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December 2013

Sweet Return Peggy Jean’s Pies Is Back!


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Contents 24

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Volume 5, Issue 9

Prime Numbers

8 Shopping 10 Tasting Room 12 Travel 14 On The Road With Ray 18 Guide To Downsizing 20 Long-Term Care Glossary

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24 Sweet Return: Peggy Jean’s Pies

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28 How-To Guides 37 Prime Time 42 How Can I Help? 44 Local Cat Show Preview 46 Pet Corner

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48 Life Lessons 50 Fun & Games 52 Recipes For Holiday Sweets 56 Prime Pages 58 Your Bucket List 62 Columbia Confidential Prime Magazine December 2013

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Welcome

What Is It About Pie? Most desserts I can think about without thinking about particular people. Not pie. Blueberry pie makes me think of my mom. Raisin pie makes me think of my husband’s great-grandma Granny Moneymaker (that really was her last name). Gooseberry pie makes me think of both of my mom’s grandmas — and family reunions for both sides of Mom’s family. I’m not sure what makes pie so good at evoking memories, but I don’t think I’m alone in feeling this way. Many Columbians revealed their soft spot for pie this fall by supporting the return of Peggy Jean’s Pies, a pie shop that was open in Columbia from 1994 to 2004. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to show how Jeanne Plumley, an original owner of the shop, and her daughter, Rebecca Miller, let their optimism and creativity go a little crazy to bring Peggy Jean’s Pies back to Columbia in time for the holidays. It doesn’t take long when talking with Jeanne and Rebecca to figure out the two of them have an exceptionally close relationship. This time of year can be difficult for those of us missing someone close to us. Dr. John Williams touches on the wistfulness of the season in this month’s Pet Corner. I will admit that as I got to the end of Dr. Williams’s column, I had a few tears. His beautiful tribute to his dad’s love left me missing my mom, who passed away in 2011, but I also felt thankful for the endless blessing of her love. Trite though it sounds, love is what Christmas is all about. As a Christian, I celebrate not just the love of friends and family but also the love of God at Christmastime. I consider the love that brought Jesus to Bethlehem and give thanks for the greatest gift of all. Here’s wishing all of you, our Prime readers, a wonderful holiday season, filled with optimism, love — and, here’s hoping, a little pie.

staff Publisher Fred Parry Associate Publisher Melody Garnett Parry Editor-in-Chief Sandy Selby Managing Editor Anita Neal Harrison Editorial Assistant Morgan McCarty Creative Director Carolyn Preul Director of Marketing Kevin Magee Graphic Designer Kate Moore Trever Griswold Photo Editor L.G. Patterson Audience Development Specialist Ren Bishop Sales Manager Deb Valvo Marketing Representatives Rosemarie Peck Joe Schmitter Jamill Teter Sales Assistants Jessica Card Kalie Clennin Office Manager Kent Hudelson Assistant Finance Manager Brenda Brooks Distribution Manager John Lapsley Director of Customer Retention Gerri Shelton

Want more of our insider view of Columbia? Sign up for the new Prime Club e-newsletter at www.insidecolumbia.net/prime. Prime Magazine is published by OutFront Communications, 47 E. Broadway, Columbia, MO 65203, 573-442-1430. Copyright OutFront Communications, 2013. The magazine is published 12 times a year on the first day of every month. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

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Contributing Writers Kathy Casteel, Sylvia Forbes, Kristen Herhold, Saralee Perel, Ray Speckman, John Williams

Serving the boomer & senior markets


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Prime Numbers: Statistics You Don’t Have To Be A Math Geek To Love

million 24.5

That’s how many farm-grown Christmas trees were sold in the U.S. in 2012, according to the National Christmas Tree Association.

5,083,000 mph According to Popular Science, that’s the average speed Santa’s sleigh must travel to deliver gifts around the world in 24 hours. That’s more than 6,600 times the speed of sound (768 mph) but far less than the speed of light (671 million mph).

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million That’s how many fake Christmas trees were sold.

$602.1 billion The National Retail Federation expects holiday spending to total this amount in 2013, a 3.9 increase over 2012.

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3.4 That’s how many times Santa could circle the equator in one minute going 5,083,000 mph.


The Shopping List

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Tinsel Utensils

Flour Should Not Be Your Only Accessory

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By Morgan McCarty

Baking for the holiday season might seem daunting, but being festively fashionable shouldn’t be! Festive cookie cutters with handles make marathon baking easy and fun. Pull out your holiday oven mitts, and don your little helper in a cute snowman apron. If in need of baking inspiration, grab a cookbook and try out a few new recipes. Remember, it’s never too late to make a new tradition.

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1. Green “Link” runner by Hen House Linens, available at Tallulah’s 7 ($23) 2. “Gingerbread Girl” spatula by Tovolo, available at Tallulah’s 8 ($11) 3. “Pin Pair” silicone and French rolling pin set by Chef ’n, available at 9 Tallulahs’s ($46) 4. “Oven Mitt Gift Set” available at Frameworks ($18.99) 5. “The Gingerbread Boy” cookie cutter by Ann Clark Ltd., available at Frameworks ($3.99) 6. “Tree” cookie cutter by Ann Clark Ltd., available at Frameworks ($3.99) 7. “Bake On” tea towel available at Tallulah’s ($9) 8. “Snowflake” cookie cutter by Ann Clark Ltd., available at Frameworks ($3.99) 9. “The Gourmet Cookie Book,” available at Tallulah’s ($18) 10. Child’s “Snowman” apron available at Frameworks ($21.99) 11. Lead-free pewter/copper “Heart Spice Spoon Set” by Beehive Kitchenware, available at Poppy ($34) 12. “Candy Cane” cookie cutter by Ann Clark Ltd., available at Frameworks ($3.99) 13. “Cookease” cookie cutter and stencil by Chef ’n, available at Tallulah’s ($12)

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The Tasting Room

Tiny Bubbles Celebrate The Holidays With These Festive Sparklers

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By Kathy Casteel

Raise a toast to the New Year in style with a glass of the finest bubbly from the Champagne house of Louis Roederer. Cristal, Roederer’s premium Champagne, has long been the jewel of Reims, in the Champagne-Ardenne region of France. Louis Roederer inherited the 57-year-old Dubois Père & Fils wine estate from his uncle in 1833. He promptly renamed the company and set out to target markets abroad. Roederer’s opportunity came in 1867, when King William I of Prussia hosted his Three Emperors Dinner in Paris for Prince Otto von Bismarck and Russia’s Czar Alexander II. The czar, who feared assassination at every turn, requested Roederer create a unique sparkling wine in a clear glass bottle so he could see the bubbles and admire its golden color; the transparent glass would also prevent anyone from hiding a bomb in the bottle, as was possible with the traditional dark green bottle. Roederer commissioned a Flemish glassmaker to create a clear, lead glass bottle with a flat bottom; he filled the bottles with the best selection from the seven finest vineyards of his estate. Roederer’s prestige cuvée became known as Cristal. This straw-colored Champagne is a 55/45 blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay; 20 percent of the wines

mature in oak casks before blending. The delicate flavor of crisp apples with citrus undertones is fresh and bright. The current release vintage is nearly a decade old and ready to serve now, although it will age gracefully in a cellar for many more years. Pair Cristal with decadent seafood entrées such as caviar with citrus, smoked salmon, lobster, scallops, crab, oysters or ceviche. Cristal is pricey ($228.97 at Macadoodles). If your wallet whimpers at your celebration plans, consider the Champagne maker’s domestic offerings — American sparklers at a fraction of the price — from Roederer Estate in California’s Anderson Valley. Roederer Estate Brut is an exquisite, Champagne-style sparkling wine, a 60/40 blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from estate-grown grapes. The addition of oak-aged reserve wines to each year’s blend creates a multivintage cuvée in the

traditional Louis Roederer style of fresh, well-defined sparkling wines. The crisp, light bubbly carries a complex mix of pear, spice and hazelnut flavors. The fruitier Roederer Estate Brut Rosé reverses the proportions of its cellar mate’s blend, going with 60 percent Pinot Noir and 40 percent Chardonnay to produce a sparkling rosé with a salmon hue. For color, a small portion of the Pinot Noir gets an extended maceration with 5 percent added back to the blend before the secondary fermentation. The floral and red berry aroma leads to a rich but delicate strawberry/raspberry flavor. It’s a very drinkable, food-friendly wine that pairs especially well with poultry and pork, Asian cuisine, and not surprisingly, salmon. You can find Roederer’s California sparklers at Macadoodles as well. The Brut runs $27.98 and the Brut Rosé is $29.44. v

International and U.S. laws restrict the use of the term “Champagne” to sparkling wine produced in France’s Champagne region.

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Travel

Atmospheric Edinburgh Head To Scotland To Explore “European Destination Of The Year” By Sylvia Forbes oldest part of the city, with many ancient buildings and closes (alleyways) from the Medieval and Renaissance ages. The Royal Mile is the main thoroughfare of Old Town and runs between two important locations, historic Edinburgh Castle, dating from the 12th century, and Holyrood Palace, the official residence of Scottish royalty since the 16th century. Queen Elizabeth spends one week at Holyrood each summer. The main thoroughfare through New Town is Princes Street, which is also about a mile long. Built in the 18th and 19th centuries, Princes Street features mostly neoclassical and Georgian architecture. These two streets, lined with shops, restaurants and pubs, are the busiest in Edinburgh.

E Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh, Scotland, has been surprising people. Often overlooked as a travel destination, in the last decade it has come into its own, winning 12 UK Best City awards in eight years and being voted “European Destination of the Year” at the 2012 World Travel Awards. Add to that two listings in UNESCO World Heritage Sites for its Old Town and New Town districts and the more recent designation as the world’s first UNESCO City of Literature in 2004, and Edinburgh starts looking like an intriguing place to visit. The city is often voted by various polls to be one of the best places in the world to live. One of the best ways to get started exploring Edinburgh is to buy an Edinburgh Pass, which includes public transportation throughout the city, a

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guidebook, discounts to 27 of Edinburgh’s top attractions, as well as coupons for many restaurants and shops. For those traveling further into the countryside, a one-year Historic Scotland membership might be worth considering, as it provides access to about 70 historic sites across the country, plus discounts to shops. History This metro city of one million sits dramatically among the volcanic hills above the Firth of Forth, an estuary of the River Forth. One of the best views of the area is from the top of Arthur’s Seat, an extinct volcano overlooking the city. Edinburgh is an old city. Originating as a fort in the hills, it became part of Scotland in the 10th century and quickly became its largest city. Old Town is the

A Literary Incubator Edinburgh pays tribute to one of its most famous writers with an impressive monument on Princes Street to Sir Walter Scott, a historical novelist, playwright and poet who lived from 1771-1832. Since then, the city has inspired a number of authors, including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Muriel Spark, Irvine Welsh, Ian Rankin, Alexander McCall Smith and J.K. Rowling. Royal Yacht Britannia One of the newest attractions in the area is the Royal Yacht Britannia, which spent 44 years in service and was decommissioned in 1997. This 412-foot-long ship traveled over one million miles and sailed 968 royal voyages, all traveled with the Royal Yachtsmen communicating by hand signals so as not to disturb the royalty. Visitors can tour the ship and view the lavish appointments such as silver urns and beautiful clocks, as well as the royal apartments.


Decisions, Decisions Like many big cities, it is difficult to choose among the abundance of things to see and do. Some visitors will be entranced by the 70-acre Royal Botanic Gardens, while others will want to visit castles, such as the ruins of Craigmillar Castle, which date from the 14th century, or Dirleton Castle, from the 12th century. The Scotch Whisky Heritage Centre may be on a visitor’s list, with tours explaining the production of this favored beverage, or the Edinburgh Crystal Visitor Center, with its beautiful hand-blown glass. Many visitors will want to peruse the Museum of Scotland and the Royal Museum, which interpret Scottish culture; the National Portrait Gallery, which tells Scotland’s history through paintings; or the Museum of Childhood, which tells how Scottish children pass time. Others will want to take in a performance of drama, comedy, opera, symphony, folk music or ballet at one of the city’s many venues.

Hogmanay Hogmanay Perhaps the most memorable event of all in Edinburgh is its New Year’s Celebration, known as Hogmanay. For many Americans, singing Auld Lang Syne is a nostalgic way to ring in the new year, along with a toast. This tradition originated in Scotland and proliferated throughout the world. Edinburgh claims the largest New Year’s celebration of all, an evening of fun that includes everyone with lots of dancing and merriment and music on several stages. The traditional Keilidh is a combination of music, song and especially dance, in which people of all ages stomp to jigs and twirl to reels. Anyone can join in, as the keilidh caller explains the steps throughout the dance, much like a square-dance caller. No matter when you visit, Edinburgh puts out the welcome mat. A visit to Edinburgh will leave you dreaming about castles, kilts, tartans and a resilient, imaginative people. v Prime Magazine December 2013

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On The Road With Ray

Back To Boston A New Look For A Historic City By ray speckman

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Much had changed in Boston since I visited a couple of decades back. Most dramatic of all was the transformation around a massive downtown road project dubbed the Big Dig. The main goal of this $14.6 billion reconstruction was to reroute Interstate 93 into a 3.5-mile tunnel. Previously a series of elevated highways, Interstate 93 ran between the downtown and what was generously described as a dilapidated waterfront. On the downtown side of those highways, buildings were in such disrepair that drivers had to beware of falling bricks and concrete.

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Then came the Big Dig, a plan to move those elevated highways underground and establish a green area in their place. Construction started in 1991 with a scheduled completion date of 1998, but the Big Dig ran billions over budget and wasn’t finished until December 2007. Other woes included a leaking tunnel and a tunnel ceiling collapse that killed a vehicle passenger in 2006. With those failures, it’s hard to call the Big Dig a success, but from what I saw on my last trip, the project has at least lead to urban renewal. Where elevated roads once crisscrossed, there is now a green-

way of grass, flowers and trees, named in honor of the Kennedy family matriarch Rose. The buildings to the west have been refurbished, and to the east, between the Dig and the waterfront, high-rise buildings glimmer. A good example of the overall renewal is the historic No Name Restaurant, a restaurant that got its start in 1917 preparing the catch of the day from local fishermen. Back when I first visited, No Name was in a rundown dock and warehouse area, but on my recent trip, I found modern surroundings and a new front on the old restaurant. The restaurant still


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offers up fresh seafood and a lobster bisque that is unmatched. There are also new restaurants that line the waterfront, offering casual to five-star dining. Mixed with the towering buildings that offer expansive and dramatic views of the city are trendy shops; one can almost smell the plastic burning there. The downtown area west of the Dig is vibrant and alive. The streets intersect at strange angles, which locals explain is what happens when streets follow old cow paths. Many older buildings have come down to make way for higher, pricier replacements. But even with all of the changes, history abounds in Boston. The Faneuil Hall Marketplace, where colonists established the doctrine of “no taxation without representation,” is still a major gathering place, offering restaurants mixed with shops selling clothes, purses and souvenirs. Down the street from the marketplace is a historic area filled mostly with restaurants preserved for centuries. The Union Oyster House is the oldest of these establishments and has served diners continuously since 1826. Diners can sit at the same bar where Daniel Webster often ordered six or more plates of oysters — with each plate bringing half a dozen oysters — and drank tumblers of brandy and water. Upstairs, there is more dining, and in a small corner is the Kennedy Table, named for the former president who dined there frequently. A huge lobster tank holds ready-to-be-scalded lobsters crawling over one another. The servers are friendly and entertain the diners with the lobsters, one that was a whopping eleven pounds (“I think it goes for $225 or so,” said one of the servers). One more bit of history I recommend seeing in Boston is Old Ironsides. The 1797 battleship formally named the USS Constitution is moored and perfectly maintained by active United States Navy personnel. The stately ship received its “Old Ironsides” nickname in the War of 1812, when British cannonballs harmlessly ricocheted off its 21-inch-thick hull. Turned into a museum in 1972, the ship is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world, and tours aboard the USS Constitution are free. I’m glad I made it back to Boston, a city full of history, sights and gastronomical delights. v Ray Speckman can be found dreaming of trying to sleep uncomfortably aboard the Constitution or at rayspeckman@emmesannex.com. Prime Magazine December 2013

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Retirement Living & Planning

Make Your Move Your Guide To Successful Downsizing

Moving and relocating to a smaller home can be liberating. A smaller place means fewer home maintenance responsibilities, especially when the new home is a condo, an apartment or a unit inside a senior housing complex. Gaining this new freedom doesn’t exactly come easy, though, as it often requires getting through the work of downsizing. How many retirees end up forgoing the benefits of a new, smaller place just because they so dread the experience of sorting through their accumulated possessions? Don’t be one of these “stuck” retirees. Tell yourself you can tackle this task, and get started with these suggestions on how to downsize successfully: How To Get Started • Start with rooms that you use the least. Begin the sorting process in these rooms and avoid cluttering the 18

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areas you use regularly. • Start with large items. Identify what you will do with the furniture before you start on the knickknacks. You will feel a greater sense of progress. • Have a sorting system. Use stickers, make piles and/or make lists of what will be kept and given away. Avoid making an “undecided” pile to keep from handling items multiple times; use this label for special cases only. • Write down family history. Or get a handheld voice recorder and talk through special memories or any family history associated with special items. This will be helpful for future generations and will contribute to the value of the family keepsakes. • Work in scheduled blocks of times. Plan to sort items for periods of no more than two hours at a time. The process of going through items is difficult and draining. You will feel less

overwhelmed and make better decisions with regular breaks. • Start early and don’t rush yourself. Plan plenty of time to sift through things. Take time to look at old pictures, read letters and grieve losses. What To Do With All This Stuff • Keep items you treasure the most. Make a list of items you refuse to part with, and keep that list in sight as you sort through other possessions. You may need to amend your list, but it will remind you that everything is not of equal value. • Bequeath items now. Identify items you want certain family members to have and consider what you are willing to give now. Think of the pleasure you will have seeing children and grandchildren receive the items and how much more meaningful it will be


to them to receive the gifts from your hands. • Get rid of things you know longer need. Be realistic about what you use regularly and what you don’t. • Consider having a garage sale or auction. You may have enough items to earn a significant profit. • Donate to charity. For those items you cannot give away or sell, make a tax-deductible donation to a charity. Consider specific items for specific things, such as musical instruments to a school program, bedroom furniture to a shelter, books to the library. • Have the adult kids remove their stuff. Give a deadline and a warning that whatever is left gets donated. Dividing Things Peacefully • Agree on a system. Avoid disagreements among children and other family members by following a clear system for identifying who gets what. One idea is to assign each family member a colored sticker and identify items accordingly. An alternative is to have family members take turns choosing items they would like to have. In both cases it is good to clearly outline what items are available for the taking. • Be sure everyone gets something special. Disagreements may still occur, but resentment is more likely avoided if everyone feels they received something meaningful to them. • Encourage negotiation. If disagreements do happen, encourage family members to negotiate amongst themselves. Someone may be willing to trade an item with financial worth for something more sentimental. If these exchanges occur, be proud of your children for working things out and do not take offense. v Sources: Tips on Downsizing: Moving from the Family Home by Christine Price, Extension State Gerontology Specialist, The Ohio State University, http://ohioline.osu.edu/ssfact/0214.html Tips on Downsizing When Moving from the Family Home by Kathy Smith, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent & http:// weatherforddemocrat.com/extensionnews/ x1097430015/EXTENSION-NEWS-Tips-ondownsizing-when-moving-from-the-familyhome/print Prime Magazine December 2013

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Retirement Living & Planning

Learn The Terms

Explore What’s Available in Long-Term Care With This Glossary

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Some 70 percent of people turning age 65 will use some form of longterm care during their lives, according to LongTermCare.gov, a site run by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The website defines long-term care as a range of services and supports that help people meet their health or personal needs over a long period of time. Long-term care takes place in a variety of settings, from individuals’ homes to licensed nursing facilities, and there are many options to explore. The following definitions from the glossary on longtermcare.gov will help consumers sort out where their needs fall and which long-term care services best suit their situations. Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) Basic actions that independently functioning individuals perform on a daily basis:

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• Bathing • Dressing • Transferring (moving to and from a bed or a chair) • Eating • Caring for incontinence Many public programs determine eligibility for services according to a person’s need for help with ADLs. Many long-term care insurance policies use the inability to do a certain number of ADLs as criteria for paying benefits. Adult Day Services Services provided during the day at a community-based center to adults with functional and/or cognitive impairments. These structured, comprehensive programs provide social and support services in a protective setting during any part of a day but not 24-hour care. Many adult day service programs include health-related services.

