing surgeons to remove the lesion with no damage to the healthy brain. Today he continues his life with no symptoms. T H E C U LTU R E W E B U ILT TOGETH ER

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


OUR P HYSI C I A N S , FAC U LT Y A N D STA FF S H OW A N U NQU ENC H A B LE

with unsurpassed quality and an unshakable belief that we can and will do better for our patients. The depth of Houston Methodist’s medical specialties, incorporation of translational research and focus on the whole person set us apart. As we continue to leverage and build upon the strengths of our centers of excellence, we will find ways to cure the incurable and generate medical breakthroughs that change the world. We have the technology, the entrepreneurial spirit and the brainpower to change the future of medicine right here at Houston Methodist. DESI R E TO P ER FO R M AT T H E H I G H E ST L E VEL,

demonstrates why Houston Methodist is leading medicine and is distinctive from other hospitals and academic medical centers. Thanks to the empowering support of our dedicated philanthropic family, Houston Methodist is primed to make transformational improvements in the way we treat disease. We look forward to continuing our valuable partnership as Houston Methodist heads toward its second century of service.

EVERY EXAM P L E

M A R C L. B OO M, MD PRESI D EN T CHI EF EXECUT IVE OFFICER HOU STON MET HODIST

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“I can hear my grandfather’s voice. ‘Put your mother first, boy.’” Eva Lynn and Steve Dunn sit in a conference room in Dunn Tower, the Houston Methodist building named in honor of Steve’s father, John S. Dunn. Today, though, he is not here to talk about his father. Instead, he leans back again over the table, taking one more look at the portrait of his mother. In the portrait she is young and beautiful. “Unbelievable,” he says, and there’s a tremor in his voice that comes from somewhere back in time. This year, Eva Lynn and Steve made a philanthropic commitment to establish the Dagmar Dow Dunn Innovator Award, a bold collaborative translational research program between Houston Methodist and Rice University. The program honors Steve’s mother and grandfather – Dagmar Dow Dunn and Charles Milby Dow. Steve remembers his mother, Dagmar Dow Dunn, as a generous and grateful woman. She was an active member of Christ Church Cathedral and a longtime volunteer at the Texas Medical Center. She passed away in December 2005. His grandfather, Charles Milby Dow, was a prominent Houstonian known for his charitable deeds, including the bequest of several parks to the City of Houston. “They were both so generous,” says Eva Lynn, “and they were both grateful to be a part of Houston.”

DAGMAR DOW DUNN

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THE INSPIRING LIVES BEHIND THE DAGMAR DOW DUNN

INNOVATOR AWARD

“For me, I felt like we’d done so much to honor my dad,” Steve says. “And we hadn’t had an opportunity until now to honor my mother and grandfather.” There is no question that the Dunn family, and the John S. Dunn Foundation, have been leading contributors to the growth and development of world-class medicine in Houston and the Texas Medical Center. Such uncommon generosity is born from a deeply ingrained spirit of giving, instilled in Steve by his family.

“We were so privileged,” Steve says. “We were so fortunate. But in addition to that great good fortune, we were told in no uncertain terms that to really appreciate our good fortune, and to truly be grateful, it didn’t stop with just saying thank you. You had to pass it on.” At Houston Methodist, in addition to the naming of Dunn Tower, the Dunn Foundation established six endowed chairs in disciplines ranging from glioblastoma to reconstructive surgery and more. At Rice University, they have most recently funded the John S. Dunn Foundation Collaborative Research Award Program for the BioSciences Research Collaborative. For Eva Lynn and Steve, however, the Dagmar Dow Dunn Innovator Award is a personal, planned giving contribution. “We’ve had such blessed lives due to our families,” says Eva Lynn. “This way we can express that gratitude.” Through a bequest, Eva Lynn and Steve’s contribution will establish an endowment which will fund the Dagmar Dow Dunn Innovator Award in perpetuity. houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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The award is modeled in part after prominent international award programs such as the Nobel Prize, the Japan Prize and the Howard Hughes Investigators. Each year, it will provide research support to a medical investigator at Houston Methodist or Rice University working at the cutting edge of science. Innovators will be selected based on their success in applying discoveries generated during research in the laboratory to the development of medical clinical trials and studies in humans. The award is shared between Houston Methodist and Rice University because of each institution’s unique focus on translational research and strong fiscal accountability. “Hopefully, this award can spur on help to the bedside,” says Steve. “The current time chasm between coming up with something really great and getting it approved for use is too long. Many people don’t live long enough to benefit. Hopefully we can speed up that process and really help people.” Additionally, awardees can work in collaboration with institutions associated with the Gulf Coast Consortia, which is comprised of seven prominent HoustonGalveston area institutions, including: Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, University of Houston, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Institute of Biosciences

CHARLES MILBY DOW

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THE INSPIRING LIVES BEHIND THE DAGMAR DOW DUNN

& Technology at Texas A&M Health Science Center. The collaborative aspect of the program was an important factor in the creation of the award. “Mixing the best with the best should create a synergy in getting all of this to the bedside – to the patient, as quickly as possible,” says Eva Lynn. “In my opinion, some of our better decisions have involved not only Houston Methodist but also the Gulf Coast Consortia,” says

Steve. “It’s been our experience that they have really taken advantage of the opportunity.” These are the words of a family that has garnered valuable experience in philanthropy and that makes philanthropic decisions with due consideration. Eva Lynn and Steve both agree that money is a tool, and its impact on the world – for good or ill – is determined by the way it is used. “I’ll never forget,” Steve says, telling the story of when his dad established the John S. Dunn Foundation. “My father came to me, and he said, ‘Look, I’m not going to give you any more money. I’m going to give you something that’s even greater. I’m going to give you a gift. And the gift is the opportunity to do a lot of good with a lot of money.’” This lesson stuck with Steve, and guides his philosophy on giving today. “To me, philanthropy is the gasoline in the car,” says Steve. “If you are in the business of writing checks for the good of the community, it really helps if you’re motivated to try to make the world a better place – without trying to drive a particular political position or offer a business opinion.

INNOVATOR AWARD

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True philanthropy is trying to make the best decision possible to help the community. It really is altruistic.” Eva Lynn and Steve’s connection to Houston Methodist is personal. Both have received what they refer to as lifesaving treatment at the hospital. And both are effusive in their praise for and trust in Houston Methodist as an institution. “We feel as though it’s an honor to be associated with Houston Methodist,” says Steve. “We’re very keen on following the money we give, and it’s really free of worry that the money is going to be mishandled. And that’s huge. After all, what’s wrong with doing business with an institution that is so successful, so well-recognized? It’s an honor for us.” Steve knows where his sense of philanthropy and his dedication to helping others originates. He gives credit to his father, who he remembers as a powerful yet generous man. But he returns again to the portrait of his mother, and then to the matching portrait of his grandfather. He can’t look away. “When I see the people that we’re able to help, it’s made me realize even more how truly blessed my life has been,” says Steve. “And it’s great to have an opportunity to make a difference for others. I feel a sense of urgency to make a difference in the community. “It’s been a gift. The gift of giving.”

UNCOMMON GENEROSITY IS BORN FROM

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


THE DAGMAR DOW DUNN INNOVATOR AWARD UNIQUELY FOCUSES ON COLLABORATIVE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AT HOUSTON METHODIST AND RICE UNIVERSITY. IN PARTICULAR, THE DAGMAR

AN INGRAINED

DOW DUNN INNOVATORS WILL BE SELECTED BASED ON THEIR SUCCESS IN APPLYING DISCOVERIES

SPIRIT OF GIVING,

GENERATED DURING

INSTILLED BY FAMILY

MEDICAL CLINICAL TRIALS

RESEARCH IN THE LABORATORY TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF AND STUDIES IN HUMANS. THIS PROCESS OF BRINGING DISCOVERIES FROM THE LABORATORY INTO HUMAN APPLICATION HAS THE POTENTIAL TO DEVELOP NEW CURES AND TREATMENTS IN YEARS RATHER THAN DECADES.

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SCHOLARS


HOUSTON METHODIST TRAINS 267 MEDICAL RESIDENTS AND FELLOWS. Philanthropy helps support some of these positions which become named scholars in honor of their supporting benefactors. Some residents also participate in Houston Methodist’s Community Scholars Program, a unique training opportunity that takes specialty care to clinics in underserved Houston communities. ONE OF THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES faced

by a major academic training hospital is funding its education mission. Only a portion of post-graduate medical education programs are supported by government sources, and the number of residencies and fellowships available have not kept pace with the number of medical student graduates. This shortage is especially acute in Texas, where an estimated 45 percent of all medical school graduates end up in out-ofstate residencies – and ultimately spend their careers in other states. Through the generosity of forwardthinking benefactors, Houston Methodist trains the next generation of physicianscientists. These scholars programs allow physician-mentors to educate fellows and residents daily, providing on-the-spot training and learning opportunities to address the health conditions of a diverse population. The program was originally established through the generosity of The Cullen Foundation and has expanded through the support of Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Anne and Charles Duncan and Becky and Ralph O’Connor. OCCIDENTAL PETROLEUM CORPORATION

Occidental Petroleum Corporation (OXY)

was founded in1920 and has evolved into a leading international oil and gas exploration and production company. In 2014 its headquarters moved from Los Angeles to Houston, where the company sought out opportunities to support the Houston community. “Part of our corporate obligation means we engage in the community and give back,” says Stephen I. Chazen, former president and CEO of OXY. “We always get involved in the countries and the communities where we drill. For example, we provide education and health care in countries such as Colombia, Oman and others.” In Houston, OXY leveraged its support by coupling physician training with the treatment of people who do not have access to health care. The Houston Methodist Community Scholars Program was a great fit, partnering veteran specialist physicians with residents and fellows to care for uninsured and underserved patients in community clinics throughout the Houston area. The company’s $4 million commitment will help sustain the program for many years to come. “We hope this program will encourage more people to support Houston Methodist,” says Stephen. “We also hope that people will get care they might not otherwise receive.”

