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JANUARY 2014

Your Guide To COLUMBIA’S FITNESS CENTERS One Couple’s ADVENTURES IN SCUBA DIVING

House Mom Lana Cameron IN CHARGE


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Contents 14

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Volume 5, Issue 10

6 Prime Numbers

Facts To Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.

8

The Shopping List

Girls’ Night Out

10

Tasting Room

Everyday Elegance

12 On The Road With Ray

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Fortuitous Visit To Fell’s Point

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The Life Of A House Mom

Lana Cameron

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Find Your Fit

Peek Inside Columbia’s Fitness Centers

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How-To Guides

How To Choose A Mattress How To Safeguard Your Golden Years How To Choose A Computer Repair Specialist How To Choose An Accountant

29 Prime Time

Can’t Miss Events For January

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How Can I Help

Second Chance

34 Pet Corner

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Wacky Critter Holidays

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Life Lessons

Treasures In The Attic

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Fun & Games

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Recipe Box

Cooking With Canned Goods

42 Prime Pages

Review Of Gone Girl

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Your Bucket List

Diving Back In

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Columbia Confidential

Publisher Fred Parry Takes On The Issues Columbians Are Talking About Prime Magazine January 2014

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Welcome

A Woman Of Mettle Not having belonged to a sorority during my time at MU, I know little about Greek life. So little, in fact, that before getting a tip on this month’s profile subject, Beta Theta Pi house director Lana Cameron, I didn’t even know about the position of “house mom” — a woman, often of retirement age, who lives in a sorority or fraternity house and manages the household. I heard about Cameron from Inside Columbia creative director Carolyn Preul, who had a chance meeting with the house mom at the King’s Daughters Holiday Festival. “Her personality is magnetic,” Preul told me. “She’s beautiful and outgoing and confident.” Once I met Cameron, I realized Preul hadn’t oversold her. Cameron, who is 72, is one of the spunkiest women I’ve ever met, and I’m not limiting that to a particular age range. Our interview started just before dinner at the Beta Theta Pi house, so she invited me to join the meal. As she introduced me to the room full of 125 college men, all looking at us, waiting for their cue to be seated (a rather intimidating moment for me), she mentioned that she was going to be our January cover girl. The room erupted in whistles and cheers, and Cameron raised a foot onto her chair and declared, “I think I’ll give them a little leg,” which, of course, met with the men’s approval. But Cameron’s spunk goes much deeper than mere confidence to joke in front of an audience. Her life before being a house mom included working as a chef in top hotels and country clubs in St. Louis — back when almost no women rose to the position of chef. Find out what that experience was like — as well as what being a house mom today is like — in Cameron’s profile on page 14. As you flip through the magazine, other stories you’ll want to look out for include a visit to Fell’s Point, Md., with roving reporter Ray Speckman; a celebration of peculiar animal holidays with Dr. John Williams; a directory of local fitness centers to help you get active this new year; and a story on a couple who went scuba diving on their honeymoon and then didn’t go again for 27 years, loved it and celebrated their 30th anniversary with a dream trip. I hope this issue of Inside Columbia’s Prime brings inspiration as we start 2014. As always, thanks for spending some time with us. Happy New Year!

staff Publisher Fred Parry Associate Publisher Melody Garnett Parry Editor-in-Chief Sandy Selby Managing Editor Anita Neal Harrison Editorial Assistant Morgan McCarty Creative Director Carolyn Preul Director of Marketing Kevin Magee Graphic Designer Kate Moore Trever Griswold Photo Editor L.G. Patterson Sales Manager Deb Valvo Marketing Representatives Rosemarie Peck Joe Schmitter Jamill Teter Sales Assistants Jessica Card Kalie Clennin Office Manager Kent Hudelson Assistant Finance Manager Brenda Brooks Distribution Manager John Lapsley Director of Customer Retention Gerri Shelton

Want more of our insider view of Columbia? Sign up for the new Prime Club e-newsletter at www.insidecolumbia.net/prime.

Contributing Writers Kathy Casteel, Sylvia Forbes, Saralee Perel, Angel Donnette Robertson, Ray Speckman, John Williams

Prime Magazine is published by OutFront Communications, 47 E. Broadway, Columbia, MO 65203, 573-442-1430. Copyright OutFront Communications, 2013. The magazine is published 12 times a year on the first day of every month. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

➲ like us! Find us at facebook.com/primemagazineonline 4

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Serving the boomer & senior markets


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Prime Numbers: Statistics You Don’t Have To Be A Math Geek To Love

35 This was King’s age when he became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 14, 1964.

250,000

Jan. 15, 1929

Martin Luther King Jr. was born

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That’s the estimated number of people in the crowd during King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered on Wed., Aug. 28, 1963, during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Nov. 2, 1983 This is when President Ronald Reagan signed a bill creating a federal holiday to honor King. The holiday was first observed on January 20, 1986.

16 That’s how many years passed between the creation of the federal Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and the first time all 50 states officially observed it, which happened on Jan. 17, 2000.


The Shopping List

Gal Pals

Take To The Town With Your Best Girlfriends

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By Morgan McCarty

This month, head out for a night of fun with your girlfriends. Treat yourselves to catching up over a fabulous dinner, followed by a fantastic show or concert. There’s no better way to warm up in the winter than by sharing an evening with great friends.

1. Off-white and black coat with fur collar by Inspired Style, available at My Sister’s Circus ($349) 2. Pink striped peasant top by Michael Stars, available at Girl Boutique ($188) 3. Long necklace available at Glik’s ($11.80) 4. Ivory clutch by Melie Bianco, available at Elly’s Couture ($72) 5. “Flight of Silver” bracelet by Ten Thousand Villages, available at The Mustard Seed ($18) 6. “Sand/Beige Sable” nail polish by Crabtree & Evelyn, available at Makes Scents ($8) 7. Black “Roxy” smoking slippers by Kravings, available at Dryer’s Shoe Store ($110) 8. Indigo jeans by Not Your Daughter’s Jeans, available at My Sister’s Circus ($98)

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The Tasting Room

Everyday Elegance Oregon Wines That Won’t Break The Bank

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By Kathy Casteel

The elegant Pinot Noir grape fascinates wine lovers. The vine’s finicky nature makes it a troublesome plant to cultivate in many climates, prompting some exasperated vintners to declare it the fruit of the devil. Yet the wine it produces is among the world’s most popular; its broad range of aromas and flavors offers a fruitful, food-friendly companion to meals and lends an air of sophistication to any occasion. Pinot Noir grapes — and white-wine cousin Pinot Gris — thrive in the yearround moderate climate of Oregon, where consistently warm days and cool nights make life a bit easier in the vineyard. Targeting the high-end segment, Oregon’s winemakers have carved a niche in the boutique wine market and built a reputation for expensive wine. Enter winemaker Ryan Harms, who moved to the state in 2001. Four years later, he founded Union Wine Co. with the goal of making affordable wines from the great grapes of Oregon. With his label Underwood, Harms has achieved his goal. Sourcing grapes from the peaks and valleys across Oregon, Underwood Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris reflect the iconic terroir of the region, in a price range that makes both varietals good options for your everyday table.

Underwood Pinot Noir fills the senses with the aroma of berries and plums. Flavors of sweet raspberries and cherries are interlaced with cocoa undertones. Light tannins carry through on the fruitful finish. Underwood Pinot Gris sports a bouquet of lemon, apple and pear. A refreshing, bright taste of sweet pear and apple leads to a clean finish. Underwood has embraced the “foodcart culture” with these approachable wines that even complement food-truck fare. They also pair well with home-style dishes, whether you’re serving a sitdown meal of steak and salad or chicken paella, or carting them along to a potluck or barbecue. Underwood is widely available in Columbia; inquire at your favorite local wine shop. v

Can It The approachable wines of Underwood are moving in on yet another market segment this year when the winery releases its wine in a can. Underwood certainly isn’t the first winery to offer a canned product, but these wines are packaged in fatter, beer-style cans more frequently found in the grips of Budweiser aficionados. It’s the “beerification” of wine, says winery owner Ryan Harms, a counter to the “winification” trend in craft beer. The cans, which debut in March, are more portable than traditional glass wine bottles, adding convenience to tailgates, picnics, bonfires and barbecues. At about $5 a pop, it’s more expensive than beer, but hey … it’s Pinot.