Assisted Living Facility Residential living arrangement that provides individualized personal care, assistance with Activities of Daily Living, help with medications, and services such as laundry and housekeeping. Facilities may also provide health and medical care, but care is not as intensive as care offered at a nursing home. Types and sizes of facilities vary, ranging from small homes to large apartment-style complexes. Levels of care and services also vary. Assisted living facilities allow people to remain relatively independent. Board and Care Home (also called Group Home) Residential private homes designed to provide housing, meals, housekeeping, personal care services, and supports to frail or disabled residents. At least one caregiver is on the premises at all times.


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In many states, Board and Care Homes are licensed or certified and must meet criteria for facility safety, types of services provided, and the number and type of residents they can care for. Board and Care Homes are often owned and managed by an individual or family involved in their everyday operation. Community-Based Services Services and service settings in the community, such as adult day services, homedelivered meals or transportation services. Often referred to as home- and community-based services, they are designed to help older people and people with disabilities stay in their homes as independently as possible. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC) Retirement complex that offers a range of services and levels of care. Residents may move first into an independent living unit, a private apartment or a house on the campus. The CCRC provides social and housing-related services and often also has an assisted living unit and an on-site or affiliated nursing home. If and when residents can no longer live independently in their apartment or home, they move into assisted living or the CCRC’s nursing home. Homemaker Licensed Homemaker Services provides “hands-off ” care such as helping with cooking and running errands. Often referred to as “personal care assistants” or “companions.” Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Activities that are not necessary for basic functioning but are necessary in order to live independently. These activities may include: • Doing light housework • Preparing and cleaning up after meals • Taking medication • Shopping • Managing money • Using communication devices • Getting around the community Long-Term Care Services and supports necessary to meet health or personal care needs over an extended period of time. 22

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Long-Term Care Insurance Insurance policy designed to offer financial support to pay for long-term care services. Long-Term Care Services Services that include medical and nonmedical care for people with a chronic illness or disability. Long-term care helps meet health or personal needs. Most long-term care services assist people with Activities of Daily Living, such as dressing, bathing and using the bathroom. Long-term care can be provided at home, in the community or in a facility. For purposes of Medicaid eligibility and payment, long-term care services are those provided to an individual who requires a level of care equivalent to that received in a nursing facility. Nursing Home (also called Long-Term Care Facility or Convalescent Care Facility) Licensed facility that provides general nursing care to those who are chronically ill or unable to take care of daily living needs. Personal Care (also called Custodial Care) Non-skilled service or care, such as help with bathing, dressing, eating, moving around and using the bathroom. Respite Care Temporary care intended to provide time off for regular caregivers. Respite care is typically 14 to 21 days of care per year and can be provided in a nursing home, adult day service center or at home by a private party. Skilled Care Nursing care such as help with medications and caring for wounds, and therapies such as occupational, speech, respiratory and physical therapy. Skilled care usually requires the services of a licensed professional such as a nurse, doctor or therapist. Supervisory Care Long-term care service for people with memory or orientation problems. Supervision ensures that people don’t harm themselves or others because their memory, reasoning and orientation to person, place or time are impaired. v Prime Magazine December 2013

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One minute, Jeanne Plumley was in her pajamas, taking it easy on a Saturday morning and chatting with her daughter, Rebecca Miller, on the phone. The next, she was frantically searching through her closet for something to wear and informing her husband, Dale Plumley, that she and Rebecca were shooting a video that afternoon to help them raise funds to reopen her, Jeanne’s, old pie shop, Peggy Jean’s Pies. Dale didn’t quite follow. “You’re going to do what?” he asked, stupefied as Jeanne hustled about. Jeanne wasn’t too sure what was happening herself. It wasn’t just the video shoot that was coming out of nowhere.

The whole plan to reopen Peggy Jean’s Pies was happening crazy fast. In less than a month, Jeanne and Rebecca had charged from a “Think-we-could?” idea to contacting a realtor to finding the perfect space to shooting a video for an online fundraising campaign. Jeanne couldn’t blame her husband for thinking she’d gone nuts. But Jeanne had always told Rebecca that if something was right, it would take off with its own momentum. Things that are meant to be don’t require a lot of pushing. “We both had a gut feeling that we are meant to be doing this at this time,” Jeanne says, “so I said, ‘Grab that brass ring and go for it.’ ”

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This makes the second time that Jeanne has decided to give making pies for a living a whirl. The first time, she partnered with a friend, Peggy Day. Both were working in mortgage banking but dreamed of owning a business. Then, one day, Jeanne made an apple pie using an old family recipe. “Peg said: ‘Why don’t we make pies? This is so delicious,’ ” Jeanne remembers. “And I said: ‘Are you kidding me? Who in the world is going to buy pies?’ ” Then Jeanne thought about that for a moment. Who would hand over money for delicious, made-from-scratch, filled-with-grandma’skind-of-love pies? Jeanne and Peggy opened their shop in 1994, and their desserts earned national attention, appearing in such media as Southern Living magazine and on the Food Network. The shop even expanded to serve breakfast and lunch. But 10 years after opening, Peggy Jean’s Pies came to an abrupt end. In 2001, Peggy began having terrible headaches; these were eventually diagnosed as a symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Within months, she was no longer coming to work. Managing the business would’ve been challenge enough for Jeanne, who preferred hiding in the kitchen to chitchatting with customers, but along with taking on Peggy’s management duties, she was also making three or four caretaking trips a day to her friend’s home. All of it together was too much, and in 2002, Jeanne was on the verge of a nervous breakdown. She knew she had to have help when she began having thoughts of suicide. During this crisis, Rebecca was going to law school in Kansas City, and she didn’t realize how far out of control her mom’s world was spinning. When she graduated and moved back to Columbia in 2002 — married and pregnant with her first child — Rebecca helped her mom get mental health care and she pitched in to help care for Peggy. For awhile, it looked like the restaurant would make it, but then Peggy’s health deteriorated more, and Jeanne made the tough decision to close down Peggy Jean’s Pies — immediately. “We didn’t even announce it to customers, it happened so quick,” Jeanne says. “You knew it had to be done, but it was hard,” Rebecca adds. “Very hard,” Jeanne agrees. With Peggy Jean’s closed, Jeanne, who was single at the time, devoted herself to caring for Peggy, even living with Peggy and her husband. “She was like a mother to me,” Jeanne says. Peggy died on Aug. 23, 2005, and for a while, Jeanne couldn’t bear to think about pies. She went to work in a hospital, focused on her grandchildren and found a new love, marrying Dale in 2008. As time passed, memories of her desperate struggle at Peggy Jean’s Pies eventually faded enough that other memories began to emerge — memories of two good friends having an awful lot of fun together baking pies. Jeanne missed those good times. Enough so, that a couple of years ago, she began suggesting to Rebecca that the two of them bake pies at Thanksgiving to sell out of a trailer in a Walmart parking lot. Jeanne thought it would be fun to partner with her daughter. The two of them are close friends and share the same madcap sense of humor. “We can fuss with each other, but then she can say things that crack me up,” Jeanne says. But Rebecca didn’t exactly love the parking-lot-pies idea. In fact, “she said I was being ridiculous,” Jeanne says. Rebecca is unabashed. “I couldn’t see saying: ‘Peggy Jean’s is back. Come visit us in our U-Haul,’ ” she explains. But Rebecca’s 11-year-old son was more supportive. He kept telling his MawMaw Jeanne to get a food truck. And she seriously considered it, even looking online to buy one as late as Labor Day 2013. But as she 26

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searched, she realized she’d have to have more space to do most of the prep work, and if she were going to find somewhere to put a kitchen, then she might as well have a connected retail space. With U-Haul dreams abandoned, Rebecca began getting excited, and she started looking for a location. To her and Jeanne’s amazement, they found the perfect space within a week of beginning their search. So then they found a contractor. And then an architect. “It literally snowballed that fast,” Rebecca says. Right after finding the perfect location, Rebecca started a blog to chronicle her and her mother’s journey. She started the online journal mostly for fun — the blog exhibits her zany sense of humor and Jeanne has learned not to take sips of coffee while reading it — but along with being a creative outlet, the blog is also part of a larger marketing campaign. Rebecca knew from the start that the success of Peggy Jean’s Pies 2.0, as she likes to call this second version of the shop, would depend on social media marketing. Then Rebecca had an idea that would throw the project into turbo gear: Kickstarter. Kickstarter.com is an online fundraising site. Project creators put together a video and short write-up explaining their projects — which might be anything from publishing a book to opening a pie shop — and then donors pledge funds. In return, donors receive rewards connected to the project — for example, a signed book or coupons for free pie. Rebecca had the idea to use Kickstarter the fourth week of September. The online campaign would last 30 days, and as the plan was to open Peggy Jean’s Pies by Thanksgiving, that left no time to mull things over. And so, on the morning of Saturday, Sept. 28, Jeanne was told to find something to wear and head to Rebecca’s to shoot a video. The campaign launched on Oct. 5. Rebecca and Jeanne set their goal at $10,000, and per Kickstarter rules, the campaign had to reach that goal or none of the pledges would be delivered. The next 30 days were a blur, as Rebecca and Jeanne promoted their campaign through social and local media while also continuing to work with their contractor, architect and suppliers to prepare for a November opening. The project hit the $10,000 goal three days early, on Thursday, Oct. 31. A total of 101 backers pledged donations ranging from $5 to $1,550 — the last amount from a stranger who wanted to be sure the Kickstarter campaign funded. It’s impossible, Rebecca says, to describe what people’s support has meant to them. “It’s a warm feeling” is the best Jeanne can do. The day after the Kickstarter campaign officially ended, Rebecca and Jeanne are looking ahead and dealing with some disappointing news their contractor delivered the previous week: There’s no way the shop will be open for Thanksgiving. But Rebecca and Jeanne are exploring other options — such as renting a commercial kitchen — that might let them get 300 or so pies out to customers. They know this challenge isn’t going to be their last, and both of them readily confess that almost every day, they question whether this whole idea really was insane. But then they think about the chance to have this adventure together. And once again, they feel good about where they are headed. “I look forward to doing this with my daughter,” Jeanne says. “That’s what gets me excited.” “We really do have fun together,” Rebecca adds. “I can’t wait.” v Prime Magazine December 2013