OXY SCHOLARS COMBINES SUPPORT FOR PHYSICIANS’ TRAINING WITH GENEROSITY THAT HELPS TREAT PATIENTS WHO MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE RECEIVE CARE

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ANNE AND CHARLES DUNCAN: SUPPORTING THE CREAM OF THE CROP DUNCAN SCHOLARS THE DUNCANS ARE INTERESTED IN SUPPORTING EDUCATION, ESPECIALLY MEDICAL EDUCATION

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Establishing Houston Methodist’s internal medicine scholars program was a natural fit for Anne and Charles Duncan. Charles is a Life Member of the Houston Methodist board, in recognition of nearly 25 years of service, a member of the Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation board, and the Duncans are longstanding supporters of health care and higher

internal medicine, the scholars program trains new physicians in specialty and sub-specialty areas. Since its inception in 2011, 14 medical residents have been honored with the coveted title of Duncan Scholar. “We support the scholars program as a function of Dr. Robbins’ work,” says Charles.

education on many fronts. In fact, the Duncans were among the first to fund education at Houston Methodist, endowing the Charles and Anne Duncan Presidential Distinguished Chair in Medicine. Dr. Richard J. Robbins, who holds that position, oversees the scholars program and encouraged the Duncans to participate. Designed to prepare physicianscientists to become the next leaders in

“It’s an extension of our interest in education in general, and medical education, specifically,” adds Anne. “We are excited about the future of this program.” The couple meets annually with the impressive Duncan Scholar awardees. “They come from all over the world,” says Charles. “They are the cream of the crop, the brightest and best, and they are all passionate and enthusiastic about their work.”

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


In 2011, a minor accident landed Ralph O’Connor at Houston Methodist under the care of orthopedic surgeon Dr. William “Bill” Bryan. While Ralph recovered, Dr. Bryan introduced him to Dr. Marc Boom, who at that time had not yet taken on the CEO role at Houston Methodist. Later, Ralph inquired about giving opportunities in appreciation of the wonderful care he received. On learning of Dr. Boom’s impending promotion, Ralph hatched plans for a memorable philanthropic contribution. On Dr. Boom’s first day as CEO, there was a personal letter and a signed check from the O’Connors on his desk.

“The hospital staff could not have done a better job in taking care of us,” says Ralph. “It’s natural to want to help someone who has helped you.” In subsequent conversations, the O’Connors learned the Houston Methodist Community Scholars Program was a top priority for Dr. Boom. “We are delighted to help doctors get excellent training right here in Houston,” says Ralph. “We know these current scholars will teach the next generation. So we’re not just helping one person; we will help a lot of people.” The O’Connor’s support will help expand the program into areas beyond nephrology, neurology and endocrinology.

BECKY AND RALPH O’CONNOR: SUPPORTING EXCELLENT TRAINING

O’CONNOR SCHOLARS THEIR HELP FOR MEDICAL SCHOLARS WILL END UP HELPING A LOT OF PEOPLE


Infectious diseases are good travelers. They’re silent, invisible and resilient. And they can spread unchecked in no time. Throw in a co-infection, antibioticresistant bacteria and the right environment, and it’s a recipe for an epidemic. Rapid testing and accurate diagnosis are critical in stopping the spread of disease, but the right tools are not always available. Tuberculosis, or TB, is a good example of a disease that has been preventable and curable for decades. Yet more than 1.5 million people – including at least 75,000 children – still die from this disease every year. Many forms of TB are 14

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

tough to diagnose, their severity impossible to gauge. Diagnosing early stage and latent TB is difficult, as is pinpointing TB in children and TB with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) coinfection. The gold standard TB diagnostic test takes four to eight weeks to complete, during which time the patient can spread the disease to many more people.

All of these are reasons why TB, often considered a third-world disease, remains a global epidemic and is still present in the United States. In fact, TB screening is a job requirement for many workers, including 20,000 Houston Methodist employees and thousands more throughout the Texas Medical Center. Today, Houston Methodist’s Dr. Tony Y. Hu is researching whether the fast and simple TB blood test


Houston Methodist is deeply grateful to the John S. Dunn Foundation and the Founding Members of the Translational Research Initiative (TRI) for their generous contributions in support of Dr. Hu’s research. His TB blood test is among the first recipients of TRI funding to quickly advance medical discoveries to clinical trials and ultimately the medical marketplace. See pages 30-33.

developed in his lab will work on a large number of blood samples, and whether his testing platform can find, measure and monitor TB/HIV co-infection on a global scale. The two-year project includes testing 3,200 blood samples from TB-infected children and adults. Success would mean the first widely available and accurate TB testing, diagnosis and monitoring

tool in the world, one which could help decrease TB’s transmission and improve therapies for patients everywhere. In short, Dr. Hu’s TB blood testing platform has the potential to revolutionize the way the world deals with TB. Utilizing microwave irradiation to produce quicker results, his test reduces the current fourto eight-week wait time down to four hours.

For centuries, TB was called ‘consumption’ because it appeared to consume its victims until they were little more than skin and bones. Caused by the airborne pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the disease generally starts in the lungs, causing a severe cough, often with sputum and blood, along with chest pain, weakness, weight loss,

fever and night sweats. Curing TB involves a tedious drug regimen that takes several months to be effective. “If our blood analysis testing platform is effective for TB, we believe it also can be used to identify and quantify other bacterial and viral infections carried by blood and body fluids,” Dr. Hu says. Once perfected, this diagnostic tool could be used to rapidly test for Ebola and other infectious diseases as well as timely evaluation of anti-HIV treatments. houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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CELEBRATING THE

FORWARD-THINKING

CAREER OF

NEUROLOGIST

STANLEY APPEL


LEADERSHIP

I

For nearly four decades, Dr. Stanley H. Appel has dedicated his life to understanding neurological diseases and their devastating effects. Now the Houston Methodist Department of Neurology that he has chaired so many years will bear his name and become the Stanley H. Appel Department of Neurology – thanks to an unprecedented and remarkable gift from the woman who has worked by his side for 18 years – his wife Joan. “His passion for his work and for his patients is incredible,” Joan says. “I thought it would be a wonderful thing to name the department after him. He is really loved.” Her gift was a sudden epiphany, providing a pathway to ensure that her husband’s remarkable legacy will forever be associated with the nationally renowned department he has built at Houston Methodist. It also honors their mutual workplace, giving the hospital abundant resources to inspire excellence and innovation in perpetuity.

INSIGHT I Dr. Appel has served as chief of the neurology division and James B. Duke Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He held a joint appointment as chair of the Department of Neurology at Baylor College of Medicine and chief of the neurology service at The Methodist Hospital from 1977 to 2004. He then became the first chair of the newly established Department of Neurology at Houston Methodist. In this role he also directs the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute and is professor of neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine. “This gift is extraordinary in so many ways,” says Dr. Marc Boom, president and CEO. “First, it’s from an individual who is, herself, a professional whose work instills the utmost respect and admiration. It’s also a transformational gift that blends current and future endowed funding that will continue to grow and support the organization forever. Finally, it’s from a wife honoring her husband in a very unique way, and both the benefactor and the honoree have dedicated their lives’ work to Houston Methodist.”

KNOWLEDGE I Stanley Hersh Appel was born in 1933 to Russian immigrant parents in Boston. As a young student at Boston Latin School, he was expected to study up to six hours a night. He completed his undergraduate work at Harvard, then attended Harvard Business School. But an epiphany at age 22 changed his course, and he decided to enroll in medical school to study and understand the workings of the human brain. He started at Tufts and earned his medical degree from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, returning to Harvard for a medical internship.