Snooth, the social networking website for wine geeks, named Oregon the Wine Region of the Year in 2013. 10

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On The Road With Ray

A Fortuitous Visit To Fell’s Point Exploring Baltimore’s Historic Waterfront Neighborhood By ray speckman

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I never worry when I get lost; I just change where I want to go. I like that old saying, and it pretty well sums up a recent travel experience. It happened like this. I belong, as I’ve mentioned in previous stories, to the Defense Orientation Conference Association, an organization that travels to military installations worldwide for tours and briefings. The association offers an annual meeting with a blacktie reception and banquet that gives members and their significant others the chance to rub elbows with military brass. The annual gathering also usually brings tours and meetings in the days leading up to the reception. This past October the annual gathering was scheduled to be in Washington, D.C. My significant other, Joyce, and I cashed in a bunch of credit card points,

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splurged and got first-class airfare to D.C. Joyce worried and finally bought an evening gown for the formal dinner. Our plans were to arrive about 10 days before the DOCA meeting, rent a car and drive to the Jamestown, Williamsburg, Yorktown and Norfolk areas of southern Virginia to visit the historic, mainly Revolutionary War, sites there. Then we received the meeting’s itinerary. There was not one tour of a military installation or facility. The four days leading up to the grand finale, the formal dinner, were filled with lectures. No thanks. There was no way we were going to sit in meeting rooms for all those days listening to what was certain to be informative but tiring briefings. We decided instead to save Joyce’s little black evening gown for another time, skip the DOCA meeting and

extend our visit to the Revolutionary War historical sites. Oops. The federal government shut down before we were scheduled to leave —which meant we weren’t getting into the historical sites. We cancelled our motel reservations in southern Virginia and plotted a new itinerary between our already reserved flights. Fell’s Point in Baltimore was one of our new stops. After a few days of exploring the fantastic Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, we meandered north to the northern extremity of the bay at Baltimore. There, just east of the neon lights and flashy new and restored buildings of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, a five minute water taxi ride took us into the neighborhood of Fell’s Point. Nearly in sight of Fort McHenry — the one bombarded by the English in the War of 1812 and the inspiration for our national anthem — Fell’s Point is a vibrant, eclectic and charming venue. First established in the 18th century, Fell’s Point served as a major shipbuilding center until the Civil War. In the early 1900s, the neighborhood fell into disrepair. The old buildings, which lined cobblestoned streets, were falling down despite their strong brick construction. Fell’s Point was a poster child for urban decay. Then in the 1960s, a revitalization of the area began to occur. What a renewal it has become, and it continues today. We chose the Admiral Fell’s Inn for our stay. This beautiful restored boutique hotel is centrally located and is right across the cobblestoned street from the


water taxis and other interesting pleasure and huge commercial ships docked in the harbor. The hotel itself offered impressively appointed rooms and the most pleasant and helpful staff, and it’s priced right, too. Sights to see in Fell’s Point include the 227-year-old Broadway Market and 18thand 19th-century homes and storefronts (most of which, Baltimore.org discloses, “were once one of the ‘three B’s’: boarding houses, brothels, and bars”). There is much shopping and tree-lined sidewalks invite exploring Fell’s Point on foot. Then there are the restaurants! Three deserve special mention. Bertha’s Mussels was one of the first commercial establishments in the revitalization of the Fell’s Point area. This restaurant has timeworn wood floors, brick and old-wood walls and ceilings, and the greatest array of mussels imaginable. Close by is the Oyster Bar, a fine-dining restaurant where we found over 30 varieties of oysters and a gregarious, knowledgeable and patient server to explain the options. I had oysters for an appetizer and one (yes, just one) oyster for dessert. Finally, there is Sláinte, an Irish pub and restaurant with true Irish servings, abundant outside seating and Guinness beer. This was my favorite people-watching spot. All in all, Fell’s Point was one of the best unplanned stops I’ve ever made, and the next time I end up there, it won’t be by accident. v Ray Speckman can be found thinking about a water taxi ride to view the hundreds of schooners in the Chesapeake Bay harbor or at rayspeckman@emmesannex.com v Prime Magazine January 2014

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B Y A N I TA N E A L H A R R I S O N P h oto s By L .G . Pat t e r s o n Prime Magazine January 2014

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Lanita “Lana” Cameron is having dinner with some 125 men this evening. A vivacious blonde, Cameron has no trouble commanding the attention of the men, who flirt with her shamelessly. One proclaims his love for her right there at the table. But Cameron, 72, hardly notices the men’s charm. She’s too busy making sure everyone eats. Dinner is just one of her duties as house mom for the University of Missouri’s Beta Theta Pi fraternity. “Everything that happens around here and you’re not sure what makes it work, it’s Mom working behind the scenes making it happen,” says Beta Theta Pi freshman Riley Askew.

Cameron’s official title at Beta Theta Pi is “house director,” a position found in almost all sorority and fraternity houses. Cameron’s specific duties include planning menus; shopping for groceries and household supplies; managing the help, which includes two cooks; hosting events from football Saturdays to family weekends; and in all other ways, making the Beta Theta Pi house a home. A widow since the early 1990s, Cameron has been the house mom at Beta Theta Pi for eight years. Shawn Sahota, a Beta Theta Pi alum who now serves on the house corporation board, says the men in the house respect Cameron because she gives them her best, always. “What Lana does to earn our respect is she doesn’t seek it out necessarily — she doesn’t go out of her way to do something to earn it — she’s just there whenever the guys need her,” Sahota says. That, and she’s no pushover, he adds. “She knows when she can be our friend, and she knows when she needs to take command of a situation,” he explains. Then he chuckles. “She can certainly grab our attention when she needs it.” 16

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Cameron shows that knack for taking control at dinner this evening. Although nothing happens requiring her intervention, it’s clear just from how she leads the noisy room that she can take charge in chaotic environments. Midway through the meal, the house manager, senior David Helmerich, does lean over and tell Cameron a problem: Someone has tracked white paint from a project onto the basement carpet. “We’ll go down and take a look after dinner,” Cameron reassures him, and when the meal is over, she and two of the house members head downstairs. The paint trail is long, extending down one hall and through the game room, but Cameron doesn’t get upset. She just gives instructions “I think it’s not going to be nearly as hard as you think,” she tells the guys. “Don’t sweat it.”


As Cameron tells this story, she looks prepared to do battle once again. Her back is straight, and her blue eyes, piercing. “If you weren’t tough, and you were a woman, it was not the place to be,” she says of her chosen career field. Then, suddenly, her rigidness melts and her voice softens. “I’m not tough, not here,” she says, and she pats her chest.

Just watching Cameron with the Beta Theta Pi men confirms she has a soft heart. Her fondness for the house members is clear from how she affectionately pats their backs to how she teases them and is teased in return. “The boys have goals, and they have aspirations,” she says, sharing why she likes their company, “and I want to see them make it. I want to see them acquire that education and use it.” That interest in the Beta Theta Pi members’ success — and how little interest she takes in receiving credit for her contributions — is something else that has impressed Sahota. He shares how his mother visited the house once when he was still a student, and Cameron told her all about how he had planned a phenomenal charity campaign — all, that is, except the part about him going to Cameron for ideas and advice. “She takes pride and joy in seeing us succeed, and even if she helps us, she doesn’t want any credit or care if anybody knows,” Sahota says. For Cameron, the rewards are elsewhere. She appreciates the chance her job gives her to use her skills, and she also likes the fact that it provides her the time and the income to travel. She’s been to China and to Europe several times in the last eight years, and she’s driven the East Coast and driven along the Gulf Coast and on to L.A. Those aren’t bad rewards, she says, and then there’s that matter of living with 125 fine young men — “I’m here because of how they treat me,” Cameron says. “They treat me very, very well.” v This is not the first job that has required Cameron to keep cool and give orders. For 30 some years, she worked in St. Louis as a chef. Even today, the occupation of chef is dominated by men; the 2012 U.S. Department of Labor statistics report only about 18 percent of chefs and head cooks are women. So the fact that Cameron was a chef back in the ’60s says a lot about her determination — and her toughness. Just how tough she was is revealed in a story she tells about one male cook who, like a lot of male cooks, didn’t like taking orders from a woman. One night, this particular cook grabbed Cameron by the throat, held her against the kitchen wall and, calling her an obscenity, threatened to slit her throat. But Cameron wasn’t intimidated. Using language to match her attacker’s, she told him coolly to go ahead but warned if he held her there two seconds longer, she was going to knee him. Prime Magazine January 2014

