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JUNE 2014

Time

Travel

Follow One Columbia Couple On Trips Through 1960s Europe


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June 2014

Contents 12

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Volume 6, Issue 3

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Columbia Outdoors

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The Tasting Room

10 On The Road With Ray 12 Time Travel: Look Inside Two 1960s Scrapbooks 18 Meet Grandma Vegas 20 How-To Guides 29 Prime Time 34 How Can I Help?

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36 Pet Corner 38 Life Lessons 40 Estate Planning 42 Health & Beauty Special Section 48 Faces & Places

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50 Tell Me About It 52 Fun & Games 54 Recipe Box 58 Chef’s Secrets 60 Your Bucket List

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62 Columbia Confidential Before

After Prime Magazine June 2014

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Welcome

Opening The Past I still remember receiving the little white book with gold lettering and a gold lock. I was in second grade and thrilled to have a diary. Soon, the pages filled with short entries about fun times at recess, fights with a sister, angst over a crush and secret fears — including a fear of Gremlins. I still have that little book, and it and other journals are among my most cherished possessions, some of the first things I’d want to grab in a fire. It’s marvelous how that little worn book brings an 8-year-old Anita to life again through her awkward cursive handwriting. That same magic was at work as I viewed two 50-year-old travel scrapbooks a reader found at a Columbia garage sale. The scrapbooks preserve two trips one prominent Columbia couple took through Europe in the 1960s. Writer Angel Donnette Robertson opens the scrapbooks for a fascinating and fun glimpse into the past on page 12. Along with that venture into history, this issue will also introduce you to Barbara Smith, costume mistress of Missouri Contemporary Ballet. I was already impressed with Smith for volunteering to sew nearly all of the dancers’ costumes, and then I found out she launders them, too! Learn more about why the dancers think Smith is exceptional on page 18. As we move into summer, be sure to take advantage of Columbia’s many beautiful parks. Find five fun things to do at Albert-Oakland Park on page 6, as well as some outdoor — and indoor — summer fun in our Prime Time calendar on page 33. All too soon, this summer will join my second-grade self and the 1960s in the past. Let’s make the most of summer 2014 while it’s here.

Prime Magazine is published by OutFront Communications, 47 E. Broadway, Columbia, MO 65203, 573-442-1430. Copyright OutFront Communications, 2013. The magazine is published 12 times a year on the first day of every month. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

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staff Publisher Fred Parry Associate Publisher Melody Garnett Parry Associate Publisher & Executive Editor Sandy Selby Managing Editor Anita Neal Harrison Editorial Assistant Morgan McCarty Graphic Designer Kate Moore Trever Griswold Photo Editor L.G. Patterson Sales Manager Deb Valvo Marketing Representatives Rosemarie Peck Joe Schmitter Jamill Teter Jessica Card Operations Manager Kalie Clennin Office Manager Kent Hudelson Assistant Finance Manager Brenda Brooks Distribution Manager John Lapsley Director of Customer Retention Gerri Shelton Contributing Writers Kathy Casteel, Nicole Eno, Saralee Perel, Angel Donnette Robertson, Ray Speckman, John Williams

SERVING THE BOOMER & SENIOR MARKETS


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Columbia Outdoors

Albert-Oakland Park 1900 Blue Ridge Road 573-474-5331

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BY NICOLE ENO Albert-Oakland Park is a perfect place to beat the summer heat. The large park includes the AlbertOakland Family Aquatic Center, as well as multiple fields, courts and recreation areas that offer ample space for a wide range of activities. There are also three reservable picnic shelters that can hold parties of up to 88 people.

5 THINGS TO DO HERE: 1. Go For A Swim. The Albert-Oakland Family Aquatic Center features a 50-meter pool with two diving boards, a children’s water play area and a large deck with shade umbrellas and lounge chairs. During the summer, the aquatic center offers a $1 adult-only swim for lap swimmers and water walkers Monday through Friday from 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. 2. Play Ball. Albert-Oakland Park has a wide selection of sports facilities including baseball, softball and soccer fields; basketball, volleyball, tennis and pickle ball courts; and even an 18-hole disc golf course. 3. Get Moving. C.M. Albert Memorial Park is also included within the Albert-Oakland Park complex. This 20-acre area includes a 1-mile fitness circuit that has 11 different exercise stations including an elliptical cross trainer and a rowing machine. 4. Walk The Trail. The Bear Creek Trailhead can be accessed at Albert-Oakland Park. The trail is a 10-foot wide gravel surface and has two bridges that cross over Bear Creek. Try taking a nice leisurely walk along the creek to cap off a day of sports and swimming. 5. Host An Event. Albert-Oakland Park’s large reservable picnic shelters are a great place to host a birthday party or family get-together. There are three covered shelters with tables, water fountains and barbecue grills. v

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The Tasting Room

Miss Congeniality This Red Blend Brings Harmony To Your Table

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BY KATHY CASTEEL

The bounty of summer brings an abundance of tastes to your table. Corral the cacophony of flavors with Röbller Villa Rouge, a Missouri red blend that pairs well with many types of dishes. Villa Rouge is one of the oldest wines produced by Röbller Vineyard in New Haven. The proprietary blend of Chambourcin, Norton and Villa Noir (a Pinot Noir hybrid) is a Solera-style wine, produced by the blending of multiple vintages over successive years. The smooth, semidry wine has an aroma of sweet cherries and chocolate. Red fruit flavors of cherries, raspberries and plums are intensified by the undercurrent of chocolate and a hint of Norton’s earthiness. The slight sweetness balances with fresh acidity, capped by a taste of tannin on the lingering finish. Pair with barbecue and tomatobased dishes such as red pasta sauces for an easy wine choice for everyday menus. The hint of sweetness balances well with the acidity of tomatoes and fruits. “Villa Rouge plays well with acidity,” says winemaker Jerry Mueller, son of winery founders Bob and Lois Mueller. “It’s very popular with our customers.” It’s so popular, Mueller notes, the current batch of Villa Rouge is down to

its last few hundred bottles. When it’s gone, a revamped wine under the same label will take its place. The new Villa Rouge — released at Röbllerfest, the winery’s 23rd anniversary celebration in April — sports a different makeup and a more complex flavor profile than its predecessors, Mueller says. He likens the 2014 release to a fruity California Chianti. “This year’s release is 100 percent Chambourcin,” Mueller says. “It has more of the dark fruit flavor profile — similar to Mendocino reds — that comes from aging in stainless steel and no oak. It really brings out the raspberry/cherry flavor of Chambourcin with a just a bit more tannin. While there is sweetness, it is balanced with structure and acidity, giving the wine good body and mouthfeel.” The new batch proved popular when it debuted at Röbllerfest and on the Hermann Wine Trail, he says. Röbller Vineyard is located south of the Missouri River, on the eastern end of the Hermann Wine Trail. The tasting room is open daily, with special events scheduled throughout the year. Live music takes center stage each month this summer at the winery’s Summerfest, Reggae Sunsplash and Tunes & Balloons. For details, visit www.robllerwines.com. v

Röbller wines are available in Columbia at Lucky’s and the Root Cellar, and on the wine list at The Wine Cellar & Bistro.

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On The Road With Ray

Take Me To The Funny Farm How A Mid-Missouri Couple Came To Own A Petting Zoo BY RAY SPECKMAN

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Is there anything more worthwhile than hearing children squeal with happiness and seeing excitement in their eyes? There is a place, close by and economical, where the delights come in droves — droves of animals, that is. It is the Funny Farm Petting Zoo near the junctions of highways 54 and 52 in Eldon.

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But first, the back story. Bob and Mary Ann Irwin, like so many in today’s world, found one another in midlife. Bob was 43 and Mary Ann, 42, when they were married in January 2004. Four months later Bob was diagnosed with brain cancer at Lake Regional Hospital. He went under the knife, and

surgeons at University Hospital removed an egg-sized tumor from his brain. Then followed months of chemotherapy and radiation to stop the cancerous army’s invasion. Bob was mobile but could no longer practice his trade as a skilled carpenter. So he and Mary Ann moved to a small farm on the outskirts of Laurie, a small town between Versailles and Camdenton on Highway 5. “Our life did a 180,” says Mary Ann. Mary Ann traded day care services for three miniature horses. The horses became therapy for Bob. He was able to take care of something, rather than be the care recipient. His life found renewed purpose with the animals. The couple still had a drive for life and became smitten with the idea of owning draft horses and a carriage. They bought a carriage on eBay, and Bob and a friend drove to the East Coast to pick up the new acquisition. With their horses and carriage, Bob and Mary Ann began “doing weddings,” offering newlyweds luxurious coach rides at sites from the Lake of the Ozarks to Columbia and eventually at their farm. They visited nursing homes and assisted living centers to give the residents carriage rides. They also began offering rides during the Christmas season at Laurie’s spectacular Enchanted Village of Lights. They accumulated more and more animals, more than 20 varieties in all, including llamas, turkeys, Clydesdales, sheep, potbelly pigs, an emu and others. Some they purchased; others were rescue projects that had to be kept in their home and bottle-fed. Bob and Mary Ann opened their farm to visitors in 2010 and named it the Funny Farm Petting Zoo. At the start of


2014, they moved their Funny Farm to 14 acres abutting Highway 54 outside of Eldon, not far from the Highway 52 overpass. For $7 a person, visitors can ride a Clydesdale, enjoy carriage rides, interact with dozens of animals, listen to entertainment and much, much more. To visit the farm and see the love expressed for the animals by Bob and Mary Ann is heartwarming. Even more so, to me, is the obvious love and respect all of the animals have for their caregivers. There is a bonding there between humans and animals. With the love shown by Bob and Mary Ann, the animals warm quickly to visitors. For youngsters — heck, oldsters also — it is pure glee. Imagine feeding a small animal, riding a Clydesdale or sitting atop a 100pound sulcata tortoise. The turkeys and peacocks strut, showing their beautiful feathers. “What does one do when given a second chance at life?” asks Mary Ann. “We give back.” The Funny Farm Petting Zoo now hosts birthday parties, along with weddings. The animals appear at events. This summer, they will be in Versailles at the Family Fun Fest on June 28. Bob and Mary Ann are going to transport a dozen or so of their animals to have a mini petting zoo and will also bring their Clydesdale and carriage to provide free rides to youngsters. The Funny Farm has been licensed by the Missouri Conservation Department to do wildlife rehabs, and through this project, Funny Farm visitors gain entertainment, education and information about wildlife in Missouri. The Funny Farm story is a story of people whose life was turned upside down and who then persevered, to pass their good fortune forward. v — Ray Speckman can be found wondering if he would enjoy riding on a tortoise or at rayspeckman@emmesannex.com. Prime Magazine June 2014

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TWO 1960s SCRAPBOOKS DOCUMENT ONE COLUMBIA COUPLE’S EUROPEAN TRAVELS BY ANGEL DONNETTE ROBERTSON

“We [had] to wait so long for dinner that we had time to observe a boy run out of the kitchens, net a trout from the pool, take it into the kitchen, and then bring it out and serve it.” Dorothy Benson, a woman whose name would’ve been well-known in Columbia 50 years ago, wrote this apparently unexaggerated description about an experience in a French restaurant in 1960. The note appears in one of two oversized travel scrapbooks that a Prime reader picked up at a garage sale earlier this spring and brought to the magazine office. Prime Magazine June 2014

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“C’est Paris” postcard, 1964 The woman who found the scrapbooks knew nothing about Dorothy Benson or her husband, Robert, but she couldn’t see letting two 50-year-old scrapbooks filled with postcards, brochures, newspaper clippings, menus and similar keepsakes from European travels hit the trash, which is where the books would’ve landed had no one taken them.

