Page 1


contents LETTER FRO M CEO 2 COVER STORY HOPE FOR THO SE WITH BREAST CA NCER ON COVER: PATIENT BARBARA BLO UGH 4 PEAK CENTER 12 FIG HTING MEMO RY LOSS 18

4 12

DI G ESTIVE DIS O R DERS 24

32 38

LIVIN G PR OOF 30 REGENER ATIVE MED ICINE 32 FAMILY TIES 38 NAV IGATOR CARE P R O GRAM 44

24

THE SO CIETY 46

44

SPECIAL EV ENTS 52 RENDEZ VOUS IN BLUE 54 IN ME MO RIAM 56 LEAD ER SHIP 58 CHAIR MAN’S LETTER 59

30

46 houstonmethodist.org/foundation

1


2

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


Last year, The Methodist Hospital System became Houston Methodist. Our new name tells the rest of the country that our Houston-based hospital system is

leading

medicine and becoming a national presence. A new identity is merely one of the many reasons I am excited by what the future holds. Without question, we see a

growing demand for more Houston Methodist services. Because of this, we are increasing the number of operating rooms in the Outpatient Center and outpatient facilities for the Houston Methodist Cancer Center, at our primary teaching hospital in the Texas Medical Center. We are

expanding to The Woodlands, constructing a

third patient tower in Sugar Land and a new West building, and we have acquired St. John in Clear Lake and St. Catherine in Katy. We are continuing our strategy of

opening

stand-alone emergency centers in Sienna Plantation, Pearland and Fulshear. Houston Methodist is still successful in recruiting the brightest physicians and scientists in the country. Of course, everything we do leads back to

focusing on the patient, and your continued

support makes it all possible. Philanthropy plays a vital role in achieving our vision. Every contribution, big or small, has the potential to impact patients -–now and for generations to come. I cannot thank you enough for your generosity and your role in

elevating

Houston Methodist to a level that is on par with the best academic medical centers in the country.

MARC BOOM, MD PRESIDENT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER HOUSTON METHODIST

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

3


Barbara Blough WAS TREATED FOR BREAST CANCER BY HOUSTON METHODIST ONCOLOGISTS AND SURGEONS. “EVERYONE CA RED ABOUT HOW I FELT. THEY WERE SO KIND AND THEY WOULD JOKE AND LAUGH WITH ME AND TELL ME I HAD THE RIGHT ATTITUDE .”

4

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


THE

HOPE OF LIFE AFTER

BREAST CANCER When Barbara Blough discovered

surgery as soon as possible. The

refused to accept her as a patient

the quarter-sized lump in her breast

problem was, she had no health

unless she cashed in her entire

in spring 2012, she immediately

insurance. Blough, who works as

State of Texas education system

suspected something was wrong.

a b u s d r i v e r f o r t h e Fo r t B e n d

retirement account, which would have

There’d been a history of breast

Independent School District, had

required her to pay a 30 percent early

cancer in her family, so she visited

an option to obtain health insurance

withdrawal penalty.

her doctor for a mammogram. He

through her employer. But she had

sent her for a second mammogram

not signed up because the deduction

way to The Rose, a nonprofit breast

and biopsy. The news that came back

from her paycheck would have left

care center that provides screening

was not good: inflammatory, triple

her short of money to pay for her

and diagnosis for women regardless

negative breast cancer.

house note and her daughter’s

of their ability to pay. A savvy patient

college tuition.

navigator at The Rose in turn referred

she says of her initial reaction to the

her to the Denver Harbor Clinic,

diagnosis. “I wanted my daughter to

entered the catch-22 of the American

where Houston Methodist oncologists

finish college. I knew she would drop

health care system; she did not make

Dr. Angel Rodriguez and Dr. Jaime

out and come home to take care of

enough money to easily afford health

Mejia run a weekly breast-health

me if she found out.”

insurance, but she made too much

clinic serving the predominantly

Blough needed an oncologist,

money to qualify for Medicaid. She

Hispanic, low-income residents of the

chemotherapy treatment and possibly

says another health care institution

eastside Houston neighborhood.

“I didn’t tell anybody at first,”

At the age of 47, Blough had

Fortunately, Blough found her

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

5


THE

BEAUTY

OF GENEROSITY

Dr. Rodriguez quickly confirmed

every chemo treatment,” says Barbara.

designated as a primary care facility

the diagnosis, outlined a course of

“Everyone at Houston Methodist cared

for Houston Methodist’s family medicine

treatment and recommended that Blough

about how I felt. They were so kind and

residents, physicians who have completed

apply for the charity care program

they would joke and laugh with me and

medical school and who plan to specialize

overseen by Houston Methodist. Once

tell me I had the right attitude.”

in the practice of family medicine. Located

her grant application was approved,

she started presurgery chemotherapy.

began, Barbara Blough is officially in

Harbor Clinic serves a Fifth Ward

A few months later, Blough underwent a

full remission.

population estimated at 28,000, virtually all

mastectomy of her right breast and lymph

“We are both excited, and I am

of whom are uninsured and about three-

nodes; the surgery was conducted by

cautiously optimistic about her prognosis,”

quarters of whom are eligible for Medicaid.

Dr. Barbara Bass, Houston Methodist’s

says Dr. Rodriguez, who also serves as

John F. and Carolyn Bookout Distinguished

director of Houston Methodist’s Triple

Hospital expanded the partnership through

Endowed Chair of Surgery.

Negative Breast Cancer Clinic. (Triple

the creation and management of the

negative is a form of breast cancer in

Denver Harbor Breast Clinic.

Foundation endowment, Houston

which there is no expression of estrogen

Methodist provided care for Blough,

receptors, progesterone receptors or

County’s population underserved, we hope

including her mastectomy, chemo-

Her2/neu. There are currently no approved

that this program will be the beginning of

therapy and further treatments.

targeted therapies for these types of

a concerted effort to bring breast cancer

The surgery was followed

cancer cells, though Dr. Rodriguez says

screening to the whole population,” says

by more chemotherapy, administered

clinical studies are in progress.)

Dr. Jenny Chang, director of Houston

under Dr. Rodriguez’s supervision at

Houston Methodist Cancer Center.

ship with the Denver Harbor Clinic

Methodist has a multidisciplinary

“My niece, Peggy, went with me to

dates back to 2006, when it was

breast center, one of the few in Houston

6

Through a generous Cullen

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

Now, a year after her treatment

Houston Methodist’s partner-

in a converted taco cantina, the Denver

In 2011, Houston Methodist

“With at least 30 percent of Harris

Methodist Cancer Center. “Houston


accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers, and we strive to offer the best breast care to all our patients.”

The program is supported by

grants from the Susan G. Komen® -Houston Affiliate, the Avon Foundation for Women and the American Cancer Society.

“The American Cancer Society

is proud to provide funding and support to Houston Methodist and specifically their screening and early detection efforts through Denver Harbor,” says Betti Guzman, senior director of community engagement for the American Cancer Society. “Women like Barbara deserve quality care and access to receive it. Supporting patients and programs like this through Houston Methodist ensures women like Barbara have their health care screening needs taken care of.”

Dr. Rodriguez wa s pa rt o f a N I N T E R D I S C I P L I N ARY t e a m t h aT p r o v ided B a r b a r a B l o u g h w i t h C O N T I N u i t y OF C AR E THROUGHOUT H E R E N T I R E TR E ATM E N T PRO C E SS .

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

7


The grants are written by Dr. Mejia, director of hematology and oncology clinical research and development.

“The comm i tment is from

the entire team,” D r. Mejia s ays. “I couldn’t do anything if it was not for Houston Methodist. The current focus is on healthy women, giving them education and mammograms. The next step is to focus on patients who are deemed to be at high risk.”

In spring 2013, at the Avon

Walk for Breast Cancer Houston, the Avon Foundation awarded Houston Methodist with a $100,000 safety net grant to go toward expenses at the Denver Harbor Breast Clinic.

“We’re pleased to be able to fund

access to mammograms at the Denver Harbor Clinic’s Breast Health Initiative, as well as a bilingual patient navigator,” says Marc Hurlbert, executive director of the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade.

Dr. Mejia SAYS O F T H E D E N V E R H A R B O R C L I N I C P R O G R A M : “OUR FOCUS IS O N GIVING WOMEN EDUCATI ON AND MAMMOGRAMS.”

8

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


THE

JOYOF

HEALTH

RESTORED “Our grant will help patients like

saving lives and ending breast cancer

Hallelujah!” and Dr. Rodriguez echoes her

Barbara Blough get the much needed

forever and this partnership allows us

words. At Dr. Bass’s recommendation,

breast cancer care they need.”

to continue that promise. Through the

she is currently exploring options for

Breast Health Initiative, the Denver Harbor

reconstructive surgery.

and Mejia, since its opening, the Denver

Clinic is serving a high-risk, underserved

Harbor Breast Clinic has provided

population with little access to health

Danyell graduated from Lamar

mammograms to hundreds of women

care services. This collaboration makes

University in Beaumont and returned to

who had never before received one.

it possible for those patients to receive

Houston. Concerned the cancer might

Many factors contribute to health care

life-saving breast health screening and

someday develop in Danyell, Houston

disparities among the poor, including

support that they wouldn’t otherwise

Methodist ran a test to determine if

awareness, education and access to

be able to afford.”

Barbara’s cancer was genetic.

health care, as well as time to be seen by

For her part, Barbara Blough

a physician, time for diagnostic tests, time

is extremely thankful she found Dr.

I was so relieved I cried in the doctor’s

for treatment and access to clinical trials,”

Rodriguez, the Denver Harbor Clinic

office,” Barbara says.

says Dr. Rodriguez. “With these grants,

and Houston Methodist.

we are able to address all of the above.”

its generous contributors, that same genetic

and I believe Dr. Rodriguez was placed

counseling is now available to all patients at

to be able to fund the work with the

there for a reason,” she says. “Without

the Denver Harbor Breast Clinic.

Houston Methodist breast health

him, Dr. Bass and Houston Methodist’s

program at Denver Harbor,” says Adriana

special program, I probably wouldn’t be

M. Higgins, EdD, executive director of

here today. They saved my life.”

To learn more or schedule an appointment with the

Susan G. Komen® -- Houston Affiliate.

Houston Methodist Cancer Center, call 713.790.2700

“Komen Houston is committed to

Barbara shouts, “I’m cancer-free!

According to Drs. Rodriguez

“It is our honor and privilege

“I have a lot of faith in God,

Now, at each follow-up visit,

In May, Barbara’s daughter

“When they told me it wasn’t,

Thanks to Houston Methodist and

or visit houstonmethodist.org/cancer.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

9


THE

INSPIRATION

OF A REMARKABLE LIFE F R O M T H E T I M E E M I LY H E R R M A N N W A S DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER IN 1998, SHE QUIETLY D ED ICATED HERSELF TO H ELPING OT H E R S W I T H CA N C E R . H E R L E GACY O F H O P E L I V E S O N AT H O U S T O N M E T H O D I S T A S T H E E M I LY H E R R M A N N C A N C E R R E S E A R C H LABORATORY CONTINUES ITS GROUNDBREAKING TRANSLATIONA L RESEARCH AND INNOVAT IVE PATIENT TREATMENTS.