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Health Focus

Find Your Fit

Peek Inside Columbia’s Fitness Centers

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By Angel Donnette Robertson With all the fresh opportunities available in the start of a new year, many individuals choose to benefit from a healthier lifestyle, and increasing physical activity is one way to achieve this goal. According to the National Institutes of Health, physical activity has many advantages, including improved strength and balance, more energy, prevention or delay of certain diseases and a reduction in depression. To receive the full benefits of exercise, the National Institutes of Health experts suggest individuals concentrate on endurance, strength, balance and flexibility. Columbia offers a large selection of fitness facilities for those seeking to increase their physical activity through these four types of exercise. Here are some of the workout centers available in Columbia: All Group Fitness 3410 Broadway Business Park Court, Suite 107 573-446-2345 www.allgroupfitness.com Among its variety of classes, Anytime Fitness offers the Grand Star class, which is choreographed for those who are older or new to exercise, as well as the Arthritis Foundation class, which is designed for those with arthritis, joint discomfort or range-ofmotion difficulty. Anytime Fitness Cherry Hill Location Liberty Square Location 2101 Corona Road, Suite 103 3200 Penn Terrace, Suite 117 573-777-7024 573-886-7024 www.anytimefitness.com Anytime Fitness provides members with a key fob that allows 24-hour, year-round (including holiday) access to the fitness facility. The cardio and weight equipment is easy-to-use, and the atmosphere is clean and friendly. The center currently accepts Silver Sneakers and other insurance reimbursement programs. The ARC (Activity & Recreation Center) 1701 W. Ash St. 573-874-7700 www.gocolumbiamo.com The ARC offers Silver Sneakers, pickleball, aquatic- and landbased classes and full cardio/strength lines with therapeutic options. In addition, the center has a hydrotherapy pool, a threelayered rubber walking track and a full locker room with showers.

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Clark’s Gym 720 N. Grace Lane 573-474-5437 Clark’s Gym offers weight training governed by each person’s age level, strength level, competitiveness and fitness goals, with goals ranging from light fitness training to international competition training. Members are provided a key, and although members are generally unsupervised, instruction and advice is available at request. Columbia Jazzercise Center 120 E. Nifong 573-823-7600 www.jazzercise.com Jazzercise combines dance, strength training, yoga, Pilates and kickboxing movement into one fun and effective total body workout. Instructors provide options throughout each of the 58 weekly classes to accommodate the needs and goals of people of all ages and fitness levels. Columbia Strength and Conditioning 501 Fay St., Suite 102 573-289-2806 www.columbiastrengthandconditioning.com Columbia Strength and Conditioning provides customized fitness and nutrition services to optimize health, appearance and performance with options that include one-on-one personal training sessions and body fat measurements. Curves 3700 I-70 Drive SE, Suite 110 1729 W. Broadway, Suite 2 573-449-4408 573-447-0013 www.curves.com Curves offers a 30-minute workout designed especially for women, combining strength training and cardio through safe and effective hydraulic resistance in a supportive, caring environment. Curves has also added morning and afternoon Zumba classes. More than 4 million women worldwide are benefiting from the Curves program, including Curves’ new online subscription diet and fitness solution, CurvesComplete.com.


Gold’s Gym Express – Columbia 2101 W. Broadway 573-303-9093 www.goldsgymexpress.com Gold’s Gym Express provides pre-recorded workouts and workout cards with guidance for self-paced workouts that allow each individual to choose a workout best suited to their fitness level and goals. Gold’s Gym has cardio equipment, weight machines and free weights. Key Largo Fitness 701 Hillsdale Road 573-256-4293 www.keylargofitness.com and www.facebook.com/keylargofitness Key Largo Fitness offers a variety of classes with membership, including Zumba, cycling, yoga flow, kickboxing, sculpting, and abs and core. Key Largo also provides personal trainers for those interested in a more individualized approach. Optimus: The Center for Health 200 E. Southampton Drive 573-777-7474 www.optimushealth.com Optimus’s health and fitness professionals provide researchbased, lifestyle interventions designed to reduce the risks for chronic diseases. Optimus is the home of OWOW – Older Women on Weights Power Lifting Team. Transformational Fitness: One-on-One Fitness Coaching 2201 Chapel Plaza Court, Suite 102 573-442-9092 www.transformationalfitness.net Transformational Fitness specializes in functional reconditioning (getting a person back in shape), helping those who suffer from painful conditions and those who have not trained in the past. This center offers professional, one-on-one fitness coaching. WELLAWARE Fitness Center 1601 E. Broadway, Boone Medical Plaza # 1, Lower Level 573-815-3876 www.boone.org/wellaware/fitness WELLAWARE offers a community-focused environment with a variety of fitness center membership options (including oneon-one assistance), personal training, massage therapy and group exercises classes. Members are closely monitored by a well-educated staff, and free blood pressure, glucose, heart rate and oxygen saturation testing are provided.

Wilson’s Fitness Wilson’s on Forum FIT (Females in Training) 2902 Forum Blvd. 2900 Forum Blvd. 573-446-3232 573-449-2606 Wilson’s on Rangeline Wilson’s in the District 2601 Rangeline 111 Orr St. 573-443-4242 573-777-6700 www.wilsonsfitness.com Every Wilson’s fitness center offers excellent cardio and weight equipment with lots of amenities, including personal training, to assist members with strength, balance and flexibility. Numerous group fitness classes are also offered, including aquastretch and water aerobics.

Yoga And Pilates In addition to many fitness centers, Columbia also has a number of yoga and Pilates studios. Above the Beyond Yoga and Healing Arts 1400 Forum Blvd, Suite 42 657-2614 www.abovethebeyondyoga.com alleyCat Yoga 17 North 4th Street 864-4132 www.alleycatyoga.com Pilates of Columbia 443-2062 www.pilatesofcolumbia.com Sumits Hot Yoga 505 E. Nifong Blvd. Ste. 103 474-YOGA (9642) www.sumitsyogacolumbia.com Yoga Sol 210B Saint James Street, North Village Arts District 356-0162 www.yogasol.org v

Before getting started on any new fitness program, anyone with a known health condition or over the age of 50 should check in with a doctor.

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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Mattress

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You spend a third of your life in your bed, so take your time to get what you need in a mattress. Trying to sleep on an old mattress or a mattress that does not fit your physical needs can deprive you of a good night’s sleep. Sleep deprivation can affect not only your mood but also your health and job performance. A new, good quality mattress that provides you with a restful night’s sleep is worth what you pay for it. Lots of choices are available. It’s easy to get confused by the multitude of styles and various materials available. Taking it a step at a time, however, you can find the perfect mattress. Start by asking friends and family about their mattresses, and then go window shopping. Get as much information as you can, and start narrowing your choices. As you figure out how much you can afford, remember that the purchase of a mattress is a long-term investment in your health. Buy the best mattress you can afford even if you need to wait for a sale or closeout. The better mattresses also last longer so are not really more expensive over the long-run.