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FAMILY I Throughout his life, Dr. Appel has maintained strong ties to family and speaks with pride of his sons Evan and Jon, his daughter Tanya, and six grandchildren. It was Dr. Appel’s mother, though, who always played a special role right up until the day she died at age 101. He had called her every Sunday night since moving into the dorm at Harvard. Dr. Appel remembers their final conversation in February 2010. “She said, ‘You know, Stan, I’m tired. I think I’m going to say goodbye.’” The next day, he received a call that she died peacefully in her sleep. “She was in perfect cognitive health – she never lost a synapse.” PASSION I The Appels share a passion for neurology and a deep commitment to their patients. She is a physician assistant and conducted HIV and AIDS research before joining the Houston Methodist Department of Neurology in 1998. They both recall one patient’s reaction to his amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diagnosis. Dr. Appel had just delivered the news when the patient said, ‘It must be so hard for you to go from room to room and tell people that they have ALS.’ “I just told you that you have ALS and all you can think of is us? That’s why we’re here,” Dr. Appel recalls. “If anything is motivating, that is motivating. It keeps you going.” VISION I Quality and duration of life have improved for ALS patients over the years. Just 15 years ago, ALS patients lived an average of three years. Today, they live five to six years, some longer. Physicians are now able to better control the main clinical problems of ALS patients – breathing difficulties and falling. Dr. Appel has teamed up with Massachusetts General Hospital to study whether altering the immune system can help ALS patients. “We’ve spent many years documenting that the immune system plays a significant role in neurological diseases,” Dr. Appel says. His research team recently took blood from an ALS patient and altered its properties before injecting it back into the patient after a few weeks. “In a mouse model, this dramatically extended its life,” he says. RESPECT

I

Dr. Appel’s passion for his patients and his vision for the future of ALS research come alive in the ALS Clinic he founded 34 years ago. The MDA/ALS Research and Clinical Center was the first multidisciplinary care center for ALS patients in the country. One Friday a month, patients and their caregivers arrive early – it’s first-come, first-served – and physicians, social workers, dietitians, physical and occupational therapists, volunteer lawyers and accountants come to them. They’re called Team Hope, and they give people as much time as they need, with no direct cost to patients. The Appels are at their best on clinic days, and they wouldn’t miss one. The love and respect they share with these patients is present in their touch, their words and their smiles. Ronald Bess (at right) is a regular patient who comes three to four times annually and has for a decade. The 65-year-old retired refinery worker drives himself 55 miles to be the first one in line. “This gentleman shows that the more positive you are, the more you fight ALS and get on with your living, the better you do,” Dr. Appel says. When the Appels hear that he arrives 45 minutes before the doors open at 6:30 a.m., they promise to put a chair by the elevator before the next clinic. 18

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THE APPELS ARE

PARTNERS IN LIFE AND IN

MEDICINE


GRATITUDE I When Joan Appel decided on this gift to name the department in her husband’s honor, Dr. Appel had no idea it was coming. “I’m grateful,” he says, “but whether Stan Appel’s name is on the department is not a key issue. What is most important is that we have a community of dedicated, highly motivated people who want to improve the quality of life for their patients.” Joan’s gift will do just that, by helping to ensure outstanding care and improved treatments in perpetuity through a sustained investment in research, innovation and discovery and by the continued recruitment and retention of leading clinician-scientists in the Appel Department of Neurology.

PARTNERSHIP I From the top floor of their Houston high-rise, the Appels have created a refuge above the city and the Texas Medical Center. They live with three cats and a nearly 360-degree view of the country’s fourth-largest city. Every evening, they sit side by side and dine by candlelight. “There aren’t many people who can work together 24-7, and we do,” Dr. Appel says. “Neither of us likes to fight – we’re non-confrontational people. We work very well together.” And they make each other laugh. “She’s smart as hell and always so funny,” he says. “What you see is what you get,” Joan Appel says of their relationship. “We have lunch together every day, and we always will. I keep threatening to retire, but I’ll work until I drop dead. I know we’re going to carry him out in a pine box.”

LEGACY I Dr. Appel’s list of accolades is long. He has written 15 books and more than 400 articles, won numerous awards and trained more than 200 neurologists, many of them now heading their own departments. “Stan Appel is among the most preeminent neurologists in the world,” says Houston Methodist Board Member Gary Edwards, whose late mother Sonja was treated by Dr. Appel and whose generous gifts – from Gary, his wife Peggy and their family – endowed the ALS chair that Dr. Appel holds, named the ALS laboratory in his mother’s memory and established the envisioned Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. “We’re so grateful for the exceptional care he provided to my mother, and my family has been honored to support his work.” Perhaps Dr. Appel’s greatest, most lasting legacy will be his connection with patients and his ongoing quest to improve their lives through research, care and compassion.

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with an image of the Coronavirus

developed the test in a matter of weeks. The threat of highly contagious “superviruses” such as Zika or Ebola can paralyze a community. But the answer to containing an outbreak may lie in the networks that bind our community together. Virginia and L.E. Simmons are philanthropists with a strategy. “If you look at how people communicate today,” says L.E., “it’s global and it’s seamless. And I think in five, 10 years, people not used to thinking that way are going to be sitting on their own little island.”

Virginia Simmons

L.E. Simmons

In January 2016, news reports began to publicize the outbreak of the Zika virus in South America. By February, the CDC estimated that there were approximately 90 cases of Zika in the United States. That same month, Houston Methodist and Texas Children’s Hospital announced they had developed the first hospital-based rapid tests for the Zika virus. Working together, they

with an image of the Ebola virus

COLLABORATION GOES VIRAL

Houston Methodist and Texas Children’s Hospital partner to develop a community defense system.


with a photo of the Zika virus

from infectious diseases by detecting, isolating, identifying and treating the illness while simultaneously rapidly communicating updates on the virus. The collaboration has already produced successful results – the nation’s first hospital-based rapid test for the Zika virus. “We certainly collaborate,” says Dr. Versalovic, “but not the institutional collaboration that we’re doing now. This is at a scale that frankly has not been matched in the Texas Medical Center.” “Thanks to the Simmons’ support, we will be able to tell the world exactly what’s going on from a viral arena in our city,” says Dr. Musser. “And that capability is truly unique.”

Dr. James Musser

with an image of the Influenza virus

Dr. James Versalovic

This bedrock belief in the value of sharing resources brought together two of Houston’s most venerable medical institutions: Houston Methodist and Texas Children’s Hospital. “I feel like we have so much strength in the Texas Medical Center,” says Virginia. “And uniting two primary hospitals and all that strength is going to go in a very positive direction.” She was right. Virginia and L.E. made a significant commitment establishing a collaboration between Dr. James Musser of Houston Methodist and Dr. James Versalovic of Texas Children’s Hospital. The program allows the two institutions to protect our community

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ALAN AND SHERRIE CONOVER TRAVEL THE COUNTRY IN THEIR RESTORED TRAIN CAR. WHEN ALAN NEEDED A LIFESAVING LIVER TRANSPLANT, THEY TRAVELED TO HOUSTON METHODIST.


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From the time he was 4 years old, Alan Conover was fascinated by trains. Every Sunday he and his father visited the railroad yard to watch, to listen and eventually, to ride. Decades later, as Alan continues his recovery and rehabilitation from a liver transplant, his heart is set on returning to his journeys aboard a historic rail car that he and his wife Sherrie restored. In the months following his May 23, 2013, liver transplant – performed by Drs. R. Mark Ghobrial and Howard Monsour in the J.C. Walter Jr. Transplant Center at Houston Methodist – Alan had two goals: get well enough to climb the rail car stairs and ride his train again; and give a generous bequest to Houston Methodist to help create the largest and best liver center in the nation.

Within two years of receiving his new lifesaving liver, he accomplished both goals. In April 2015, Alan and Sherrie – along with Dr. Ghobrial and his wife Kathy, Dr. Marc Boom and his wife Dr. Julie Boom, and Alan’s nephew Ed Jones, chief operating officer of the Houston Methodist Research Institute – took the J. Pinckney Henderson on a Houston-to-San Antonio train tour. Named after Texas’ first governor and called The Texas Special for its original route from St. Louis to San Antonio, the historic train attracted railroad enthusiasts all along the route. Made of stainless steel and the only rail car that was part of Amtrak’s experimental luxury service, this was The Texas Special’s first return trip since the original route ended in 1959. Although still weak and 150 pounds lighter than

THE CONOVERS’ GIFT WILL FUND MEDICAL DISCOVERIES TO HELP MORE PATIENTS. PICTURED BESIDE THE CONOVERS’ RESTORED TRAIN CAR: MARC BOOM, MD, SHERRIE “GAIL” CONOVER, ALAN CONOVER AND MARK GHOBRIAL, MD, PHD


before his liver began failing, Alan was back on track, his wife of 32 years by his side as they visited with guests and cherished the ride. The following June, they returned to Houston Methodist for a formal dedication of the Sherrie and Alan Conover Center for Liver Disease & Transplantation. The couple decided to give what they have – not just what they could. Their transformational $6.5 million commitment – a blended gift of current use and a bequest, and the first named center at Houston Methodist from generous benefactors from a state other than Texas – will provide resources for groundbreaking research to help more liver patients get the lifesaving treatments they need. Alan and Sherrie have lived in Florida since retiring in the 1980s. He worked as a fireman in

New York’s Hudson Valley for 20 years, and Sherrie was a reading specialist in the Newburgh, NY, school district. Their lives in retirement were packed with full-time adventure. Alan pursued his passion for trains with gusto, and the couple restored two historic train cars. They hosted their friends on rail trips all over the country, including a memorable rail trip to the Kentucky Derby. Life was full and good. About four years ago, Alan’s lungs started collecting fluid. He couldn’t catch his breath and within a very short time, this generally healthy, active man became critically ill. His Florida doctors blamed the fluid buildup on a failing liver. And since Alan was over 70, doctors there told him he was too old for surgery and there was nothing they could do but drain the fluid periodically.