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PROMOTION

How To Choose An Ear, Nose And Throat Specialist Seven Areas Of Expertise According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, there are seven subspecialties within the ear, nose and throat specialty:

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If you have suffered with an earache, sore throat or stuffy nose, you know the impact these issues can have on your quality of life. Your ears, nose and throat control everything from your hearing and breathing to your sense of smell. Because of the complex workings of these body parts, it is critical to find a physician who specializes in the ear, nose and throat. The scientific name for such a doctor is otolaryngologist; however, most people simply call them an ear, nose and throat — or ENT — specialist. When creating a short list of ear, nose and throat doctors, look for a specialist who is board certified by the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. Then look into the doctor’s history. Find out how long they have been in practice and if any malpractice suits have been filed and how those were resolved. Qualified ear, nose and throat specialists are able to provide surgical and medical treatment for children and adults. An ear, nose and throat physi-

➤ Otology/Neurotology: diseases of the ear, including trauma (injury), cancer and nerve pathway disorders, which affect hearing and balance cian can treat ear, sinus, head and neck cancers, sleep apnea, nasal airway and hearing problems — including hearing aid evaluations and fittings. Find out if any of the doctors on your list have treated patients with the particular problems you are facing. If you can find a physician who is well skilled in treating your ailment, you stand a better chance of receiving proper treatment. Ask friends, family and your family physician for recommendations. Patients are more than happy to share positive experiences with their doctors, and your general practitioner is a great source of information when looking for a specialist in a particular area. In fact, a referral to an ear, nose and throat specialist may even be required by your health insurance provider. There are several websites that provide reviews of ear, nose and throat specialists, which makes using the Web in your search beneficial. When you choose a doctor with positive reviews, you will have the peace of mind that comes from making an informed decision. v

➤ Pediatric Otolaryngology: diseases in children with special ENT problems ➤ Head and Neck: cancerous and noncancerous tumors in the head and neck, including the thyroid and parathyroid ➤ Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: cosmetic, functional and reconstructive surgical treatment of abnormalities of the face and neck ➤ Rhinology: disorders of the nose and sinuses ➤ Laryngology: disorders of the throat, including voice and swallowing problems ➤ Allergy: treatment by medication, immunotherapy (allergy shots) and/or avoidance of pollen, dust, mold, food and other sensitivities that affect the ear, nose and throat

This “How To” section appears in each issue of Inside Columbia’s Prime. Readers learn the best way to obtain services and products they need. 28

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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Massage Therapist

References, Happy Customers Like any business, good massage therapists will have plenty of happy customers. If your friends or family members get massages regularly, ask them for recommendations. Word of mouth is often the best and most reliable source of information on any service provider. You can also ask message therapists for references. Talk to people who have used their services in the past to see if their techniques are effective. If you need a therapist for an injury, consult a doctor to find a massage therapist who is trained to meet your medical needs. Pricing The prices for massage therapy can vary dramatically depending on the type of massage, the therapist’s training and other factors. Your health insurance company may cover part of the bill. Some insurance providers will pay for massage therapy when it is prescribed by an osteopath or chiropractor.

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When you feel sore or exhausted, there is no better way to pamper yourself than paying a visit to a massage therapist. But not all massage therapists are the same. Choosing the best one for you requires some planning and thought, and may require trying more than one provider to explore services. Before you make an appointment, here are some things to keep in mind: Training Missouri requires massage therapists and operators of massage therapy businesses to have a current license with the Board of Therapeutic Massage. A license ensures the provider has professional training, among other requirements, so be sure to ask providers if they have a current Missouri license.

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Specializations There are more than 250 different kinds of massage therapies available, including deep tissue massage, aromatherapy, Swedish massage and hot stone massage. Therapies can also involve lotions, powders and oils designed to either increase or reduce friction as part of the process. With so many choices, it is important to research your options. There is no need for surprises. Knowing what to expect will help you feel comfortable. Your best source of information is your massage therapist. Many of them specialize in more than one type of massage. Find out what they specialize in because that’s the procedure they’re going to be best at performing.

Personality Massage therapy is a very personal business, one that requires direct one-on-one interaction with another person for long periods of time. While this may not be your main consideration, consider whether your therapist’s personality is a match for yours. To relax and get the best benefits from a massage, you should feel comfortable. Part of that comes down to how well you get along with the therapist. Location Finally, consider where the massage therapist is located. Is the office convenient to where you live and work? The office should also be neat, clean and professional-looking. You might also consider massage therapists who will make visits to your home or office. Having a massage therapist come to you is, for many people, the ultimate luxury. v


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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Gym

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Are you apprehensive about joining a gym? When people think of fitness facilities, they may imagine beautiful people wearing expensive workout gear. In reality, gyms are a fantastic way to lose weight, strengthen muscles, tone your body and, believe it or not, have some fun. At a gym, you can find support for your health goals. Experts are usually on hand to help you maximize your workout potential. The benefits of exercise are wellknown. Exercise releases endorphins, which improve mood and fight stress while also increasing energy levels and improving sleep. Not only does exercise in and of itself burn calories, but the

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muscle you build from exercise helps you burn calories more effectively. Regular exercise also lowers blood pressure, while reducing the risk of some types of cancer, osteoporosis, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. The truth is that good fitness habits are hard to form and most fitness regimens are difficult to maintain. It’s easy to create excuses or simply lack the time and motivation to exercise. If you are finished with excuses and are determined to live a healthier lifestyle, then finding a good workout facility is a great first step on the path toward a better way of life. Gyms help cure the boredom sometimes experienced while working out.

These facilities provide a variety of equipment, programs, classes and instructors in an effort to mix up workouts and keep exercise interesting. Becoming a member of a gym increases your chances of working out: You have already paid for the gym use, so it is harder to make excuses to skip exercising. Membership also provides you with the opportunity to meet other people with similar exercise goals who can offer motivation and support. Once you’ve decided to commit to a fitness facility, the number of options available can make the choice daunting. Some gyms have pools, many have classes, and most have some sort of equipment. Fitness studios or fitness centers that focus on a particular type of exercise such as yoga, bar or pre-choreographed classes have become very popular recently. These centers offer fewer options but are very effective. The most important aspect in looking for a gym is to find one that helps members attain their individual fitness goals by inspiring them. The right gym for you may not be the right gym for someone else. Each fitness center has different programs and services to help members work on their abilities and goals. For those with health restrictions, other considerations must be made. For example, someone with joint pain will need to find low-impact workouts, which are available in a wide variety. Some facilities offer classes for people with specific limitations, such as arthritis. Lastly, when deciding on a gym, potential members should look not only to their present goals but also to their future ones. Whether you are interested in losing weight, strengthening your core or toning those abs, you should focus on improvement rather than perfection. Once you reach your goal, you will have become used to the routine and will likely be able to maintain your success. In the end, belonging to a gym makes you more accountable, gives you a sense of community, provides a support system and, most importantly, offers a variety of options to obtain improved fitness. v


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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Foundation Repair Company

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Selecting a contractor for any home repair or remodeling project requires doing extensive research, and this especially holds true when the needed service is foundation repair. Which contractor to hire will depend on the exact type of work your foundation requires, as well as the condition and construction of the foundation. Your foundation may be made from cement blocks, poured concrete or granite slabs. In addition to its structure, you will want to know whether the problem is related to cracking or leaking, as these issues require different types of repair. When researching foundation repair, you will find that there are two distinct types of repair companies to choose from. Some companies specialize in fixing leaky foundations by setting up pumps and installing drains. Other companies specialize in the engineered aspects of the damage. These companies can provide necessary repairs such as pouring concrete, replacing blocks and installing jacks or piers. While you may find several companies that are able to provide a variety of ser-

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vices, be sure to choose one that specializes in the type of repair pertinent to the damage your foundation has sustained. If you have several issues, a company that can provide a wide variety of services is in order. If not, try to stick with a company that specializes in one area. Homes that have a finished basement may need additional services, such as carpentry, floor laying and finishing. If your basement is rough or unfinished, the level of work needed will be less as will the cost of the repairs. It is still important to find the right contractor for the job. In many cases, a contractor who specializes in foundation repair will be able to inspect the damage and provide you with an estimate. Be sure to get written estimates from several different companies in order to get the best value. During the inspections, make sure the contractor is clear about what repairs will be needed and how long they will take to complete. Each contractor who provides an estimate should give you approximately the same timeframe for completion. Avoid any contractor who goes way over or comes in way under the average timeframe.

Also beware of contractors who give you a cost estimate that is far lower than the rest. The estimate may be less because of the types of materials used or the contractor’s lack of experience. Find out what products the contractor will be using and whether those materials have a reputation of being long-lasting. If you know friends, family members or neighbors who have had foundation repair work done, ask them which contractor they used and if they were happy with the service. Find out if the repair work is holding up and if they would use the same contractor again. Word of mouth is a contractor’s best friend, and if your friends give rave reviews, choosing the same contractor is a good idea. Also check out the contractor’s rating with the Mid-Missouri Better Business Bureau by calling 573-886-8965. You can also call the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 800-392-8222. Before any work begins, make sure that the contractor has provided you with a current insurance certificate. You want to be sure that any accidents involving workers or damage to your home is covered during the job. If the contractor is unable to provide you with this certificate, contact their insurance company director to find out what they cover. It is also very important to find out about the contractor’s warranty, including what it covers, for how long and what happens to the warranty if the contractor is no longer in business. Confirm this information to be true. It will take time to research contractors, but it will be well worth the costs you will save in the long run. You will also have peace of mind knowing that the foundation of your home is in good shape. v


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Prime Time

12.13December December 1 The Missouri Symphony Conservatory Winter Concert celebrates the talents of more than 175 students from almost two dozen local public, private and home schools. The concert at the Missouri Theatre will feature the conservatory’s three youth ensembles: the Junior Sinfonia (grades 3–8), the Young Artists Philharmonic (grades 8–12) and the Children’s Chorus (grades 6–9). Free; 7 p.m.; 203 S. Ninth St.; 573-875-0600; www.mosymphonysociety.org