Laura Jolley, senior manuscript specialist at the State Historical Society of Missouri, agrees that would’ve been a terrible shame. “Despite the challenges of preserving the scrapbook format, we enjoy collecting them because they offer a unique insight into the lives of the creators,” Jolley says, her “we” referring to the historical society. “There are items preserved in the scrapbook that can’t be found anywhere else, and the types of items collected reflect the decade in which they were created. The scrapbook acts like a time capsule, so to speak.” The two scrapbooks delivered to Prime — one is green, dated 1960, and the other is reddish-brown, dated 1964, but both are trimmed with gold borders and are at least three inches thick — take readers back to the 1960s to travel through Europe with one prominent Columbia couple. The books also

Moulin Rouge Program, 1964

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offer glimpses into the personalities of Robert “Bob” and Dorothy “Dot” Benson, revealing a couple who had an avid appreciation for history, an interest in genealogy and a sense of humor. Dorothy wrote the journal entries in 1960, and Robert wrote them in 1964. The following are some of the more humorous and poignant memories they shared. While in France in 1964, the Bensons decided to visit Moulin Rouge, as Robert had read in the newspaper that they would have the U.S. election results there. Upon arriving, the couple realized a “strip-tease joint” next to the authentic Moulin Rouge was capitalizing on its neighbor’s publicity by borrowing the name. The election returns were at the “New Moulin Rouge.” “We went to the original Moulin Rouge,” Robert wrote, “where we didn’t get any election returns, but where we did see a very good stage show.” The Bensons included the program from Moulin Rouge in the scrapbook. Some of the more compelling memorabilia tucked within the pages includes a menu from the gala dinner on board the S.S. United States. As well as bonein sirloin steak sautéed with mushrooms and asparagus spears in hollandaise sauce, the passengers were offered kangaroo tail. The Bensons also saved a program from Dublin’s Gate Theatre’s production of “You Never Can Tell” by Bernard Shaw and a menu completely handwritten in French. As they toured Europe, the Bensons regularly visited historical sites, collecting pamphlets and brochures as they went. In 1960, Dorothy wrote of visiting Winchester, England, the “ancient capital of Alfred the great Saxon King.” While in Winchester, the Bensons ate lunch at one of the oldest inns in England and viewed the oldest pub, which was located across the street and whose doors and woodwork were “said to have come from the wrecked Spanish Armada.” The Bensons also visited several abbeys, cathedrals, castles and museums throughout Europe. Along the way, they researched Robert’s genealogy. According to the journal entry dated June 6 in the 1960 scrapbook, the


Bensons attended D-Day ceremonies on Utah Beach. Dorothy wrote, “Bob explored the area and relived the never-to-be-forgotten invasion experiences.” The Bensons ended the day in Saint-Lo, France. Later, in 1964, Robert walked the streets of Liege looking for the spot where he had discovered his brother, George, 20 years earlier. When Robert had checked his brother’s barracks, he had been told George was “somewhere downtown.” Robert’s army buddy assured him that he would never find his brother in a town with more than 300,000 people. “Sure enough,” wrote Robert, “it wasn’t twenty minutes after we got to town that I spotted him.” In the journal, Robert admitted that he found the street more cold and uninviting on his current visit than he had in August 1944, when American soldiers had filled the area. A few hours later, the Bensons were in Huy, where Robert walked towards the river, recalling a particular Sunday morning during the Battle of the Bulge when “Hitler sent one of his jets to bomb the bridge.” Robert added that it was the first jet the American soldiers had ever seen and it had “left quite an impression.” Scattered throughout the journal entries are moments of humor, such as when Dorothy shared an experience after the group had decided not to attempt driving in London: “I called the agency,” she wrote, never naming the particular agency, “and they sent out a very weird person, who gave us one of the wildest rides we have ever had — it was so bad that when we got out of the car at the hotel, we forgot half of our stuff in the car.” Their possessions were returned the next day. In 1964, Robert tells of the couple taking a wrong road and finally landing at a “small third-rate hotel.” While the Bensons were eating in the restaurant, a music group started “playing the St. Louis Blues and some song about Kansas City.” Apparently unimpressed, Robert wrote, “They were like Elvis Prestley (sic), but even worse.” On the ship, as they returned home, the Bensons resided in first class, curious as to whether they would enjoy the experience more than the trip over in tourist class. In the end, they found the food of equal quality, although in more variety, and the people “stuffier” with everybody

“trying to make an impression on everybody else.” In particular, Robert was skeptical of two women in their 60s, or “sophisticated phonies” as he wrote, who had taken a Lincoln Continental with them to England and France. “How they ever got that big car around on those narrow roads,” he

wrote, “I’ll never know, but they were trying so hard to make an impression, they just ignored how inconsiderate it was on those small roads.” The Bensons arrived back in Missouri on Nov. 11, 1964. The second scrapbook ends with the two arriving home for a “very pleasant home-coming dinner on the porch.” v

Saville Theatre Program, London 1964

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INTRODUCING MR. & MRS. BENSON

Born in 1923 in Pleasant Hill, Robert Benson left the University of Kansas City in 1942 to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II, landing on the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944. He was part of the first wave onto Utah Beach. Later, Robert obtained his bachelor’s degree and partnered with his brother, George Benson –– the brother he had discovered on the streets of Liege in the middle of a world war. The two brothers owned Benson Building Materials and Benson Lumber Company, as well as several lumber yards, including one in Columbia. In 1918, Dorothy Benson was born in Grand Forks, N.D. Before the United States entered World War II, Dorothy volunteered in the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army, plotting air planes. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, she was a secretary for the Selective Service, and in 1943, she enlisted in the U.S. Women Marine Corps. In April 1944, she was called to service. After the war, she obtained her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Eventually, after her marriage to Robert on May 8, 1954, she worked at Stephens College in Columbia. Both Robert and Dorothy were involved in the local community. Robert was a member of the Mid-Missouri Development Council, the American Forestry Association, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Native Sons of Kansas City, and the Country Club of Missouri. He was also on the Board of the Southwestern Lumbermen’s Association. Dorothy was a member of the Board of YMCA at the University of Missouri, the Friends of the Library, the Missouri Historical Society, the King’s Daughters and the Country Club of Missouri. In 1958, she was the president of the League of Women Voters. In the scrapbooks, she wrote of receiving flowers from the League of Women Voters as the Bensons started their first journey. In 2010, Robert and Dorothy Benson died within three months of each other, Robert in January at the age of 86 and Dorothy in March at the age of 91. v 16

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THE BENSONS’ TRAVEL ITINERARIES 1960 May 7 –– May 10 –– May 11 –– May 12 ––

Left Columbia by car. Arrived in Arlington, Va. Arrived in New York City Boarded S.S. United States May 17 –– Arrived in Southampton, England (rented car) May 19 –– Arrived at Torquay, England May 20 –– Arrived at St. Ives, England May 22 –– Arrived in Wells, England May 24 –– Arrived in Lancaster, England May 25 –– Arrived in Dumfries, Scotland May 26 –– Arrived in Edinburgh, Scotland May 27 –– Arrived in Corbridge, England May 30 –– Arrived in London (returned rental car) June 1 –– Left for Paris (took boat train either to ferry or ship) June 2 –– Arrived in Paris June 5 –– Drove out of Paris (rented another car) June 6 –– Visited Utah Beach, ended the day at SaintLo, France June 8 –– Arrived in Poitiers, France June 11 –– Arrived in Strasburg, Germany and ended day in Heidelberg, Germany June 12 –– Arrived in Weisbaden, Germany (returned rental car) June 15 –– Left by train for Norway, going through Denmark and arriving in Oslo June 17 –– Arrived in Bjorkelangen, Norway, by rental car June 18 –– Returned to Oslo (returned car) June 19 –– Arrived in Gothenburg, Sweden (perhaps arrived on train)

June 20 –– Sailed for Copenhagen, Denmark June 21 –– Sailed for U.S. (destination unclear but probably New York City) July 6 –– Arrived in Columbia 1964 Sept. 23 –– Left Columbia by car Sept. 29 –– Arrived in Washington, D.C. Sept. 30 –– Took train to New York City Oct. 1 –– Boarded S.S. France Oct. 6 –– Landed in Southampton, England Oct. 10 –– Arrived in Holyhead, Wales; boarded boat to cross the Irish Sea Oct. 11 –– Arrived in Dublin, Ireland Oct. 16 –– Arrived by train in Limerick, Ireland Oct. 19 –– Left Limerick by rental car Oct. 20 –– Arrived at Dublin, Ireland Oct. 22 –– Left Dublin by train; Arrived at Dun Laoghaire, Ireland; Left Dun Loaghaire by boat; Arrived at Holyhead, Wales Oct. 23 –– Arrived in Chester, England Oct. 26 –– Arrived by train in London, England Oct. 30 –– Arrived by train in Port of Dover, England; Boarded boat to cross the English Channel; Arrived in Ostend, Belgium; Took train to Liege, Belgium Oct. 31 –– Arrived by train in Luxembourg, Belgium Nov. 1 –– Arrived by train in Paris, France Nov. 5 –– Left Paris by boat train (boat train destination unclear) Nov. 10 –– Arrived in New York City Nov. 11 –– Arrived in Columbia

Military Memories From Bob And Dot Both Bensons wrote about their experiences during World War II. According to his obituary, Robert Benson “wrote three booklets on his Army days, which he gave to members of his company and to libraries and historical societies,” while Dorothy Benson wrote a copyrighted booklet, My Story of World War II Service in the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserve. Dorothy’s booklet is available in the reference section of the Columbia Public Library.