10

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


Six years after Emily’s death, her family, friends and

Led by internationally acclaimed oncologist Dr. Jenny

former workplace colleagues at Walter Oil & Gas gathered

Chang, the lab’s research team is pioneering new treatment

at the research lab in December 2013 to celebrate her

protocols and investigating potential cures. Projects include

life and launch another fundraising initiative to establish

an implantable drug delivery system for breast cancer

the Emily Herrmann Chair in Cancer Research. The new

prevention therapy, an insertion of “suicide” genes against

chair will recognize a distinguished cancer researcher,

breast cancer stem cells using photothermal nanoblades

support the latest in medical education through visiting

and utilization of state-of-the-art microfluidics technology

lectureships, provide seed funds for innovative research

to prevent triple negative breast cancer metastasis.

projects and further strengthen the momentum toward

discovering new medications, treatments and cures.

and Frank W. “Billy” Harrison and Carole and Jim Looke,

“I have no doubt that the breakthrough research

pledged $500,000 in matching gifts for this latest initiative

taking place at Houston Methodist will lead to advances

to create the Emily Herrmann Chair in Cancer Research.

in cancer therapy,” says Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter, Emily

It is the next big step in developing the research laboratory

Herrmann’s close friend and the generous benefactor whose

and breakthroughs in cancer care.

company helped create the Emily Herrmann Cancer Research

Laboratory at Houston Methodist shortly before her death.

loving wife and a dedicated mother. She is survived by her

“I am hopeful that these advances will eventually lead to a cure

husband of 24 years, Mike, and children Daniel, John and

for a disease that claims so many lives each year,” says Rusty.

Suzann. Throughout her 10-year battle with breast cancer,

Emily maintained her strength, humor and dignity and prayed

The lab opened in 2011 thanks to a generous gift from

Rusty Walter and his wife Paula, along with Ann

Emily was beloved by many as a wonderful friend, a

Walter Oil & Gas and through the largess of Rusty Walter and

for progress in the quest to understand and treat cancer, at

his sister, Carole Walter Looke. Emily Herrmann worked for

one point saying: “I will continue to pray that a cure will

Walter Oil & Gas for 20 years, and as treasurer and controller

be found soon and that the [Houston] Methodist Cancer

was a strong force in the company’s growth and success.

Center will be instrumental in finding it.”

EMILY HERRMANN (1953-2007)

“M Y O N C O LO G I S T T O L D M E T H AT E A C H P E R S O N ’ S B AT T L E W I T H

C A N C E R I S D I F F E R E N T A N D H A S T O B E D I L I G E N T LY F O L LO W E D A N D WAT C H E D . H E A L S O T O L D M E T H AT A P O S I T I V E AT T I T U D E WA S I M P E R AT I V E I N C A N C E R T R E AT M E N T A N D S U RV I VA L . I S O O N R E A L I Z E D T H AT A B AT T L E W I T H C A N C E R WA S B I G G E R T H A N I WA S , S O I I M M E D I AT E LY T U R N E D M Y B AT T L E O V E R T O G O D A N D E N T R U S T E D M Y C A R E A N D G U I D A N C E T O H I M .”

Rusty Walter challenged others at the lab’s opening

to join in advancing cancer research, and Walter Oil & Gas pledged to match any gifts, dollar for dollar, to fund high-

To learn more about the Emily Herrmann Chair for Cancer Research, or to

impact research projects. This initial effort far surpassed

make a gift, visit houstonmethodist.org/Emily.

expectations, raising $350,000 that was used as seed funding for innovative projects, all with the potential to yield significant results in the battle against cancer. houstonmethodist.org/foundation

11


HOUSTON METHODIST KENNETH R. PEAK CENTER F O R B R A I N A N D P I T U I TA R Y T U M O R T R E AT M E N T AND RESEARCH

12

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


T H E C E N T E R I S U N I Q U E I N M A N Y W AY S .

CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCHERS IN NANOT E C H N O L O G Y, G E N E T H E R A P Y, N E U R O C H E M I S T R Y, S T E M C E L L T E C H N O L O G Y AND GENETICS ARE WORKING SIDE-BYSIDE WITH WORLD-CLASS CLINICIANS INCLUDING NEUROSURGEONS, NEUROLO G I ST S , R A D I AT I O N O N C O LO G I ST S , M E D I C A L O N C O L O G I S T S A N D R E H A B I L I TAT I O N SPECIALISTS TO PROVIDE PERSONALIZED C A R E F O R E A C H A N D E V E R Y PAT I E N T.

THANKS TO THE GENEROSITY OF KENNETH AND DONNA PEAK, THE CENTER PROVIDES I N D I V I D U A L I Z E D C A R E T O PAT I E N T S W I T H B R A I N , S P I N A L A N D P I T U I TA RY T U M O R S A N D OT H E R B R A I N A N D P I T U I TA RY D I S O R D E R S T O D E V E L O P P E R S O N A L I Z E D T R E AT M E N T NEVER BEFORE THOUGHT POSSIBLE.

D R . D AV I D S . B A S K I N ( L E F T ) , DIRECTOR OF THE PEAK CENTER, WITH RESEARCHER MARTYN SHARPE

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

13


Institute. The diagnosis was not

to a n a l y z e t h e e n t i r e g e n e t i c

and respected member of Houston’s

good; Peak had a very aggressive

m a k e u p o f t h e t u m o r. We t h e n

oil community, had not been feeling

tumor called a glioblastoma that had

took every chemotherapy agent

like himself. A disciplined runner,

spread throughout major portions of

known to man, tested them to

he’ d been both e red by weakness

his brain.

see what worked, then combined

on one side of his body that was

all this informati on to design a

making it difficult for him to keep up

have been measured in days to

highly specialized treatment. At

his routine.

weeks. After st andard treatments

on e p o i n t i n t i m e , w e e v e n u s e d

failed, Dr. B askin and his team

superselective microcatheters

Baskin, vice chair and residency

explored additional novel technologies

t o d e l i v e r ch e m o t h e r a p y d r u g s

program director of Houston

that are still in development.

d i r e c t l y i n t o t h e b r a i n ’s b l o o d

Methodist Hospital’s Department of

vessels that were actually feeding

Neurosurgery and a senior member

sending his tumor tissue to

the tumor at the stem of his brain,”

of the Houston Methodist Research

four major genetic laboratories

Dr. B askin explains.

Kenneth Peak, a prominent

He went to see Dr. David

His survival would normally

“In his case, it meant

D R . D AV I D S . B A S K I N , K E N N E T H P E A K ’S NEUROSURGEON, USED THE MOST A D VA N C E D T R E AT M E N T S T O E X T E N D M R . P E A K ’S L I F E .

14

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


As a result of a number of treat-

ments, Peak’s tumor shrank considerably over the course of the next several months,

2 4 / 7 PAT I E N T - F O C U S E D C A R E

and he was able to remain mentally alert and physically functional.

The Kenneth R. Peak Center for Brain and Pituitary Tumor

Treatment and Research provides patients immediate access

“Mr. Peak was a very smart man,”

says Dr. Baskin. “This was a man who ran

and around-the-clock care. Patients’ personalized treatment

major companies. He motivated people as

plans are tailored to their unique conditions, with access

soon as he walked into the room. He was a

to ongoing national brain cancer protocols, as well as novel

master at organizing new ideas and quickly

research projects unique to Houston Methodist.

creating successful ventures. He realized that this was an extraordinary effort.

“We had long conversations

along with his wife Donna, who is an incredible woman. She has a PhD in biochemistry and was 101 percent upto-date with everything we were doing. She has a tremendous understanding of

A team of dedicated, knowledgeable and compassionate caregivers provide an unprecedented and comprehensive continuity of care. The team considers every aspect of a patient’s treatment, from the individual genetic makeup of each patient’s tumor, drug side effects, the important role of nutrition and emotional concerns, considering alternative therapies as appropriate.

molecular biology. One could have very

Technological advances and protocols under development and in

high-level scientific conversations with

use at the Peak center include:

her and get new ideas, like speaking

• Minimally invasive endoscopic brain surgery to remove

with a senior research colleague. Donna

pituitary and other skull base tumors through a patient’s nostril,

was instrumental in helping to design

sparing intensive recovery from traditional open surgery

and execute Mr. Peak’s personalized treatment, and brought a creative scientific outlook to the table during our many discussions.”

At one point, Kenneth asked Dr.

Baskin if the kind of out-of-the-box treatment he was getting was available for everybody. Dr. Baskin replied, “We do the best we can,

• Immune therapy and tumor vaccines made from the patient’s own tumor, to use the immune system to kill cancer cells • Robotic nanosyringes that inject chemotherapy directly into cancer cells, sparing healthy ones • Smart bombs that selectively deliver chemotherapy to a cancer cell’s mitochondria, thus killing the cancer’s energy source And that’s just the beginning of what is possible in the Peak center.

and we do very well. But in order to deliver this

Visit houstonmethodist.org/peakcenter for more information

on a larger scale, it’s always been my dream

about clinical trials and to view patient stories. If you have

to build a brain tumor center and to have

questions about the Peak center or would like to schedule

a whole bevy of people available for

an appointment, please call 713.441.8500 or email Dr. Baskin

each and every patient -– multispecialty

at dbaskin@houstonmethodist.org.

doctors, caregivers, nurse practitioners, research scientists -– a combined effort to try to bring this to the next level.” houstonmethodist.org/foundation

15


In the end, the best medical science

and cancer treatment options. It will give patients

available in the world could not save Kenneth

access to novel research studies not available

Peak. He passed away in April 2013 at the

elsewhere. Investigational therapies include

age of 67. But before he died, he and Donna

immunotherapy, nanosyringes for drug delivery,

made a $10 million commitment to Houston

mitochondrial chemotherapy “smart bombs,”

Methodist to establish the Kenneth R. Peak

stem cells, gene therapy, genomic, proteo-

“I T’S A LW AY S B E E N

Center for Brain and Pituitary Tumor Treatment

nomic and DNA profiling, and high throughput

MY DREAM TO BUILD A

and Research. The Peak center, which is already

screening of every tumor to determine the

BRAIN TUMOR CENTER

up and running, should move into a beautiful

most effective course of treatment.