December 3 Start December off by enjoying a classic holiday experience for the entire family. The Great Russian Nutcracker performed by the Moscow Ballet comes to Jesse Auditorium. This classic Christmas story performed to Tchaikovsky’s musical masterpiece will set a fanciful holiday mood, from the opening “Miniature Overture” to the closing “Farewell Waltz of the Flowers.” From $19, children, $12; doors 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m.; Jesse Hall (MU campus); 573882-3781; www.concertseries.org

December 5 Fresh off the release of his debut album, “It Goes Like This,” country singer Thomas Rhett performs at The Blue Note. His debut single, “Something To Do With My Hands,” along with his second and third releases, peaked in the top 20 of the country airplay charts in 2012 and 2013. This year, Rhett also co-wrote songs for other successful country artists, such as Florida Georgia Line’s “Round Here,” Jason Aldean’s “1994” and Lee Brice’s “Parking Lot Party.” $21; doors at 8 p.m., show at 9 p.m.; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573-8741944; www.thebluenote.com

December 6 The Odyssey Chamber Music Series Holiday Songs concert at First Baptist Church marks the organization’s 10th anniversary and the Columbia Handbell

December 6 The annual Living Windows Festival in The District is a celebration of the holiday season. The event features shopping, fun and entertainment with live holiday scenes in store windows throughout downtown CoMo. Enjoy beautifully designed holiday windowscapes featuring costumes and sets created by local businesses, and visit with Santa, enjoy open houses, listen to strolling carolers and taste holiday treats. Free; 6 to 8 p.m.; downtown Columbia; 573-442-6816; www.discoverthedistrict.com

Ensemble’s 24th anniversary. The Élan Singers of Columbia will join the ensemble to perform David Ludwig’s “Hanukkah Songs.” Soprano Christine Seitz, accompanied by pianist Ayako Tsurata, will perform songs by Scandinavian composers, Norway’s Edvard Gried and Finland’s Jean Sibelius. A flute quartet will round out the holiday performance. $10 for students, $20 general admission; doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m.; 1112 E. Broadway; 573442-1149; www.odysseymissouri.org

December 6 The Mizzou wrestling team opens its conference season by hosting Ohio University. Because the SEC does not have a wrestling program, the Tigers began wrestling in the

Mid-American Conference last year, winning the conference title in its first season of MAC competition. Check out one of Mizzou’s most successful athletic programs at the Hearnes Center. $5 for adults, $3 for youths/seniors; 7 p.m.; 600 E. Stadium Blvd. (MU campus); 800-CAT-PAWS (2287297); www.mutigers.com

December 6–8, 11–12 Get your fill of holiday cheer at Stephens College Macklanburg Playhouse with this hilarious behind-the-scenes look at a community theatre’s production of “A Christmas Carol” gone awry. In the play “Inspecting Carol,” a third-tier theater learns its funding is about to be cut. As a result, the wacky cast of the company’s Prime Magazine December 2013

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annual production of “A Christmas Carol” will do anything to prove they deserve funding. Some eccentric characters in this holiday farce include a not-so-Tiny Tim, a Scrooge dreaming of performing en Español and an ill-fated wannabe actor pulled into the center of this laugh-out-loud spoof. From $7; 7:30 p.m. each show except the 2 p.m. matinee Dec. 8; 100 Willis Ave. (Stephens College campus); 573876-7199; www.stephens.edu/performingarts

December 7 Keep those roars coming as basketball season gets underway. Mizzou Men’s basketball faces UCLA in Mizzou Arena. Missouri hopes to avenge last year’s 97-94 overtime loss in Los Angeles. Come cheer on the Tigers as they face a Pac-12 foe. Prices vary, 11:30 a.m.; 1 Champions Drive; 800-CAT-PAWS (2287297); www.mutigers.com

December 7 The Cheese and Sauerkraut 10-Mile is a nowristwatch race in which participants must guess their finish time. The runner who most closely predicts his or her time will go home with a basket of cheeses. The runner whose guess is furthest from his or her time will leave with a can of sauerkraut. The race, organized by the Columbia Track Club, will start at the Katy Trail stop in McBaine. $3 for non-CTC members; 8:30 a.m.; 7149 W. Route K; 573874-2906; www.columbiatrackclub.com

December 7 From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., children between the ages of 3 and 10 can call the Santa Hotline in the North Pole. Santa, Mrs. Claus and the many elves of the North Pole will be standing by to take calls. Call 874-7473 or 874-6335 only on this day. Free; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 573-874-7473 or 573-874-6335; www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec

December 7 Celebrate the African-American holiday based around developing positive families and communities. The City Kwanzaa Celebration in the Frederick Douglass High School gymnasium offers entertainment and a holiday feast, plus several community awards. Free; 2 to 5 p.m.; 310 N. Providence Road; 573-817-5077; www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec

December 7 In its last home game of 2013, Stephens College basketball hosts Missouri Baptist University. This is the team’s second conference game of the season; the Stars will play Missouri Baptist again on Feb. 1 38

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in St. Louis. $5; 2 p.m.; Dorsey Street (Stephens College campus); 573-876-7212; www.stephens.edu/campuslife/athletics

December 7 Enjoy an evening of bygone revelry when the J. Huston Tavern hosts an 1870s English Christmas dinner. Based on the book Christmas with Dickens by Cedric Dickens — great-grandson of Charles — the period meal features six courses as well as readings from A Christmas Carol. Guests are encouraged to join in singing carols and playing games that are included in Dickens’s writing. Guests who would like to don period attire for the evening are welcome to do so. $60, reservation and advanced payment required; 6 p.m.; 305 Main St., Arrow Rock; 660-837-3200; mostateparks.com/page/54070/dining

December 8 Aaron Diehl is a pianist who honors tradition as he embarks into new territory. The Juilliard graduate and 2011 American Pianists Association Cole Porter Fellow leads the Aaron Diehl Quartet, which will perform at Murry’s as part of the We Always Swing Jazz Series. Diehl on piano is joined by Warren Wolf on vibraphone, David Wong on bass and Rodney Green on drums. From $18; doors open at 2:30 p.m. for the 3:30 show, doors at 6 for the 7 p.m. show; 3107 Green Meadows Way; 573-4493009; www.wealwaysswing.org

December 8 The legendary and world-renowned St. Louis Symphony will perform a classic concert in the historic Missouri Theatre. The concert, conducted by St. Louis Symphony’s resident conductor Stephen Jarvi, is a co-presentation of the MU School of Music and University Concert Series. Audiences will enjoy such pieces as Mozart’s “Don Giovanni Overture” and Mendelssohn’s “Symphony No. 4 ‘Italian.’ ” From $29 general admission, $19 students; 7 p.m.; 203 S. Ninth St.; 573-8829472; www.concertseries.org

December 8 The Stephens Sings Winter Choral Concert in the recital hall of historic Senior Hall features the Stephens College Concert Choir accompanied by the college’s a cappella jazz ensemble, The Velvetones. A joyous evening of classical, vocal jazz and seasonal works is in store. The free concert is open to the public and suitable for all ages. Free; 7:30 p.m.; 100 Waugh St.; 573-876-7199; www.stephens.edu/news Prime Magazine December 2013

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December 14 Local cat club, Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers, hosts a Cat Fancier’s Association sanctioned show of pedigreed cats. The Tiger’s Lair Feline Fancier’s Cat Show at the Plaza Event Center in the Parkade Plaza is a judged affair using the CFA Breed Standard for each of its 42 breeds. $3 children and seniors, $5 for adults; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 601 Business Loop 70 W.; 573-239-7970; www.cfamidwest.org

December 14 Known for his fun, easygoing demeanor and chart-topping hits, country singer Casey Donohew will perform at The Blue Note. The Burleson, Texas, native’s most recent album, “Double Wide Dream,” released on Donohew’s own label, Almost Country Entertainment, and kicked off a slew of sold-out concerts across the country. Donohew and his band, The Casey Donohew Band, are nearing country superstardom — you don’t want to miss a minute of the rise to fame. $15; doors at 8 p.m., show at 9 p.m.; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573874-1944; www.thebluenote.com

December 14 Show your holiday spirit while supporting arthritis research during the Jingle Bell Run/Walk. The 5K raises funds to fight arthritis, and has a goal of raising $40,000 during this year’s event. Participants are invited to dress in holiday-themed attire and tie jingle bells to their shoes. A free all-youcan-eat pancake breakfast at Bleu Restaurant will follow. $35; 8 a.m.; 801 E. Walnut; 314447-4883; www.jbrcolumbiamo.kintera.org

December 15 Celebrate the holiday season’s music at A Symphony of Toys in the Missouri Theatre. The concert will feature a variety of holiday favorites and includes performances by the Missouri Symphony Orchestra and Columbia Suzuki Ensemble. There will even be a special guest from the North Pole. Bring a donated toy for the Marines Toys for Tots program. $15, $7 for students and children; 3 p.m.; 209 S. Ninth St; 573-882-3781; www.mosymphonysociety.org

December 16 After making it to the postseason last year for the first time since 2007, Mizzou Women’s basketball looks to continue proving itself when the team faces Belmont in Mizzou Arena. Last year’s WNIT appearance capped Robin Pingeton’s best record in her four years as head coach, and the Tigers are anxious to improve upon last year’s 17-13 record. Prices vary; 7 p.m.; 40

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1 Champions Drive (MU campus); 800-CAT-PAWS; www.mutigers.com

December 18 ’Tis the season to give, not only to loved ones but to those less fortunate as well during The Mayor’s Challenge Food Drive, co-sponsored by Inside Columbia magazine. Families are encouraged to give a dollar and a nonperishable food item for every member of their immediate family, with the proceeds and food going straight to The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri. Mayor Bob McDavid has challenged Columbians to raise 1 million pounds of food or the cash equivalent to make sure Columbia pantries get stocked in time for Christmas. The event’s motto is “Freezing for Food.” Free, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.; corner of Broadway and Providence Road; 573-4741020; www.sharefoodbringhope.org

December 20 Enjoy the holiday lights and decorations of Columbia homes during the Holiday Lights and Sights Tour. Bring hot chocolate, a camera and meet your Parks and Recreation minibus at the Activity & Recreation Center (ARC). Enjoy a tour of several Columbia neighborhoods in comfort. Call ahead to reserve your seat for one of two tour sessions. $8; 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. and 7:45 to 9 p.m.; 1701 W. Ash St.; 573-874-7460 or 573-874-7700; www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec

December 28 Cheer on the Cougars before the New Year at the Columbia College vs. Avila University men’s basketball game. The Cougars do not begin conference play until January, but the game against Kansas Citybased Avila is sure to be exciting. $8 adults, $5 K–college students with ID; 7 p.m.; 700 Range Line St. (Columbia College campus); 573-875-7433; www.columbiacougars.com

December 31 Formerly known as First Night 5K, Boone Hospital Center’s Columbia Eve Fest 5K Run/ Walk is the same race, just under a different name. The race begins in front of CyclExtreme in downtown Columbia. Runners will head south to Champions Drive and Providence Point and then run back to CyclExtreme. Entry fee includes a T-shirt; proceeds from the event benefit Columbia Eve Fest. $25 on or before Dec. 29, $30 race day, children 12 and under $12 pre-registration, $15 race day; 4 p.m.; 19 S. Sixth St.; 573-874-7044; www.columbiatrackclub.com v Prime Magazine December 2013

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How Can I Help?