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Prime People

Grandma Meet Barbara Smith, Costume Mistress At Missouri Contemporary Ballet BY ANITA NEAL HARRISON

They call her “G. Veg,” short for “Grandma Vegas.” She’s one of the most dedicated artists at the Missouri Contemporary Ballet, and without her, no production would look the same. Because G. Veg, also known as Barbara Smith, makes the dancers’ costumes — for free. “I want the dancers to have quality and securely made costumes because I believe they will dance better if they know the costumes will not fall apart on stage,” she says. Smith, a 73-year-old retired sixth grade English teacher, began volunteering for Missouri Contemporary Ballet about five years ago, not long after she moved to Columbia from Las Vegas to be closer to her only child — the artistic and executive director of Missouri Contemporary Ballet, Mama Vegas herself, Karen Mareck Grundy. “I saw the state of her costumes, and she didn’t have the money to pay a costumer, so she talked me into doing it,” Smith says. Smith wasn’t sure she was good enough. Her experience in designing stage costumes was limited to what she had sewed for Grundy’s childhood. Even now, after several shows, Grundy says her mom still doesn’t give herself enough credit. “When we come to her with a design or a thought, always, initially, she’s like, ‘Ugh, I don’t think I can do that,’ ” Grundy says, “and I’m always like, ‘Yeah, I think you can.’ Then she takes some time to think about it, and she always figures a way.” In most cases, Smith starts with an illustration, which someone else draws to capture the vision of the choreographer. Once Smith has talked through the design, she looks to see if an old costume can be reworked or if she’ll need to order a new pattern. Sometimes, she makes the pattern herself. During a “sewing season,” as Smith calls the three or so months she spends preparing for a season at Missouri 18

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Contemporary Ballet, Smith spends about 20 hours a week sewing. Helping Smith is Alex Gordon, a male dancer who is learning costume design. He’s often the one who draws the costume sketches for Smith, and he says it’s amazing how she immediately understands his vision. “Instead of having comments on the drawing per se, it is more right away about material and how it is actually going to happen,” Gordon says. “And what’s so great about her is she protects the creativity. When I show her a sketch, she tries to make it to a T. … As an artist, I am allowed to say, ‘This is what I want,’ and she has the level of detail to make that happen.” “She’s a perfectionist,” Grundy says, “which, I’m sure, is where I learned that.” One production that required an exceptional amount of thinking and sewing time, too, was last summer’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” Details such as a backless dress for Alice and a skirt with some stiffness in the hem to make it fluff were essential to creating the show’s magic and presented new challenges to Smith. Gordon was a big help for “Alice” — but before he could help, Smith had to teach him how to sew. It was just one more example of her generosity, Gordon says. “She’s the kind of person who gives a little more than you expect from someone,” he says, “and that makes you feel like family because that’s what family does: They give a little bit more than a friend would.” Grundy describes her mom’s relationships with the dancers in terms of family as well. “My dancers are, in a way, my kids, which I think makes her feel like they are kind of her grandkids,” Grundy says. Smith agrees, adding that it’s not uncommon for the dancers to come to the home she shares with Grundy for meals or for them to go watch a movie together. “I get close to all of them,” she says. “There are dancers leaving this time I will really miss. It’s hard to talk to them right now because they are getting ready to leave, and I will miss them and they will miss me.” The relationships are Smith’s reward for her volunteering. Unlike the dancers who perform their art out of a passion for the art itself, Smith doesn’t sew for sewing’s sake. “I don’t specially like doing it,” she admits with a little laugh. “I just like doing it for them.” v Prime Magazine June 2014

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PROMOTION

How To Fall In Love With Your Farmers’ Market

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There is nothing like buying fresh, locally harvested produce from the farmer who grew it. At summertime farmers’ markets, local growers and merchants offer their fresh fruits, vegetables, jams, baked goods and locally grown meat to people who want to put healthful food on their tables. The sights and smells from a farmers’ market make it a pleasant way to spend a morning or afternoon. There are many compelling reasons why people shop at these markets. First, you are supporting local small businesses and the environment. Once you have tasted berries picked that morning by the grower himself, it is unlikely you will want well-traveled, two-week old berries — not to mention the ecological cost of trucking fruit 3,000 miles. Second, farmers’ markets offer an extensive variety of produce. Local growers have varieties of vegetables unavailable in supermarkets because they don’t “ship well.” You can also find a larger selection of berries, peppers, corn, potatoes and tomatoes than you will see in a large retail setting. Third, local vendors have plenty of knowledge to share about their produce and baked goods. For example, they can tell you what type of flavor to expect from a vegetable or the heat level for a specific pepper variety. Local growers can also advise you on the types of peaches, tomatoes or apples that are best for cooking. Some growers may even give you recipe ideas or introduce you to a type of produce you have never eaten before. Many

vendors may give you the opportunity to sample fruit, vegetables and other home-grown items they are selling. Fourth, farmers’ markets sell more than just produce. Some vendors have items such as honey, herbs, baked goods, handmade pastas, farm-fresh eggs, milk, cheese, meats or homecanned jams and jellies. You can often sample freshly baked herb breads along with locally produced goat cheese. You may also see plants and flowers for sale. Most vendors will have tips on how to care for them. Fifth, if you regularly shop at the same market, you can often get insight into what will be coming in the future. You will learn the best days and times to shop. It will help you get some fantastic deals. Buying produce at the local farmers’ market is not only pleasant and healthy but it is also a frugal way to shop. It gives you the opportunity to experience new fruits and vegetables at the peak of their freshness and at prices less expensive than you might think. A visit to a farmer’s market is more than just a buying trip. It can be an educational experience and a pleasant outing for the whole family. In fact, it is fun to visit farmers’ markets in other locations while on vacation. We all know that we should be adding more fruits and vegetables to our diets. Yet, sometimes out of habit, we buy the same few items every week at the nearest retail supermarket. Try something new. Take a trip to your local farmer’s market. You will be glad you did. v

This “How To” section appears each month in Inside Columbia’s Prime. Readers learn how to find and choose various products and services. 20

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PROMOTION

How To Choose An Awesome Bakery

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Do you love the smell of freshly baked bread? Does the aroma of cookies or pies coming out of the oven give you a warm, wonderful feeling? For people who love baked goods, finding the best bakery is a priority. Whether you are planning a special event or looking for a simple treat, high-quality baked goods are perfect for any occasion. There are times when store-bought goodies just aren’t good enough. The hardest part of finding a bakery is deciding what you want to order. You have the option of buying muffins, delicious bread, doughnuts or cakes. While many bakeries have a specialty, there are some things that all great bakeries share.

as the food is consistent regardless of who is making it. The bakery should create your baked goods with top-notch ingredients, combined in the same way each day.

HIGH-QUALITY INGREDIENTS An awesome bakery uses high-quality products. Imagine fudge made with pure Belgian chocolate or a cake topped with an organic chocolate drizzle. Top bakeries combine the best ingredients in ways no one else can.

BUDGET You will find bakeries that fit in all budgets. The absolute best products will cost more because the supplies are expensive, but bakeries strive very hard to accommodate all spending levels. Make your purchases depending on what you can afford. There is no need to be embarrassed about admitting a budget. If you are purchasing food for a special occasion, look for a bakery that shares in customers’ excitement and is eager to make the event as memorable as it can be. Ask your friends and family for referrals, and ask them to be specific in their praise. Ask someone working at the bakery why people love them, and then pay attention to how easy it is for them to answer, as well as the reasons they give. If those are reasons that are important to you — and you have heard similar testimonies from friends and family — then there’s a good chance you have found yourself a bakery. v

ATMOSPHERE When you visit a great bakery, the staff should greet you promptly. The bakery should have an inviting atmosphere. The employees should be there because they like helping customers. The best bakeries smell like wonderful memories of childhood. They might even give you free nibbles to encourage you to buy their newest product. CONSISTENCY The bakery should take great pride in the products they create. There should be no need to worry about who is working, 22

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SPECIALTIES Some bakeries have specialty products that are unique to them. Whether you are looking for cake pops or pies how Grandma made them, there is a bakery that will suit your every desire. Many bakeries use family recipes to make mile-high dinner rolls or unique wedding cakes. Whatever you need, you will find a bakery that is just right for you.


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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Financial Adviser

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Financial advisers do much more than handle investments. Great financial advisers teach their clients how to manage their household expenses, how to pay the lowest taxes possible, how to plan for retirement and how to invest. They also assist their clients in managing financial risk. STARTING YOUR SEARCH A great place to start looking for a financial adviser is by asking friends and neighbors for suggestions. After you have created a list of possibilities, investigate each choice. It is a good idea to choose a financial adviser who is certified because gaining certification requires specialized training and passing rigorous exams. After determining the adviser’s qualifications, contact the certifying organizations to see if there have been any complaints filed against the adviser. If so, find out how those complaints were handled. Also ask potential financial advisers what awards they have received. Again, call the organization that gave the award and verify that the financial adviser is telling the truth. Furthermore, find out what the qualifications were to receive the award. Then ask the financial adviser for a list of satisfied clients who have goals comparable to yours. AREAS OF EXPERTISE There is a wide array of financial products that can contribute to your financial well-being. Common investing tools range from bonds to mutual funds and commodities to stocks. However, depending upon your appetite for risk, some investment vehicles are better for your portfolio than others. You want to find a financial adviser who is an expert in customizing a financial plan for your benefit. Consider the specific segment of the market in which you want to invest your money. Look for a financial adviser specializing in that particular investment type. For example, you might want to invest in the commodities market. If your potential financial adviser has little experience in that market, consider a different choice on your candidate list.