The Conovers weren’t willing to settle for a compromised life if there was hope. “I called Ed and asked, ‘What are we going to do about your Uncle Alan?’” Sherrie recalls. Jones immediately reached out to Dr. Monsour. “When I got the call from Ed, it was no different than other calls we get, because there’s a philosophy within the liver program that we take all comers,” says Dr. Monsour, chief of hepatology. “Alan came with a particular problem and we were able to figure it out. It was a team effort. I can tell you with all sincerity that Alan being alive today – Sherrie’s just as much a part of that as every physician and worker at the hospital.” Sherrie usually knew Alan’s ‘labs’ before his

doctors did. She had an eagle eye for red flags and bad numbers. When Drs. Monsour and Ghobrial first met Alan, he was very ill. Within three months, his liver disease was at a critical stage. Yet Dr. Ghobrial says he never considered not seeking a transplant. “I think a good center is one that’s able to treat sick patients and older patients with good outcomes,” Dr. Ghobrial says. “We’ve had excellent outcomes over time.” Houston Methodist’s collaborative environment was critical to Alan’s post-transplant recovery. He suffered complications with his heart, requiring two aortic valve surgeries. Dr. Michael Reardon, a cardiothoracic surgeon with the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and a valve expert,


“ABOUT A YEAR AFTER THE TRANSPLANT, WE SAID, ‘YOU KNOW, LET’S TAKE THE MAJORITY OF OUR STOCK, AND GIVE IT TO HOUSTON METHODIST FOR THE LIVER CENTER.

WE WEREN’T LOOKING TO FIND A NAME FOR OURSELVES, OR A NAME FOR A UNIT. WE WANTED TO PUT IT WHERE IT WOULD DO SOME GOOD AND HELP THE MOST PEOPLE.” - SHERRIE AND ALAN CONOVER

performed the surgeries. The Conovers credit all three doctors and their teams with saving Alan’s life. “I don’t think there are any better people anywhere,” Alan says. In the months following his transplant, the couple started talking about how they could show their gratitude and appreciation to their doctors and nurses at Houston Methodist. “We don’t have any children,” Alan explains. “And this will do more good for more people.” Despite his illness, Alan keeps his sense of mischief about him and notices weekly improvement in his health. He proudly shows a photo of a much heavier Alan Conover patting a sleeping cheetah on a refuge in Africa. “That was me before I went on the Ghobrial diet. I don’t recommend it,” he says.

Even when asked about the incredible and unexpected bequest, Alan responds that since they have no children, he didn’t really want to leave the money to his pets’ veterinarian when he passes. He has great one-liners and likes to make people laugh. But he and Sherrie also show a deep joy for the moment – a sincere appreciation for life that many people seem to overlook. “Each day as it comes,” Sherrie is fond of saying. They truly enjoy a delicious meal together, and they laugh a lot. They revel in the company of good friends and family, laughter and shared memories. Most of all, they love to board the J. Pinckney Henderson for their next journey together, letting their lives roll with the rhythm of the rails.


from Medical breakthroughs typically take decades and billions of dollars to make it to market. Thousands of these projects languish in the process, along with many patients they could have helped. Houston Methodist’s Translational Research Initiative (TRI), a first-of-its-kind program focused on speeding potentially lifesaving treatments from the laboratory to patients’ bedsides, is poised to change this forever. The TRI combines the passion of philanthropy with an expedited research model, launching one of the most innovative research strategies ever undertaken. Nearly 50 bold entrepreneurs are on board as Founding Members of the TRI and already have established an invest30

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

DISCOVERY

ment pool of more than $8 million toward a $10 million goal. Fueled by a generous matching challenge, each Founding Member’s investment is double its face value in a unique blending of science, industry, business and entrepreneurism. Founding Members are risk takers looking to make medical breakthroughs a reality. “Translational research is based on the single most important goal: efficiently and effectively finding real treatments, medical devices and cures that improve and save lives, and getting them to patients as quickly and safely as possible,” says Mark Houser, chair of the Houston Methodist Research Institute Board of Directors. “Our TRI is a game changer.”


to

RECOVERY

Philanthropy has always been a cornerstone of medical advances and gives stability to medical research, Houser explains, adding that the Houston Methodist TRI model builds a bridge between the separate worlds of discovery and translation. The TRI focuses on advancing research to human clinical trials in a few years rather than the typical decades. Thirteen projects were submitted for the first round of TRI Awards, and four were selected for funding. Houston Methodist’s TRI awardees are pioneers in their fields, and all are conducting translational research with global implications, working to develop the following: • A test that predicts which patients will have the

best outcomes after liver transplant • A portable magnetic stimulation helmet that can reactivate brain function in stroke patients • A simple blood test that accurately and quickly diagnoses TB and other infectious diseases • An imaging probe that detects recurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma in patients without symptoms “There’s something different about Houston Methodist – there’s a real culture of innovation here,” says Rod Canion, co-founder and former CEO of Compaq Computer Corp., head of the TRI external advisory group that screens projects and a member of the Houston Methodist Research Institute board. houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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CONGRATULATIONS RECIPIENTS to our

1. Xian Li, PhD, and R. Mark Ghobrial, MD, PhD, are developing a test that predicts which patients will have the best outcomes after liver transplant.

2. Tony Hu, PhD, is developing a simple blood test that accurately and quickly diagnoses TB and other infectious diseases.

3. Meixiang Yu, PhD, is developing an imaging probe that reports recurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma without patient symptoms.

4. Santosh Helekar, MD, PhD, and David Chiu, MD, are testing a portable magnetic stimulation helmet that can reactivate brain function in stroke patients.

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


The head of Freeport LNG, a generous industry contributor to TRI, views his company’s participation as a valued partnership. “Freeport LNG is proud to be part of this farsighted translational research strategy, and we look forward to the leverage these initial projects can build for more groundbreaking developments to come,” says Michael S. Smith, chairman and CEO of Freeport LNG.

TRI’s first projects are underway:

1.

Principal investigators Drs. R. Mark Ghobrial and Xian Li, and biostatistician Dr. Beverly Shirkey, have developed a DNA-based test that can predict which patients are at risk for sepsis to prevent futile liver transplants. A patent is pending for their testing platform.

2.

Working with co-investigators Drs. Edward Graviss and Xuewu Liu, Dr. Tony Hu has developed a simple, accurate TB blood test that works in four hours rather than four to eight weeks. He is testing the platform on TB/HIV co-infected blood samples. (See page 14.)

3.

Dr. Meixiang Yu has invented a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probe that can detect Hodgkin lymphoma relapse before symptoms appear. Developed with co-investigators Drs. Youli Zu and Swaminathan Iyer, the imaging tool can also monitor therapeutic response for treatment.

4.

Drs. Santosh Helekar and David Chiu are testing a portable, wireless magnetic stimulation helmet – invented by Dr. Helekar and Weill Cornell Medicine – that shows promise in restoring some motor function in stroke patients. TRI funding will advance their project to a 30-person pilot clinical trial, and a patent on the device is pending. (See page 42.)

THANK YOU TO THE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH INITIATIVE FOUNDING MEMBERS Edward R. Allen III and Chinhui Juhn Carolyn J. and Robert J. Allison Jr. Family Foundation Shahla and Hushang Ansary Steven D. Arnold Everett E. and Randee K. Bernal Leslie and Jack S. Blanton Jr. John F. III and Ann H. Bookout Drs. Julie and Marc Boom Cathy and Giorgio Borlenghi Maria and Neil Bush Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation Cam and Rod Canion Alice and Roderick Ciaccio The Cockrell Foundation Estela and David A. Cockrell Janet and Ernest H. Cockrell Stephanie and Ernest D. Cockrell Carol Cockrell Curran and Richard B. Curran Christy and J. Webb Jennings Laura Jennings Turner and John A. Turner Roberto and Claudia Contreras Dr. Veronica Selinko-Curran and Michael F. Curran Martha and Andrew DeBusk Nancy and Jack Dinerstein Juliet Ellis and West Griffin Lesha and Tom Elsenbrook Clayton and Shel Erikson Patti and Richard Everett Clara and Mauricio Fabre Paola and Mauro Ferrari Freeport LNG Development, L.P. Kathy and Greg Geib E. J. and Wilda Grivetti Jes and John Hagale Terence and Henrietta Hall Robert A. Hay Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Houser Kimberly and Kyle Hranicky Invesco Cathy and Mel Jodeit Rosemarie Johnson and Matthew L. Johnson Fadila and Paal Kibsgaard Colleen and John Kotts The Mehta Family Foundation Dharmesh Mehta Jainesh Mehta Nisha Mehta Rahul Mehta Midway Foundation Claudia and Brad Freels Wendy and Ben Moreland Libbie and Greg Nelson Scurlock Foundation Lynne and Jim Vanderhider Lisa and John Walker Walter Oil & Gas Corporation through the generosity of Paula and Rusty Walter and Carole and Jim Looke Kay and Ewing Werlein Jr. Patti and Paul Yetter Kelley and Donald Young Founding Members as of February 20, 2016. For more information on how to become a Founding Member, please visit houstonmethodist.org/tri or call 832.667.6194.