The Man With The Bag Toys For Tots Delivers Christmas To Columbia Children By Morgan McCarty

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The Columbia chapter of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves Toys for Tots Foundation is on a mission to give Christmas toys to children in need. “There are a lot of families out there that are, due to circumstance, unable to give Christmas to their kids,” says Robert “Dannie” Weddle, the coordinator of Columbia’s Toys for Tots program and a 1963–1967 Vietnam veteran. Every year, Toys for Tots collects new, unwrapped toys through fall and early winter and distributes these toys as Christmas gifts to children living in the area where the collection campaigns took place. The distribution area for Columbia’s Toys for Tots ranges from

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Weddle says the biggest way for the community to support Toys for Tots is by making a cash donation to the Columbia branch. “Every year we start doing our distribution, and we’ll run out of one age group, so we’ll go to Walmart or Sears or someplace and make arrangements with them to buy more toys for that age group,” Weddle says. Donations ensure that Columbia’s Toys for Tots is able to purchase enough toys to meet the need. All donations come with a receipt. Donations can be mailed to Columbia Toys for Tots, P.O. Box 30534, Columbia, MO, 65205. Checks should be made out to “Toys for Tots.” The magic for Weddle is being able to give the magic of Christmas to those who might not otherwise be able to enjoy it. “Our goal is to see the happy faces in the families that come in and tell us and cry on our shoulder and say: ‘Thank you, thank you. Because of you, we had a Christmas we would not have had.’ ” v Rocheport all the way to Warrington along the I-70 corridor. Columbia’s Toys for Tots also supplies toys to local organizations including Salvation Army, Voluntary Action Center and Burrell Behavioral Health. The total number of children served in 2012 through Columbia’s Toys for Tots program was roughly 3,000. Families who qualify for Toys for Tots can submit an application either on paper or online with the age and gender of their children. Starting in September, Toys for Tots begins to gather toys through donations and through purchasing toys with local donations and funds from the Toys for Tots national foundation.

Where to Drop Off Toys New, unwrapped toys can be dropped off at any of the Toys for Tots boxes around town, including at these locations: • All Landmark Bank locations • Mid-America Harley-Davidson • Joe Machens Toyota Joe Machens Ford • Head Motor Company • All US Bank locations (excepting MU) • Columbia’s Toys for Tots distribution center located at 1800 Burlington, off of Vandiver Drive.


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Pet Spotlight

Fancy That! Local Feline Fanciers Host Annual Cat Show By Kristen Herhold

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Love cats? Or have a grandchild who does? Then consider attending the Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers’ Cat Show at the Plaza Event Center at the Parkade Center on Saturday, Dec. 14. A local show for the worldwide Cat Fancier Association, the event will showcase 150 to 225 pedigreed cats representing 42 breeds, from the popular Persian to the exotic Egyptian Mau. “It’s an amazing show,” says Nancy Forrest, vice president of Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers, the Columbia club for pedigreed cats. “If you like cats, this is a great place to come and learn about the different breeds and to understand more about cat behavior.” If you’ve watched the National Dog Show on Thanksgiving Day, the format for the cat show might surprise you.

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Unlike dog shows, cat shows do not require training the animals for specific behaviors. Instead cats are judged on how well they meet the criteria of their specific breeds. “It’s much different from a dog who needs to learn to walk and stop on lead,” says Larry Adkison, a Cat Fancier Association certified judge and one of the six judges for the upcoming Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers show. “There’s a written standard for each breed based upon a 100-point system. Each breed has certain features that are worth more points. The color on some breeds may be worth 20 points, whereas for other breeds, color is only worth one point or zero points.” Though cats aren’t trained, the president of Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers Susan Norbury says there are certain

traits a cat should exhibit in order to be successful in the shows. “You want to show a cat that’s very calm and very friendly and doesn’t scare easily,” she says. “Cats need to be able to stand being handled by judges throughout the show.” Norbury has been showing cats for 12 years and currently owns six Maine Coons. “I love showing off my Maine Coons,” she says. “I love the friends I have made over the years at these shows. This is kind of a social thing for a lot of us.” Adkison has been a cat show judge for 33 years. He says his favorite part of being a judge is traveling the world. “I’ve done 66 shows outside of the United States,” he says. “I’ve been to China, Malaysia and Indonesia just this year. I’m going to Japan on Thanksgiving, and next year I’m going to Rome and back to Indonesia.” The 2013 show marks the 25th anniversary of the Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers’ Cat Show. Forrest hopes to grow the club this year to further the mission of the Cat Fancier Assocization. “Bottom line, the CFA is concerned with the welfare of all cats, not solely for the welfare of pedigree cats, which is a misconception,” she says. “If we can grow our club, we would like to donate a portion of our proceeds to benefit other nonprofits such as spaying and neutering programs, Columbia Second Chance and the Central Missouri Humane Society.” Cat shows aren’t only for the stereotypical cat-obsessed people. There are a wide variety of attendees at cat shows, sometimes even famous people.


“Nicole Kidman came to a show I judged at Madison Square Garden,” Adkison says. “There are a lot of famous people who happen to like cats.” Though the show in Columbia likely won’t attract movie stars, Forrest hopes it will attract local residents looking for an entertaining day. “It’s a fun way to come out and see all these different breeds of cats in one place,” she says. “It’s our passion, and we want others to be a part of it too. We don’t do this for money. It’s purely because of our love of cats.” The event will be at 601 Business Loop 70 W. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will be $3 for children and seniors and $5 for adults. v Ready, Set, Show! Interested in entering a feline companion in a cat show? Learn how on the Cat Fancier Association’s website at www.cfainc.org or ask someone at the show! Prime Magazine December 2013

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Pet Corner

Ghosts Of Christmas Past Unexpected Finds Conjure Up Warm Memories

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By Dr. John Williams

This is going to be a little different. A few days ago I was going through my files and ran across a folder that was simply tagged “Mom and Dad’s Stuff.” Perhaps it was serendipity, but as I was thumbing through Social Security cards, ancient insurance policies and the like, I came across two papers that were not only unexpected to find but surprisingly appropriate for this time of year. Neither was titled nor was there an author’s name listed. Regardless, I remembered all too well who had written them. So, without any fear of charges of plagiarism here they are, I hope for your holiday enjoyment. Twas The Night Before Christmas Twas the night before Christmas and all through the flat All the creatures were wondering where old Doc was at. All the bowls were filled with premium chow And litter boxes were clean ’neath the holiday bough. Their owners were worn, the bustlings just over. Only Doc was not home yet, emergencies to cover. The food was cooling, but it would reheat. They knew he’d be along, though tired and beat. When out of the night came a noise at the door. They knew it was Doc, finally home from the chore. His hair was quite gray and his back a bit bent, His eyes a slight twinkle, a bit of Irish glint.

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Dr. John S. Williams and his dad, John J. Williams A quick bite with his gang, with a warm family fire, All home for this night, the only gift he desires. And as he unwinds midst this holiday lore, He wishes Merry Christmas to all, two legged and four. RADIO GREETINGS Curiously, the second document reads like this: Time is up and we have to go. Before we sign off I have Christmas presents for everybody. For you dog owners: I give you, The joy of coming home to a cold nose and a warm heart. The wonderful memories of loyal, four-legged friends that have passed. A loyal, selfless companion that will always be your friend.

A quiet nod to all they were glad to see, Then with his full bag, he went straight to the tree. Catnip for little Billy, and a toy for Finn, A collar for Newman and a chew bone for Jen.

For you cat owners: I give you, Quiet purrs in quiet times. For those cold winter nights, a small, furry body on your lap, and that curious contradiction of extreme aloofness that turns to warm affection.

Truman’s new bow, and B.J.’s red sock, A tear of memory for Mag, Rose, and Old Doc. Pet food for all and a few good treats, He sighed as he finished and got off of his feet.

For my friends: I give you, My gratitude,

December 2013 Prime Magazine


My respect, My sincerest thanks, And my friendship in return. For my parents: I give you, The wonderful memories of Lucky, Candy, Geraldine, and Rosie. The love and energy of your little friend, B.J. And, the love and respect of your children and grandchildren. For my family: I give you, My total devotion, My immense pride in you And, all my love. And for all you listeners: I give you, My sincere efforts to provide your pet with help and provide you with an occasional smile. My thanks for your loyalty and support. And best wishes from my family to yours for a happy, healthy, and holy holiday season. At the bottom of the latter piece, in his handwriting, my father wrote: “Each week, radio station KFRU 1400 AM, in Columbia, Missouri broadcasts an hour show named ‘The Pet Place’ which is hosted by Dr. John Williams. It is a callin show with listeners calling in questions concerning their pets. This is the script that Dr. Williams used to close the show on Saturday, December 23, 2000.” Ancient history I suppose and maybe of interest only to me, but I hope you enjoyed my efforts from that time. I think Dad did. Happy holidays to all. v

— John Williams, DVM, is a retired Columbia veterinarian who spent 39 years as a small-animal practitioner. Prime Magazine December 2013

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Life Lessons

Dread, Drama And The Drill Oh, Why Must We Go To The Dentist? By Saralee Perel

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Panic kicked in like a lightning bolt. The team in white coats swarmed through the examining room as medicinal odors encircled me. Yes, I was at the dentist’s office. “It’s so hot in here,” I said. My face was red from a hot flash. I was given water. I closed my eyes so I wouldn’t see the needle. Then came the spine-chilling sound of the drill. Terrified, I asked, “Are we almost done?” “Well, we just started,” the dentist said. Some people might think my unease justified, but here’s the thing: It was my husband, Bob’s, appointment. I was in the room while he was having a cavity filled. I was there to comfort Bob, who happened to be asleep. I believe that if he could give birth, he’d sleep right through it. I also had the notion that I could desensitize myself from my fear of the dentist by watching the procedure. Ha!