A N D T O H AV E . . .

new location before the end of 2015. It will

be housed in Houston Methodist’s state-of-

brain and spine, Dr. Baskin says the Peak center

the-art outpatient facility and will collaborate

will focus on cancers that have metastasized to

extensively with the Houston Methodist Cancer

the brain (usually from the breast or lung), as well

Center, under the direction of world-renowned

as pituitary tumors. While pituitary tumors are

breast cancer researcher Dr. Jenny Chang.

rarely malignant, they can cause blindness or

other life-threatening disorders due to hormonal

A C O M B I N E D E F F O RT TO T RY TO B R I N G T H I S T O T H E N E X T L E V E L .” D R . D AV I D S . B A S K I N

16

“Donna Peak was instrumental in this

In addition to tumors originating in the

gift,” says Dr. Baskin, “because Mr. Peak looked

changes, if they go untreated.

to her to explain to him what was going on. He

was a brilliant human being, and had an innate

devastating set of diseases,” says Dr. Baskin.

ability to grasp complex issues quickly. However,

“We are bringing together specialists from

understanding neuroscience and tumor biology

all over the world and, using state-of-the-

was like learning a foreign language to him, and

art technology, designing novel, personalized

Donna was his teacher. But Donna looked to him,

treatment for each patient, and when possible,

too, to make major decisions all along the way.

eradicating tumors and killing cancer.”

“When people have cancer, one

“Brain and pituitary tumors are a

Dr. Baskin, who began his medical and

sometimes sees the very worst in families, not

research career at Baylor College of Medicine

the best. Minor stresses turn into major rifts.

in 1984 and now is a professor of neurological

Personality differences become major issues.

surgery at Houston Methodist and the Weill

But not with the Peaks. This is a loving and

Cornell Medical College, emphasized that

wonderful family, who rallied together to fight

Houston Methodist is covering all of the

Ken’s cancer with their hearts, souls and

construction and operational costs, so that the

minds. The captain of the ship was Donna

gifts from the Peaks and other contributors will

Peak, with scientific brilliance and a profound

be devoted entirely to patient care and research.

love for Ken that one rarely has the privilege to

“Houston Methodist’s generosity is unusual in the

see. She idolized him to the last second.”

medical world, where such gifts almost always

have to support a portion of operational

In keeping with Kenneth Peak’s wish

for everyone to have access to the same kind of

costs for the institution. Their willingness to

care he received at Houston Methodist, the Peak

cover construction and infrastructural costs

center will offer personalized neurosurgical

leverages this gift and allows me to use all of

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


these funds for what they were

For a man who spends his days

gratitude for the gift he and Houston Methodist

intended for, with the operation of the

getting inside people’s heads, literally,

have been given by Kenneth and Donna Peak.

center supported by the hospital.

Dr. Baskin seems to have maintained the

ability to not take himself too seriously.

who had the worst of the worst, who we

unique, and know that each tumor has

Among the weighted volumes of scientific

really couldn’t help as much as we’ve helped

different genetic information and biological

research lining the shelves of his

so many people, could still have the vision,

behaviors. The Peak center will capitalize

Scurlock Tower office is a thin book called

foresight, compassion and commitment to

on these differences, starting with an

Your Brain on Cubs, documenting the

the Houston community to provide such

initial $5 million commitment to research

biochemical changes that apparently

generous support? Here’s a man who knew

which we hope will further our goal to

result from rooting for a team that has not

he was dying, but who made this gift to

provide personalized treatment using new

won the World Series in more than 100 years.

help others after him. It speaks volumes

technologies to achieve cure rates never

about him and his family, and sets a high

before thought to be possible.”

expresses his profound appreciation and

“We consider each patient to be

But he is not kidding when he

“How paradoxical is it that the man

bar for all of us to cure brain tumors.”

K E N N E T H P E A K WA N T E D OT H E R PAT I E N T S TO H AV E AC C E S S TO N OV E L R E S E A R C H ST U D I E S A N D O U T - O F - T H E - B OX I N V E ST I GAT I O N A L T H E R A P I E S .

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

17


fighting 18

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


IT IS HEARTBREAKING WHEN ALZHEIMER’S PATIENTS CAN NO LONGER RECOGNIZE THE FACES OF THEIR LOVED ONES. THE NANTZ NATIONAL ALZHEIMER CENTER AT HOUSTON METHODIST IS LEADING THE FIGHT AGAINST DEMENTIA, WITH CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH AND STATE-OF-THE-ART TRAINING FOR PHYSICIANS AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS.

memory loss houstonmethodist.org/foundation

19


“ ALTHOUGH I DON’T KNOW JIM NANTZ PERSONALLY, HIS DONATION IN HONOR OF HIS FATH ER INSPIRED ME TO DO SOMETHING SIMILAR FOR MY MOM.” -- BILLY HARRISON

Like many people with a family member suffering from Alzheimer’s

cells cannot be reversed. The good news is that research

disease, Frank W. “Billy” Harrison has seen firsthand how it can

breakthroughs have revealed that Alzheimer’s and other neuro-

erase a lifetime of memories. His mother has had Alzheimer’s for

degenerative diseases -– disorders that involve accelerated

many years, and she is now in its advanced stages. So, while

nerve cell damage or death -–appear to have similar underlying

Harrison understands that his mother’s disease cannot be

processes. These disease processes are at the core of

reversed, he decided to honor her in a another way.

Houston Methodist’s efforts to understand and combat

Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative disorders such as

Harrison learned about the Alzheimer’s research hap-

pening at Houston Methodist, so he made a contribution in his

Parkinson’s, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS/Lou

mother’s name to help further those efforts. The clinic space in

Gehrig’s disease), Huntington’s and others.

the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, where patients are seen by

their physicians, has been named the Pat Harrison Alzheimer’s

ment of an internationally acclaimed expert in neuroimaging,

Consultation Suites in Mrs. Harrison’s honor.

Joseph Masdeu, MD, PhD, which was made possible by a

generous gift from Bob and Annie Graham. Dr. Masdeu joins

“Houston Methodist has such a great reputation in

IMAGING EXPERT These efforts include the recruit-

research and in patient care, and I wanted to honor my

other Houston Methodist researchers, including Stephen Wong,

mom with a gift in her name,” explains Harrison, who is

PhD, PE, John S. Dunn Sr. Distinguished Endowed Chair in

the co-founder and co-owner of Houston Energy, L.P.

Biomedical Engineering, to continue the fight against Alzheimer’s.

who are you? “My mom is still living, but sadly, she is too sick to

“Research on Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative

come in to see the suites named for her. But for future gen-

diseases is coalescing around certain malformed proteins

erations, including my friends, family and the people of

that trigger damaging inflammatory processes in brain cells,”

Houston, I wanted to help take Houston Methodist to the

says Stanley H. Appel, MD, the Peggy and Gary Edwards

next level in Alzheimer’s research. It’s certainly one of the

Distinguished Endowed Chair and director of Houston Methodist

biggest health care challenges as our generation ages.”

Neurological Institute. “Neuroimaging allows us to study these

HOPE ON THE HORIZON Alzheimer’s disease

starts years before symptoms appear, and the damage to brain

20

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

disease processes at cellular and molecular levels in the brains of living people, so this is where Dr. Masdeu’s expertise comes in.”


houstonmethodist.org/foundation

21


EMMY AWARD-WINNING CBS SPORTS COMMENTATOR JIM NANTZ AND HIS WIFE COURTNEY PARTNERED WITH HOUSTON METHODIST NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE TO CREATE THE NANTZ NATIONAL ALZHEIMER CENTER. THEY HAVE MADE A GENEROUS LIFETIME COMMITMENT TO AGGRESSIVELY SUPPORT RESEARCH TO FIND A CURE FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AS A LASTING TRIBUTE TO JIM’S FATHER, JIM NANTZ JR., WHO BATTLED ALZHEIMER’S FOR 13 YEARS. PICTURED BELO W: JIM NANTZ AND HIS B E LOVED FATHER

To schedule an appointment at the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, call 713.441.1150. To learn more, visit nantzfriends.org.

22

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


GETTING THE PICTURE One of the keys to understanding

repurposed for other diseases in addition to the ones for

the disease process in Alzheimer’s appears to be beta amyloid –

which they were approved. “Instead of starting from

a microscopic protein fragment that is always present in

scratch looking for Alzheimer’s drugs, we work toward

the brains of people with Alzheimer’s but is absent in those

identifying drugs that we can reposition,” explains Dr.

without the disease. “The causes and effects surrounding

Wong. “That requires merging data from many sources,

beta amyloid and nerve cell damage are still unclear, but we

including neuroimaging and brain mapping information

believe that neuroimaging data is crucial to our ongoing

from Dr. Masdeu, longitudinal clinical patient data from

research,” explains Dr. Masdeu, who was most recently

Houston Methodist, public clinical trial and research data-

the senior staff physician in the Section on Integrative

bases, and drug screening and preclinical results from our

Neuroimaging at the National Institutes of Health. “For

Chao Center for B RAI N. Especially in the case of

example, using positron emission tomography (PET)

Alzheimer’s, computer modeling can accelerate the testing

scanning, we can measure exactly how much beta amy-

of potential drugs and cut years off the time it would take

loid is present, and exactly where it’s located in the brain.

to run drug trials on people and learn the results.”

We believe that collating these and other research data with

clinical findings will point the way to treatments that can stop

without proper financing, and the availability of funding from

Alzheimer’s before the damage starts. However, testing preventa-

government sources is steadily decreasing. This is just one of the

tive Alzheimer’s drugs is extremely problematic given the time lag

many reasons that philanthropy will continue to play a crucial role

of several years between the onset of the disease and the onset

in the ongoing research into neurodegenerative diseases.

of symptoms. This is where Dr. Wong’s expertise comes in.”

we will not forget

PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER Dr. Wong is

THE PATH AHEAD Of course, none of this happens

“Although I don’t know Jim Nantz personally, his

donation in honor of his father inspired me to do something

the founding director of the Ting Tsung and Wei Fong Chao

similar for my mom,” explains Harrison. “I will continue to support

Center for BRAIN (Bioinformatics Research and Imaging for

the Nantz National Alzheimer Center’s efforts in Alzheimer’s

Neurosciences). He is a world-renowned expert in bioinformatics,

research because it’s so important that we find a cure.”

a field of research that gathers massive amounts of biological

and biochemical information for various purposes, including

having good people and the right resources to put them to work,”

computer modeling. The goal is to create mathematical and

says Dr. Appel. “We have the ideas and we have the opportunity

“virtual” models of disease processes in humans, on which

here at Houston Methodist. I call it ‘pioneering the future of medical

experiments can be run.

care.’ We want to be practicing next year’s medicine today. But

we still need help from the friends of Houston Methodist to

Among Dr. Wong’s numerous projects with bioinfor-

“We cannot do all the research we need to do without

matics, one of the most promising is drug repositioning. This

support the kind of efforts that we think are going to make a

process uses huge databases and high throughput image

difference, because we know it will take a significant amount

screening to identify FDA approved drugs that could be

of work and resource investment to get there.” houstonmethodist.org/foundation

23


AS MANY AS 70 MILLION AMERICANS SUFFER FROM DIGESTIVE DISORDER S . THE LYNDA K. AND DAVID M. UNDERW O OD CENTER FOR DIGESTIVE DISORDERS AT HOUSTON METHODIST IS MAKING A CONCERTED EFFORT TO REMEDY THIS PROBLEM.