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RATE OF SUCCESS Has your potential candidate’s rate of return on his recommendations outpaced the average market rate over the last year, five years or 10 years? How well has the financial adviser weathered past economic recessions for his clients? Do his clients continue to thrive in a bleak financial environment? On the other hand, have his clients experienced multiple hits to their portfolios? This will indicate why an adviser’s success is well worth your consideration. FEES OR COMMISSIONS? Ask all potential financial advisers about their compensation method. Is if fee-based or commission-based? This will greatly influence your final selection. A commission-based adviser will suggest financial products that fit you, and you will know what it costs. Choose a commission-based adviser if he has a proven track record of success and has your best interest in mind. Fee-based advisers will move your investments for you as needed without your involvement, which appeals to some people. INTERVIEW Once you have narrowed your list down to two or three candidates, schedule a meeting with each one. During this meeting, make sure you are honest and clear about your goals. Look for a financial adviser who can teach you. While advisers never want to work themselves out of a job, they should be continually working to increase your knowledge of your current financial situation and how to improve it. PUT IT IN WRITING After you have further narrowed your list to one or two advisers, have each adviser write a plan for moving you from where you are to where you want to be. Get a written copy of the plan. The plan should have short-term goals and longer-term goals and should also state who else will profit from the proposal. Make sure that the plan is written so that you thoroughly understand it. v


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PROMOTION

How To Choose A Great Salon

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If you find yourself having frequent bad hair days, it might be time to find a new salon. No matter what kind of hair you have, the right hairstylist can transform it into something spectacular. Unfortunately, not all salons have amazing stylists. If you find yourself jumping from salon to salon, it might be time to reconsider your options. Finding a great salon does not have to be a matter of luck. It takes effort to find the right hairstylist. GET ADVICE Referrals are a great way to inquire about salons and stylists. Ask friends and acquaintances with similar hair for recommendations. If you have straight, fine hair, friends with coarse, curly hair might have a different experience with their stylists. Good salons should have different stylists who specialize in certain areas. That is why it is important to tell the receptionist what type of hair you have so that you are scheduled with the stylist who works well with your hair type or excels in the hair service you desire. Some salons offer referral programs, which can offer discounts for new clients Consultations are a great way to start if you are hesitant to try a new salon/ stylist. Most salons do not charge a fee for consultations. The stylist will discuss options and different styles for your hair, take you on a tour of the salon and

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answer any questions you might have before your actual appointment. LOOK ONLINE Internet research can go a long way in helping you refine your list. Look at salon websites to gain insight into the business and their values. If you want a salon with stylists who are passionate about what they do, look for salons that post pictures and up-todate looks of services they have recently done on social media outlets. You can see the range of talent that each stylist has. MATCH YOUR LIFE Find a salon that matches your lifestyle. If you like to get trims on your lunch break, make sure the salon is close to work. If you work long hours, your ideal salon will need to stay open late. If you want a hip style, find a salon that is energetic and trendy. PRICE For many people, price is one of the most important criteria in choosing a salon. When a salon quotes a price for a haircut, find out exactly what is included. Some salons will charge a separate fee for washing or blow drying. Also, depending on the amount and length of your hair, you may pay a different price than the standard. This is why a consultation is important because it will ensure

that there are no unpleasant surprises at checkout. There are many variables that go into a salon’s price point. Most salons have a starting price that can increase depending upon service received as well as the level of stylists’ education. This doesn’t hold true for all salons because some don’t require education. This is something to inquire about when talking to the receptionist. OTHER OPTIONS Some salon owners require that their stylists have continuing education. Trends are always changing, and it is important that stylists stay up-to-date on what’s up-and-coming. If you are loyal to a certain brand of hair care products, you can check on the brand’s website to search for salons in your area that carry its products. When you buy professional products from your salon, you are supporting your local community. Professional products are like an insurance policy for your hair. They will help maintain your style and integrity of your hair between visits. Your appearance says a lot about you. Your hair is your best accessory. If you want to make a good impression, choosing the right salon is vital. It may take some time, but once you find the right salon for you, great hair days are within your reach. v


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Prime Time

05.14June JUNE 4 Rain or shine, check out 9th Street Summerfest with Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. The Blue Note outdoor event takes place on Ninth Street between Broadway and Walnut Street; the entry gate is on the Walnut intersection. Concerts are general admission, and no pets, backpacks or bikes allowed. Tickets $25; gate opens at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:30; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573-874-1944; www.thebluenote.com

JUNE 4–14 Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre presents the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “The King and I,” the tale of the English widow Anna Leonowens, who travels to Bangkok to tutor the king’s many wives and children. Each year the Lyceum Theatre attracts professional talent from all over the country to produce an eightshow season. $35.50 for adults, discounts for seniors, students & children; 8 p.m.; 114 High St., Arrow Rock; 660-837-3311; www.lyceumtheatre.org

JUNE 5 Get ready to dance as Woodhaven presents the third annual Red Carpet Gala in the Kimball Ballroom of Lela Raney Wood Hall on the Stephens College campus. Join friends for a celebration of inclusion, independence and dedication to the community. The event benefits the Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri. Admission is five nonperishable food items, RSVP required; 6:30 p.m.; 6 N. College Ave.; 573-876-7338; www.woodhaventeam.org

JUNE 5 JUNE 5 Break out your blankets and lawn chairs for the June installment of the Stephens Lake Park Amphitheater Concert Series, featuring the Missouri Symphony Society. The series, sponsored by KPLA-FM 101.5, features a performance on the first Thursday of every month through September. The Columbia Office of Cultural Affairs and the Missouri Arts Council are sponsors of the June concert. Free; 7 p.m.; 100 Old 63 N.; 573-874-7460; www.gocolumbiamo.com

Angeles-based Dawes is an American folk-rock band that released its third album, “Stories Don’t End,” last year. $27 in advance, $30 day of show; doors open at 7:30 p.m., show at 8:30; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573-874-1944; www.thebluenote.com

JUNE 7

JUNE 5 The Blue Note hosts singer-songwriter Conor Oberst, accompanied by special guest Dawes. Indie rocker Oberst, from Omaha, Neb., has been recording for nearly 20 years, most notably with Bright Eyes, and recently signed with Nonesuch, a subsidiary of Warner Music Group. Los

member carefully selected to portray both the appearance and playing styles of his Zeppelin counterpart. $10; doors open at 8 p.m., show at 9; 17 N. Ninth St.; 573874-1944; www.thebluenote.com

JUNE 6 The Blue Note presents Zoso: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience, along with The Bon Scott 5: A Tribute to AC/DC. The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience formed in 1995, each band

Hop on your motorcycle or pile into the car. The fourth annual MFA Oil Poker Run and Car Show offers six, brand-new routes for the 100-mile race. Starting points include Columbia, Jefferson City, Sedalia, Lake Ozark, Moberly and O’Fallon. Each route features five stops Prime Magazine June 2014

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along the way and ends at Memorial Park in Jefferson City. Live entertainment, live and silent auctions, and the announcement of winners follows the 11:30 a.m. lunch in the park. Proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Mid-Missouri and University of Missouri Children’s Hospital. From $20; pokerrun@ mfaoil.com; www.mfaoilpokerrun.com

JUNE 7 During Camp Hickory Hill Summer Blast, families can enjoy bounce houses; face painting and a fireworks show. This event helps raise money for Camp Hickory Hill, a residential camp that sustains a community, culture and medically sound program of support for children age 7 to 17 with Type 1 Diabetes. Money raised will help families interested in sending their children to camp this summer. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m.; 6401 U.S. 40 W. (I-70 Exit 121); 573-445-9146; www.camphickoryhill.com

â–˛ JUNE 8 The 76th annual Mid-Missouri Soap Box Derby is sure to bring out the best youth racers in the region. Competitors begin assembling their cars as early as January to ensure their best version is ready for the race. Each year, youths age 7 to 13 race in the hope of making it to the World Championship at Derby Downs in Akron, Ohio. Free; race starts at 8:30 a.m.; downtown Columbia; 573881-3471; www.midmosbd.org

JUNE 13 Relive the days of outdoor movie fun with Movies in the Park, sponsored by Parks & Recreation, KPLA-FM 101.5 30

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and Boone Electric Community Trust. “Frankenweenie” (PG) will be projected onto an inflatable screen at Flat Branch Park. The movie is a parody by director Tim Burton and pays homage to the classic 1931 film “Frankenstein.” “Frankenweenie” features black-and-white, stop-motion animation in which a young filmmaker, Victor, conducts a science experiment to bring his beloved dog, Sparky, back to life. What follows are unintended and at times monstrous consequences. Bring your blanket, enjoy concessions and take in a movie under the stars. No rain date. $2 per person, children under 8 free; 9 p.m; 101 S. Fourth St.; 573-874-7460; www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec

JUNE 19 Calling all backyard chefs! The College of BBQ Knowledge — at Inside Columbia magazine’s headquarters — returns to serve up inspiration for mastering your backyard barbecue techniques. Enjoy classes taught by professional pit masters and heaping helpings of food. There will be a beer trailer to cool you down if the charcoal gets too hot and a backyard barbecue competition fixing up sauces, chicken and ribs. Work up an appetite by dancing along with a rockin’ bluegrass band. $25; 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; 47 E. Broadway; 573-442-1430; www.InsideColumbia.net/College-Of-BBQKnowledge

▲ JUNE 19-22 The 19th annual Missouri State Senior Games gets underway in an Olympicstyle sports festival for those 50 and older. Participants compete for medals in archery, badminton, 3 on 3 basketball, bowling, cycling, golf, horseshoes, race walking, Prime Magazine June 2014

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road race, shuffleboard, softball, swimming, tennis, triathlon, track and field, and volleyball. Other sports and activities include darts, shooting, skills contests, soccer and washers. Registration fees vary; venues throughout Columbia; 573882-2101; www.smsg.org/senior_games

JUNE 21 On June 19, 1865, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, and declared that slavery had ended. Commemorated as Juneteenth, the date is celebrated all over the country with festivals. Families from all racial and ethnic backgrounds are encouraged to attend the celebration in Douglass Park. Free; 3 p.m.; 400 N. Providence Road; 573-874-7460; www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec

▲ JUNE 21-29

Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre presents “Little Shop of Horrors,” the longest-running off-Broadway show of all time. The lively musical features a down-and-out floral assistant who becomes an overnight sensation after discovering an exotic plant with an insatiable craving for fresh blood. The plant promises fame and fortune to the florist as long as the assistant feeds the plant’s appetite. $35.50 for adults, discounts for seniors, students & children; 114 High St, Arrow Rock; 660-837-3311; www.lyceumtheatre.org

JUNE 24–AUGUST 22 Columbia Art League invites aspiring artists, current artists and art lovers to the Bountiful Boone Art Exhibition, which features art from all over Boone County. Showcased works will appear in both 2-D and 3-D, and will feature various media ranging from acrylic paint on canvas to clay sculptures. The exhibition runs for a week. The opening reception runs from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 28. All artwork is also for sale. Free; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 207 S. Ninth St.; 573-443-8838; www.columbiaartleague.org v 32

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How Can I Help?

Getting In STEP MU’s Senior Teacher Educator Program

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BY MORGAN MCCARTY The Heysel Senior Teacher Educator Program at the University of Missouri connects local older adults with first year medical students. These active, older adults mentor the medical students during their first year, and the pair develops a relationship that research shows allows medical students to better serve their patients in the future. What do STEP volunteers do? The program begins in late summer with the Kickoff Dinner Event, where seniors and students meet each other for the first time. Throughout the school year STEP seniors and students meet at the medical school for special events that include lunch followed by a talk on aging. Students and seniors enjoy all sorts of activities together: They have dinners with each other, go to movies and concerts, exercise (walking is very popular), and stay in touch through e-mail and phone calls. While students and seniors are officially matched for one year, the friendships made in STEP often continue throughout the students’ four years in medical school education and well beyond that.