Once you are ready to buy your new mattress, here are a few things to consider: — Do you need a soft or hard mattress? If you have a bad back, neck or leg pain, or circulatory problems, you might need firm support to keep the spine aligned or require flexible support that contours with the shape of your body. — Do you sleep with another person? A memory foam mattress, which contours to the shape of each person’s body, can be beneficial as one person’s movement will less likely disturb the sleep of the other person. — Do you have allergies? Standard mattresses commonly aggravate allergies in people who are sensitive to lint, cotton, dust or dust mites. If this is the case with you or your partner, you should consider latex, foam or water mattresses. Another option is to purchase a hypoallergenic mattress cover. Regarding your actual mattress options, the following are popular choices: — Pillowtop mattresses have an extra layer of softness for additional com-

fort. Although they do not generally provide a very firm sleep surface, they do come in various levels of firmness. It should be noted that these mattresses usually require a larger bottom sheet because the pillowtop adds extra thickness. — Coil spring construction can come in very firm styles for people who want a firm mattress. When buying a coil spring mattress, choose the best construction you can afford. Most mattress stores can show you cross-section samples of their product lines to show the coil spring construction. — “Memory” or high-density foam and latex mattresses are also widely available. These are helpful for people with physical issues such as skeletal pain or circulatory problems. They conform to the shape of the body while minimizing pressure points from the head, shoulders and hips. — Adjustable air mattresses. Air mattresses are equipped with electronic and mechanical devices that adjust the firmness or softness of certain areas of the bed by controlling air chambers. This is ideal for partners who have different mattress firmness requirements for sleeping. When shopping for a mattress, don’t be afraid to try them out. Wear comfortable clothes, and lie down on the mattress. Roll over and pay attention to whether it fits your comfort level. Ask whether the mattress comes with a guarantee or warranty. A good warranty length is 10 years. If the warranty is shorter or non-existent, consider looking elsewhere. As you shop, keep in mind that a good mattress is not a luxury but a requirement for feeling your best. Choose wisely and your purchase will reward you with years of wonderfully restful sleep.v

This “How To” section appears each month in Inside Columbia’s Prime. Readers learn how to find and choose various products and services. 20

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PROMOTION

How To Safeguard Your Golden Years Medicare Benefits Launched in 1966, Medicare is one of several federal programs in existence for the benefit of seniors. The purpose of the program has always been to ensure health coverage for Americans over the age of 65. It is also possible for individuals with qualifying conditions who are younger than 65 to receive benefits under the program. Among the expenses covered by the program are hospitalization, prescription drugs, physicians’ office visits and home nursing assistance. Elder law attorneys are tremendous resources for anyone interested in learning more about Medicare benefits. Qualified lawyers experienced in this area will be able to provide invaluable information regarding program eligibility and can help senior clients maximize the benefits to which they are entitled.

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There is a wide array of potential issues for seniors drawing close to retirement. A few of the most significant priorities are medical expenses, hospital costs, drug prices and nursing care, while estate planning and wealth management are other topics of great interest. Those possessing specialized, professional expertise in these areas can be invaluable to seniors and can help safeguard their financial futures. When seniors feel assured that their health coverage and other benefits are guaranteed, they have a greater likelihood of enjoying good health as they age. It is also important for senior citizens to realize that with proper planning, they have the power to preserve their wealth in order to provide lasting benefits for their families.

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Medicaid Benefits Medicaid is not the same as Medicare in that it offers medical coverage for lowincome citizens regardless of age. The program encompasses expenses such as prescription drugs, home health care, doctor visits and more. Attorneys specializing in Medicaid will be able to guide clients through the application process and will be able to assist them in getting the maximum level of assistance possible. Disability Legal Assistance Attorneys specializing in disability matters have the ability to greatly enhance the lives of their clients. Such professionals can help guide clients toward the healthcare resources, financial assistance and educational benefits to which they may be entitled. Consulting with a disability lawyer is a great way to ensure that those suffering from disabilities receive every available

resource and opportunity to help them fulfill their true potential and lead the most satisfying life possible. Veterans’ Aid There are many benefits available to eligible veterans. Seniors who may be entitled to veterans’ benefits should always take steps to ensure they receive everything they are due. Attorneys specializing in veterans’ affairs are invaluable resources for those who need help understanding what types of benefits are available and the necessary processes for claiming them. In many cases, spouses of veterans also have the ability to receive certain types of benefits, and an experienced lawyer can help them effectively navigate the system. Asset Management And Protection No elderly individual should ignore estate planning. It is perhaps the most critical aspect of any senior’s wealth management strategy. Ensuring that the distribution of one’s assets occurs in a deliberate, tactical manner is the best way to safeguard wealth for future generations. Failing to draft a thorough estate plan can lead to devastating outcomes and can cause the unintended dissipation of wealth that leaves younger generations without the financial resources the decedent had wished them to receive. Estate planning lawyers have the expertise necessary to craft legal documents able to fulfill their client’s true intent regarding how their assets should be distributed. Wills and trusts are examples of the types of documents with which an estate attorney can assist and are two common methods of ensuring the smooth transition of assets from one family member to another. Attorneys have the ability to help seniors plan for the distribution of their wealth upon death and can craft strategies able to successfully minimize the amount of taxes for which their heirs will be responsible. Skilled estate planning lawyers can also offer creative methods for protecting as many assets as possible from the unwanted effects of the probate process. v


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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Computer Repair Specialist have a degree in a computer-related field. These can be good indicators of self-discipline and career focus in your technician, but they don’t guarantee the technician’s ability. In the world of computers, experience and skill can carry more weight than a diploma.

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As modern society has become increasingly dependent on personal computers, it has become essential to be able to get a computer fixed quickly and successfully. Whether it’s a computer that’s used for work or one that’s for fun and entertainment, a breakdown can ruin your day. It’s a good idea to find a qualified computer repairman you can trust before you need one. Here are some factors to consider when looking for a computer repair specialist. Type Of Computer Do you use a PC or a Mac? If there’s an emblem of an apple somewhere on it, then it’s a Mac. If you’re not sure what you use, then it’s probably a PC. Make sure you choose a specialist who focuses on your type of computer; for instance, if you use a Mac, then only work with a company that has experience working with Macintosh computers. Is your computer a desktop or laptop system? Desktop systems are generally made up of a tower, a monitor, a keyboard and a mouse. Laptops are selfcontained in a package that folds up and

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travels easily. Desktops and laptops often have different issues, so it’s best to consult a technician who specializes in your type of computer. Ask friends and relatives to recommend a repair specialist, or research reviews online to see what other people have to say about the computer repair shops in your area. If your computer is broken, use a web-enabled mobile phone or tablet to look up reviews. Experience Look for a specialist who has successfully fixed many computers similar to yours. You don’t want them getting on-the-job training on your machine. Find out how long they’ve worked on computers and how they keep up with new developments. An experienced technician who attends seminars or classes to learn about the latest computer news is likely to be wellequipped to address your computer issue. Training and Certification Ask your prospective technician whether he or she has earned any software certifications from Microsoft or Apple, or if they

Price As with most services, don’t automatically go with the vendor who offers the lowest quote. If something goes wrong during the repair, you may have to eat the additional costs incurred to fix the new problem. On the other hand, don’t assume that the vendor with the highest price offers the best quality or service. Small shops and individuals frequently offer the best deals because they don’t emphasize selling you a bundle of services or software that you don’t need.  Make a Personal Visit Take a careful look around the computer repair shop where your potential technician works. When you first enter a computer repair shop, beware of sales representatives in the front who may try to sell you a new product rather than get something fixed. Make sure you meet the technician who will work on your computer.  As you describe your computer’s problem, watch his or her response carefully — both words and body language. If they seem to know the problem, then odds are that’s the case. If they don’t instill confidence, you should probably take your computer elsewhere. The most important thing is for you to feel comfortable with and confident in your computer repair specialist. Finding the right combination of experience, customer service and price can be a challenge, but it’s worth the extra effort in the long run. v


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PROMOTION

How To Choose An Accountant

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You work hard for your money. A good accountant can ensure that money stays protected and works for you. The right accountant knows how to plan ahead and advise you accordingly. A bad accountant can waste your money and hurt you financially. Take your time and do your research to find the right accountant. An accountant is a licensed professional who can examine, organize and keep track of the financial matters of people and businesses. Accountants must have the ability to crunch numbers and be familiar with legal issues as they relate to finance. Choosing the right accountant will give you someone who will be able to tell you both the financial and legal implications of your decisions.

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As you search for an accountant, look for someone who has a proven track record and satisfied client base. Check the Internet. Many sites offer reviews from individuals and business owners who have used accountants. But be aware, as with any online reviews, that people who are dissatisfied are more likely to post than those who are happy with the service. Ask friends and family which accountants they have used. Word of mouth is often the best way to measure the trustworthiness and performance of any professional. If you know someone who is already using a particular accountant, that person should be happy to tell you whether you should consider using that accountant, too.