Between 60 and 70 million Americans suffer from

is a very long delay in the diagnosis, because people

digestive disorders. Many of these conditions are

are reluctant to complain about diarrhea or a change

highly treatable or curable. Yet, they often go

in their bowel habits.”

undiagnosed and untreated for one critical reason:

People are embarrassed to talk about them, even

early detection, the outlook for these disorders is much

to a medical professional.

improved, and there are many effective therapies now.

The main message, Dr. Quigley says, is that with

SOMETIMES TELLING YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT DIGESTIVE DISORDERS IS HARD TO STOMACH

The Underwood center, funded

by a generous gift from David and Lynda Underwood, was launched in May 2013. David Underwood is Houston Methodist’s longest-serving board member, vice chair and longtime chair of the finance committee. His leadership and keen financial stewardship helped establish Houston

Methodist as a financially secure, leading academic

Chair of Medicine in Digestive Disorders and

medical center. David, Lynda and their family have

co-director of the Lynda K. and David M. Underwood

faithfully supported Houston Methodist, giving

Center for Digestive Disorders at Houston Methodist,

generously of their time, expertise and philanthropy,

has spent most of his professional life researching

most recently to create the Underwood center.

“gut health.” He is the immediate past president of the

American College of Gastroenterology.

patient-focused care, which is done in an environment

Vital to the center’s effectiveness is the

“Colon cancer, which is one of the most

that fosters education, training and research. Through

common cancers in the United States, is largely

the Underwood center’s relationship with the Houston

preventable through screening and early detection,” Dr.

Methodist Research Institute, patients can become

Quigley says. “Yet, despite a lot of publicity, screening is

involved in trials of new therapies and diagnostics. The

far from complete across the population. There are a

Underwood center exemplifies Houston Methodist’s

lot of other disorders out there, such as irritable bowel

core mission of education, research and patient care.

syndrome and ulcerative colitis, that can be treated

very effectively, yet we know from research that there

provide enhanced care and research in this area, so

24

Dr. Eamonn Quigley, David M. Underwood

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

“Lynda and I saw a need in our community to


“PATIENT CARE IS DONE IN AN ENVIRONMENT T H AT F O ST E R S E D U CAT I O N , T R A I N I N G A N D R E S E A R C H . T H R O U G H L I N K AG E W I T H THE R ESEARCH INSTITUTE, PATI E NTS CAN BECOME INVOLVED IN TRIALS OF NE W THERAPIES AND DIAGNOSTICS.“

we’re grateful to have the opportunity to provide such

Distinguished Endowed Chair in Medicine at Houston

a service in Houston,” says Mr. Underwood, who also

Methodist. They in turn recruited Dr. Quigley.

serves as chairman of the board of directors for the

Texas Medical Center.

access to the best current care, but also to therapies

being developed and introduced to the clinic from

The Fondren Foundation Program for

Inflammatory Bowel Disease was established in December 2013 through a generous gift from The Fondren Foundation. This support enabled the creation of the program that is focused on fully integrated patient care, education and translational research in IBD. “We are pleased to continue our long tradition of supporting the important work of Houston Methodist,” says Robert E. Fondren of The Fondren Foundation. “The Underwood Center for Digestive Diseases and the

“This integrated approach not only ensures

our scientist and research partners,” Dr. Bass says.

RESEARCHERS

HUNGRY TO

FIND ANSWERS

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center will provide much

“Our hope is that it will be a one-stop treatment

needed research and support for those afflicted with

center for digestive disease and serve as a beacon

Crohn’s, colitis and other digestive disorders. The

for pioneering research and exemplary education

Fondren Foundation is proud to be a part of this

for gastroenterology professionals.” Adds Dr.

important effort to find a cure for these diseases.”

Robbins, “We are very grateful to David and Lynda

Underwood for allowing us to realize this vision.”

The Underwood center’s integration

of specialists -– including gastroenterologists,

Dr. Quigley says that medical science is

gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary surgeons, body

making rapid advances in the study of “microbiota,”

imaging radiologists and molecular pathologists -–

the microorganisms that inhabit the human digestive

is crucial to effective management of disorders of

system. “This is the hottest area in biological science

the digestive system. The center was founded by

at the moment,” he says. “We already know of several

Dr. Barbara Bass, John F. and Carolyn Bookout

instances where disturbances in the microbiota led

Distinguished Endowed Chair of Surgery, and

to disease stage, and where restoring the microbiota

Dr. Richard Robbins, Charles and Anne Duncan

can alleviate that disease stage.”

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

27


STUDYING “GUT FLORA“ OR “MICROBIOTA“ IS THE HOTTEST AREA IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE AT THE MOMENT, ACCORDING TO DR. QUIGLEY. HE SAYS, “RESTORING THE MICROBIOTA CAN ALLEVIATE DISEASE.“

The classic example is what happens when

One of the most controversial areas in the

we take antibiotics, says Dr. Quigley, and we’re

treatment of digestive disorders has been the subtle

learning more and more about changes in the

relationship between psychological and biological

microbiota that may well play a role in the causation

conditions. The Underwood center is pursuing an

or the continuation of diseases such as colitis,

integrative approach to treatment, working in

Crohn’s disease, fatty liver and other liver diseases.

tandem with dietitians from the Houston Methodist

MEDICAL ADVANCES

ON GUT FLORA ARE GROWING

“It’s not very far away when we will be able

to give specific therapies to modulate microbiota, to restore it to ‘normal’ and hopefully alleviate the

28

Wellness Center as well as evaluating psychological factors. For decades, doctors assumed that disorders originated in the patient’s mental state and then manifested physically. “I want to say very firmly that is not the case. There’s been a major shift away from that idea,” Dr. Quigley explains. He believes that Houston

Methodist’s ability to provide comprehensive care makes the Underwood center unique.

“The center’s state-of-the-art diagnostic

condition,” he says.

and therapeutic facilities and personnel set Houston

Methodist apart,” he says. “Gastroenterology and

Dr. Quigley works with biomarkers to

improve diagnosing irrit able bowel syndrome.

digestive surgery collaborate hand-in-hand with

“Right now, the only way we can diagnose irritable

imaging, pathology, allied diagnostics and other

bowel syndrome is by excluding other conditions that

disciplines. We have the ability to pull together a

might cause the same symptoms,” Dr. Quigley says.

whole range of diagnostic and therapeutic options

and to have those handled by people who really

“There has been a concerted effort to

identify physical changes, which might better

are experts in the field.”

identify patients with irritable bowel syndrome

For more information about the services available at the Underwood center, or to schedule

without several negative tests.”

an appointment, call 713.441.9770 or visit houstonmethodist.org/underwood-center.

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


LI VI N G P RO O F P R O F E S S I O N A L W E D D I N G P H OTO G R A P H E R H E AT H E R ST E R L I N G S U R V I V E D A R U P T U R E D B LO O D V E S S E L I N H E R B R A I N T H AT C O U L D H AV E B E E N FATA L . H E R E ’ S H O W S H E A N D H E R FA M I LY

From Cakes By Gina

ARE MOVING ON AND GIVING BACK.


When Heather Sterling moved back to Houston

in 200 9 after art school in Chicago, the

to normal, her parents considered ways to

headaches she’d been experiencing weren’t

show their appreciation. “Dr. Zhang’s bill

getting better. “I had just started my photog-

seemed minor compared to what he did for

raphy business,” recalls Heather, now 26.

us,” says Mrs. Oden. “When Jim (Tamie’s

“Late one night in January 2011, I experienced

husband) asked Dr. Zhang how we could

massive pain, like something fell on my head

help, Dr. Zhang said ‘research.’ Heather

from the ceiling.”

benefited from past research, so we hope

our contribution will help someone else.”

That was her last memory for several

As Heather’s life started returning

days. Heather had an arteriovenous malforma-

The Odens’ initial gift was matched by Jim’s

tion (AVM), a defect in a blood vessel in the

employer, Apache, and the Odens hope to

brain that ruptured. Fortunately, an astute

continue to raise more money.

paramedic recognized that Heather was

experiencing brain trauma. He re-routed the

helping Dr. Zhang find answers to difficult

ambulance to Houston Methodist Hospital,

questions about AVMs. “We’re trying to

where neurosurgeon Jonathan Zhang, MD,

understand why AVMs occur,” says Dr.

performed emergency, life-saving surgery to

Zhang. “We’re working on the physics and

remove the huge blood clot that had formed.

hemodynamics of blood vessels, research

Dr. Zhang eventually removed the entire AVM.

that incorporates advanced mathematics

and computer modeling.”

“Surgically removing the AVM reduces

The Odens’ gift will go toward

the chances of redevelopment,” explains Dr.

Zhang. “Since we don’t know the underlying

purpose, and we also have purpose for our

cause of AVMs, we will continue to monitor

giving,” says Mrs. Oden. “We plan to stay

Heather. If she ever develops another AVM in

involved with Houston Methodist, and con-

the years ahead, we’ll have even better tech-

tinue speaking on behalf of the hospital and

nology to treat it.”

Dr. Zhang.”

“There are many people to thank for

“We know Heather was saved for a

in California, and she often travels back to

the staff of the ICU, where Heather received

Houston to photograph weddings. But she

fabulous care from the moment she arrived,

knows her life has changed. “I have a new

and Dr. Zhang, who gave us confidence and

perspective on what’s really important to

Oden, Heather’s mother.

HEATHER STERLING AND HER MOTHER TAMIE ODEN

Currently, Heather lives and works

Heather’s survival, including the paramedic,

hope every day,” says Mrs. Tamie

JAMES ODEN, DIRECTOR APACHE CORP. AND HEATHER’S FATHER

me,” she admits. “Life is too short to worry about anything else.”

Y. JONATHAN ZHANG, MD, HOUSTON METHODIST NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE

For additional information or to schedule an appointment with the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, visit houstonmethodist.org/ni or call 713.441.3850.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

31


Regenerative Medicine 32

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


If an octopus loses an arm, the tentacle will grow back, or “regenerate.� Today, researchers at Houston Methodist Research Institute are discovering regenerative treatments to bring patients new hope for healing.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

33


The ideas sound like the stuff of a science fiction movie:

• A hydrogel that can be injected into an injured spine to regenerate bone tissue, similar to the way a salamander grows a new tail or a starfish grows a new arm.

• The use of “nanoscaffolds” –- imagine Russian nesting dolls made up of tiny nanoparticles, one inside the other –- to allow the reconstruction and recovery of nerve connections from the spinal cord to urological functions.

• A computerized exoskeleton that allows paraplegics to stand up and walk while directing the computer with their brain waves.

It is the Neuroregenerative

Medicine Program and the Regenerative Medicine Program at Houston Methodist Research Institute. And the time frame is not centuries in the future, but now, or very soon.