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Bernadette was assisting that day. As always, she treated me like I was her best friend. “Do you like your work?” I asked her. “I do. I love the people.” And I love her. I believe one cause of anxiety is isolation. So whenever I find myself in a stressful situation, I try to make connections with caring people. At the dentist office, I am frail and frightened. I tell the staff that. And their compassionate response helps me avoid panic. I see them care as much about me as they do about my teeth. I’m not just a patient; I’m a human being who is afraid. Once I saw a dentist for a root canal. I told him I was very anxious. He said, “You’re old enough to stop being a baby.” My terror then soared. So I did something that I’m still surprised I did. As he was about to proceed, I removed his equipment from my mouth, stood up from the chair and left.

I sent him a letter to which he never responded. Who could relax when being dealt with the way this fellow dealt with me? As I’ve said before, if someone doesn’t treat me well because I’m afraid, whose problem is that? Things are different with my current dentist. I asked Lisa, a hygienist, the same question I asked Bernadette: “Do you like your work?” Lisa hadn’t heard me ask Bernadette, but she gave the same response: “Oh, yes. I love the people.” Lisa and I don’t socialize, but when we’re together at the office, it’s as genuine a bond as any other. How I am feeling is priority to her. In all parts of my life, it is the connections I make that help settle my angst. Ruminating to myself makes nothing better. Instead, it fuels my isolation and anxiety. “We’re done now, right?” I asked the dentist. “Just about,” he said. It was hard to hear him over Bob’s snoring. I put my head between my knees so I wouldn’t pass out. Bernadette offered me a cool towel and more water. Then the dentist said: “All done. You did great.” “Oh, thanks,” I said. “It was pure hell, but I made it through.” I realized too late the dentist was talking to Bob. As we left the office, I said to my husband, “You’re my inspiration.” He tenderly kissed my forehead and said, “And you’re a doofus.” “Well, I’m perfectly calm now.” We got into our car. I gave him a big hug, told him how relieved I was it was over, put on my seatbelt and passed out. v Award-winning columnist, Saralee Perel, can be reached at sperel@saraleeperel.com or via her website: www.saraleeperel.com.


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Fun & Games

Letter-Link Word Search Puzzle Directions: The words in the Word List are hidden in the puzzle grid. Some are not in straight lines, so look in all directions for each next letter (right, left, up, down, diagonal). Do not backtrack. Words may overlap each other or themselves by one letter.

Silent Night

word list ADVENT WREATH

LAUREL

ANNUNCIATION

MADONNA

BETHLEHEM

MANGER

BIRTHDAY

MELCHIOR

BOUGH

MESSIAH

CAESAR

MICAH

CANDLES

MYRRH

CENSUS

NATIVITY

CITY OF DAVID

OXEN

DECREE

PROPHECY

DONKEY

REDEEMER

EVE

SAVIOR

GOSPEL

SERVICE

HALLELUJAH CHORUS

SHEEP

HARK! THE HERALD

SHEPHERD

ANGELS SING

THE FIRST NOEL

IMMANUEL

WE THREE KINGS OF

INN ISRAEL © 2013 Eliza Bettin: Eliza Bettin’s puzzles have been in newspaper syndication and IGA, United Airlines and Earthgrains magazines.

Cryptogram Decipher this quote by unraveling the secret code. Each letter stands for another letter. We’ve given you a few hints to get you started.

>>>

Test your knowledge! Turn to Page 56 to check your answers. 50

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December 2013 Prime Magazine

SIMEON

HOLY LAND

ORIENT ARE WORSHIP


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Recipe Box

Ho, Ho, Holiday Treats

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Make The Season Simple And Sweet

Nothing says home for the holidays like the smell of treats baking in the oven and a crowded kitchen filled with loved ones. Whether making decades-old family favorites or starting new holiday baking traditions, you can create homemade holiday goodies in a (ginger) snap. “The holidays are a time when families are in the kitchen at record rates to bake cookies, build gingerbread houses and create a wide variety of sweet treats,” says Nancy Siler, vice president of consumer affairs at Wilton. “The good news is, even if you only have 30 minutes to spare during this hectic time, you can make amazing desserts for gatherings or gifting.” Try these easy treat ideas from Wilton to spread holiday cheer: • Holiday Helpers: Invite family and friends for a cookie decorating day to help prepare gifts for upcoming events. You provide the Sparkling Sugars and Sprinkles, Peppermint Twisted Sticks, and red and green icing. Everyone else provides the creativity. • Miracle on Your Street: Crunched for time with a party to attend? Pick up ready-to-eat cookies and artfully dip them in red and green Candy Melts candy for an elegant upgrade. No one has to know how simple it was to create a customized dessert. • Instant Snowman: Coat peanut butter sandwich cookies in white Candy Melts candy to create instant snowmen. Decorate with hats, scarves and, of course, carrot noses. • It’s a Wrap: Turn your homemade treats into gourmet gifts. Stock up on holiday-themed gift bags and boxes, colorful tissue paper, ribbons and tags to transform made-from-the-heart goodies into extra special gifts. • For more holiday ideas and inspiration, visit www.wilton.com.

Cheery Cereal Tree Treats Makes about 12 treats 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine 4 cups mini marshmallows juniper or leaf green icing color 6 cups crisp rice cereal white cookie icing jumbo rainbow nonpareils, sprinkles or sugars, as desired Prepare 3D Silicone Tree Mold and silicone spatula or wooden spoon with vegetable pan spray. In large saucepan, melt butter. Add marshmallows; cook and stir until melted. Tint with icing color. Remove from heat and add cereal; mix well. Press into prepared mold. When cool to touch, remove from mold. (If mixture becomes hard to work with, microwave at 50 percent power for 30 to 60 seconds to soften.) Heat cookie icing following label directions. Squeeze snow and garlands on trees; add sprinkles and sugars as desired. Let dry. 52

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Christmas Candy Swirl Cookies Makes about 2 dozen cookies. 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1-1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 egg 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon almond extract (optional) red and green sparkle gel Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly spray Easy Decorate Swirl Cookie Pan with vegetable pan spray. In small bowl, combine flour and salt. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer at medium speed until well blended. Beat in egg and extracts; mix well. Add flour mixture; beat until well blended. Press dough into pan cavities, filling 2/3 full. Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until light brown around edges. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Turn pan over; lightly tap pan to remove cookies. Cool cookies completely. Decorate cooled cookies with sparkle gel. Let set, at least 30 minutes.


Jolly Santa’s Treat Cookies Makes about 3 dozen cookies 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1-1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 egg 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon almond extract red, green and white cookie icing red and dark green colored sugars white sparkling or pearlized sugar white sugar pearls Preheat oven to 350°F. In small bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add egg and extracts; mix well. Add flour mixture, 1 cup at a time, mixing after each addition. Do not chill dough. Divide dough into 2 balls. On floured surface, roll each ball into a circle approximately 12 inches diameter and 1/8 inch thick. Dip Cookie Hugger or “Ho-Ho” word cookie cutters in flour before each use. Bake cookies on ungreased cookie sheet 8 to 11 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned. Cool cookies completely. Outline and fill-in cooled cookies with cookie icing. For “Ho-Ho” cookies, sprinkle with sugars; let set until icing is completely dry. For snowflake cookie, add white cookie icing detail to dried cookie; attach sugar pearls with dots of icing. Prime Magazine December 2013

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Recipe Box

Delicious Pie End Holiday Gatherings With A Slice Of Decadence

S Sweet Snowmen Cookies •

white, red, green, black and orange Candy Melts candy peanut butter sandwich cookies holiday confetti, holiday and snowflake mix sprinkles cinnamon drops black sugar pearls silver pearlized sugar

• • • • •

Melt white Candy Melts candy following package instructions. Place cookies on cooling grid positioned over parchment-lined cookie sheet. Spoon melted candy over top surface of cookie; chill 5 to 10 minutes or until set. Turn cookies over, candy side down, on cooling grid. Completely cover cookies with melted candy; chill 5 to 10 minutes or until set. Repeat, if needed, to completely cover cookie. To decorate snowmen, melt Candy Melts candy following package instructions as needed. Using red, green and white candy in candy or disposable decorating bag, pipe hats, ear muff band and scarves, adding colored sugar trim to candy before it sets. For ball cap, cut a Candy Melt candy wafer in half; attach with melted candy. Attach sprinkles for buttons, ear muffs and decorative accents using dots of melted candy. Using melted black candy and decorating bag, pipe facial features. Using melted orange candy and decorating bag, pipe nose. v 54

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December 2013 Prime Magazine

Savoring a flavorful, homemade pie is the perfect way to end any gathering during the holidays. While apple, pecan and pumpkin are goto favorites this time of year, introducing holiday-inspired flavor twists is perfect for those who crave a little variety. “You’ll love the smooth layers of rich chocolate and the crunch of pecans seasoned with cinnamon and allspice in this easy-to-make pecan pie,” says Mary Beth Harrington of the McCormick Kitchens. “I like to bring this pie as a hostess gift, too. The additional ingredients give it a unique, memorable touch.” Make any pie holiday-worthy by topping each piece with an extraspecial homemade whipped cream flavored with vanilla extract. Try other festive varieties like candy cane, cocoa cinnamon and eggnog. For more holidayinspired recipes, visit www.McCormick. com, www. Facebook.com/ McCormickSpice or www.Pinterest.com/ mccormickspices.

Decadent Chocolate Pecan Pie Serves: 10

directions

INGREDIENTS

Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 9-inch deepdish pie plate with pie crust. Bake 7 minutes. Remove crust from oven. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.