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Who are the ideal candidates for participation in STEP? Active older volunteers who are interested in mentoring medical students. Folks may join on their own or as a couple. What are the benefits of participating? Those who take part in the program will meet nice people and make new friends, enjoy complimentary lunches with their student partner, hear interesting talks from MU health experts and help shape health care of the future. What are the participation requirements and details? STEP welcomes older adults who are age 65 or older, able to attend meetings at MU’s School of Medicine and willing to spend about three to four hours per month (when school is in session) talking/visiting with a medical student partner. How big is this group? Last year 74 students and 94 seniors participated. How can people apply to participate in STEP? Call Peggy Gray, STEP program coordinator, at 573-884-3337, or apply online by visiting www.stepmu.com v


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Pet Corner

Pet Peeves “Old Doc” Shares A Few Frustrations

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BY DR. JOHN WILLIAMS It’s time for my annual “vent your spleen” event. If you’re not aware of this little cleansing exercise, it’s a yearly rite that I undertake to express my confusion and frustrations about all things in the animal world that have come to torment my daily existence. Please pardon my cynicism. Just as an aside, it is interesting that as I age more rapidly these days, I do find that my threshold for things that make this list is getting lower and lower, and the list is getting longer and longer. Why is that? Anyway, here is this year’s list of ire: • Why will everybody on the Internet immediately stop reading something significant, like a revolutionary cancer cure, to watch a video of a baby panda sneezing? • What is the big deal about pet foods proclaiming to be “all natural”? Couldn’t that much be said of road kill? And cyanide and arsenic are “natural,” too. • When someone says to me, “If a person and a cat were crossing the street in front of me, I’d swerve to miss the cat,” it scares the heck out of me. • I realize that coats and sweaters may keep a short-haired dog warmer in the winter, but do they really need the designer cap and galoshes, too? Why don’t people

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spend that money on something more important? Like “all natural” pet food. To those people who feel the overwhelming need to berate their pet groomer for the last haircut that little Fifi got, a little advice: Lighten up. It’s not like the wrong leg was amputated. She’s not scarred for life. Give it two weeks. It will be fine. I hate to burst the bubble of many people, but contrary to popular belief, veterinarians do not “experiment” on pets when owners leave them overnight at the hospital. Believe it or not, a veterinarian you just met at a wedding reception may not be all that interested in any of your cute pet stories. Unless, of course, there is an open bar. While we’re on the subject, I hate to disappoint a bunch of you, but quizzing Old Doc about the various wildlife species that you’ve spotted around your neighborhood may be a fruitless task. Most of us didn’t take courses on squirrel medicine or groundhog surgery. By the way, the word is spayed not spaded. And, for those of you who want to show off, the real word is ovariohysterectomy. Probably best not to try to use that word three times today, though.

• The lead story recently heard on a network news channel was, “Family dog gets invited to senior prom.” I guess the economy or the war on terror doesn’t grab the audience like it used to. • People don’t want to admit it, but the biggest failure in housebreaking puppies stems from the owners letting the pup train them. In other words, that 3 a.m. “recreational” for little Fluffy is not really necessary unless you just want to see that lunar eclipse. • Where were “dog whisperers” when we were kids? Maybe that’s why my old beagle, Geraldine, used to walk around with a look of total frustration on her face. I always thought that she was just constipated from eating too much natural road kill. OK, I’m done venting now. I feel a little better. v

— John Williams, DVM, is a retired Columbia veterinarian who spent 39 years as a small-animal practitioner.


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Life Lessons

At This Very Moment Learning To Live In The Beautiful Now BY SARALEE PEREL

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Two weeks ago, my husband, Bob, was taken by ambulance to the emergency room. He was having sharp chest pains, so I called 911. Because of my disability, I couldn’t go to the hospital with him. The ER doctor called me at 4 in the morning. He said Bob’s tests were good but he needed to see a cardiologist right away. Thank God, he has been feeling well ever since, though he’s gone through many cardiac tests and has to wear an event monitor for a month, to record data via electrodes placed on his chest. This experience has transformed him. He has a newfound appreciation of life. I find it nauseating. “Saralee,” he said one morning, “look at my water glass.” “Yes, Bob. It has water in it.” He said, “It has water in it!” “Uh-huh.” “I’m drinking the water,” he said, closing his eyes while he “fully experienced” a “sacred” swallow. Then he kissed me. “Bob,” I was choking during the inordinately long kiss, “I can’t breathe.” “I can’t either.” He gasped for breath. “Isn’t this magnificent?”

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Then he turned on a lamp. “Look at that!” he said, wide-eyed. “I’m looking.” I didn’t see anything. “The bulb. It’s giving out light.” I sat him down. “Sweets,” I said, “this new shtick? It’s got to stop.” “Why?” “Because — because —” Then I realized that Bob had nothing to stop. He’s always been appreciative of the greatness of so many things that I take for granted. Why on earth would I ever put a damper on that? On that dreadful night when he had chest pains, I sat alone, staring at the phone waiting for the doctor’s call. I thought, “The next thing I hear might be, ‘I have bad news.’ ” Sometimes love can be so painful. Bob came home by cab. I watched out the window, waiting to see the taxi bring my husband back to me. How shockingly and suddenly a life can fall to pieces. Was that the lesson I was supposed to learn from all this? No. That night in bed, Bob and I cried. We were so relieved to be touching each other. In silence, we caressed each other’s faces. No words were needed. We knew

we were both thinking that our lives have been unusually beautiful, with good times and bad, through losing our beloved pets and yet loving new ones. Through the tragedy of my spinal cord injury, when literally overnight, Bob became my caregiver. He fed me and carried me. I remember we wept with grief over the loss of a way of life that was never again to be. “Bob,” I said in bed, still touching his face. “We both know that anything can happen suddenly to horribly change the present.” He smiled as he looked at me and whispered: “We’re not going to live that way. Look at us at this very moment. Have you ever experienced such beauty in your life as now?” I said, “It couldn’t be better than this.” He told me, “If we concentrate on awful possibilities, we’ll miss out on the wonders we’re sharing — right now.” “Right now,” I whispered back. “Now is all we have.” “But tomorrow, anything can — ” He stopped me from finishing my sentence. “Who knows about tomorrow?” he said. “All we can be sure of is this moment. Our kitten in my armpit, sleeping and purring at the same time. Me massaging your thumb knuckle, which always makes you sleepy. The sounds of the wind. This kiss.” Bob’s kiss was as gentle as a butterfly’s wings. I was filled with light and love, taking in the beautiful moments of that beautiful night, with my husband safe in my arms. Dwelling in the “now,” I found perfect contentment. v — Award-winning columnist Saralee Perel can be reached at sperel@saraleeperel.com or via her website: www. saraleeperel.com.


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Estate Planning

Does Equal Mean Fair? If The Topic Is Wills, Then Yes, Experts Say BY ANITA NEAL HARRISON

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As people think about dividing up their estate, there might be situations where an equal distribution among children doesn’t seem like the best route to take. Parents sometimes consider unequal inheritances when • one child is financially better (or worse) off than the others, • one child has helped more with caregiving, • one child has already received a lot more financial help, • one child has shown much more interest in something, such as a farm or vacation home, or • one child has been estranged. Although these circumstances can make unequal distribution seem reasonable, Suzanne Gellman, an attorney who serves as an MU Extension family financial education specialist, and Skip Walther, an attorney who teaches estate planning as an adjunct professor in MU’s College of Human Environmental Sciences, advise against it.

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“Unless there is an obvious reason as to why the split is unequal and the relatives are rational about why, which generally is not the case, then it can be challenging to ongoing family relationships,” Gellman says. In fact, she adds, she just learned about a mother who left more to her daughter than to her son, and as a result, the brother and sister haven’t talked to each other since the mother’s death more than 10 years ago. The reason for such bitterness, Walther says, is that children tend to equate love and money when it comes to wills. “It’s almost certainly going to be true that the one who gets the short end of the stick is going to feel the parent didn’t love them as much,” Walther says. “That’s just human nature. And for that reason, [giving unequal amounts] is — at least in my view — a huge mistake. “The will that a parent makes is the last expression of their relationship with their kids,” Walther continues, “and

there’s no rebuttal; there’s no opportunity to debate. It’s a very final statement.” Aside from hurt feelings, there are other reasons to think twice before choosing an unequal distribution. One that Gellman notes is people’s tendency not to revise their wills as often as is recommended. “Many things can change between the time a will or trust is written and when it comes into play,” she says. “For example, a child that seemed to be more well-off when the will/trust was written has since gotten divorced or fallen on hard financial times, a child who was estranged may have come back into the picture, all the children may since have gotten equal financial help or distribution (and there are better ways to document the gifts against the will), a child who seemed less well-off may have had a change of circumstance and is now well-to-do. “Most people do not have a crystal ball to see into the future, and what they think is equitable or fair one day, may turn out not to be the next,” she concludes. However, if the parent knows the condition being addressed is permanent, that might be different, Gellman adds. “For example, setting up a special needs trust for a child with some sort of permanent disability might be grounds for unequal distribution,” she says. In any case, if parents are considering unequal inheritances, they need to explain their reasoning to their children, Walther and Gellman both say. “And it’s important that the parent is confident that their children understand,” Walther says, “because money just is not worth a lifetime of thinking that you weren’t as valuable to your parents as your siblings.” v


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Special Section

The Truth About Varicose Veins Get The Facts With This Q&A

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Varicose veins affect half of people 50 years and older. This Q&A from Women’sHealth.gov provides important information on identifying and treating this common problem. WHAT ARE VARICOSE VEINS AND SPIDER VEINS? Varicose veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red or flesh-colored. They can be swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are often found on the legs. Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller and closer to the surface of the skin. Often, they are red or blue and look like tree branches or spiderwebs with short, jagged lines. They can be found on the legs and face and can cover either a very small or very large area of skin. WHAT CAUSES VARICOSE VEINS AND SPIDER VEINS? Varicose veins can be caused by weak or damaged valves in the veins, which allow blood to flow backward and collect in the vein. Spider veins can be caused by the backup of blood. They can also be caused by hormone changes, exposure to the sun and injuries.