In 2013, The Cullen Trust for

Health Care awarded $3 million to establish

Dr. Tasciotti IS OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THE TIME IT WILL TAKE FOR NANOMEDICINE TREATMENTS TO PROGRESS FROM THE BENCH TO THE BEDSIDE.

the Regenerative Medicine Program. Two

for a robotics research collaboration

therapies and treatments for a host of

years earlier, in 2011, Houston Methodist

between the University of Houston and

diseases and conditions, and we look

was awarded a $500,000 challenge grant

Houston Methodist Research Institute.

forward to the pioneering work underway

from The Brown Foundation toward the

(See the story on page 37.)

by these brilliant researchers as they tap

launch of the Neuroregenerative Medicine

into the ability of cells and tissues to heal

Research Program. In 2013, the Cullen

forefront of the burgeoning field of

and defend themselves. This research

Foundation and The Institute for

regenerative medicine,” says Dr. Cullen

represents the future of medicine.”

Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR)

Geiselman, board chair with The Cullen

Foundation, through Mission Connect,

Trust for Health Care. “Regenerative

a start on these projects possible,”

awarded grants totaling $695,000

medicine holds great promise for new

says Dr. Robert Grossman, professor of

34

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

“Houston Methodist is at the

“A number of things have made


neurosurgery and Robert

the barriers to natural recovery, and

G. Grossman Chair in

based on those two factors, figure out

Neurosurgery. “First and

a way to facilitate the natural repair by

foremost, we appreciate

dealing with the barriers,” he explains.

the tremendous generosity

of The Brown Foundation,

involves the use of nanotechnology-–

The Cullen Trust for

nanoparticles are, in effect, a bridge

Health Care, TIRR

between bulk materials and molecular

Foundation, The Cullen Foundation and numerous others who have provided

Dr. Boone S AYS T H AT “T H E B E ST F O R M S O F R E PA I R A R E I N H E R E N T TO YO U R O W N B O DY.”

The program’s specific focus

structures -–for spinal cord repair and bladder reconstruction after a spinal cord injury (SCI). It is difficult to overstate the

funding for this leading-edge research.

and Dr. Ennio Tasciotti, associate

trauma that follows an injury to the spinal

We are truly grateful for their vision and

member, Houston Methodist Research

cord. SCI often results in the loss of

investment to make this work a reality.”

Institute, and co-chair, Department of

everyday neurological functions, causing

Nanomedicine.

varying degrees of motor, sensory,

Dr. Grossman says the timing

is right for other reasons as well.

“Neuroregeneration implies

bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction.

“The tremendous growth of computer

that there is some damage or

programming, with the miniaturization

injury to the nervous system

of electronics, and the development

that needs to be repaired,”

of molecular biology allow us to have

says Dr. Boone. “The best

a much better understanding of the

forms of repair are inherent to

structure and chemistry of the nervous

your own body.” Many things

system.” The Neuroregenerative

stand in the way of that

Medicine Program links three comple-

normal repair mechanism, Dr.

mentary components: spinal cord

Boone says. It’s particularly

injury and other neurological dis-

difficult in the nervous system,

orders; urological (bladder and

because the cells are less apt

kidney) dysfunction; and biomaterials

to regenerate centrally than

engineering and stem cell technology.

they are peripherally.

Dr. Grossman is joined by colleagues

Dr. Timothy Boone, chair of the Depart-

icine is trying to understand

ATLAS OF THE HUMAN SPINAL CORD, HELPING

ment of Urology at Houston Methodist,

the natural processes and

SURGEONS WITH NEUROREGENERATIVE THERAPY.

“Regenerative med-

Dr. Grossman

C R E AT E D A N A N ATO M I CA L

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

35


The adjustment to this stark new reality

says. “That discovery was made possible

he says. “In this case, with regenerative

brings with it a barrage of physical and

by an atlas of the human brain created in

medicine, the big advantage of nano

emotional challenges.

Germany. Until now, we have not had a

is that we can create materials that

similar atlas for the spinal cord.”

are closer to the actual architecture

priorities has been the creation of an

and structure of the tissues that we

anatomical atlas of the human spinal cord.

technology lab the clinical trials are taking

want to regenerate.”

The atlas is currently being prepared for

place, says he is optimistic about the time

publication, but it is available to surgeons

it will take for nanomedicine treatments to

trial in which bone tissue was successfully

who are engaged in human clinical trials

progress from the bench to the bedside.

regenerated in rats. Another revolutionary

for neuroregenerative therapy.

research project involved bone regenera-

of nanotechnology to the biomedical

tion in a sheep’s leg. By implanting a

forward in clinical trials involving the

arena, to problems that we couldn’t find

polymeric scaffold reinforcement in

injection of stem cells into the spinal

solutions for with current techniques,

the injured leg, researchers averted

cord,” he says. “You have to have an atlas

whether they are pharmacological or

amputation and the sheep was running

to know the exact position of where to

surgical,” Dr. Tasciotti says.

and walking normally within weeks.

Among Dr. Grossman’s top

“I think it will be a major step

inject, and how deep you should go.

“For example, we now know that

Dr. Tasciotti, in whose spinal

“Nanomedicine is the application

“Nanomedicine offers a lot of

Dr. Tasciotti points to a clinical

“Ten years ago, we would have been

Holy Grails, from the magic silver bullet

talking about science fiction,” he says.

Parkinson’s Disease can be treated with

that attacks the cancer cell and spares

“With the right team and the right

deep brain stimulation,” Dr. Grossman

the other tissues, to a lot of other fields,”

resources, we can solve these problems.”

OUR DEEPEST THANKS TO THE LEAD CONTRIBUTORS TO THESE PROGRAMS The Cullen Foundation The Cullen Trust for Health Care TIRR Foundation The Brown Foundation, Inc. The Society for Leading Medicine Becker Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. R. Drayton McLane Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William N. Mathis Harriet and Joe Foster Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. Selsberg Mr. Darrell Rosenthal E. J. and Wilda Grivetti Mr. Bobby K. Newman Shadywood Foundation Anonymous

Starfish can regrow limbs. For humanity, regenerative medicine is the “next evolution of medical treatments..” 36

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


REX In 2007, Dr. Eugene Alford, a respected

Jose Contreras-Vidal, PhD. It takes its

surgeon at Houston Methodist, was

name from its manufacturer, Rex Bionics

clearing brush on his family’s ranch in

of New Zealand.

Bellville, Texas, when a dead tree fell

on him, resulting in a severe spinal cord

bounds ahead of what they are doing in

injury. After months of intensive therapy,

surgery,” says Dr. Alford.

he eventually recovered well enough to

use a wheelchair and resume his surgical

purchased the latest version, nicknamed

practice, but his legs were permanently

NeuroRex, with the support of a grant

paralyzed.

from TIRR Foundation. “This version

has integrated circuitry that makes

Five years later, Dr. Alford walked

“Dr. Contreras is leaps and

Houston Methodist recently

into a room full of doctors and scientists at

it possible to communicate with

the Houston Methodist Research Institute.

our brain-machine interface (BMI)

He is still paralyzed from the waist down,

system based on a high-density scalp

but he is able to stand upright and move

electroencephalogram (EEG),” says

with the help of Rex, a robotic exoskeleton

Dr. Contreras.

that relies on an external brainwave/

machine interface.

improve and restore neurological functions

in individuals with spinal cord and brain

In other words, Dr. Alford thinks

“Facilitating research that will

about moving, and Rex moves.

injuries is what TIRR Foundation’s

neurotrauma research program, Mission

Rex is the result of a partnership

between Houston Methodist Research

Connect, is all about,” says TIRR executive

Institute’s Neuroregenerative Medicine

director Cynthia Adkins. “When you see

Research Program, under the direction of

a person who is completely wheelchair

Dr. Robert Grossman, and University of

dependent stand and walk, assisted only

Houston computer engineering professor

by the Rex, it is wonderful.”

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

37


FAMILY

TIES FOR GENERATIONS, THE BLANTON/SCURLOCK/WAREING

FAMILY HAS HELPED HOUSTON METHODIST

GROW AND THRIVE

1

It started with Eddy Scurlock and William Blanton, who served together on the board of The Methodist Hospital. Their children married in 1928.

38

MethodistHealth.com/Foundation


2

The late Jack S. Blanton Sr. and Laura Lee Scurlock Blanton, who died in 1999, were tireless supporters of Houston Methodist. Jack and his widow Ginger continued their involvement.

3

Jack S. Blanton Sr.’s three children continue the family legacy. Elizabeth Wareing, Jack Blanton Jr. and Eddy Blanton all give their time, talent and treasure to support Houston Methodist.

4

A fourth generation continues the work, with involvement in The Society for Leading Medicine and other organizations at Houston Methodist.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

39


THE TOWERING REDWOODS IN CALIFORNIA, THE CATHEDRALS OF EUROPE AND EVEN THE CURRENT TECHNOLOGY THAT MAKES LIFE EASIER, ALL HAVE SOMETHING IN COMMON: THEY TOOK GENERATIONS OF EFFORT TO CREATE. GREAT STRUCTURES AND ADVANCES ARE NEVER THE RESULT OF A SINGLE GENERATION.

AT HOUSTON METHODIST, MANY FAMILIES WHO HAVE SUPPORTED

THE ORGANIZATION THROUGH PHILANTHROPY HAVE SECOND OR THIRD GE N ERAT I ONS I NVO LV E D . HO W EV ER , T H E S C U R LO C K / B L A N TO N / WAREING CLAN IS NOW ON ITS FOURTH GENERATION OF SUPPORTERS.

Elizabeth and Eddy C. Scurlock

40

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


The Foundations of the Past The story begins in the late 1940s with two early trustees on Houston Methodist’s board of directors: William N. Blanton and Eddy C. Scurlock. William’s son, Jack S. Blanton Sr., married Eddy’s daughter, Laura Lee Scurlock, and they carried on the tradition of giving of their time, talents and treasure to Houston Methodist. Jack and Laura Lee’s three children, Elizabeth Blanton Wareing, Jack Blanton Jr. and Eddy Blanton -–and many of their children-– continue the family’s involvement with Houston Methodist today.

Elizabeth, who volunteered as a teenager in the

BlueBird Clinic, worked in Houston Methodist’s social services department as her first job, under the direction of former hospital administrators Ted Bowen and Larry Mathis. Like her father and grandfathers before her, she currently serves on the board of directors at Houston Methodist. Jack Jr. previously served on the Houston Methodist Research Institute Government and Community Affairs Committee. Eddy is active on the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute National Council.

Jack S. Blanton Sr.

(See our In Memoriam article on page 57.)

“I don’t remember a time when our family was not

involved with Houston Methodist,” Elizabeth explains.

Moving Forward For both the Blanton and Scurlock families,

“Although I never specifically asked my grandfathers why

supporting Houston Methodist has always been about more

they were involved, they were both active in the United

than just financial giving. “The gift of time is the most valuable

Methodist Church, so it was a natural outreach. My

thing that anyone can offer. I admire my dad and my grandfathers

parents also had that sense of service. My father, in

for giving their time and talents, as well,” says Elizabeth. “They

particular, had an enthusiasm about the hospital which

supported the hospital with all their resources. It wasn’t about

was contagious. One of the gifts he had was bringing

just having their name listed on the board.”

people together and solving problems. He would always

say 'How can I help you?’ He and my mother always

approach,” agrees Eddy. “They believed that when you built

wanted to be of service.”

something, you were required to be involved, not just write a check.

