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Back to School Bash! Savannah will be signing autographs immediately after the concert!

Indianapolis Zoo Saturday, September 12 12 Noon Concert is free withwith general admission zoo. Concert is free general admissionto to the the zoo.


If you’re 10–14 years old (grades 5-8), catch the excitement of being a Junior Broadcaster for the Indianapolis Colts! One Lucky contestant may tour the broadcast booth, experience a pre-game interview and receive four tickets to an Indianapolis Colts home game.

Get all the info and sign up at: www.IndianaDairyCouncil.org.

Entry Deadline September 20, 2009

Indiana’s Dairy Farmers. Delivering for You, Every Single Day.

©2009 NFL Properties, LLC. Team names/logos are trademarks of the teams indicated. All other NFL-related trademarks are trademarks of the National Football League. Previous Grand Prize Winners are not eligible

– milk, cheese & yogurt – WinnersDrinkMilk.com


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Are your kids ready to walk for their future? Walk Into My Future is a first-of-its-kind opportunity for our children to raise money for their future education. With pledges from friends, family, and the community, thousands of young Hoosiers will gather on September 25 to walk a 5.29 kilometer route. The money each one raises will be deposited in his or her own 529 college savings plan account. When: September 25, 2009 Where: White River State Park, Indianapolis Who: Children and families who want to save for college Join us as we celebrate a future of education and hope!

Visit walkintomyfuture.com for details and registration information.

For more information about the CollegeChoice 529 Direct Savings Plan, call 1.866.485.9415 or visit www.collegechoicedirect.com to obtain a Disclosure Statement which includes investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information; read and consider it carefully before investing. Upromise Investments, Inc. Distributor and Underwriter. CollegeChoice 529 Direct Savings Plan (Plan) is administered by the Indiana Education Savings Authority. Upromise Investments, Inc. serves as the Program Manager and Upromise Investment Advisors, LLC, provides investment advisory services and recordkeeping and administrative services. Upromise Investments, Inc. and Upromise Investment Advisors, LLC have overall responsibility for the day-to-day operations, including effecting transactions and marketing and distribution of the Plan. Dodge & Cox; Frontegra Asset Management, Inc.; The Vanguard Group, Inc.; and Western Asset serve as Investment Managers for the Plan. The Plan’s Portfolios, although they invest in mutual funds are not mutual funds. Units of the Portfolios are municipal securities and the value of units will vary with market conditions. IN2096A1 0809

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SEPTEMBER 2009 table of contents

20

Peering into the world of private schools

NEWS & SHOPPING * News You Can Use

RESOURCES 08

One Chic Mama: Jeans, Belts & Handbags—Oh My!

16

Health & Wellness * PEDIATRIC HEALTH: Understanding the Tween Years

40

SPECIAL NEEDS AWARENESS: Scouting for Youth with Special Needs

41

PEDIATRIC HEALTH: Emergency Preparedness Month

42

Around Town * Museum Notes: Science Journals Teach Kids That Science is for Everyone

34

Experiencing life one field trip at a time

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profile: International Talent Academy

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ARTS & ENRICHMENT: When a Black Belt is More Than a Black Belt

37

FAMILY FUN IN INDY: September is All About Culture in Indy

45

Commentary & Parenting * Publisher’s Note: Going Local for September

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Ages & Stages: Safety for Toddlers, Predators & Communicating for Safety

10

TEens & Tweens: Assertiveness and Teens

13

My Parent, My Mentor: Mentoring at the Mall

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DeAR TEACHER: Middle School Ed, Dental Checkups, Skipping Grades & Library Visits 28 Growing Up Online: Raising Savvy Social Networkers

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RESOURCES * Childcare & Education Directory

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FIeld Trip & Enrichment Guide

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Calendar

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Shopping Corner

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Party Directory

59

Classifieds

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Fun & Frolicking in INdy Tennis, tennis, tennis!