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WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF VARICOSE VEINS? Varicose veins can often be seen on the skin. Other common symptoms of varicose veins in the legs include aching pain that may get worse after sitting or standing for a long time; throbbing or cramping; heaviness; swelling; rash that’s itchy or irritated; darkening of the skin (in severe cases); and restless legs SHOULD I SEE A DOCTOR ABOUT VARICOSE VEINS? You should see a doctor about varicose veins if the vein has become swollen, red or very tender or warm to the touch, there are sores or a rash on the leg or near the ankle, the skin on the ankle and calf becomes thick and changes color, one of the varicose veins begins to bleed, your leg symptoms are interfering with daily activities, or the appearance of the veins is causing you distress. If you’re having pain, even if it’s just a dull ache, don’t hesitate to get help. HOW ARE VARICOSE VEINS DIAGNOSED? Your doctor will look at your legs while you’re standing or sitting with your legs dangling. He or she may ask you about

your symptoms, including any pain you’re having. You might have an ultrasound to see the veins’ structure, check the blood flow in your veins and look for blood clots. Although less likely, you might have a venogram, which provides a more detailed look at blood flow through your veins. HOW ARE VARICOSE AND SPIDER VEINS TREATED? Your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes if your varicose veins don’t cause many symptoms. If symptoms are more severe, your doctor may recommend medical treatments, which range from compression stockings to surgery. Sclerotherapy is the most common treatment for both spider veins and varicose veins. The doctor uses a needle to inject a liquid chemical into the vein. The chemical causes the vein walls to swell, stick together and seal shut. This stops the flow of blood, and the vein turns into scar tissue. In a few weeks, the vein should fade. This treatment does not require anesthesia and can be done in your doctor’s office. You can return to normal activity right after treatment. The same vein may need to be treated more than once. Treatments are usually done every 4 to 6 weeks. This treatment is very effective when done correctly. Other treatments include surface laser treatments and endovenous techniques (radiofrequency and laser). CAN VARICOSE AND SPIDER VEINS RETURN EVEN AFTER TREATMENT? Current treatments for varicose veins and spider veins have very high success rates compared to traditional surgical treatments. Over a period of years, however, more abnormal veins can develop because there is no cure for weak vein valves. Ultrasound can be used to keep track of how badly the valves are leaking. Ongoing treatment can help keep this problem under control. v


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Special Section

Cosmetic Services 101 Your Guide To Common Cosmetic Procedures

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Cosmetic procedures include surgical and nonsurgical procedures that reshape normal structures of the body in order to improve appearance and self-esteem. The following descriptions of popular cosmetic procedures come from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons’ website, www.plasticsurgery.org. Botulinum toxin is the most popular way to reduce facial wrinkles without a surgical facelift. Botulinum toxin can be used as a wrinkle treatment to smooth frown lines, crows fee, forehead furrows and skin bands on the neck. Injections of botulinum toxin block muscular nerve signals, which then weakens the muscle so that it can’t contract and diminishes unwanted facial wrinkles. Botulinum toxin can be combined with other cosmetic skin procedures

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such as chemical peels, dermal fillers or microdermabrasion. This combination of therapies can even help to prevent the formation of new lines and wrinkles. Chemical peels use a chemical solution to smooth the texture of skin by removing the damaged outer layers. Sun exposure, acne or just getting older can leave skin tone uneven, wrinkled, spotted or scarred. A chemical peel is not effective for treating deep facial lines; tightening loose or sagging skin; removing broken capillaries; changing pore size; or removing deep scars. Dermabrasion and dermaplaning help to “refinish” the skin’s top layers through a method of controlled surgical scraping. The treatments soften the sharp edges of surface irregularities, giving the skin a smoother appearance.

Dermabrasion improves the look of facial skin left scarred by accidents or previous surgery and smooths out fine facial wrinkles. It’s also sometimes used to remove the pre-cancerous growths called keratoses and is commonly used to treat deep acne scars. Both dermabrasion and dermaplaning can be performed on small areas of skin or on the entire face. They can be used alone or with other procedures such as facelift, scar removal or chemical peel. Microdermabrasion treatments use a minimally abrasive instrument to gently sand skin, removing the thicker, uneven outer layer. Microdermabrasion can improve age spots and black heads; lighten dark skin patches; exfoliate; lessen the appearance of stretch marks; reduce fine lines and wrinkles; reduce or eliminate enlarged pores; and treat acne and acne scars. Microdermabrasion helps to thicken collagen, which results in a younger looking complexion. Dermal fillers have been called “liquid facelifts” and can restore youthful fullness to a face, plump up lips, enhance shallow contours, or soften facial creases and wrinkles. Although they can’t help with excess sagging skin, these soft tissue fillers can add more volume and provide immediate results at a lower cost than surgery. These treatments aren’t permanent, however; they must be repeated and maintained. Some dermal fillers are used in conjunction with other skin rejuvenation treatments such as injections of botulinum toxin. Laser skin resurfacing, also known as a laser peel, laser vaporization and lasabrasion, can reduce facial wrinkles, scars and blemishes. The surgeon uses the laser to send short, concentrated pulsating beams


of light at irregular skin. This removes unwanted, damaged skin in a very precise manner one layer at a time and also works to stimulate growth of new collagen fibers. As the treated area heals, the new skin that forms is smoother and firmer. Laser skin resurfacing’s targeted approach means there are fewer problems with excess lightening of skin for procedures such as laser acne scar removal. Facelift surgery, technically known as rhytidectomy, is a surgical procedure to improve visible signs of aging in the face and neck, such as sagging in the mid-face; deep creases below the lower eyelids; deep creases along the nose extending to the corner of the mouth; fat that has fallen or is displaced; loss of muscle tone in the lower face that creates jowls; and loose skin and excess fatty deposits under the chin and jaw. Procedures typically performed along with a facelift are a brow lift to correct a sagging or deeply furrowed brow and eyelid surgery to rejuvenate aging eyes. As a restorative surgery, a facelift does not change a person’s fundamental appearance and cannot stop the aging process. Arm lift surgery, or brachioplasty, is a surgical procedure that reduces excess sagging skin that droops downward; tightens and smoothes the underlying supportive tissue that defines the shape of the upper arm; and reduces localized pockets of fat in the upper arm region. Liposuction slims and reshapes specific areas of the body by removing excess fat deposits and improving body contours and proportion. Liposuction techniques may be used to reduce localized fat deposits of the thighs; hips and buttocks; abdomen and waist; upper arms; back; inner knee; chest area; cheeks, chin and neck; and calves and ankles. Liposuction can be performed alone or along with other plastic surgery procedures, such as a facelift, breast reduction or a tummy tuck. Liposuction is not a treatment for obesity or a substitute for proper diet and exercise. It is also not an effective treatment for cellulite — the dimpled skin that typically appears on the thighs, hips and buttocks — or loose saggy skin. v

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Special Section

Do You Need Statins? Your Cholesterol Levels Alone Can’t Tell You

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The American Heart Association reports that a new clinical practice guideline released last fall has changed how doctors approach the treatment of blood cholesterol, especially for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of the arteries. The guideline — put forth by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association — identifies four major groups of patients for whom cholesterol-lowering statins have the greatest chance of preventing stroke and heart attacks. The guideline also emphasizes the importance of adopting a hearthealthy lifestyle to prevent and control high blood cholesterol. “This guideline represents a departure from previous guidelines because it doesn’t focus on specific target levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, commonly known as LDL, or ‘bad cholesterol,’ although the definition of optimal LDL cholesterol has not changed,” says Dr. Neil J. Stone, Bonow professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and chair of the expert panel that wrote the new guideline. “Instead, it focuses on defining groups for whom LDL lowering is proven to be most beneficial.” The new guideline recommends moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy for these four groups:

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• Patients who have cardiovascular disease; • Patients with an LDL, or “bad” cholesterol level of 190 mg/dL or higher; • Patients with Type 2 diabetes who are between 40 and 75 years of age; and • Patients with an estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease of 7.5 percent or higher who are between 40 and 75 years of age (the report provides formulas for calculating 10-year risk). Doctors can use risk assessment tools in some cases to determine which patients would most likely benefit from statin therapy, rather than focusing only on blood cholesterol to determine which patients would benefit. “The likely impact of the recommendations is that more people who would benefit from statins are going to be on them, while fewer people who wouldn’t benefit from statins are going to be on them,” Stone says. The expert panel authoring the report chose to focus on the use of statins after a detailed review of other cholesterollowering drugs. “Statins were chosen because their use has resulted in the greatest benefit and the lowest rates of safety issues,” Stone says. “No other cholesterol-low-

ering drug is as effective as statins.” He added that there is still a role for other cholesterol-lowering drugs, for example, in patients who suffer side effects from statins. In addition to identifying patients most likely to benefit from statins, the guideline outlines the recommended intensity of statin therapy for different patient groups. Rather than use a “lowest is best” approach that combines a low dose of a statin drug along with several other cholesterol-lowering drugs, the panel found that it can be preferable to focus instead on a healthy lifestyle along with a higher dose of statins, eliminating the need for additional medications. “The focus for years has been on getting the LDL low,” Stone says. “Our guidelines are not against that. We’re simply saying how you get the LDL low is important. Considering all the possible treatments, we recommend a hearthealthy lifestyle and statin therapy for the best chance of reducing your risk of stroke or heart attack in the next 10 years.” The guidelines are intended to serve as a starting point for clinicians. Some patients who do not fall into the four major categories may also benefit from statin therapy, a decision that will need to be made on a case-by-case basis. v


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Faces And Places

44th Annual Jefferson Club Celebration The Jefferson Club, the premier donor society at the University of Missouri, hosted its 44th annual dinner on April 26, 2014. Trustee chair Steven A. Richardson passed the gavel to the new chair, Naomi Cupp. Mizzou’s new chancellor, R. Bowen Loftin, outlined his vision for the university and his passion for the students. Mizzou alum and pro football Hall of Fame honoree Kellen Winslow shared extraordinary insights into his own life. And, with Mizzou Forte leading the audience in the alma mater, all looked forward to the coming year with great expectations.

R.D. and Loretta Ross

Lenard Politte, Mary Lu Politte, Gary Tatlow, Bea Smith and Larry McMullen

R. Bowen Loftin and Anne Kinder

Brock Hessing and Hannah Hessing Watts

Gayle Johnson, Mary and Donald Baker, and Vicky Shy

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Barbara and Handy Williamson

Michael Middleton, Kellen Winslow, Wes Kemp and Dudley McCarter

Elizabeth and James Cogswell with Karin Loftin

Shirley and Charles Brown


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Prime Advice

Tell Me About It

With Angel Donnette Robertson

Q:

My friend is always “too busy” for me. I am always the one who has to contact her, and the few times we manage to schedule lunch or dinner, she cancels. I feel like our friendship is very one-sided.