The newspaper and telephone business directory are also valid sources of information. If you choose to use the phone book as a source, call several accountants and ask for references. Ask questions of the accountant or ask to set up a consultation where you can meet the professional face-to-face. Also look at the Better Business Bureau’s website. Many accountants are listed, and you can get a better idea of the satisfaction of former clients. Check with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants as well. Once you have a short list of accountants, set up meetings. Remember that you will be sharing sensitive financial details with this person. You want to hire an accountant who puts you at ease, radiates professionalism and gains your trust. v


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Prime Time

01.14January January 8, 9 For two consecutive nights, the University of Missouri men’s and women’s basketball teams play Georgia at Mizzou Arena. Jan. 8 kicks off the men’s Southeastern Conference basketball season. The Tigers look to improve on last year’s 11-7 SEC record. The Jan. 9 women’s basketball game is the team’s third conference game of the season. Last year’s women’s team landed in the NIT, its first postseason play since the 2006–2007 season; this year they hope to go further. Price TBA; 7 p.m.; 1 Champions Drive; 800-CAT-PAWS (2287297); www.mutigers.com

January 10 Mizzou track and field begins its season at the Missouri Opener at Hearnes Fieldhouse. Teams from across the country will compete. Free; field events at 1 p.m., track at 2 p.m.; 600 E. Stadium Blvd.; 800-CAT- PAWS (228-7297); www.mutigers.com January 16 Honor the life and teachings of Martin Luther King Jr. at the Columbia Values Diversity Celebration in the Holiday Inn Executive Center. The event will include diversity awards for Columbians who have impact in promoting diversity and a student writing program in which students from grades 4–12 are invited to submit essays and poems for publication in the 2014 Columbia Values Diversity Celebration Student Writings Booklet. Steve Pemberton, chief diversity officer and divisional vice president for Walgreens, will be the keynote speaker, and Missouri Contemporary Ballet will perform. $15; 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.; 2200 I-70 Drive S.W.; 573-874-6386; www.gocolumbiamo.com/Arts/CVDC

January 23 They jam, but don’t call them a jam band. They’re similar to bluegrass, but don’t think they adhere to the constraints of the bluegrass genre. The six-person band Railroad Earth is somewhere in-between with lively sounds, seamless arrangements and superb musicianship. Whatever they’re doing, Grateful Dead bass player Phil Lesh approves of it. Railroad Earth brings its Americana, acoustic, jam-but-notjam-band, bluegrass-vibe-but-not-bluegrass sound to The Blue Note for all generations to enjoy. $20; doors open at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m.; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573-8741944; www.thebluenote.com

January 17

January 20

MU Women’s Gymnastics hosts Arkansas during the team’s annual pink-out meet at the Hearnes Center. Partnering with Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, the Tigers hope to promote breast cancer awareness and will donate $1 for every ticket sold. Fans are encouraged to wear pink; the first 500 in attendance will receive a free T-shirt. Adults $5, youths and seniors $3; 6:30 p.m.; 600 E. Stadium Blvd.; 800-CAT- PAWS (2287297); www.mutigers.com

Mizzou Women’s Tennis plays St. Louis University and Southern Illinois University at the Mizzou Tennis Center in the team’s first matches of the year. These are the only Tiger home matches until SEC play begins in March. Free; SLU at 11 a.m., Southern Illinois at 5 p.m.; 2001 S. Providence Road; 800-CAT- PAWS (228-7297); www.mutigers.com

January 21 Join Tays Taylor from Glazers Distributing

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for the second annual Scotch Tasting at Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventures Center located in the offices of Inside Columbia magazine. Taylor will explore the nuances of traditional Scotch whisky in this tasting. Each Scotch will be paired with appetizers from the Culinary Adventures kitchen. $45; 6 p.m.; 47 E. Broadway; 573-442-1430; www.comoculinaryadventures.com

January 23 The smash-hit musical “Green Day’s American Idiot” comes to MU’s Jesse Auditorium direct from Broadway. The musical tells the story of three lifelong friends forced to choose between pursuing their dreams or the safety of suburbia. Chart-topping hits such as “Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” “21 Guns,” “Wake Me Up When September Ends,” “Holiday” and the blockbuster title track, “American Idiot,” pepper this new take on a musical performance. From $15; doors open at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m.; Jesse Hall (MU campus); 573-882-3781; www.concertseries.org

January 23

››› Visit Us

On The Web www.PrimeMagazineOnline.com Inside Columbia’s Prime magazine’s website is a great resource for Columbia’s visitors and newcomers. While you’re there, sign up to receive the new Prime Club e-newsletter with news and information Baby Boomers can use. 30

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Are you in need of motivation for your New Year’s resolutions? Or, do you just need new recipes to keep you and your family in good health? Join Amanda Lucas, nutritionist at Chews Your Health, for a gluten-free evening of fun and healthy cooking during Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventures’ Healthy Cooking class. Learn how to prepare healthy and easy dishes for you and your family. $45; 6 p.m.; 47 E. Broadway; 573-442-1430; www.comoculinaryadventures.com

January 24 Grammy-award winning Arturo O’Farrill performs the Dr. Carlos Perez-Mesa Memorial Concert as part of the “We Always Swing” Jazz Series “Jazz in the District.” O’Farrill is a pianist, educator, founder and artistic director of the nonprofit Afro Latin Jazz Alliance. Born in Mexico and raised and educated in New York City, he founded the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra for Jazz at Lincoln Center. O’Farrill also directed his father’s large ensemble, The Chico O’Farrill Afro Cuban Jazz Orchestra, for 15 years. The pianistcomposer will perform with his quintet

in the Kimball Ballroom of Lela Raney Woods Hall on the Stephens College campus. From $18; doors open at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m.; 6 N. College Ave.; 573-449-3001; www.wealwaysswing.org

January 26 Join the “We Always Swing” Jazz Series for a special engagement and fundraiser at Murry’s featuring percussionist Matt Wilson’s quartet plus keyboardist John Medeski (one-third of the trio Medeski, Martin and Wood). The group will perform with multiinstrumentalist Jeff Lederer, trumpeter Kurt Knuffke and bassist Chris Lightcap. Wilson returns to the Jazz Series stage having last played in Columbia during the 2011–2012 season with Arts & Crafts. The two horns plus piano, bass and percussion will play a fun, special concert with all net proceeds benefiting the Jazz Series. From $25; first show doors open at 2:30 p.m., show at 3:30 p.m.; second show doors open at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m.; 3107 Green Meadows Way; 573-4493001; www.wealwaysswing.org

January 29 In honor of Martin Luther King Jr., the public is invited to attend The University of Missouri Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. with Hill Harper at the Missouri Theatre. Harper is a nationally recognized actor, author and Harvard Law School graduate. He was the Aug. 28, 2013, co-host of the Let Freedom Ring commemoration of the Martin Luther King Jr. “I Have A Dream” speech in Washington, D.C. Harper will speak on the topic of “Manifest Your Destiny: How to Achieve Your Goals and Overcome Fears.” Free; reception 6 to 7 p.m., presentation 7 to 8:30 p.m.; 203 S. Ninth St.; 573-882-5838; mlk.missouri.edu

January 30 Looking to avenge last season’s losses, Mizzou Women’s’ Basketball plays Vanderbilt at the Mizzou Arena in its eighth conference game of the season. Two of the team’s 15 losses last season were to Vanderbilt. $5 adults, $3 seniors and youths; 7 p.m.; 1 Champions Drive.; 800-CAT- PAWS (228-7297); www.mutigers.com


save the date February 14 An elegant dining experience awaits couples during the Valentine’s Day Dinner at Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventures Center. The evening features a six-course meal comprised of dishes inspired by and symbolic of love. Each course is paired with a specialty wine, hand-selected from the private wine cellar of Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventures. Reserve your seats today, as space is limited for this intimate, romantic dining experience. $75; 6:30 p.m.; 47 E. Broadway; 573-442-1430; www.comoculinaryadventures.com

▲ February 22 Crazed chili fans unite, the Ninth Annual MFA Rootin’ Tootin’ Chili Cookoff returns to serve up the finest chili from local chefs, businesses and talented amateur cooks at the Central Missouri Events Center, home of the Boone County Fair. The annual fundraiser benefits the Boys & Girls Club of Columbia and is a rootin’ tootin’ good time. $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 2 to 6 p.m.; 5212 N. Oakland Gravel Road; 573-8231157; www.rtchilicookoff.com

February 27–March 2 The 11th True/False Film Fest continues the annual tradition of bringing renowned documentary films to Columbia for a weekend of filmbuff fun. The theme of this year’s festival is Magic Realism. Panels, seminars, receptions, galas, parties, contests, games and more pack the weekend’s schedule. Filmmakers from all over the world travel to Columbia to interact with audiences and fans. Passes are available on the festival’s website, with varying levels of access to the weekend’s events. Tickets from $8, $6 for students, passes from $75; various times and locations; 573-4428783; www.truefalse.org v Prime Magazine January 2014

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How Can I Help?