A good example is how one of our grandfathers acquired the

“I think both my grandfathers learned early on from

“Yes, both our father and grandfathers had a hands-on

their parents to be generous and caring – simply living

property where the Scurlock Tower and Marriott Hotel now sit.”

biblical values, including caring for the sick and less fortunate,”

continues Eddy. “Also, our father ’s involvement with

discussed purchasing the property from Bill Williams, who

Houston Methodist was a great example of leadership and

owned the restaurant located there. In 1971, Eddy Scurlock

philanthropy. It’s given Jack, Elizabeth and me a foundation

learned through business contacts that Williams was in talks

for helping others in our community.”

with another party to buy the property.

For years, the board of Houston Methodist had

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

41


Working in the Present The Scurlock and Blanton

Scurlock-–fearing the hospital would not be able to

raise the money in time-–negotiated to buy the property himself.

names are prominent elsewhere across the Houston Methodist

This gave the hospital time to raise the money and purchase

Hospital campus in support of numerous causes. Two of these

the property from him. The medical tower was named after

causes include stroke and neurodegenerative disorders.

Scurlock in appreciation of his efforts to secure the future of

Houston Methodist.

Methodist Hospital is one of the nation’s first certified com-

prehensive stroke centers and the only one in Texas. This

“Our grandfather had a different way of think-

The Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center at Houston

ing about things because he was a visionary,” says Jack

means that in Harris County-–where the stroke death rate is

Jr. “Because of his vision and our father’s vision,

twice the national average-–patients who receive care at the

Houston Methodist expanded significantly over the

Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center have better outcomes with

years, and we are very proud that they were so actively

fewer complications than at other area hospitals. Dr. David Chiu,

involved in the history of this great institution.”

medical director of the center, helped develop the certifica-

tion standards now used by accrediting agencies nationwide.

“Daddy had an expression: ‘I’m for you,’” says

Elizabeth. “He was ‘for’ Houston Methodist for over 50

The Blanton family has also created the Jack S. Blanton

years. We hope we can contribute a little bit of what he

Distinguished Endowed Chair at the Houston Methodist

did over the years for the hospital.”

Neurological Institute, a position currently held by Gustavo C.

IT SEEMS THAT

GIVING

BACK IS IN THEIR GENES

Elizabeth Wareing

42

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


Giving to Houston Methodist can also hit close to

home. “Recently, I encouraged a friend not to wait until he developed an illness to consider giving money for research,” says Eddy. “Give now while you are in good health, and the research might make a difference in your life.”

“Houston Methodist really is an exciting place,”

agrees Elizabeth. “My view is that a contribution to Houston Methodist is ‘leveraged,’ because we already have such amazing infrastructure and physicians. We are literally making discoveries that make life better for human kind. Who wouldn’t want to be part of that?”

Jack Blanton Jr. Román, MD. Dr. Román is a renowned expert in memory problems, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

“We are so honored to be part of the Stroke Center’s

accomplishments and Dr. Román’s work,” explains Eddy. “We’ve had friends who’ve suffered strokes and were treated at the Stroke Center, and of course Alzheimer’s is affecting so many people these days. It’s gratifying to support this worldclass institution right here in Houston.”

Planning for the Future Looking to the future,

the Blanton and Wareing families are well aware of the challenges that lie ahead. Current changes in health care reimbursement are not only affecting patient care, but they are affecting critical research as well.

“Every medical procedure you have ever had started

with research,” explains Jack Jr. “People take it for granted

Eddy Blanton

that research will always continue, and new cures will be found. However, that isn’t necessarily the case today. So ‘Leading Medicine’ isn’t just a slogan; it’s a plan to continue being a world leader in medicine and research.”

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

43


If you are driving across town and are not sure how to get where you’re going, you can go online to get directions. Easier still, just punch the address into your GPS and a soothing voice will guide you along the way. BUT FOR PATIENTS WHO’VE RECENTLY R E C E I V E D A D I A G N O S I S T H AT R E Q U I R E S H O S P I TA L I Z AT I O N O R A T E A M O F P H Y S I C I A N S , T H E R E I S N O R O A D M A P. T H E Y O F T E N F E E L LO ST.

At Houston Methodist, however, there is a Care Navigator program designed to assist patients and their physicians and nurses with coordinating plans of care, to ensure that patients are receiving the right care in the right setting at the right time. Care Navigator nurses maintain detailed documentation of each interaction with a patient and of any interventions and referrals provided to the patient. “If you have a new health problem, you are at the mercy of the system,” says Dr. Paul Hodgins, Chief Medical Officer at ConocoPhillips. “The Houston Methodist Care Navigator Program is designed to help patients through this process-– improving the outcomes for patients by ensuring access to the right specialists,” he says. The program has received strong support including a generous unrestricted contribution from ConocoPhillips.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

45


The Society FOR LEADING MEDICINE

Houstonians have long been famous for

their generosity, especially when it comes

was formed not only for the people who

physicians and researchers at Houston

to supporting bold, visionary ventures

have supported Houston Methodist over

Methodist. Society members enjoy

such as the Texas Medical Center. Houston

the years, but with a vision of significantly

facilitated access to care at Houston

Methodist in particular has benefited

expanding membership to include first-

Methodist and fun events such as the

from a strong legacy that has made it the

time contributions. There are several levels

Houston Texans Family Field Day and

national leader in medicine it is today.

of participation, allowing contributors

member appreciation parties.

to join The Society for as little as $1,000,

handed down through many Houston

and increase their participation as the

was founded by an exceptional group of

families, and today there are new gener-

years go on.

community leaders with enthusiasm and

ations of Houstonians who want to continue

dedication to Houston Methodist, and

that legacy of support in a way that can be

access to many programs and opportunities

you will read about some of them in the

sustained for years to come. These aspira-

designed to educate members about the

following pages. At this critical moment

tions led to the creation of The Society for

excellence of Houston Methodist. For

in health care, we invite you to join these

Leading Medicine, Houston Methodist’s

example, Leadership Grand Rounds and

leaders to help fulfill Houston Methodist’s

new annual giving society.

House Calls events offer personal conver-

vision for the future.

This tradition of giving has been

The Society for Leading Medicine

Society members at all levels have

sations and interactions with renowned

The Society for Leading Medicine

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBERS

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N O N T H E S O C I E T Y,

P R E S I D E N T ’S C I R C L E M E M B E R S

CORNERSTONE MEMBERS

please contact Amanda Harris

Carolyn J. and Robert J. Allison Jr. Randee and Everett Bernal James G. Floyd and Glenna S. Floyd Ann and Johnny Johnson Matthew and Rosemarie Johnson Doug Pitcock

The Cockrell Foundation Estela and David A. Cockrell Janet and Ernest Cockrell Stephanie and Ernest Cockrell Carol Cockrell Curran and Richard B. Curran Christy and J. Webb Jennings Laura Jennings Turner and John A. Turner Michael M. and Joann H. Cone Jenny Elkins Karen and David Haug

at 832.667.5813 or abharris@houstonmethodist.org. Please mail membership gifts to: Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Attention: The Society P.O. Box 4384 Houston, Texas 77210-4384 houstonmethodist.org/thesociety

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

47


theCockrells

CHAIRS OF THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE Estela and David A. Cockrell, chairs of

relationships can produce remarkable results.

The Society for Leading Medicine, exemplify

“The decision to chair The Society

future of philanthropy at Houston Methodist

the past and the future of philanthropy at

was influenced by our relationships with

is well served by The Society’s multigen-

Houston Methodist.

Houston Methodist President and CEO

erational focus, and we are thrilled to be

Dr. Marc Boom, the Houston Methodist

involved in the collaborative research pro-

Foundation has supported health care and

Hospital Foundation team, and David’s

grams that are advancing medicine,” adds

medical research, and Houston Methodist

longtime involvement with the institution as

David. “Houston Methodist Hospital is the

is a long-time beneficiary. Most recently,

a director of The Cockrell Foundation,” says

number one clinical care hospital in Texas,

this support includes the Cockrell Center

Estela. “We believe the annual fund model

and we think The Society’s efforts can help

for Advanced Therapeutics at Houston

can support Houston Methodist’s mission

make Houston Methodist the number one

Methodist Research Institute.

to expedite the translation of research into

hospital and research facility in America.”

clinical care. We would especially like to

members have also generously donated

see progress in converting regenerative

help share Houston Methodist’s message,”

their time. For example, Ernest H. Cockrell,

medicine and stem cell research into

says Estela. “In years past, the community

David’s father, is a life member of Houston

patient therapies more quickly. By combining

wasn’t always aware of the hospital’s

Methodist’s Board and past chair of

this work with precision medicine, Houston

numerous achievements. But now, we’re

Houston Methodist Research Institute.

Methodist physicians and researchers

showcasing these accomplishments,

The next generation of Cockrells leading

have the potential to create tailored,

and The Society is helping throw the

the next generation of philanthropy is a

preventative health plans for patients,

‘coming out party.’ David and I are excited

powerful testament to the idea that long-term

which is the future of medicine.”

to be part of that.”

48

For five decades, The Cockrell

Over the years, Cockrell family

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

“Estela and I also believe the

“Additionally, The Society will


The Cone family, starting with patriarch

So, involving this younger group in The

Methodist,” adds Scott. “It’s good to

Mike Cone, has supported Houston

Society expands our contributor base,

know you can call the hospital, and get

Methodist for many years. Scott Cone,

and grows it for the future.”

help in finding the best physicians for

Mike’s son, has continued the tradition by

you and your family.”

serving on the board of Houston Methodist

to many programs that are unique to

Research Institute, among other roles.

Houston Methodist. “I think one of

Cones have supported includes the area

When discussions began about creating

the most interesting opportunities is

of robotics. “Houston Methodist surgeons

The Society for Leading Medicine, the

participating in the Leadership Grand

are leaders in the use of robotic tech-

whole family, including Scott and his wife

Rounds,” Mike says. “It’s an exclusive,

nology, expanding the surgical options

Dru, and mother Joann, were on board

behind-the-scenes tour of a world-

available to patients while improving

with the plan from the beginning.

renowned medical center from the inside.

the quality of patient care,” says Mike.

An up-close and personal experience

“Additionally, Houston Methodist trains

The Society was to give us a way to

such as viewing live open-heart surgery

surgeons from all over the world in the

engage younger generations, the 30- to

allows people to see their contribution in

latest robotic techniques. We are glad

45-year-old demographic,” explains

action in a powerful way.”

to support forward-looking initiatives like

Scott. “These folks have the ability to

these, because they truly embody the

give, but not at the highest levels yet.