MAKING LIFE BRIGHTER FOR PATIENTS WITH

Z HEIM ER‘S L A

Debbie and Jack Moore and Wendy and Bill Chiles have known each other for years, primarily through Jack’s and Bill’s connection in the energy business. However, when both families were touched by Alzheimer’s and dementiarelated disorders, they joined forces in support of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at Houston Methodist. The Chiles’ connection with the Nantz Center began when they heard Dr. Gustavo Román speak. When Wendy started having concerns about her mother, she brought her to Houston Methodist where her diagnosis was confirmed, and innovative, compassionate treatment began. “My mother is remarkably better under Dr. Román’s care,” explains Wendy. “It’s personal for us now. Supporting the Nantz Center is our passion.”


Their passion was further sparked when the Moores and Chiles learned of the Alzheimer’s imaging and drug repositioning research taking place at Houston Methodist. Working in collaboration, Dr. Joseph Masdeu is using neuroimaging to study the role of beta amyloid and tau in the progression of the disease while Dr. Stephen Wong is applying intensive drug repositioning analysis to test existing drugs for efficacy in the treatment of the disease at various stages. “We deeply appreciate the help Houston Methodist has given to patients and families already affected by Alzheimer’s,” says Bill. “Of course, our hope is that the work of Drs. Masdeu and Wong will produce a cure within our lifetimes that will benefit our friends, families and others who face Alzheimer’s.” In October 2015, the couples hosted a special luncheon featuring CBS Sports commentator and

co-founder of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, Jim Nantz, and developments in the field. During the event both the Chiles and Moores announced significant matching commitments. “We are so blessed to have the Nantz Center here in Houston,” says Jack. “This work is exciting and encouraging. These discoveries have the potential to transform Alzheimer’s care.” Following their gift announcement, the couples challenged their friends, colleagues and community leaders to lend their support as well. “My family has been personally touched by this disease. We hope getting more people involved will create momentum to advance treatments, further prevention and ultimately develop a cure,” says Debbie. Visit nantzfriends.org to support the Nantz National Alzheimer Center and join Nantz Friends.

Pictured left to right: Jack and Debbie Moore, Wendy and Bill Chiles


The Society for Leading Medicine is an exceptional group of leaders who meet for special events – from formal occasions to sports gatherings. The funds they raise help keep Houston Methodist on the leading edge of medicine.

BLACK

WHITE

TIE COAT

P I C T U R E D L E F T TO R I G H T:

E D DY A N D K E L L I B L A N T O N , C A B R I N A A N D S T E V E N O W S L E Y

N E X T PA G E : D R . J U L I U S B A LO G H A N D D R . S TA CY S M I T H


The Society for Leading Medicine, Houston Methodist’s annual giving program, raised $2.1 million in 2015 and grew to include 488 members, making it a powerful philanthropic force for the hospital’s education, research and clinical care programs. “The Society is unique in that it brings together groups of people from all ages and backgrounds with one common denominator: garnering recognition that Houston Methodist is leading medicine in all disciplines,” says Kelli Blanton, co-chair of The Society, who works together with her husband Eddy, and friends Cabrina and Steven Owsley, to spearhead the group. An annual giving program comprised of an exceptional group of community leaders with enthusiasm and dedication to Houston Methodist, The Society engages members through fun and educational events such as the Houston Texans Family Fun Day and member appreciation parties. Since its inception just three years ago, The Society has raised $5.78 million to support priority programs at Houston Methodist. In 2015, The Society supported the Houston Methodist Community Scholars, Department of Spiritual Care and Education chaplaincy program and an endowed scholarship program that allows residents and fellows

to explore innovative, leading-edge health care projects. “The Society Scholars program helps mold the next generation of physicians who will care for our families and our community, which is a truly priceless gift,” says Cabrina Owsley. Two of this year’s Society Scholars, Dr. Stacy Smith, a fellow in neuro-ophthalmology, and Dr. Julius Balogh, a resident in general surgery and elected chief resident of patient care and quality improvement, are participating in two significant health care initiatives. As a Society Scholar, Dr. Smith is collaborating with hospital administrators to improve transitions in patient care, while Dr. Balogh is working with program engineers to design and implement EPIC, a technologically advanced electronic medical record program. As the chief resident for EPIC design, Dr. Balogh is working with programmers to improve physician communication and continuity of care by tracking inpatient transitions. “This is an excellent time to be involved with Houston Methodist,” Dr. Smith says. “The scholars program is young and fluid, but it grants us the opportunity to develop projects under the leader- ship of prestigious physicians who have a tremendous amount of experience.”

The Society for Leading Medicine memberships start at $1,000 annually and include invitations to unique events as well as facilitated access to health care. To join, visit houstonmethodist.org/thesociety or contact Amanda Harris at 832.667.5813.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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Renewed Life.

Cancer clinical trial puts Evelyn Daves in remission and savoring life with her grandchildren.

Evelyn and Ralph Daves with their grandkids: Ethan, Laine and Caleb Meriwether 38

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


January 2015 was a month of dark days for Evelyn Daves and her husband Ralph. They spent more time in Houston Methodist Hospital than they did in their Kingwood home. Her diagnosis with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, had left her blood levels dangerously low. She fought blood infections, required numerous transfusions and couldn’t visit her young grandchildren because the disease left her susceptible to infections of every kind. There were times her family thought they might lose her. A year later, Evelyn is diseasefree, her blood levels are normal, her chromosome abnormalities gone. For Dr. Swaminathan Iyer, the Cockrell Center for Advanced Therapeutics (CCAT) medical director, Evelyn’s case is a landmark example of realizing the promise of medicine. “She’s one of the defining moments for me,” Dr. Iyer says. “The medicines are only part of the story. It’s the attitude, the convictions, and it comes from getting your mind, body and spirit together. This is a testimony to the Daves’ faith.” Each year since 2009, Houston Methodist has received a generous gift from The Cockrell Foundation toward an endowment that supports CCAT. The program fosters

innovation, research and advanced improvements in patient care – with the ultimate goal of using science and medicine to benefit humanity. CCAT started its Phase I clinical trials unit in 2015; its first patient was Evelyn Daves. When Dr. Iyer first suggested that Evelyn could be a good candidate for an international multicenter clinical trial of GDC-0199 and Obinutuzumab, the Daves put it in God’s hands. If the clinical trial was approved for CCAT and she was accepted, they’d give it 100 percent. It was a difficult and intense clinical trial, requiring drug ramp-up, constant blood draws and monitoring – it virtually takes over a patient’s life. The CCAT Phase I unit became their home. “I had a pretty rough go of it,” Evelyn says. But the commitment was worth the effort. Ralph meticulously logs the numbers and tracks Evelyn’s progress, and they are prompt for every follow-up appointment. She has renewed energy, and the couple can enjoy their grandchildren again and look forward to life and a future. “There’s never a guarantee,” Evelyn says. “No one can be given a clean bill of health from cancer. But I’m so thankful that I feel good enough to play with my grandchildren, and I just hope and pray that I continue to be cancer-free.” Of the five patients in the GDC-0199 clinical trial, three are in remission and the drug combination has shown no side effects. Visit houstonmethodist.org/research/clinical-trials for more information about CCAT and clinical trials which are now available at Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital, Houston Methodist West Hospital and Houston Methodist Primary Care Group – Pearland.


FAITH IN ACTION

As the Rev. Mark Klein waited at Houston

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

Methodist Hospital for a heart transplant, he often made his way slowly to the Dunn Tower lobby, wheeling his heart balloon pump. There in the hospital’s main public gathering spot lives a piece of artwork that inspires hope and tranquility, a 7-foot-tall bronze


sculpture called ‘Jesus – The Great Physician.’ The compelling figure shows Jesus healing a sick woman who kneels before him. Rev. Klein visited the sculpture whenever he had the strength. “It really spoke to me,” he recalls. “It reminded me that the Lord wants to heal us.” After receiving a new heart in July 2013, Rev. Klein

and his wife Jacqueline took stock of the multitude of miracles along his pathway to restored health and wanted to give something back to their Lord and Savior and to Houston Methodist. They remembered the power of the sculpture and it dawned on them – just as ‘Jesus – The Great Physician’ spoke to him, “I know the statue speaks to others,” he says. The Kleins gave a generous gift for the fabrication of a replica statue at Houston Methodist St. Catherine Hospital, one of Houston Methodist’s newest community hospitals. It was blessed in its new home in March 2015. Three months later, the Kleins pledged another sculpture for Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital, which will open in 2017. “They are reminders to everybody where the healing comes from,” Rev. Klein says. “We are so honored and thankful – I’m here today because of faith and medicine.” The Klein’s generous gifts honor a Houston Methodist tradition of faith that goes back to the hospital’s inception and was brought to life when the original statue was created by sculptor Wei Li “Willy” Wang. It was erected as a memorial to longtime board member W.R. “Randy” Smith, who had dreamed of having such an enduring reminder of Christ’s healing ministry displayed in the main lobby of the hospital. Smith’s friends, led by current Board Chair Ewing Werlein Jr., gave generously for the original gift in Smith’s memory. The two sculptures made possible by the Kleins bring the total number to eight. Besides the original artwork in Houston Methodist’s flagship hospital, reproductions of ‘J esus – The Great Physician’ are featured in the lobbies of Houston Methodist San Jacinto, St. John, Sugar Land, Willowbrook and West hospitals. For Rev. Klein – a patient who flat-lined and saw angels wing-to-wing around his hospital bed – the statues represent the daily miracles that sprout from faith-based medicine.