A:

We tend to make time for what is important to us. That being said, however, it doesn’t necessarily follow that you aren’t important to your friend. At times, we all have issues that take precedence over a friendship — a sick parent, a troubled teenage child, work deadlines. If, in the past, your friend has generally been able to hold up her side of the relationship, then you may just need to give her time to resolve whatever issue is currently occupying most of her time. In fact, if you know she is struggling, you may need to offer assistance rather than demand time. And, later, when you are struggling with a hefty problem, she will reverse the roles and support you. If she is, in fact, a good friend who is simply overwhelmed at the moment. However, if she is consistently “too busy,” you need to evaluate the friendship. Perhaps the two of you have diverged in interests, attitudes or lifestyles to the point that maintaining a close friendship is no longer desirable. Or perhaps she is simply taking advantage of your tendency to “be there” for her without any intention of returning the favor. You can approach your friend, without accusations and without defensiveness, to discuss why she does not have time for you. Depending on whether her reasons for “busyness” are valid and

whether her future actions change, you need to decide whether the friendship really has any value to you. You need a friend on whom you can rely. And if she can’t ever be there for dinner, she most likely won’t be there for a crisis. Not every friendship is meant to last a lifetime. It’s OK to let a bad one — or even just an indifferent one — go. Remember the good times, appreciate what you learned from the friend, allow for the possibility of resuming the friendship later and move on. v

Q:

My other siblings do not help me in caring for our aging parent. I can’t keep doing everything by myself. How can I make them help me?

A:

First, a simple question — have you asked for their help? Sometimes, people struggle in actually asking for help. We assume others should know how much we are doing and how overwhelmed we are. We want them to offer so we don’t actually have to ask. And then when we do ask, we keep the request vague. Worse, we may even just drop a hint, rather than even a nonspecific plea for help. So, my first suggestion is ask for help — in as direct a manner as you can. If you need a few hours break once a week, ask another sibling to take over the caregiving for those hours. If you need help with grocery shopping or bill paying, ask specifically. Often, people will respond to a direct request, when a vague one either leaves them uncertain about action or provides them an easy excuse to ignore you.

Have a relationship question for Angel? Email it to prime@insidecolumbia.net. Angel will select reader questions to answer, along with questions she finds, in upcoming issues of Inside Columbia’s Prime. 50

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But if, even after direct requests, your siblings still don’t offer any assistance, the truth is you cannot make them. We cannot make any other individual take any action they do not choose to take. We can ask. We can beg, plead and cajole. We can manipulate. We can even threaten. But the other person still has to choose to take the requested action. So, if you are left without any help from your siblings, you can still turn to your church and community. Support groups and assistance can also often be found online, especially for caregivers to patients with certain types of illness or disease. And you need to release yourself from any anger or bitterness towards your siblings. You will have peace knowing you had the experience of spending time with your parents and making their lives a little easier in their later years. Leave your siblings to their regrets. v

— Angel

Donnette Robertson is not a professional counselor, but she has a lifelong appreciation for the beauty and complications of relationships.

MEMOIR PROMPT Think of a childhood hero — real or fictional. Why were they your hero? What specific attributes made them admirable to you? Did your respect and admiration grow or diminish as you obtained maturity and wisdom? When and why did your opinion change? Or why has it remained unshaken?

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Fun & Games

Letter-Link Word Search Puzzle Directions: The words in the Word List are hidden in the puzzle grid. Some are not in straight lines, so look in all directions for each next letter (right, left, up, down, diagonal). Do not backtrack. Words may overlap each other or themselves by one letter.

Thick Or Thin, Will It Tear?

WORD LIST ANNOUNCEMENT

MAGAZINE

ART PRINT

MAP

BAG

OVOLI

BAKING CUP

PICTURE

BALLOT

POSTER

CALENDAR

PROGRAM

CARTON

RECEIPT

CATALOGUE

REPORT

CONFETTI

SCRATCH PAD

COUPON

SCROLL

DIPLOMA

STAMP

DRINKING CUP

STATEMENT

GET-WELL-CARD

TAPE MEASURE

INVITATION

TELEPHONE BOOK

JIGSAW PUZZLE

TICKET

KITE

TISSUE

LITMUS STRIP

WRIST BAND

© 2014 Eliza Bettin: Eliza Bettin’s puzzles have been in newspaper syndication and IGA, United Airlines and Earthgrains magazines.

Cryptogram Decipher this quote by unraveling the secret code. Each letter stands for another letter. We’ve given you a few hints to get you started.

>>>

Test your knowledge! Turn to Page 58 to check your answers. 52

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Recipe Box

Grill Up An Incredible Steak

Q

T-Bones — The Best Of Both Worlds

Quite possibly the ultimate steak, the T-bone embodies the rich blend of varied beef flavors that steak lovers crave, from tender and mild to bold and beefy. On one side of the T-bone is the filet mignon. French for “dainty fillet,” the filet mignon is considered the most tender cut, with a mild beef flavor. On the other side of the T-bone is the strip loin or New York strip, a firm, robust steak that is naturally marbled and offers a bold taste. The bone itself also provides additional flavor in the cooking process. With this pairing of tastes, it is no surprise that the T-bone is considered to be “the best of both worlds” by steak connoisseurs. TEN TIPS FOR PERFECT GRILLING 1. Clean and preheat your grill on high. 2. Lightly oil everything before you put it on the grill. This helps the searing process and prevents sticking. 3. Season your food before grilling. 4. Sear the outside of steaks when grilling. This really helps with the flavor and juiciness. 5. Use tongs or a spatula to turn your meat on the grill. Using a fork can damage the meat. 6. Cover your grill as much as possible during the grilling process. This helps to lock in the grilled flavor and will help prevent flare-ups. 7. Keep a spray bottle with water handy to douse any unexpected flare-ups. 8. Use the 60/40 grilling method. Grill for 60 percent of the time on the first side, then grill 40 percent of the time after you turn over the food. This will give you an evenly cooked product. 9. Place your cooked product on a clean plate. Never place cooked product on the plate you used to transport the raw product to the grill without thoroughly washing it first. 10. Allow your foods to “rest” for 5 minutes between cooking and eating. This will help them retain moisture when you cut into them. v For more steak recipes, visit www.OmahaSteaks.com.

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ANCHO CHILE GRILLED T-BONES Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Total time: 15 minutes Serves: 4 4 2 4 12

Omaha Steaks T-bone steaks tablespoons olive oil tablespoons Ancho Chile Rub (see recipe below) grilled tri-color sweet baby peppers

Preheat grill to medium. Thaw and blot dry steaks. Brush steaks with olive oil. Generously cover both sides of steaks with Ancho Chile Rub by dipping them in rub. Continue until steaks are completely covered. Place steaks on heated grill and grill to desired doneness. (For a medium-rare steak, grill approximately 8 minutes on first side and 6 to 7 minutes on second side.) Remove steaks from grill and garnish with grilled tri-colored sweet baby peppers.

ANCHO CHILE RUB Makes: 4 tablespoons 1 2 2 1

tablespoon smoked paprika teaspoons sea salt tablespoons ancho chile powder teaspoon brown sugar

Combine all ingredients and mix well.


GRILLED T-BONES WITH TABASCO AND ROQUEFORT CHEESE BUTTER Prep time: 15 minutes, plus 4 hours refrigerator time Cook time: 15 minutes Total time: 4 hours and 30 minutes Serves: 4 4 Omaha Steaks T-bones Omaha Steaks All Natural Steak Seasoning, or salt and pepper, to taste 4 slices (1 1/2-inch coins) Tabasco and Roquefort Cheese Butter (see recipe below) 2 tablespoons minced chives Thaw steaks overnight in refrigerator or quick thaw by placing sealed steaks in sink with water for approximately one hour. Preheat grill to medium. Season both sides of steaks with seasoning, or salt and pepper. Grill steaks to desired doneness. (For medium-rare steak, grill approximately 8 minutes on first side and 6 to 7 minutes on second side.) Just before removing steaks from grill, place butter slice on each steak. The idea is to have butter half melted on top as you are serving steaks. Garnish each steak with sprinkle of minced chives.

TABASCO AND ROQUEFORT CHEESE BUTTER 4 ounces unsalted butter, softened 4 ounces Roquefort blue cheese, crumbled 3 tablespoons Tabasco sauce 1/4 cup fresh chives, minced 2 tablespoons fresh garlic, minced 1 roasted red pepper, peeled, seeded and diced 1 teaspoon kosher salt Whip butter slightly in mixer. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. Transfer mixture to sheet of parchment paper. Roll into tube (approximately 1 1/2-inch diameter) and twist paper at the ends. Refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours. When ready to serve, slice into coins as needed. Unused butter can be stored in the refrigerator for up to one week. Prime Magazine June 2014

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Recipe Box

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Fat Free Milk

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Today, 85 percent of Americans fall short of the USDA’s recommended daily servings of lowfat or fat free milk — a staggering number when you take into account that milk is the top food source for three out of the four “nutrients of concern” — the nutrients that Americans are most lacking, including calcium, potassium and vitamin D. Each 8-oz glass has nine essential nutrients including eight grams of high-quality protein– that’s more than an egg. Milk also has B vitamins for energy, vitamin A for a healthy immune system, and bone-building nutrients, including calcium and vitamin D. Incorporating milk into your morning meal is an easy way to help close the gap between actual and recommended milk intake. Is fat free milk your milk of choice? Here are five things you may not know about skim or fat free milk: 1. Counting calories? One 8-oz. glass of fat free milk has just 80 calories. 2. Milk drinkers tend to be leaner than non-milk drinkers. Experts recommend including three servings of fat free or lowfat milk each day to help maintain a healthy weight. 3. Drinking fat free milk at breakfast could help stave off lunchtime hunger, according to an Australian study. Researchers found that drinking fat free milk (20 ounces) in the morning helped increase satiety, or a feeling of fullness, and led to decreased calorie intake at the next meal, as compared with a fruit drink. The milk drinkers ate about 50 fewer calories (or nearly 9 percent less food) at lunch. 4. Think fat free means fewer nutrients? Think again. Fat free milk has the same nine essential nutrients as lowfat, reduced fat or whole milk — just with fewer calories. 5. Not all “milks” are created equal. Many of the alternative beverages just can’t provide what you would get in a glass of fat free dairy milk. For example, while an 8-oz glass of vanilla almond “milk” has about the same calories, it contains only 1 gram of protein, compared to fat free milk’s 8 grams of high-quality protein. v For more fresh recipes using fat free milk, visit MilkLife.com.

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Breakfast Pudding Makes: 4 servings 1/4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 cups fat free milk 2 egg yolks, lightly beaten 2 tablespoons almond butter 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Mixed fresh berries for serving Crunchy cereal for serving Whisk sugar and cornstarch in a medium saucepan until well blended. Slowly drizzle in milk, whisking until smooth, then whisk in eggs. Cook pudding over medium heat until it begins to thicken, whisking often. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir pudding with spatula, scraping the sides and bottom of pot until thickened. Off heat, whisk in almond butter and vanilla. Transfer pudding to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, pressing to the surface to prevent skin from forming, and chill for at least 2 hours. Spoon 1/3 cup of chilled pudding into four parfait glasses. Top with some berries and 2 tablespoons cereal, then layer another 1/3 cup pudding on top, followed by more berries and cereal. Nutrition 240 calories;12 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 330 mg cholesterol; 11 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 30 mg sodium; 200 mg calcium (20% of daily value).