1

refrigerated pie crust (from 14.1-ounce package) 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 3 tablespoons milk 4  eggs 3 tablespoons butter, melted 2 teaspoons McCormick® pure vanilla extract 1 cup dark corn syrup 1 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® ground allspice 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 cups pecan halves

Meanwhile, microwave chocolate chips and milk in medium microwavable bowl on high 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. Stir until smooth. Pour chocolate evenly over crust. Beat eggs in large bowl. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Slowly pour mixture over chocolate layer. Place ring of foil around edges of crust to prevent over-browning. Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until filling is puffed and center is still soft enough to move when shaken gently. Cool completely on wire rack.


Holiday-Flavored Whipped Toppings directions For vanilla whipped cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar and 1 teaspoon McCormick® pure vanilla extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. For candy cane whipped cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® pure vanilla extract and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® pure peppermint extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. For cocoa cinnamon whipped cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa powder,1/2 teaspoon McCormick® ground cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® pure vanilla extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. For eggnog whipped cream, beat 1 cup heavy cream, 1/2 teaspoon McCormick® pure vanilla extract, 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® ground nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon McCormick® imitation rum extract in medium bowl with electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. v

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Prime Pages

fun & games solved Challenge your brain with this month’s puzzles found on Page 50.

Letter-Link Word Search

Cryptogram Answer

The Christmas Box Richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster, 1995)

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Did You Know?

REVIEWED By Gretchen Pressley

The holidays are a time for togetherness and love, and The Christmas Box is sure to get readers into the holiday mood. The book is a quick read and would be perfect for sharing with grandkids for a cozy story time in front of the fireplace. Richard Paul Evans wrote The Christmas Box for his two daughters and self-published the novel in 1993. Local success brought the attention of major publishers, and when Simon & Schuster released the book in 1995, it became an instant success all around the country for its timeless message of love during the holiday season. The story is simple but poignant. A young couple, Rick and Keri, and their 4-year-old daughter, Jenna, have just moved so that Rick can start a formalwear business. After making do in a very small apartment, they are hired on as caretakers to an elderly woman named Mary and invited to share her sprawling Victorian home. As soon as they move in, it becomes apparent that Mary is looking more for companionship and family than for caretakers. The little family begins spending more and more time with Mary, and in turn, she becomes a grandmother figure for them. With this newfound closeness, however, Mary begins reproving Rick for putting his startup business before time with his family. But it isn’t until Mary becomes sick that Rick realizes the tragic story behind her agitation with his devotion to his job. Mary’s story, and the gift she gives Rick’s little family, are treasures we can all hold close this holiday season. v

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A Christmas candle is a lovely thing; it makes no noise at all, but softly gives itself away. ~Eva Logue

December 2013 Prime Magazine

The first release of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol was on Dec. 19, 1843, and all 6,000 copies sold out by Christmas Eve five days later.


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Your Bucket List

A Grief Overcome George Minnick By Anita Neal harrison

Editor’s Note: In this new recurring feature, Prime readers have the chance to share what they’re crossing off their bucket lists. This month, we have the bucket list of Prime reader George Minnick. Minnick, 81, began this list after his wife of 22 years, Bobbie, died in 2009. Bobbie’s hospice provider sent someone out every month to check on Minnick after Bobbie’s passing, and this visitor helped Minnick out of his depression. “She reminded me of my mother,” Minnick says with a chuckle. “She’d stand in the living room with her hands on her hips and say: ‘Get out of that recliner. Get out of this house. Do something.’ ” The following has been Minnick’s response.

G

GEORGE MINNICK’S BUCKET LIST Started: August 9, 2009 Finished: ???

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Take Bobbie’s ashes to Oregon. Done.

Go on a Muskie fishing trip with [stepdaughter] Mary Jo. Done.

Buy a newer car. Done.

Visit my old fishing spots in Illinois. Done 6/19/12. Neat memories.

Helicopter ride over our [former] house on the Lake [of the Ozarks]. Did helicopter ride at Niagara Falls; would still like to fly over Lake.


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Do some shows in Branson. Done, nice time.

See my great-grandchildren. Seen Carter 6/20/12, looks like [son] Mitch when he was that age.

Look up a woman I dated many, many years ago. Done 6/18/12. Long story but happy to hear her life turned out well.

Go to the Lake fishing [but not in the old places]. Two-day trip to Osage Beach done with [friend] Donna.

Visit Boys Town. Done, nice three-day trip with Donna.

Ride in a hot air balloon. Done on 9/9/12. Very nice weekend trip to KC.

Own and drive a vintage Corvette. Yes, yes. Been wanting one since the age of 29, but children, work, living at the Lake — I thought I would never see that day come. Gave it to myself for my 80th birthday, so dreams can come true even though they may take 50 years.

Visit Mt. Rushmore again. Done, July 2011.

Go on a cruise. Done 7/14/2012. Very nice trip.

Visit to St. Jude’s hospital in Memphis. Done with Mary Jo.

One more trip to Nova Scotia? Yes. Done in July 2013 with the help of Mary Jo. Very emotional to visit some of the places that both Bobbie and I enjoyed.

Trip to Niagara Falls. Done on my 79th birthday. Great trip.

See Fiddler on the Roof live one more time. Done on Dec. 1, 2011.

Take banjo lessons. Tried it, sold the banjo, no longer a priority.

Make a trip to Florida to visit my friend Tom. 2/13/11 done. Great trip.

Visit Dan and Loretta in Kansas. Done but sad reunion.

Take an odyssey trip [take off on a whim and go as I please] to visit an old friend of mine in Illinois and then visit the gravesite of the couple who changed my life with their love and understanding. Done on 6/9/11. Very, very, emotional day but wonderful!

Travel to Colorado Springs to see Mary Jo’s new house. Done. Great trip.

Christmas trip to Branson for the shows. Done, nice time.


Make a return trip to Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Big item on my bucket list is to own one more Cadillac before I go. We will see what happens.

Spend two nights with [sons] Mark and Mitch at Harrah’s in St. Louis.

One more fishing trip with Mark and Mitch to Birch Island.

One more fishing trip to Boyd’s [Mason Lake Resort in Wisconsin] with Mark and Mitch.

Pilot a plane one more time.

Skydiving? Why not?

Zip line. What a way to go!

Treasure Island, Fla., one more time?

Alaska cruise. Looks like my health will not permit it.

Odyssey trip to Wisconsin to visit my old haunts there.

Portland, Maine, Lobster Fest.

Paint a landscape. Working at it.

Visit the hospital chapel once a week. Working at it.

Tell my children and stepchildren I love them each time I talk to them. Working at it. v Tell us your story

Have you crossed something off your bucket list? Please share your experience with us for a chance to be featured in an upcoming issue of Prime! Just send a brief note describing your bucket list adventure to anita@insidecolumbia.net, and if we choose to feature your triumph, we will be in contact for an interview. Prime Magazine December 2013

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Columbia Confidential: Publisher Fred Parry On The Issues Columbia Is Talking About

Columbia’s Crumbling Infrastructure

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Last month, Columbia voters approved a $32.3 million bond issue to maintain and extend Columbia’s aging sewer system. The ballot issue received overwhelming support from voters, but the city’s attempts to educate the general public on the sewer issue may have unintentionally raised new questions about the overall condition of Columbia’s other infrastructural components, including our electric utility, streets, sidewalks and traffic flow. Many voters were surprised to learn that an astonishing 40 percent of our city’s 675 miles of sewer lines are more than 75 years old. Given the reported conditions of our sewers, many now wonder if our electric utility has also been subject to the same neglect. Columbia has been growing at a steady pace over the last three decades, which leads one to believe that city leaders have failed to keep up with the demands this growth has placed on our infrastructure. For most people, this theory may manifest itself at the intersections of Providence Road and Stadium Boulevard or at Grindstone Parkway and Forum Boulevard at 7:45 on weekday mornings. For others, the issue is evident after a large rainstorm when raw sewage backs up into their basements. For economic developers, the issue looms large when there is an insufficient supply of electricity available to support a prospective employer who wants to move a business into our central city. For those who follow local government, there’s a common theme emerging from the very selective messaging that leaks out of City Hall. Columbia’s purse strings are controlled by a city council that prefers to spend money on pet projects involving public transportation, recreation and alternative energy sources rather than addressing our city’s most pressing needs. While the words may never be spoken in public, it’s clear that there’s plenty of pressure placed on our city manager and department heads to pursue these nonessential fringe projects rather than address critical infrastructure issues. As taxpayers, we are only exposed to the cold, hard truth about our crumbling infrastructure when more money is needed to fix the problem. There’s a tendency by elected officials to “kick the can down the road” when the issues get tough. Rather than take the lumps associated with fixing an underfunded pension program or repairing sewers in desperate need of repair, many public officials would rather fund the “project du jour” than make the tough decision to fix a problem that may

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have been passed along to them. Unfortunately, this type of neglect has resulted in well-publicized bankruptcies filed by local governments such as Detroit, Stockton, Calif., and Jefferson County, Ala. While Columbia City Council members can conveniently find cover from the shell game that has been our city budget process, they ultimately decided in recent years that they would rather build a new $30 million City Hall and a 10-story parking garage, install hundreds of miles of bicycle lanes and purchase wind energy from a town in Iowa than address significant present-day infrastructural issues. Interestingly enough, most of these projects were funded without voter approval. In a way, it’s ironic that voters are only asked to approve funding for projects that ought to be among the basic services provided by a city, like sewers. As a taxpayer and a concerned citizen, I’d like to know more about the condition of Columbia’s core infrastructural components. But here’s the catch: I’d like to have this information before we approve the next new park, buy a hydrogen-powered city bus or hire a consultant to evaluate the taxation benefits of legalizing marijuana in Columbia. It should be incumbent upon the City Council and the city manager to provide a State of Columbia’s Infrastructure report every year before the annual budget is presented. As a community, we must begin the process of undoing selfimposed ordinances and sunsetting dedicated sales taxes that allow our city officials to neglect priorities. Years of prosperity combined with a less-than-transparent budgeting process led us to the tangled mess that prevents us from taking care of our city’s most basic needs. Now is a good time to stop, take a deep breath and start tackling the tough issues before Columbia’s progressive City Council moves us deeper into troubled financial waters.

Fred Parry, fred@insidecolumbia.net


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Prime December 2013  

Sweet Return: Peggy Jean's Pies is back! Plus Champagne suggestions for toasting the holidays, travel to Scotland with writer Sylvia Forbes...

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