People For Pets Give Animals Who Weren’t Given A First Chance, A Second By Morgan McCarty

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Founded in 1985, Second Chance (formerly known as Columbia Second Chance) addresses the needs of the unwanted pet population in central Missouri. At the time of Second Chance’s conception, many healthy pets were euthanized because of space constraints at the Central Missouri Humane Society’s shelter. Second Chance’s founders found this situation unacceptable and began fostering overflow animals until they were adopted. Over the past 29 years, Second Chance has rescued and rehomed almost 14,000 animals. “As a result, more animals are rescued, more families are created, and Columbia, as well as central Missouri, is a better place,” Valerie Chaffin, executive director of Second Chance, says. Second Chance provides food, shelter, medical assistance and general relief to animals who have been made homeless through acts or omissions of people. Simultaneously, the organization researches and approves permanent adoptive homes for these pets. Chaffin

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says they also educate the public regarding the health, exercise and general needs of these animals. They also advise the public on the necessity of spaying and neutering as a means of alleviating the burden of unwanted animals. “While we do not accept every animal desiring the resources of Second Chance, no animal is put to sleep because of space limitations,” Chaffin says. The organization maintains an adoption center on Highway 179 near Boonville. According to Chaffin, 80 percent of Second Chance’s cats are housed here. It is also where dogs come with their foster families to meet potential adopters on the weekends. Foster families are volunteers who provide a loving home environment, transportation to adoption events, help to socialize the dogs and provide basic behavioral training such as housebreaking and crate training, if it is needed. Second Chance provides all supplies for its foster animals, as well as veterinary care.

Chaffin encourages people interested in helping Second Chance animals to become foster families or volunteer at the adoption center. “There are few instances where one can honestly get more out of something than they put in; this is one of those instances,” Chaffin says. “Every moment someone walks a dog, feeds a cat, cleans a litter box, cuddles with a kitten or calms a frightened dog not only extends the life of the animal, it improves the life of the caregiver.” The public is also invited to support Second Chance through financial and supply donations, event attendance and sponsorship, and through in-kind donations of their talents and services. “We are fortunate to live in a community that understands and supports our mission,” Chaffin says. “Proof of that support can be found in our warehouse in the form of animal food, cat litter, donated linens and cleaning supplies. Area businesses are the backbone of our fundraising efforts through event sponsorship and donated auction items.” Through volunteering or by donating time or services, caring people make a difference. Chaffin says, “Not everyone that comes to our adoption center adopts an animal, but everyone leaves our center with the knowledge that they have helped to save a life.” v UPCOMING EVENTS Beginning in 2014, Second Chance will have community adoption events on Friday nights from 5 to 7 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to noon. During Friday events, called “Thanks Goodness It’s Furry Friday,” adoptable dogs and cats will be available to meet at various local businesses. The first event is Jan. 10 at Orscheln’s.


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Pet Corner

Party Animals Wacky Critter Holidays To Celebrate In 2014

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By Dr. John Williams

OK. The party’s over. The holidays have passed. We’ve eaten too much, drank a little more than usual and swiped the old Visa slick. So, now what? Well, there’s still plenty to celebrate, and not just for you two-legged party animals. Now, you can include the fourlegged family member. Just a quick glance at the calendar for the New Year reveals that there are more celebrations than you can shake a lamp shade or a shock collar at. So break out the noisemakers and the party hats. Here’s what we’re going to be celebrating in 2014. January gets it all started with National Dress Up Your Pet Day on January 14th. Why should you be the only one embarrassed by that tie that Uncle Skeeter left for you under the tree? February is National Adopt a Rescue Rabbit month. Other notable celebrations will include National Dog Biscuit Day, February 23rd, and one of my favorites, National Polar Bear Day on the 27th. Probably best to celebrate that one a safe distance from the guest of honor. March is both Dolphin Awareness Month and Adopt a Rescue Guinea Pig Month, so plan accordingly. Likewise, on the first of the month everyone can get together and party it up for National Pig Day, followed in two weeks by National Buzzard Day, which is highlighted by the annual return of that disgusting bird to beautiful downtown Hinckley, Ohio. April brings showers, but it also brings us some of my favorite holidays. The first week is designated as “Scoop the Poop Week,” which is followed up a couple of weeks later by Don’t Step in Poop Day on the 25th. Dress is casual. Also celebrated is National Ferret Day on the 2nd and possibly the most curious day of the

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year, National Hairball Awareness Day on the 30th. No reservations required. The first week of May, of course, is the annual Be Kind to Animals Week. But, not to be overlooked is Hug Your Cat Day on the 30th, Respect for Chickens Day on the 4th and Save the Rhino Day on the 1st. Probably the highlight of the whole month is the big celebration in San Juan Capistrano, Calif., when they return again. No, not the swallows. That’s on March 15th. On May 29th everyone, with a strong stomach, gets together to celebrate the return of the slugs. Ughs. June, of course, has the annual Take Your Dog to Work Day on the 22nd, as well as Donald Duck Day on the 9th. Probably less noteworthy but nonetheless a reason to celebrate is Dinosaur Day on the 1st and Cordova Ice Worm Day on the 21st. You may want to Google that one. July is relatively quiet. It has only one designation — National Dog House Repair Month. August is similarly quiet with celebrations. The 26th is National Dog Day, as well as another excuse to party into the wee hours, National Sea Serpent Day. What the ...? September has only one verifiable celebration. National Dog Week is a weeklong extravaganza throughout the last week of the month. The second week of October is National Squirrel Awareness Week. All motorists should be alert for short, furry

picketers along the roadside. Later in the month, on the 16th, is National Feral Cat Day. Over the years various celebrations have been planned on this day only to be quashed when the guests of honor refused to sit at the head table. November is simply designated as Senior Pet Month. At one time there was a movement to make it National Turkey Month, but the turkeys declined so as to deflect any more publicity than is usually accorded to them. In December, the year winds up with a couple of holidays that should be near and dear to all pet owners, and parents. December 2nd is National Mutt Day, and the 15th is Cat Herding Day. Happy New Year everybody. Party hard, but party smart. v

— John Williams, DVM, is a retired Columbia veterinarian who spent 39 years as a small-animal practitioner.


Inside Columbia’s PRIME magazine

HOW-TO

Guide Inside Columbia’s Prime magazine now features a How-To Guide in every issue. This new section contains expertly written articles with helpful tips on a wide variety of interesting topics.

TURN TO PAGE 20 THIS MONTH, LEARN How To: Choose A Mattress Safeguard Your Golden Years Choose A Computer Repair Specialist Choose An Accountant

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Life Lessons

Treasures In The Attic Bring Them Out For Enjoyment’s Sake By Saralee Perel

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During special occasions, I think about using the keepsakes stowed in the attic. But I usually don’t because I’m afraid of something happening to them. When I gave a piece of antique jewelry to Kaileigh, my 11-year-old friend, she said, “I love it!” Then she put it away. It was a pin my mother handed down to me, a star sapphire set in sterling silver. “Why won’t you wear it, Kaileigh?” “Because I’m afraid of losing it.” A favorite blouse of mine never gets stained. That’s because it stays in my closet. My grandmother’s wedding band never looses a diamond because I don’t wear it.