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fun & games solved

Chef ’s Secrets

Challenge your brain with this month’s puzzles found on Page 52.

Think Sharp

Letter-Link Word Search

Tips To Hone Your Knife Skills BY DENNIS CLAY

I

It goes without saying: A cook’s best friend is his trusted steel. In the professional kitchen, some of us are borderline obsessive about our double-edged companions and will search relentlessly for that artisan knife-maker from Osaka, Japan, who sells only a small allotment of knives to his distributors every year. Or we might scour foreign websites for the most ornate mother-of-pearl inlaid handle on a stamped Damascus steel blade. Ornamentation might be optional, but if you cook, you have to have a sharp knife. A dull knife is worse than useless; it’s dangerous. Think about this: If you were to accidentally cut yourself, a sharp knife would glide through your skin, whereas a dull knife would forcibly rip through it. The sharpest knives are made with Japanese steel. German steel is fine, but you will have to re-edge and sharpen it a lot more if you are an everyday user. Japanese steel is softer, making it easier to bring to a sharp edge. I highly recommend making the small investment in a good solid knife. You can find great knives online at jbprince.com. My next recommendation is using a diamond-edge knife sharpener, which is way less expensive than it sounds. It is very easy to use and can also be found at the link above. A great knife is only the beginning of the battle, though. What are you going to do with that sharp object next?

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Practice, practice and more practice. Here are five basic knife cuts that will propel you from home cook into home chef: Large dice, a square block cut, measuring 3/4 of an inch all around. Medium dice, a square block cut, measuring 1/2 of an inch all around. Brunoise, a tiny square block cut measuring 1/16 of an inch all around. Batonnet, a rectangular stick cut, measuring 1/4 inch by 1/4 inch by 2 to 3 inches. Julienne, a smaller rectangular stick cut, measuring 1/8 inch by 1/8 inch by 1 to 2 inches. v

Cryptogram Answer “If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there’d be a shortage of fishing poles.” ~ Doug Larson

Did You Know?

— Dennis Clay is the executive chef at Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventures.

CHOP, CHOP Learn more knife tips from Chef Clay at Inside Columbia’s Culinary Adventure Center’s first Knife Skills class on June 24. Find details and sign up at comoculinaryadventures. com/classes/.

From 1965 to 1985, the average amount of time that married fathers spent caring for children in their household grew from 2.6 to 3 hours per week. Over the next 15 years, that amount of time more than doubled — to 6.5 hours per week in 2000.


Inside Columbia’s PRIME magazine

HOW-TO

GUIDE Inside Columbia’s Prime magazine now features a How-To Guide in every issue. This new section contains expertly written articles with helpful tips on a wide variety of interesting topics.

TURN TO PAGE 20 THIS MONTH, LEARN HOW TO: Fall In Love With Your Farmers’ Market Choose An Awesome Bakery Choose A Financial Advisor Choose A Great Salon

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Your Bucket List

Writing What Matters Teresa Shields Parker Shares How She Found Freedom

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BY ANITA NEAL HARRISON

“Last year I marked off the only two things on my bucket list: I wrote a book that I feel really matters and I became healthy after reaching the milestone of losing 250 pounds.” So says Teresa Shields Parker, a Columbia writer who in 2013 published a weight loss memoir, Sweet Grace: How I Lost 250 Pounds and Stopped Trying to Earn God’s Favor. The book recounts how Parker, who at her heaviest weighed more than 430 pounds, was able to confront her compulsive overeating and sugar addiction. The story hinges on her belief that God provided her both with her answer — that she needed to stop eating sugar and eat more meat, fruit and vegetables — and the means, or grace, to follow that direction. While the weight loss was a huge victory for Parker, the book was the realization of a lifelong dream. Her desire to write a book began as she watched her mother, who suffered from bipolar disorder, escape from her moods into books. Her mother also encouraged Parker to read, and Parker’s favorite books were biographies of famous people. “I felt these were books that really mattered because they always had a strong moral,” she says. Parker’s love for reading lead her to earn a degree in journalism, which she used to work in newspapers and PR. In 1995, at the request of a friend, she put together a list book of ideas and sugges-

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tions for improving a marriage. That book took little time to complete. “While it was nice to be a published author, it wasn’t the book I longed to write,” Parker says. In 2010, after regaining much of the weight she’d lost with a 2004 gastric bypass surgery, Parker finally decided regaining control of her life was worth the difficult choices and changes she would have to make. And once she had regained that control, she felt like God “nudged” her to write a book about her weight loss journey. “Writing this book was a dream come true for many reasons,” she says. “The biggest one is that I know it is a book that will make a difference for those who battle morbid obesity.” Parker now has 27 books to write on her bucket list. She expects to finish two this year and start a third.

“Weight loss has definitely helped me dream again,” she says. “I used to have only two things on my dream list: lose weight and write a book. Now my list continues to explode with more books, projects, ideas, places to visit and things to do.” v

TELL US YOUR STORY Have you crossed something off your bucket list? Please send a brief note describing the feat to anita@insidecolumbia.net, and if we choose to feature your triumph, we will be in contact for an interview.


Unguarded Moments

Stories of Working inside the Missouri State Penitentiary Larry E. Neal & Anita Neal Harrison

$19.95 pb 9781612481104 $9.95 e-book 9781612481111 200 pp. • 31 b/w illus.

In this first memoir about life in the Missouri State Penitentiary by a worker who was neither a prisoner nor a guard, Larry E. Neal reveals a portrait of prison life very different from common conceptions. As a maintenance worker, Neal led prisoner work crews, and his stories show that life inside the prison walls could be surprisingly lighthearted, with prisoners and staff playing pranks on each other and crawling through dark tunnels together. In addition to a rare insider’s view into prison humor, Unguarded Moments also gives readers a window into the rhythms of daily life inside and the shared humanity of everyone behind the walls.

ANY BOOK • ANY TIME 15% DISCOUNT & FREE SHIPPING tsup.truman.edu

100 E. Normal Ave. • Kirksville, MO 63501 (660) 785-7336 • Fax (660) 785-4480

tsup.truman.edu

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Columbia Confidential: Publisher Fred Parry On The Issues Columbia Is Talking About

Summer Lovin’…CoMo Style

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I love summer in Columbia. While I could live without the heat and humidity we endure in July and August, I can’t complain about the transformation our city experiences every year in the month of June. My affinity for CoMo summers may be tied to the fact that our population drops by more than 30,000 residents at the end of May, but I’m still enamored with our city’s customs, traditions and hot spots that have been around since I first arrived in Columbia more than 30 summers ago. It’s no secret that I’m drawn to the culinary offerings of almost any city, so it seems only fair to start with the culinary adventures that are indigenous to summer in Columbia. First stop on my list is Mugs Up Drive-In. For more than 50 years, this family-owned establishment has been serving homemade root beer alongside classic, old-fashioned drivein fare. Known for its chili dogs and loose meat sandwiches, this place looks and feels as if it sprang from the lyrics of a John Cougar Mellencamp song. Nothing beats sitting on the tailgate and enjoying a Zip Burger, cheese fries and a frosted mug of the famous root beer. You’ll quickly discover that this is a favorite hangout for construction workers as well as Little Leaguers after a baseball game at Cosmo Park. Your American Express Platinum card means nothing to these folks. Cash only. When I think of summer, I think of ice cream. Another summer tradition for Columbians involves Buck’s Ice Cream Shop in Eckles Hall on the University of Missouri campus. Since the 1920s, students in the College of Agriculture have been experimenting with ice cream, and I think they’ve achieved perfection in their best-selling Tiger Stripe ice cream. Imagine going to college to learn how to make ice cream! I’m in. Longtime Columbians will recall visits to Arbuckle’s Ice Cream Parlor, which operated in the Broadway Shopping Center from 1962 to 1974. Mizzou grad Wendell “Buck” Arbuckle (aka “Dr. Ice Cream”) operated this popular shop and played a major role in bringing the art of ice cream to the MU campus. I have many happy memories of whiling away the hours on the patios of Katy Station and Boone Tavern. The restaurants’ names have changed to Shiloh and Bleu, but the inviting patios are still there. And I’m nostalgic about the early Twilight Festivals downtown or strolling down Ninth Street enjoying impromptu performances by a variety of street musicians. A somewhat healthier summer tradition involves an evening bicycle ride on the Katy Trail to Cooper’s Landing, where you can watch the sun set on the Missouri River while dining on Thai food freshly made in a mobile kitchen. Sounds like

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June 2014 Prime Magazine

a strange combination, I know, but you can’t beat this magical mix of local spice and flavor. Speaking of the Katy Trail, it’s hard to mention Columbia without mentioning bicycles. Our fair city offers an abundance of bike trails, and there’s nothing like an early morning ride on the trail during the summer months. In addition to some very interesting people watching, you’re bound to see a bit of wildlife — deer, turkey and an occasional goat. I like to follow the trail to the MU campus, where a ride through Francis Quadrangle affords a fabulous view of early morning light on the face of the Jesse Hall dome. It really is spectacular. If you’re into arts and culture, you’ll find everything you’re looking for and more during the summer months in Columbia. Our summer kicks off with the annual Blind Boone Ragtime Festival followed by the impressive Hot Summer Nights series presented by the Missouri Symphony Society. If you’re a fan of live theater, you’ll marvel at the local talent offered at Maplewood Barn Theatre or MU’s Rhynsburger Theatre. And if off-Broadway is your bag, make the trip to the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre in the picturesque hamlet of Arrow Rock. It’s worth the 40-minute drive. Hollywood screenwriter and Columbia native Ken LaZebnik penned an essay about his childhood summers and what it was like to grow up in Columbia in 1997 for Garrison Keillor’s popular radio show, “A Prairie Home Companion.” LaZebnik wrote: “Columbia’s year ended each spring with graduation. From one day to the next, the town was suddenly quiet. The year was over — everyone said so, and between Memorial Day and Labor Day there was a magical interregnum of summer. We kids had all the fields to ourselves.” I know Columbia wouldn’t be the town it is today without the tens of thousands of college students that call CoMo home for nine months of the year, but it’s still a nice reprieve to have a couple of months each year to experience the town LaZebnik recalls. See you at the ice cream shop!

Fred Parry, fred@insidecolumbia.net


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Inside Columbia's Prime June 2014