Society is the facilitated access to Houston

“One of the purposes for creating

Society members have access

“Another popular feature of The

One area of medicine that the

mission of ‘Leading Medicine.’”

Furniture in this article provided by Alyson Jon.

FOUNDING MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE

theCones

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

49


the Johnsons

FOUNDING MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE

When Rosemarie and Matt Johnson

with Estela and David Cockrell, they

moved to Houston in 2009 for Matt’s

learned about The Society for Leading

learning more about the various research

job, the former New Yorkers didn’t waste

Medicine. “Estela is so passionate about

and clinical initiatives at Houston Methodist

any time getting involved in philanthropic

both Houston Methodist and The Society,”

surrounding genetics and genetic testing.

causes across the city. They have supported

explains Rosemarie. “Her passion sparked

“All families have inherited diseases,

numerous causes including children’s

a great deal of curiosity about the hospital

including ours,” says Rosemarie. “So it

health initiatives, the arts and others.

and its mission, so we were interested in

follows that genetic research could even-

However, two very personal experiences

learning more.”

tually benefit every human being. That’s

led the Johnsons to join The Society

powerful.”

for Leading Medicine.

Johnsons to get involved, both because of

the excellence of the hospital and the

Estela Cockrell to thank her for introducing

Methodist Hospital was through our

multigenerational focus of The Society.

the Johnsons to The Society. “I wanted to

personal experience with our physicians,”

“We have small children, and we are

let Estela know how grateful we were for her

explains Matt. “We were very impressed

looking forward to the educational and

invitation to get involved,” says Rosemarie.

by their expertise and knowledge, and

family programs offered by The Society,”

“Supporting Houston Methodist will

they made us feel comfortable right away.”

says Matt. “We also believe it’s a chance

continue to be very important to our family

Then, through the Johnsons’ friendship

to teach our children about philanthropy.”

in the years ahead.”

50

“Our first exposure to Houston

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

It was a natural decision for the

The Johnsons are also intent on

Not long ago, Rosemarie wrote


The history of Houston is filled with people

Leading Medicine when we were asked.”

fix your problem, but it takes a special

who came from elsewhere but went on to

place to want to keep you healthy.”

make important contributions to the city.

multigenerational approach, because

Eva and Beau Bisso are two great examples

we have young children and also aging

Wellness Program, because it promotes

of this long Houston tradition.

parents,” says Eva. “While we enjoy the

a proactive relationship with a health care

fun family-oriented events like meeting

provider,” continued Eva. “However, if you

Orleans during the evacuation of Hurricane

the Texans football players, we also want

are diagnosed with something, Houston

Katrina, and they didn’t know anyone when

to support an outstanding hospital like

Methodist offers access to the same

they arrived. “But it was incredible how

Houston Methodist because chances

medical specialists that attract people

Houston embraced us so warmly,” says

are we’ll eventually need their services.”

from all over the world.”

Beau, who eventually moved the head-

quarters of his company, Bisso Marine, to

the Bissos are interested in Houston

contributions to The Society will benefit the

Houston. “Philanthropy has always been

Methodist’s efforts to promote well-

Houston community, but they recognize that

important to our family, because it provides

ness and avoid hospital stays. “The

these efforts could impact their own health.

balance in life, and helps keep your

research and the clinical programs that

As Beau points out, “The research happening

priorities straight. So it was a natural

aim to keep people healthy are critical,”

today at Houston Methodist just might

choice for us to join The Society for

explains Beau. “Most hospitals can

save our own lives someday in the future.”

The Bissos came from New

“We also were attracted to the

However, for the moment,

“One example is the Executive

The Bissos are gratified their

FOUNDING MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE

the Bissos

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

51


1

JANUARY 9, 2013 NANTZ NATIONAL ALZHEIMER CENTER SECOND ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION In celebration of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center’s second anniversary, Jim Nantz, his wife Courtney and mother Doris joined Houston Methodist for a celebration and unveiling of the new Nantz Friends wall. At the time of the event, the Nantz Center had raised over $8.2 million for Alzheimer’s disease research.

2

FEBRUARY 6, 2013 THE SOCIETY FOR LEADING MEDICINE LAUNCH PARTY Hosted by Chairs Estela and David A. Cockrell, Houston Methodist launched The Society for Leading Medicine at the Houston Ballet Center for Dance. The evening featured remarks by Drs. Marc Boom, David Baskin, Patrick McCulloch and Ennio Tasciotti, and a sneak peek of Houston Ballet’s La Bayadère. As of December 2013, The Society has raised over $1.4 million through 229 memberships.

SPECIAL EVENTS 52

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

3

MAY 23, 2013 UNDERWOOD CENTER Houston Methodist honored the Underwoods for their generous gift to create the Lynda K. and David M. Underwood Center for Digestive Disorders. The center brings together extensive resources in the field of digestive disease to provide patients with an unparalleled level of quality care.


4

JUNE 29, 2013 TABLE ROCK RANCH Paula and Rusty Walter generously hosted Houston Methodist guests for a mid-summer adventure at their beautiful ranch in Colorado. The day included fly-fishing, hayrides, hiking and much more.

5

JULY 10, 2013 PEAK PERFORMANCES Rod and Cam Canion, Pat Cooper, Julie and Marc Boom, Nancy and Jack Dinerstein and Susan and Dick Stasney hosted Peak Performances, Houston Methodist’s summer event in Aspen. Held in Pat Cooper’s beautiful home, the event featured Houston Methodist medical leaders and their insights on achieving and maintaining optimal human performance.

6

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 BATTING PRACTICE Dr. Jeremy Finkelstein, Eddy Blanton and Larry Dierker attended batting practice at Minute Maid Park. Guests swung for the fences in a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to play in a Major League park. Batting practice was followed by dinner in the Diamond Club and remarks by Houston Methodist Orthopedics and Sports Medicine physicians.

7

OCTOBER 21, 2013 FAITH & MEDICINE LUNCHEON In partnership with the Southern Methodist University Perkins School of Theology, Houston Methodist Hospital hosted the first annual Faith & Medicine Luncheon. With introductions by Most Reverend Joseph A. Fiorenza, Archbishop Emeritus of Galveston-Houston, and Dr. William Lawrence, Dean of the Perkins School of Theology, Drs. Mauro Ferrari and William Abraham addressed the convergence of spirituality and health care. Pictured from left to right: Cathy Jodeit, Paula Walter, Rev. Charles Millikan and Libby Nelson. houstonmethodist.org/foundation

53


RENDEZVOUS IN BLUE NOVEMBER 7, 2013

1

CELEBRATING 94 YEARS OF LEADING MEDICINE

Guests at Houston Methodist’s “Rendezvous in Blue” gala enjoyed dinner, an electrifying floor show and a high-energy dance party at the Hilton Americas – Houston on November 7. Jenna Bush Hager and Marc Vandermeer emceed the festivities which raised $1.7 million for research, education and patient care throughout the system. The evening included a special performance by St. Luke’s United Methodist Church Chancel and Handbell Choirs, remarks from Houston Methodist President and CEO, Dr. Marc Boom; Houston Methodist Vice President of Spiritual Care and Values Integration, Dr. Charles Millikan; and Weill Cornell Medical College Board of Overseers Chairman, Sanford Weill. The gala, which was presented by Weatherford, also honored six couples whose outstanding stewardship has helped Houston Methodist achieve success: Ginger and Jack S. Blanton Sr.; Carolyn and John Bookout; Janet and Ernie Cockrell; Anne and Charles Duncan; Lynda and David Underwood; and Paula and Rusty Walter.

4

3

2

6 5

6

54

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation

7


1. David Underwood Michael Linn Rusty Walter John Bookout John Bookout III 2. Denis DeBakey Lavonne Cox Morrie and Rolaine Abramson 3. Ernie D. Cockrell, David A. Cockrell 8

4. Anne and Charles Duncan 5. Dr. Dick Stasney, Spencer Stasney, Jack and Ginger Blanton, Allison Stasney and Susan Stasney 6. David Underwood, Trina Murray, Lynda Underwood, Christine Underwood, David Underwood and Fulton Murray 7. Sanford I. Weill, Drs. Julie and Marc Boom and Dr. Antonio Gotto 8. Rusty and Paula Walter, Greg and Libbie Nelson, Paola and Dr. Mauro Ferrari 9. Jenna Bush Hager and Marc Vandermeer emceed the festivities. Shown here with photos of the evening’s honorees.

9

10

10 Chairs Emily and Holcombe Crosswell and Loretta and Bob Moses with Jenna Bush Hager “ RENDEZVOUS IN BLUE WAS A HUGE SUCCESS, in part because of our honorees. Their families and friends all joined together to recognize and celebrate their legacy of service to Houston Methodist,” says gala chairs Emily Crosswell and Loretta Moses. “Additionally, we expanded our circle of supporters to include many generous Houstonians who are now engaging with us and learning about the excellence of Houston Methodist.”

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

55


IN MEMORIAM

D. Gibson “Gib” Walton ON FEBRUARY 7, 2013, the Houston Methodist family lost a cherished friend with the passing of Gib Walton. GIB WAS VITAL LY IMPORTANT to the growth and evolution of Houston Methodist. He joined the Board of Directors in 1997 and served as the vice chair of the Board in recent years. A brilliant legal mind, he shared his skills as chair of the Governance Committee and at the time of his death was chair of the Houston Methodist Research Institute Board. Gib also served as an Advisory Board Member for the Center for Performing Arts Medicine, and worked on a number of other committees. In addition, he was a great champion for creating and nurturing the I CARE values across the Houston Methodist system. PROFESSION AL LY, Gib was a highly respected attorney and partner with the global law firm Hogan Lovells, LLP and co-leader of its Global Projects, Engineering and Construction practice. Previously he was a partner and member of the Management Committee at Vinson & Elkins. He was elected President of the State Bar of Texas, and later served as Chairman of the St ate B ar Foundation.

A NATIVE HOUSTONIAN, Gib’s extensive service to the community included serving as President of the Houston Bar Association; chair of the Houston Bar Foundation; member of the Committee on Admissions for the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas; chair of the U.S. Magistrate Judge Selection Committee, Southern District of Texas; member of the Board of Directors at Brookwood Community and Briarwood School; and trustee of the Cullen Trust for Healthcare. PRIVATELY, Gib was a deeply spiritual man. His faith inspired his active role in the United Methodist Church, both locally and beyond. He was a key lay leader in St. Luke’s United Methodist Church. He served for nearly 20 years as Co-Chancellor and Chancellor of the Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church, in which capacity he was the Conference’s legal advisor. He was an elected delegate to numerous Annual, Jurisdictional and global General Conferences of the denomination. MOST IMPORTANTLY, Gib was ardently devoted to his family. So it is with a heavy heart that the entire Houston Methodist family offers its thoughts and prayers to Gib’s wife Martha and their two children. There is no way to measure how deeply he is missed.