GIVING BACK

RUSTY WALTER EXPERIENCED A DEVASTATING STROKE -AND RESPONDED WITH GREAT COURAGE AND GENEROSITY.

Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter III was at the peak of his life in December 2013. He’d just finished a hunting trip in West Texas and enjoyed a 5-mile run before his flight home to Houston. At 56, he was in top physical shape and, just two months before, received a stellar annual health report.

As he boarded his plane, the pilot – a longtime friend – stopped him. Rusty didn’t look right. They went to a nearby emergency room, where a brain scan confirmed life-altering news: Rusty had suffered a massive stroke. Physicians administered tPA (tissue plasminogen activator), the only FDA-approved treatment for an acute stroke. A helicopter sped him home to Houston Methodist Hospital and Dr. David Chiu, director of the Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center.

“It was a surreal time,” Rusty recalls. The probable cause of the cardioembolic stroke was traced to atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat, and a combination of bad circumstances – high altitude, dehydration and thickening blood that formed a clot in the brain’s right hemisphere. “It could have easily killed me,” Rusty says. “I’m lucky to be alive.”

once came easily. An independent, motivated man, Rusty depends on caregivers to help him with basic tasks. He works at rehabilitation up to 30 hours a week, focusing on dexterity, like picking up corks for a half hour at a time. Improvements come in small increments, but each one counts.

“It’s literally like a lightning strike,” Dr. Chiu says. “The term ‘stroke’ connotes that sudden attack of neurological impairment. A stroke can affect every function of the brain, striking at the heart of what it means to be a human being. It can affect anybody – nobody is exempt.”

oilman and president and CEO of Walter Oil & Gas Corp., Rusty’s life before the stroke was intense, productive and generous. He and his wife Paula devoted much of their time to giving back to Houston institutions through board service, volunteer work and philanthropy. At Houston Methodist, Rusty was board chair for the Houston Methodist Research Institute, where the couple had just committed a challenge gift that launched the

The stroke severely weakened Rusty’s entire left side and his walking. He has spent the last two years working to restore movements that

As a third-generation Houston

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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$10 million Translational Research Initiative (TRI) to help speed medical discoveries from the research laboratory to patients’ bedsides.

Today, his life remains as productive and generous as before, but his intensity is even greater as he and Paula dedicate themselves to finding better treatments for what has become a global health epidemic and one of the leading causes of serious disability among adults.

Rusty already has participated in two promising clinical trials under the watchful eye of Dr. Chiu. The day of his stroke, he became one of 129 patients nationwide in a multicenter adult stem cell trial. He also participated in a clinical trial for transcranial magnetic stimulation, a non-invasive treatment that uses a magnetic field to stimulate the brain and correct imbalance caused by the stroke.

Dr. Chiu calls Rusty his hero. “He’s had just the right amount of not only motivation, but an appreciation of the science. He’s a remarkable man.”

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Rusty and Paula also gave a

The Walters believe that Rusty

generous gift to launch the Coordinated Stroke Initiative (CSI) and Stroke Stem Cell Research Program. Their challenge grant was immediately matched by Lynn and Oscar Wyatt, a longtime Texas oilman who suffered a stroke in 2008.

is alive today because he “was in the hands of great people making great decisions.” His bonds with Houston Methodist go back to his boyhood when his father Joseph C. Walter Jr. served 21 years on the board. His father also received a lifesaving heart transplant at Houston Methodist Hospital, which was renamed the J.C. Walter Jr. Transplant Center in his honor following a generous 2010 gift from Rusty and his sister, Carole Walter Looke.

“It’s an incredible show of support,” Dr. Chiu says. “They recognize a crying need for improved treatments, improved prevention, improved modalities of recovery and stroke rehabilitation. I’m extremely grateful that Mr. Walter and Mr. Wyatt and their families contributed to this effort.”

The CSI will allow Houston Methodist, which treats more than 1,000 stroke patients annually, to offer endovascular mechanical clot retrieval therapy to stroke patients who meet the criteria and can get to the hospital quickly. The Walter/ Wyatt gift will also allow the development of a state-of-the-art stroke registry, which is expected to generate a wave of stroke research.

The couple take life one day at a time, relying on the prayers and sensitive care of family and friends, which is their sustaining force and a priceless gift, Paula says. Rusty considers himself a better person today. “You realize what really counts,” he says. “It’s not about self. It’s about others. I want to live longer for my family.” When Rusty returned home after one and a half months of hospitalization following his stroke, a big sign paraphrasing Winston Churchill greeted him: “Never, never, never give up.” It remains his daily motto.


PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT: SANTOSH HELEKAR, MD • DAVID CHIU, MD DAVID McCANE • STANLEY H. APPEL, MD

RUSTY’S MEDICAL TEAM COLLABORATES ON HIS CARE, MAKING A HEROIC FIGHT FOR HIS RECOVERY. GIVING BACK


RENDEZVOUS

GENEROUSLY PRESENTED BY THE HONORABLE AND MRS. HUSHANG ANSARY AND CORPORATE PRESENTING SPONSOR WEATHERFORD, RENDEZVOUS WITH HOUSTON METHODIST WAS HELD ON NOVEMBER 12, 2015, AT THE HILTON AMERICAS – HOUSTON.

Through the leadership of exceptional chairs and pioneering honorees, Houston Methodist’s biennial fundraising gala was a remarkable success, raising $2,587,401 for research, education and patient care in the system’s seven hospitals. Chairs Cam and Rod Canion and Elizabeth and Peter Wareing guided Rendezvous with Houston Methodist to its record-setting achievement, which was announced to the 1,300-plus crowd by Houston Methodist President and CEO Dr. Marc L. Boom.

Event chairs Peter and Elizabeth Wareing and Cam and Rod Canion

The gala was highlighted by recognition of four honorees who have made an indelible mark on Houston Methodist and the history of health care in our community — Emily A. Crosswell, the John S. Dunn Foundation, Occidental Petroleum Corporation and Sanford I. Weill. They were celebrated by their friends, family and closest colleagues in a video presentation introduced by master of ceremonies, FOX 26 morning anchor Melissa Wilson. The evening also featured a special interview with former Houston Astro Jed Lowrie. Honoree Sanford I. Weill, Drs. Julie and Marc Boom, Jed and Milessa Lowrie and Dr. Antonio M. Gotto Jr.

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


Representing honoree Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Patricia and Steve Chazen, Vicki Hollub and Glenn Vige

Lisa Stone, honoree Emily Crosswell and David Stone

Presenting sponsor Hushang Ansary, honoree Sanford I. Weill and Ewing Werlein Jr.

Representing corporate presenting sponsor Weatherford, Monica and Brent Emerson

Honoree John S. Dunn Foundation represented by Eva Lynn and Steve Dunn

Visionary level sponsors Donald and Kelley Young houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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SPECIAL EVENTS

PEAK PERFORMANCES | JULY 16, 2015 Cam and Rod Canion, Nancy and Jack Dinerstein and

Lesha and Tom Elsenbrook hosted Peak Performances – a three-part event featuring a golf tournament, Food for Thought cooking class and special evening reception. The Grand Rounds Golf Open presented by Bayou City Capital, L.P. was championed by “caddies” Clayton Erikson, Denise Monteleone and Dr. Veronica Selinko-Curran. Pictured: Tom and Lesha Elsenbrook, Jack and Nancy Dinerstein, Rod and Cam Canion, Drs. Marc and Julie Boom

THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE APPRECIATION EVENT | FEBRUARY 11, 2015 The Society

for Leading Medicine’s members gathered at inaugural chairs Estela and David A. Cockrell’s beautiful home to applaud another year of generous support. The evening celebrated 2014 membership gifts which raised $2,098,348 for Houston Methodist. Pictured: David A. and Estela Cockrell, Drs. Julie and Marc Boom

THE CALLING TO PEBBLE BEACH | JUNE 12 – 14, 2015 Courtney and Jim Nantz hosted The Calling to Pebble Beach, a three-day star-studded event featuring a food and wine golf outing and special dinner honoring Arnold Palmer. All proceeds benefited the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at Houston Methodist. Pictured: Jim and Courtney Nantz, Arnold Palmer, Clint Eastwood and Christina Sandera, and Dr. Stanley Appel

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


WOMEN’S EVENT | JANUARY 21, 2015 Hosted by Elaine Finger,

Joyce Haufrect, Cissie Kaplan, Judy O. Margolis, Jane Parker and Rosalie Ravkind, the 2015 Women’s Event honored Drs. Eric Haufrect, Alan Kaplan and Keith Reeves. The event raised $90,000 for the Alan L. Kaplan, MD Chair in Obstetrics and Gynecology which was completed through the generosity of 171 contributors in June 2015. More than 250 guests enjoyed a keynote address by Lisa Ling, executive producer and host of “This is Life” on CNN, followed by breakout sessions featuring a variety of health topics and lunch with Houston Methodist physicians. Pictured: Jane Parker, Joyce Haufrect, Rolaine Abramson, Cissie Kaplan, Dr. Alan L. Kaplan, Rosalie Ravkind and Judy O. Margolis

NIGHT AT THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE | OCTOBER 27, 2015

The Society for Leading Medicine members enjoyed a hands-on evening featuring nanotechnology, science, engineering and medicine. Pictured: Elliott David, son of honorary executive committee members Isabel and Danny David, conducting an electroplating experiment with graduate research fellows Thomas Geninatti and Laura Pandolfi

JACK S. BLANTON SR. EYE INSTITUTE DEDICATION | APRIL 16, 2015

In 2015, the Houston Methodist Department of Ophthalmology became the Jack S. Blanton Sr. Eye Institute, named in his memory to encourage trailblazing research, education and clinical care programs. Pictured: Jack S. Blanton Jr., Ginger Blanton, Elizabeth Wareing and Eddy Blanton Sr.