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A friend, Veronica, who doesn’t use her heirlooms said: “It’s a sad waste. I’m hoping to get the whole kit and caboodle to my niece in Florida.” My pal, Gail, keeps her mother’s things in her attic. She said, “Someday I will leave them to my children, and they can deal with stuff from the ancestors they never met.” So on and on it goes, from one generation to the next. Precious belongings never to be enjoyed. The thing is, if I lost Grandma’s ring, she would have said: “Saura Leah (my Hebrew name), that’s not what matters. I didn’t give it to you so you’d keep it in a drawer.”

My friend Paula does use her valuables. When I asked how she’d feel if something broke, she said: “I would be heartbroken, of course, Saralee, but what is the use in having these things if all you are going to do is look at them? Seems to me, it takes away most of the joy of having them if you don’t use them.” The first day I met Kaileigh, I fell in love with her. I wondered if someday she’d ever feel the same about me. Whenever she played the violin, I was enchanted watching this beautiful girl with her beloved instrument. When she told me she was giving a solo performance at a concert at her high school, she said, “It’s in front of 3,000 people!” Kaileigh bravely faced the crowd and played “Amazing Grace” with elegance and poise. I received the sweetest gift of all that night: She was wearing my mother’s pin. Later, when I asked how she felt wearing it, she said: “I loved it. I love you and I felt loved by you.” And to think, my wish had come true that someday she would love me too. Well, what if I spill wine on my special blouse? It wouldn’t be the end of the world. And if family china breaks, then it breaks. If I lost a diamond from the ring, I’d be all right. I’d have my grandmother’s blessings in my heart. And so, I joyfully took my favorite blouse from its hanger. It went so beautifully with Grandma’s wedding band, which has stayed on my finger every day since. It’s time to savor the moments and treasure the good things. v Award-winning columnist, Saralee Perel, can be reached at sperel@saraleeperel.com or via her website: www.saraleeperel.com.


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Fun & Games

Letter-Link Word Search Puzzle Directions: The words in the Word List are hidden in the puzzle grid. Some are not in straight lines, so look in all directions for each next letter (right, left, up, down, diagonal). Do not backtrack. Words may overlap each other or themselves by one letter.

If At First I Don’t Succeed...

word list ACCEPTING

HONEST

ATTENTIVE

HOPEFUL

BRAVE

KIND

CIVIL

ON TIME

CONSERVATIVE

PATIENT

COOPERATIVE

POSITIVE

EXEMPLARY

RELAXED

FORGIVING

STRONG

FRIENDLY

SUPPORTIVE

FUN

SYMPATHETIC

GENTEEL

THOUGHTFUL

GLEEFUL

TIDY

GRACIOUS

TOLERANT

HELPFUL AT HOME

TRUSTING

© 2013 Eliza Bettin: Eliza Bettin’s puzzles have been in newspaper syndication and IGA, United Airlines and Earthgrains magazines.

Cryptogram Decipher this quote by unraveling the secret code. Each letter stands for another letter. We’ve given you a few hints to get you started.

>>>

Test your knowledge! Turn to Page 42 to check your answers. 38

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Pick up your copy of Prime Magazine at one of these locations. Bank of Missouri Boone County National Bank Boone Hospital Center Chamber of Commerce City of Columbia Columbia Parks & Recreation Columbia Senior Activity Center Columbia Public Library Commerce Bank D&H Drug Store First State Community Bank Health Connection

Joe Machens Dealerships Kilgore’s Pharmacy Landmark Bank Meals On Wheels Missouri Cancer Associates UMB Bank University Hospital Walgreens

573-442-1430 www.PrimeMagazineOnline.com Find us on Facebook! Prime Magazine January 2014

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Recipe Box

Turn To Your Pantry For Mealtime Inspiration

For more recipe inspiration and to learn how you can get cooking with cans, visit www.Facebook.com/CansGetYouCooking, www.Pinterest.com/CansGetUCooking and www.YouTube.com/CansGetYouCooking.

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More and more Americans are turning to their pantry for mealtime inspiration. In fact, most Americans don’t go a week without using canned foods, and more often than not, a home cooked meal means cooking with canned ingredients. There’s no question that cans help save time and get a delicious, wholesome and affordable meal on the table. Yet, according to a recent study conducted by Wakefield Research, 68 percent of Americans say they are in need of canned food recipes. With ingredients like canned pumpkin, tomatoes, beans and canned chicken in your pantry, easy, homemade meals are just a can away. These delicious dishes are just a few ideas of what can be created with the bounty available to you inside your pantry, any time of year.

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Pumpkin Chili Mexicana Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 40 minutes Serves: 6 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1/2 cup chopped onion 1 cup chopped red bell pepper 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 1 pound ground turkey 2 (14.5-ounce) cans Red Gold diced tomatoes, undrained 1 (15-ounce) can Libby’s 100% Pure Pumpkin 1 (15-ounce) can Muir Glen tomato sauce

1

(15.25-ounce) can Allens dark red kidney beans, drained 1 (4.5-ounce) can Old El Paso green chiles, chopped 1/2 cup canned whole-kernel corn 1 tablespoon chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper Heat vegetable oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion, bell pepper and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender. Add turkey; cook until browned. Drain. Add tomatoes with juice, pumpkin, tomato sauce, beans, chiles, corn, chili powder, cumin and black pepper. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover; cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes.


Chicken And Wild Rice Casserole Prep time: under 30 min Cook time: 1 hour Serves: 6 2

(6-ounce) packages longgrain and wild rice blend with seasonings 1 (10-ounce) can HORMEL Chunk Breast of Chicken, drained and flaked 1 (10 3/4-ounce) can cream of mushroom soup 1 (10 3/4-ounce) can cream of chicken soup 1 (4-ounce) can sliced mushrooms, drained 3/4 cup chopped celery 1/2 cup HORMEL Real Bacon Pieces 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup breadcrumbs 1/2 cup slivered almonds 2 tablespoons butter, melted Heat oven to 350째F. Lightly grease 2-quart casserole dish. Prepare rice according to package directions. In large bowl, combine rice, chicken, soups, mushrooms, celery, bacon pieces and pepper. Transfer rice mixture to casserole dish. Bake 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in small bowl, combine breadcrumbs, almonds and butter; mix well. Sprinkle over casserole. Bake 5 to 10 minutes or until topping is golden brown. Prime Magazine January 2014

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Prime Pages

fun & games solved Challenge your brain with this month’s puzzles found on Page 38.

Letter-Link Word Search

Cryptogram Answer

Gone Girl

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Gillian Flynn (Crown, 2012) REVIEWED By Gretchen Pressley

To get your brain back in gear after the holidays and your reading muscles flexing again for the new year, check out Gone Girl, a psychological thriller by Gillian Flynn. Readers experience the story through the diary entries of husband and wife Nick and Amy. Like any couple, these two have had their ups and downs, but the downs seem to be lasting longer and longer. In fact, the past year or so has been one extended down. Then Amy disappears on the couple’s fifth wedding anniversary. The circumstances are suspicious enough, but then Nick can’t seem to stop himself from lying to the police, withholding information from the reader and acting unemotional about his wife’s disappearance at every turn. Amy, meanwhile, seems like the perfect girl. She was trying so hard to bring their marriage back together, to show Nick that they could survive anything that life threw at them. But soon the reader realizes both Nick and Amy have secrets, and who can the reader trust when no one is telling the truth? Although the pace of the first section drags a bit toward the end, the story never gets slow enough to stop those pages from turning, and the twists of part two make up for the earlier drag. As is expected from psychological mastermind Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl takes readers into disturbing territory while exploring what can happen when two people build a life together and get to know one another better than they know themselves. This is a novel of relationships, deceit, betrayal, emotion and, maybe, even love. v

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What we call the beginning is often the end And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from. ~ T.S. Eliot

Did You Know?