56

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


IN MEMORIAM

Jack S. Blanton Sr. O N D E C E M B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 3 , Houston Methodist, the city of Houston and the state of Texas lost a champion, a civic icon and a dear friend as Jack S. Blanton Sr. died peacefully in his Galveston vacation home. FE W HAVE BEEN MORE COMMITTED to leading Houston Methodist toward growth and advancement than Jack S. Blanton Sr. Jack joined the Board of Directors in 1967 and served faithfully for 46 years. In 2008, he was named a life member of the Board for his unflagging commitment to Houston and his immense contributions to the development of Houston Methodist. In 2009, he received our Ella F. Fondren Award for his philanthropic support of research and medical care programs, particularly in neurology and the Center for Performing Arts Medicine. His work and generosity made possible the creation of the Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center, nationally recognized as one of the region’s top centers for the treatment of stroke. A member of The Society for Leading Medicine, Jack was also an enthusiastic supporter of our fundraising efforts. At the recent “Rendezvous in Blue” gala, Jack and his wife Ginger were honored as one of the institution’s legacy couples. He served in a number of important roles on the Board, including vice chairman and assistant treasurer. HIS CAREER began in 1950 when he joined Scurlock Oil Company in Houston, becoming its president in 1958 and then chairman in 1983, after the company was sold to Ashland Oil. H I S L E A D E R S H I P enhanced every aspect of the Houston community, as Jack served on the boards of the

Houston Endowment, the Texas Medical Center and the

Houston Zoo, among others. He is known for diversifying the investment portfolio of the Houston Endowment, helping double its assets to more than $1 billion in the 1990s. Jack’s other life-long quest was improving state education, especially at his alma mater --- The University of Texas. He was appointed to the board of regents of The University of Texas System by Gov. Mark White in 1985 and expanded the university’s presence to South Texas, establishing The University of Texas in Brownsville. HIS CHARACTER showed in business and in his personal life. Jack rarely took himself seriously, except on the tennis court where he always competed to win. He appreciated the simple things in life, from Blue Bell vanilla ice cream to cheering for the St. Louis Cardinals. He loved a good joke and enjoyed wearing funny hats to amuse his grandchildren. HIS FAMILY and his friends mourn the loss of such a dynamic, caring human being. The entire Houston Methodist family offers our condolences and prayers to Jack’s wife Ginger, his children Elizabeth, Jack and Eddy, and his nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Jack’s impact as a friend, a colleague and a true civic leader will be remembered with deep gratitude.

houstonmethodist.org/foundation

57


LEADERSHIP

HO U STO N M E TH O D I ST BOA RD O F D I R E CTO R S Morrie K. Abramson Carlton E. Baucum, Treasurer John F. Bookout, Senior Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President & CEO Emily A. Crosswell Mary A. Daffin Connie M. Dyer Gary W. Edwards Eric J. Haufrect, MD, President of the Medical Staff Mark A. Houser Bishop Janice Riggle Huie Rev. Kenneth R. Levingston Vidal G. Martinez Robert K. Moses Jr., Asst. Secretary Gregory V. Nelson, Vice Chair Thomas J. Pace III, DMin Joe Bob Perkins Keith O. Reeves, MD C. Richard Stasney, MD, President-Elect of the Medical Staff (Advisory) David M. Underwood, Vice Chair Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter III, Asst. Treasurer Elizabeth Blanton Wareing, Secretary Stephen Wende, DMin Ewing Werlein Jr., Chair Rev. B. T. Williamson (Advisory) Sandra Gayle Wright, RN, EdD Life Members Ernest H. Cockrell James C. Dishman Charles W. Duncan Jr. Isaac H. Kempner III Nat S. Rogers

HOUSTON METHODIST HOSPITAL FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Morrie K. Abramson John F. Bookout, Chair Marc L. Boom, MD, President & CEO Michael M. Cone Emily A. Crosswell, Secretary Charles W. Duncan Jr. John S. Dunn Jr. Marvy A. Finger John W. Johnson Raleigh W. Johnson Jr. Vidal G. Martinez Robert K. Moses Jr. David M. Underwood, Vice Chair James V. Walzel Elizabeth Blanton Wareing Ewing Werlein Jr.

H O U STON ME THODIST R E S E ARC H IN STITU TE B OAR D OF DIRE CTORS Morrie K. Abramson Steven D. Arnold John F. Bookout, Senior Chair John F. Bookout III Marc L. Boom, MD, President & CEO Giorgio Borlenghi Joseph R. Canion Albert Y. Chao Ernest D. Cockrell II, Secretary Mary A. Daffin Dan O. Dinges Andrew Von Eschenbach, MD Joe B. Foster Mauro Ferrari, PhD, President & CEO Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, Dean Antonio Gotto, MD, DPhil, Retired Dean Mark A. Houser, Vice Chair/Chair Elect Catherine S. Jodeit Gregory V. Nelson C. Richard Stasney, MD Stuart W. Stedman Joseph C. “Rusty” Walter III, Chair Elizabeth Blanton Wareing Ewing Werlein Jr.

H O U STON ME THODIST D E B AKE Y HE ART & VAS C U LAR C EN TE R Robert J. Allison Jr. Seth M. Barrett J. Denny Bartell Christopher R. Black Marc L. Boom, MD, President & CEO John R. Butler Jr. Philip J. Carroll Gerardo A. Chapa Mary A. Daffin Ray Davis Denis A. DeBakey Prof. Lois E. DeBakey, PhD Joann P. DiGennaro William J. Doré Jr. William J. Doré Sr. Connie Dyer, Co-Chair Eva K. Farha Linda C. Gill William E. Gipson Marc P. Gordon Miguel A. Hernandez Jo Ruth Kaplan William E. King Cynthia G. Kostas George J. Kostas Carole E. Looke John M. McCormack Robert K. Moses Jr. Frank D. Perez Cynthia Pickett-Stevenson, Co-Chair Douglas R. Quinn Valentina Ugolini, MD Elizabeth Walter

HOU STON METHODIST PHYS IC IAN S ORGAN IZATION B OARD OF DIRE CTORS Stanley H. Appel, MD Barbara L. Bass, MD, FACS Timothy B. Boone, MD, PhD Gavin W. Britz, MBBCh, MPH, FAANS E. Brian Butler, MD Stuart M. Dobbs, MD Jaime Gateno, DDS, MD Eric J. Haufrect, MD Alan L. Kaplan, MD Andrew G. Lee, MD Alan B. Lumsden, MD James M. Musser, MD, PhD Joseph J. Naples, MD Robert A. Phillips, MD, PhD, Chair, President & CEO Miguel A. Quiñones, MD, MACC Richard J. Robbins, MD Kevin E. Varner, MD

HOU STON METHODIST N E U ROLOG ICAL IN STITU TE N ATION AL C OU N C IL Morrie K. Abramson James R. Bath Everett E. Bernal Randee K. Bernal Eddy S. Blanton John F. Bookout J. David Cabello Gary W. Edwards, Chair Thomas D. Friedkin Kate H. Gibson, Co-Chair S. Malcolm Gillis, PhD Robert H. Graham Dorothy Jenkins Mary F. Johnston Elise Joseph Thomas C. Knudson Gregory A. Kozmetsky Leon M. Payne Arthur A. Seeligson III Donna S. Stahlhut Henry J.N. “Kitch” Taub II Anne G. Thobae David M. Underwood Dancie Perugini Ware Elizabeth Blanton Wareing W. Temple Webber III

HOU STON METHODIST LIVE R C EN TE R TAS K FORC E Paula D. Criel Burt H. Keenan Lawrence W. Kellner Linda G. Lykos Eugene A. O’Donnell

HOU STON MET HOD I ST CEN T ER FOR PER FOR MI NG ART S MED I CI NE ADVI SORY B OAR D Bobby R. Alford, MD E. William Barnett Janice H. Barrow Virginia Blanton Anthony K. Brandt, PhD Philip J. Carroll Albert Y. Chao Evan D. Collins, MD, MBA Lavonne C. Cox, RPh James W. Crownover Francoise Djerejian Deborah K. Duncan Victor Fainstein, MD Jerry E. Finger Jeremy Finkelstein, MD Gina E. Fish, RN J. Todd Frazier Robert Freeman, PhD Elizabeth Ghrist Susanne M. Glasscock Richard L. Harper, MD Eric J. Haufrect, MD Patricia P. Hubbard Robert E. Jackson, MD Christof Karmonik, PhD Tom Krouskop, PhD, PE Michael W. Lieberman, MD, PhD Sharon Ley Lietzow Judy E. Margolis Hoyt T. “Toby” Mattox Nicholas A. Phillips Keith O. Reeves, MD Ann Scanlon McGinity, PhD, RN L. E. Simmons Jerome B. Simon Lois F. Stark C. Richard Stasney, MD Ron Tintner, MD Laura Jennings Turner Kevin E. Varner, MD Richard E. Wainerdi, PhD, PE Margaret Alkek Williams Aline Wilson Ed Wulfe Robert A. Yekovich, DMA

HOU STON MET HOD I ST CAN CER CENT ER TASK FOR CE Ann H. Elvin Maryanne W. McCormack Rick Moore Loretta B. Moses Jane L. Parker Betty A. Sommer Glenn R. Smith


H O USTO N M E T HO D IST H AS B E E N B L ESSED WIT H FA R S IGH TE D CO NTR IBU TO R S who possess the willingness to generously give. We have benefited from philanthropic gifts given by those personally touched by a particular illness as well as from those who graciously want to contribute so that others may benefit.

In 2013, our generous contributors helped raise

approximately $33 million through more than 4,000 gifts.

No matter the catalyst, I sincerely thank each

John Bookout, C H AIR

individual, family, corporation and foundation who has given

HOUSTON METH O DIST HOSPITAL

to Houston Methodist. I also recognize the dedication of

FOUNDATION BOARD

our boards, advisory councils, task forces and volunteers who share their time and expertise with our institution. Your commitment brings breakthroughs to light.

IN SH O RT, YO UR CO N T R IBU T IO N S E N A B LE U S TO CO NTIN U E L E A DIN G M E D I C I N E .

Your support saves lives daily.

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation Magazine Credits Executive Director: Susan Coulter, JD Managing Editor: Katelyn Furman Editors: Patti Muck, Nathan Cernosek, Katie Lipnick Creative: Richards/Carlberg, Art Director Karen Holland Writers: Josh Powers, Rick Mitchell, Robin Phillips Photographers: Terry Vine, Frank White, Mark Laita Illustrators: Martin Leon Barreto, Matthew Cook, Chris Gall, Jack Molloy, Bruce Morser, Charis Tsevis Online giving: houstonmethodist.org/foundation Subscription information: houstonmethodist.org/foundation-magazine houstonmethodist.org/foundation

59


MAN Y T HANKS Contributors are listed online at houstonmethodist.org/foundation.

60

Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation


Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation 1707 Sunset Boulevard Houston, Texas 77005 832.667.5816 donor@houstonmethodist.org

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Houston, Texas Permit No. 2034

Houston Methodist 2013 Foundation Magazine  
Houston Methodist 2013 Foundation Magazine