PRESIDENT’S LEADERSHIP COUNCIL ANNUAL MEETING | OCTOBER 21, 2015 Dr. Marc Boom and chair Greg Nelson

hosted the second annual President’s Leadership Council meeting. The evening included the State of the System address by Dr. Boom, a special presentation by Dr. Michael Reardon on the latest advances in heart disease treatment and dinner with Houston Methodist physicians and scientists. Pictured: Christine Underwood, David Underwood – President’s Leadership Council Patient Experience Committee Chair, and Sarah Underwood houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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2015

YEAR IN REVIEW TOTAL COMMITTED

9.15

% INCREASE IN FUNDRAISING OVER 2014

$44,449,952

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TRI FOUNDING MEMBERS THE SOCIETY GREW TO

488

MEMBERS UP FROM 352

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


INCOME SOURCES

69% INDIVIDUALS 13% FOUNDATIONS 2% ORGANIZATIONS  16% CORPORATIONS

& BUSINESSES

2,944 GIFTS

2,366

TOTAL UNIQUE DONORS

MANY THANKS


LEADERSHIP

Houston Methodist Board of Directors Ewing Werlein Jr., Chair John F. Bookout, Senior Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President and CEO Carlton E. Baucum, Vice Chair Gregory V. Nelson, Vice Chair Elizabeth Blanton Wareing, Secretary Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter III, Treasurer Robert K. Moses Jr., Asst. Secretary Mary A. Daffin, Asst. Treasurer Emily A. Crosswell Martha DeBusk Gary W. Edwards Juliet S. Ellis Ron A. Gentry, MD Mark A. Houser Bishop Janice Riggle Huie Rev. Kenneth R. Levingston Vidal G. Martinez W. Benjamin Moreland Thomas J. Pace III, DMin Joe Bob Perkins C. Richard Stasney, MD, President of the Medical Staff Spencer A. Tillman David M. Underwood Jr. Stephen Wende, DMin Advisory Todd W. Trask, MD, President-Elect of the Medical Staff Rev. B.T. Williamson Life Members Ernest H. Cockrell James C. Dishman Charles W. Duncan Jr. Connie M. Dyer Isaac H. Kempner III Sandra Gayle Wright, EdD, RN

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

Houston Methodist Research Institute Board of Directors Mark A. Houser, Chair John F. Bookout, Senior Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President and CEO, Houston Methodist Mauro Ferrari, PhD, President and CEO, Houston Methodist Research Institute Elizabeth Blanton Wareing, Vice Chair Ernest D. Cockrell II, Secretary Steven D. Arnold John F. Bookout III Timothy B. Boone, MD, PhD Giorgio Borlenghi Joseph R. “Rod” Canion Albert Y. Chao John P. Cooke, MD, PhD Dan O. Dinges Joe B. Foster Laurie H. Glimcher, MD Antonio M. Gotto Jr., MD, DPhil Catherine S. Jodeit Evan H. Katz Rev. Kenneth R. Levingston Vidal G. Martinez Gregory V. Nelson Stuart W. Stedman Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD Martha S. Walton Ewing Werlein Jr.

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Board of Directors John W. Johnson, Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President and CEO Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter III, Vice Chair Emily A. Crosswell, Secretary Morrie K. Abramson John F. Bookout Michael M. Cone Charles W. Duncan Jr. John S. Dunn Jr. Marvy A. Finger Raleigh W. Johnson Jr. Vidal G. Martinez Robert K. Moses Jr. David M. Underwood Jr. James V. Walzel Elizabeth Blanton Wareing Ewing Werlein Jr.

President’s Leadership Council

Senior Cabinet Gregory V. Nelson, Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President and CEO Robert J. Allison Jr. Eva C. Bisso Kelli L. Blanton Stephen I. Chazen David A. Cockrell Clayton Erikson Daniel M. Gilbane Eric J. Haufrect, MD John W. Johnson David Kinder John P. Kotts William Gentry Lee Jr. Michael C. Linn Rahul B. Mehta Cynthia Pickett-Stevenson Veronica Selinko-Curran, MD Steven D. Stephens Douglas E. Swanson Jr. David M. Underwood Jr. Franco Valobra Kelley C. Young Members Dorothy M. Ables Gina B. Andrews Arch “Beaver” Aplin III Judson E. Bailey Matthew K. Baird Jonathan Baksht E. William Barnett Seth M. Barrett Janice H. Barrow James R. Bath Vicki L. Baucum Bruce R. Bilger Eddy S. Blanton Ginger Blanton Kenneth E. Breaux George M. Britton Jr. John R. Butler Jr. P. Embry Canterbury Carl M. Carter III Gerardo A. Chapa Muffin M. Clark M. Scott Cone Claudia Contreras Paula D. Criel James W. Crownover Isabel G. David Ray C. Davis Scott A. Davis Denis A. DeBakey Lavonne C. DeBakey, PharmD, RPh Joann P. DiGennaro Nancy S. Dinerstein Francoise A. Djerejian David R. Dominy William J. Doré Jr. Celia J. Dupré Gina Eandi, RN Jenny Elkins W. Lawrence Elliott Danielle Ellis

Thomas L. Elsenbrook Ann H. Elvin Jerry E. Finger* Jeffrey H. Foutch Elizabeth Ghrist Kate H. Gibson Linda C. Gill William E. Gipson Marc P. Gordon Billy Harrison Laura Laux Higgins Vicki A. Hollub Lou Houser Mary F. Johnston Jo Ruth Kaplan Steven J. Kean William E. King Thomas C. Knudson George J. Kostas Linda G. Lykos Jeffrey E. Margolis Judy E. Margolis Dale L. Martin George M. Masterson John M. McCormack Andrew McCullough Jr. Mary Ann McKeithan Denise D. Monteleone Joel L. Moore Rick L. Moore W. Benjamin Moreland Loretta B. Moses Mason L. Mote Eugene A. O’Donnell Cabrina F. Owsley Jane L. Parker Frank D. Perez Rick J. Perez Nicholas A. Phillips Michael J. Plank Douglas R. Quinn Melanie Rothwell Scott E. Schwinger Ward Sheffield L. E. Simmons Glenn R. Smith Sue H. Smith Betty A. Sommer Cullen R. Spitzer Alan L. Stein Henry J.N. “Kitch” Taub II Marcy E. Taub Tadd Tellepsen Duncan K. Underwood Tony Vallone Richard E. Wainerdi, PhD, PE Karen D. Walker Dancie Perugini Ware W. Temple Webber III Scott Wegmann Robert A. Yekovich, DMA Paul Yetter Faculty Advisors Bobby R. Alford, MD Eric H. Bernicker, MD Neal G. Copeland, PhD Robert E. Jackson, MD Christof Karmonik, PhD Daniel E. Lehane, MD Alexandria T. Phan, MD Keith O. Reeves, MD Valentina Ugolini, MD


Houston Methodist Neurological Institute National Council Gary W. Edwards, Chair Kate H. Gibson, Co-Chair Morrie K. Abramson James R. Bath Everett E. Bernal Randee K. Bernal Eddy S. Blanton Ginger Blanton John F. Bookout J. David Cabello William E. Chiles Robert H. Graham Billy Harrison Mary F. Johnston Elise Joseph Thomas C. Knudson Gregory A. Kozmetsky James W. Oden Cabrina F. Owsley Leon M. Payne Arthur A. Seeligson III Donna S. Stahlhut Roxane R. Strickling Henry J.N. “Kitch” Taub II Anne G. Thobae Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD Dancie Perugini Ware Elizabeth Blanton Wareing W. Temple Webber III

Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center Council Connie M. Dyer, Chair Cynthia Pickett-Stevenson, Co-Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President and CEO Robert J. Allison Jr. Seth M. Barrett J. Denny Bartell Kenneth E. Breaux John R. Butler Jr. P. Embry Canterbury Carl M. Carter III Gerardo A. Chapa Mary A. Daffin Ray Davis Denis A. DeBakey Lois DeBakey, PhD Joann P. DiGennaro William J. Doré Jr. William J. Doré Sr. Danielle Ellis Eva K. Farha William E. Gipson Marc P. Gordon Miguel A. Hernandez Jo Ruth Kaplan William E. King Cynthia G. Kostas George J. Kostas Carole E. Looke John M. McCormack Mason L. Mote Frank D. Perez Douglas R. Quinn Valentina Ugolini, MD Tony Vallone Elizabeth Walter