Julius Caesar instituted January 1 as the first day of the year when he introduced the Julian calendar in 46 B.C. January’s namesake, Janus, is the Roman god of beginnings and transitions and has two faces, to look back at the past and forward to the future.


save the date: February 22, 2014 A conference for men wanting to explore a deeper relationship with God

FOUR FABULOUS SPEAKERS AT THIS EVENT: Dr. Robert Lewis, the creator of The Quest for Authentic Manhood series and the author of numerous books including Raising a Modern Day Knight. Dr. Lewis is also the creator of 33: The Series, a curriculum that is currently being used in thousands of churches and men's groups across this country. Michael Joiner, this actor/comedian is star of the Sony Pictures 2013 release Grace Card, the compelling story of a police officer's efforts to rebuild his life after losing his son in a tragic accident. Joiner is best known as one of the nation's funniest "clean" comedians. He has been recognized by TV Guide as "one of the funniest, most original stand up comedians working today."

Darryl Strawberry, the World Series champion and MVP baseball player whose career came crashing to an end due to his own drug abuse and addiction. Strawberry is now living a transformed life as a Baptist preacher and founder of a ministry that is helping others turn their lives around. Keith Chancey, the president of the Kanakuk Institute and a leader who has dedicated the last 30 years of his life to youth initiatives. Chancey has played an integral role in the success of Kanakuk Camps, a mininstry that has brought tens of thousands of young men and women closer to Christ.

Tickets On Sale Now At

www.CoMoChristian.com

Prime Magazine January 2014

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Your Bucket List

Diving Back In Tracey Berry and Ray Legg By Anita Neal harrison

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Tracey Berry and Ray Legg in Cayman Islands Tracey Berry was 19 and Ray Legg was 22 when the two of them took their honeymoon to the Bahamas. Legg, a Navy veteran and scuba diver, had teased Berry ahead of the trip that if she wanted to see him on their honeymoon, she needed to learn to dive. So Berry did. The dives were fun, but then it was time to go back home and start life. The next 27 years brought a law career for Legg, along with service in the Missouri National Guard; a journalism and public relations career for Berry; two sons; mortgages and all the other usual responsibilities of adulthood. Then in 2010, Legg was deployed to Afghanistan for a year. He and Berry took a trip to Florida before he left, to see the St. Louis Cardinals in spring training, and on that trip, Legg decided to go scuba diving. It was the first time he’d gone since his and Berry’s honeymoon, and Legg discovered he still had a passion for the sport.

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Berry didn’t join her husband on that trip because she felt she needed more training. But after Legg returned from Afghanistan, she went to a Columbia dive shop, Captain Nemo’s, to be recertified. There her instructor turned out to be the same instructor she’d had back when she was 19, the shop’s owner, Dwain Gardner. Finally, 28 years after their first dive together, Berry and Legg were all set to go diving again. Their first trip was to Key Largo, and Berry, too, fell back in love with the sport. Next came several dives in the Florida Keys, as well as freshwater lake dives in northern Arkansas. Then it was 2013, and Berry and Legg began talking about how they wanted to celebrate their 30th anniversary. There was one trip Legg had dreamed of taking ever since he started diving back in 1981, and he and Berry decided it would be the perfect trip to mark their upcoming milestone. So, it was off to the Cayman Islands to dive the renowned Bloody Bay Wall.

It was the first time either of them had dived a coral reef wall. “Because the area is a marine sanctuary, the reef is very healthy with a good diversity of marine life, from reef fish, sponges, corals and macro-life,” Legg says. “We left the inn each morning excited to experience another two to three dives that day.” Legg and Berry took a total of 14 dives while in Little Cayman and two while in Grand Cayman. “The most memorable dive for me was on Valentine’s Day,” Berry says. “We came across a turtle rubbing itself on a coral head. It was very friendly and swam over to greet us. I swear it was posing as Ray shot photos.” Other memorable moments included seeing multiple reef sharks on a single dive and finding a small cleaner shrimp hiding under a small rock on a sandy bottom. It was the dream trip both of them had hoped it would be, and now that it’s over, Legg and Berry have started planning for their next diving adventure. “Our next bucket list experience is to spend a week on a ‘liveaboard’ dive boat, where the motto is, ‘Eat, sleep, dive,’ ” Berry says. v Tell us your story Have you crossed something off your bucket list? Please share your experience with us for a chance to be featured in an upcoming issue of Prime! Just send a brief note describing the feat to anita@insidecolumbia.net, and if we choose to feature your triumph, we will be in contact for an interview.


Prime Magazine January 2014

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Columbia Confidential: Publisher Fred Parry On The Issues Columbia Is Talking About

The Destructive Nature Of Health Care’s Perfect Storm

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I recently had the opportunity to hear Steve Lipstein, president of BJC HealthCare, give an update on the status of health care reform in the United States. Lipstein is well-qualified to speak on the subject. He leads one of the most respected health care systems in the country, and it’s no secret that he served in some advisory capacity to the Obama administration when it was designing the Affordable Care Act. BJC is one of Missouri’s largest employers and has a lease arrangement to manage Boone Hospital Center here in Columbia. When Obamacare eventually fails or limps forward, Lipstein will deserve either some of the credit — or some of the blame. Nonetheless, he has a comprehensive understanding of the issue. Living in a community where health care is a $1 billion industry, all Columbians will be affected in some way by the fallout of health care reform. It’s fair to assume that when a major driver in the local economy is about to be turned upside-down, things cannot remain as they once were. While most reasonable people would agree that our national health care system was in desperate need of repair, few could defend the calamities of Obamacare’s first three months. In retrospect, this perfect storm occurred as this country attempted to recover from the most significant economic downturn while at the same time trying to overhaul its single largest industry. The timing could not have been worse. During his speech, Lipstein reminded his audience of the various pieces of regulation and legislation that inadvertently impacted the health care industry during a short, four-year span. In 2009, we saw the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act go into effect. This “stimulus” package required hospitals to become “meaningful” users of health information technology. Although this change was partially subsidized, it wreaked havoc on physicians and placed an additional financial burden on hospitals. In 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As the stages of this legislation take effect, the impact has been reduced Medicare payments to hospitals, the advent of insurance exchanges, highdeductible health plans and the financial strains of guaranteed issuance of health insurance. To add insult to injury, the Budget Control Act of 2011, which allows for automatic budget cuts — or “sequestration” — to kick in, further reduced Medicare payments to hospitals in an attempt to reduce the federal deficit. As if that wasn’t enough, along came the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 — purported to bring us back from the “fiscal cliff ” — that, yet again, reduced Medicare payments in an effort to prevent tax increases.

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It doesn’t matter if you’re a Republican, Democrat, independent or member of the Communist Party — you should recognize that the cumulative effect of these political footballs has been disastrous for our health care industry. Even if you’ve been historically skeptical about the ethics of insurance companies or the generous compensation packages once received by physicians and health care executives, it’s hard to argue in favor of the fairness of the continued bombardment of governmental regulation. In changing the financial model of health care reimbursement, the very nature of health care, as we once knew it, has essentially changed forever. The government’s new business model incentivizes hospitals to essentially make themselves extinct. With pressure for better care coordination and more effective management of chronic diseases, hospital use rates are already declining. This trend is further fueled by more aggressive attempts at prevention, screening and early detection of diseases. Anyone who has been forced to move to a high-deductible insurance policy also has a pretty powerful financial incentive to stay away from the hospital except for life-threatening conditions. Many would argue that the mass confusion surrounding the implementation of health care reform has also had a negative impact on local hospitals. The failed launch of the online registration for Obamacare and the president’s broken promises surrounding one’s ability to keep current insurance coverage has created an additional level of uncertainty for consumers. Many patients have delayed surgeries and other elective procedures until the status of their own health care coverage becomes clear. Today, it seems unlikely that these questions will be answered at any point in the near future. President Obama’s hope is that health care reform will be the lasting legacy of his presidency. As it stands now, a more likely projection is that his legacy will be tied to the destruction of America’s once-strong health care system.

Fred Parry, fred@insidecolumbia.net


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Inside Columbia's Prime January 2014  
Inside Columbia's Prime January 2014  

Meet Beta Theta Pi house mom Lana Cameron, find a guide to Columbia's fitness centers and see one couple's adventures in scuba diving in the...

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