Center for Performing Arts Medicine Advisory Board

Houston Methodist Cancer Center Task Force

Robert E. Jackson, MD, FACP, Chair C. Richard Stasney, MD, Founder Bobby R. Alford, MD E. William Barnett Janice H. Barrow Ginger Blanton Anthony K. Brandt, PhD Albert Y. Chao Evan D. Collins, MD James W. Crownover Lavonne C. DeBakey, PharmD, RPh Francoise A. Djerejian Deborah K. Duncan Gina Eandi, RN Victor Fainstein, MD Jerry E. Finger* Jeremy Finkelstein, MD J. Todd Frazier Robert Freeman, PhD Elizabeth Ghrist Susanne M. Glasscock Carole J. Hackett Richard L. Harper, MD Eric J. Haufrect, MD Patricia P. Hubbard Christof Karmonik, PhD Tom Krouskop, PhD, PE Michael W. Lieberman, MD, PhD Sharon Ley Lietzow Judy E. Margolis Vidal G. Martinez Hoyt T. “Toby” Mattox Edwards U. McReynolds, MD Rev. Charles R. Millikan, DMin James M. Musser, MD, PhD Nicholas A. Phillips Patricia Rauch Keith O. Reeves, MD L.E. Simmons Jerome B. Simon Lois F. Stark Ron Tintner, MD Laura Jennings Turner Kevin E. Varner, MD Richard E. Wainerdi, PhD, PE Margaret Alkek Williams Aline Wilson Ed Wulfe Robert A. Yekovich, DMA

Dorothy M. Ables Jud Bailey Carin M. Barth Vicki L. Baucum Daphne Bernicker Scott A. Davis Ann H. Elvin Lou Houser Alan Kaplan, MD Cissie Rauch-Kaplan Christine Lukens Dale Martin Peggy D. Martin Maryanne W. McCormack Rick Moore Loretta B. Moses Jane L. Parker Glenn R. Smith Betty A. Sommer Faculty Advisors Eric H. Bernicker, MD E. Brian Butler, MD Jenny Chang, MD Neal G. Copeland, PhD Nancy A. Jenkins, PhD Daniel E. Lehane, MD Alexandria T. Phan, MD Bin S. Teh, MD Stephen Wong, PhD, PE

Houston Methodist Concussion Center Task Force J. D. Bucky Allshouse Chris Canetti Jennifer Davenport Howard S. Derman, MD Jace Duke Theron Enns Heather Firestone Terry Lohrenz, PhD Ken Podell, PhD Margaret D. Reppert Jamey C. Rootes Barry D. Warner

Lynda K. and David M. Underwood Center for Digestive Disorders Task Force Jim Braniff Pedro L. Duran-Gomez Carol F. Fondren Robert E. Fondren Jay H. Golding Duncan K. Underwood Brock L. Wagner Karen Wagner

Houston Methodist Liver Center Task Force Paula D. Criel Burt H. Keenan Lawrence W. Kellner Linda G. Lykos Eugene A. O’Donnell * In loving memory

IN MEMORIAM

Nathaniel “Nat” S. Rogers 1919-2016

Houston Methodist lost a life member of its Board on February 22, 2016. Former President of First City National Bank of Houston, Nathaniel “Nat” S. Rogers was a board member for 25 years from 1971 to 1996, at which time he was elected as a Life Member of the board. Nat provided strong financial leadership that helped shape this institution’s stability, growth and reputation for quality. His business acumen was integral to his service on the executive, investment, real estate and employee pension and trust committees. Nat passed away in Mississippi and is survived by his wife of 73 years - Helen, a daughter, two sons, eight grandchildren and five great-grandsons. The Houston Methodist family is grateful for Nat’s many years of dedication and leadership. His wisdom and experience made Houston Methodist stronger through his presence.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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IN MEMORIAM

David M. Underwood 1937–2015

ON AUGUST 30, 2015, Houston Methodist lost its longestserving board member and one of its most trusted guiding lights when David M. Underwood passed away surrounded by family in his Houston home. A WISE AND VISIONARY LEADER, David ably carried on the legacy of his grandparents, Walter W. and Ella F. Fondren, steering Houston Methodist on a track of keen financial stewardship as it evolved into one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers. He served on the Board for 52 years, chairing the Finance Committee and Houston Methodist’s first fundraising campaign, which raised $212 million for patient care, education and research. His remarkable record of service led to the 2013 naming of the David M. Underwood Board Room in Dunn Tower. Furthermore he instilled a great appreciation of Houston Methodist in his children: David M. Underwood Jr. carries on his father’s legacy as a member of the Houston Methodist Board of Directors, while son and daughter-in-law, Duncan and Sarah Underwood, are members of The Society for Leading Medicine Honorary Executive Committee. In addition, David promoted and enhanced the quality of health care throughout the Texas Medical Center, where he served as TMC Board of Directors chairman for 23 years. During that time, the world’s largest medical complex expanded from 24 to 56 member institutions. DAVID GRADUATED FROM YALE UNIVERSITY and was a broker/adviser for many years, including several at Underwood Neuhaus & Co., Inc., and most recently in his profes-

sional role as managing director of Wells Fargo Advisors. He served in leadership positions with the National Association of Securities Dealers, the Securities Industry Association and the Texas Stock and Bond Dealers Association. He also served as president, director and CEO of his family company, Feliciana Corporation. He was a captain in the U.S. Army Reserve, earning the Army Commendation Medal for distinctive service while at Fort Polk during the Berlin Crisis. HE DEFINED PHILANTHROPY AT ITS BEST, faithfully supporting Houston Methodist and many other Houston institutions with his time and resources. His, his grandparents’ and his extended family’s generosity – both personally and through the Fondren Foundation – established a long list of Houston Methodist hallmarks, including the Fondren Tower; Sue Trammell Pavilion, also known as Fondren 12; the Fondren Presidential Distinguished Chair at the Houston Methodist Research Institute; the Walter W. Fondren III Distinguished Chair at the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center; The Fondren Foundation Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program; and the Lynda K. and David M. Underwood Center for Digestive Disorders. INTEGRITY AND PROFOUND KINDNESS permeated David’s character. He also was known for his wonderful sense of humor, his tender-heartedness, his faith and his love for his family, including Lynda, his wife of five decades, and his three children and nine grandchildren. Houston Methodist has lost a treasured member of the family and one of the brightest lights in the institution’s nearly 100-year history.

Friends and colleagues remembered David Underwood with generous gifts to Houston Methodist in his memory. As the Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Magazine went to press, more than 150 gifts have been made in support of the David M. Underwood Lung Transplant Lecture Fund.

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


LE T T ER F R OM OUR CHA IRM A N Each year we provide this report to those who contributed to Houston Methodist’s success in leading medicine. Our focus is to feature the best of what philanthropy is – from highlighting the motivations of those who have made gifts to the opportunities for new discoveries which will provide life-changing treatments for patients. In 2015, Houston Methodist lost a cherished leader and dear friend with the passing of David M. Underwood. (See at left.) His chairmanship of our first modern-day fundraising campaign was paramount to its success, raising $212 million. We will forever be grateful for his devoted leadership and benevolent support. Since the Leading Medicine, Giving Hope campaign conclusion in 2012, Houston Methodist has received more than $100 million in philanthropic support. This tremendous growth is a testament to how much the patients we serve, their families and our community appreciate what Houston Methodist does. This year I was honored to become chairman of the Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Board of Directors, following John F. Bookout’s 23 years of service in that capacity. Mr. Bookout’s inspiring leadership and philanthropic spirit have transformed the future of academic medicine for Houston. On behalf of the Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Board, I express our deepest gratitude for his commitment, vision and generosity. Thank you also to the individuals, families, foundations and corporations who have given generously to enable us to reach new heights. In addition, I extend my appreciation to the dedicated boards, councils and task forces who give of their time, energy and support to Houston Methodist. Your commitment enhances our ability to continue leading medicine.

JOHN W. JOHNSON, CHAIR

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Board of Directors

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

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SNEAK PEEK

A new 366-bed inpatient tower is under construction on the Houston Methodist Hospital campus in the Texas Medical Center. The tower will include 102 ICU beds, expanded OR suites, hybrid suites and a dedicated cardiology floor with 14 inter-

CREDITS

ventional catheterization labs.

Executive Director: Susan Coulter, JD Managing Editor: Katelyn Furman Editors: Katie Lipnick, Denny Angelle, Nathan Cernosek, Patti Muck, Mallory Rogers, Amir Safi Writers: Patti Muck, Nathan Cernosek, Mallory Rogers, Robin Phillips Art Director & Designer: Karen Holland , Richards/Carlberg Photographers: Terry Vine, Robert Seale, Jeff Fantich, Richard Carson, Jenny Antill Illustrators: Jim Salvati, Matt Cook, Bruce Morser

If you wish to have your name removed from Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation correspondence, please call 832.667.5619, email donor@houstonmethodist.org or write to Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation, P.O. Box 4384, Houston, Texas 77210-4384.

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Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


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1707 Sunset Boulevard Houston, Texas 77005 832.667.5816

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Houston Methodist 2015 Foundation Magazine  
Houston Methodist 2015 Foundation Magazine