Play golf, tennis, fly fish & and avoid political discussions.

Vitamin D & Fish Oil—and my Wii Fit and treadmill.

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Not enough, but Wii Fit when I have time.

Avoiding negativity and sharing laughs!

Keep a food journal at livestrong.com and exercise! ip

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Exercise and lots of special times with family & friends!

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Publisher’s Note

Going Local for September Festivals, Farms,Writers and Family

Founding Publisher Barbara Wynne Publisher/President Mary Wynne Cox Executive Vice President Richard Dickinson Editor-In-Chief Lynette Rowland Marketing DIRECTOR Rachel Wynn Art Direction & DESIGN Heather Lipe Assistant of business development Josie Fine Accountant Brooke Vance On the cover Mackenzie Manning and Zoe Nash

This issue of Indy’s Child is about field trips that your families or schools can plan to enhance the curiosity and learning opportunities for your children. Parents are often invited to volunteer to help with logistics and safety. Consider being a volunteer in your child’s classroom at least once during the school year.

I would like to suggest visiting a farm and witnessing the harvest or the actual hard work associated with modern farming. The locavore movement is br inging urban dwellers back in touch with rural roots by encouraging families to learn the importance of supporting your local farms and community gardens. In the nearby Zionsville area, you can take your family for a tour of the Traders Point Creamery on Friday evenings. Make sure to attend the Green Market from 4-8 p.m. where you can also enjoy a healthy dinner while you are there. The Creamer y is located at 9101 Moore Road in Zionsville. For more information call 317-733-1700 or visit www.traderspointcreamery.com. The list of activities at the Traders Point Creamer y includes hiking and viewing the farm and their BRAND NEW Safari

Sundays! The 40-acre Spencer Farm in Noblesville lets you can dig up your own mum plants. You can f ind them at 7177 East 161st Street in Noblesville or call 317776-1560 to f ind out what crops are being harvested. For a complete list of farms in Indiana, visit the Indiana Department of Agriculture’s website at www.in.gov/ core/agriculture.htm. It lists the crops they raise, visiting hours and you’ll even f ind recycling locations and more! At the center of Agrotourism lies the support of the Hoosier leaderswho are urging ever y citizen to participate in Going Local Week from September 6-12, 2009. Your challenge: to eat one Indiana local food at each meal. You should also mark your calendars for September 27-October 2 for the PBS documentary on our National Parks. The Ken Burns’ series is titled: The National Park: America’s Best Idea. Burns concludes that having 275 million visitors to our national parks is proof of the wisdom of conserving and preserving land.

feelings and the faith she is gaining to win this battle. Kathy wants a cheering section and I think the cheering section should include Indy’s Child readers. Send your letters of encouragement to Kathy at: Indy’s Child, c/o Letters to Kathy, 1901 Broad Ripple Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46220 or to publisher@indyschild. com. Please support the I.W.I.N. Mum sale (317-475-0565 or www.iwinfoundation. org) this month on September 19th to support breast cancer awareness. Two local pick-up sites include: Bright Ideas, 7425 Westf ield Blvd from 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. and in Carmel at Harris Bank, 11592 Rangeline Road from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Enjoy the month of September and cheer on the Colts, Fever, Indians and most of all—each other.

I am very proud of my daughter-in-law, Kathy, who is currently battling breast cancer. She is writing a journal of her

Cover Photography Shawna Schaub {photography by design} Subscribe today to the magazine or our free weekly newsletter all at...

indyschild.com we want to hear from our readers! Send your letters to the editor to editor@indyschild.com

Indy’s Child 1901 Broad Ripple Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46220 317.722.8500 (p) 317.722.8510 (f ) indyschild@indyschild.com Copyright: Indy’s Child Parenting Magazine is published monthly. Copyright 2008 by Indy’s Child Inc. and Midwest Parenting Publications, LLC.All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of products, commentary or services herein. For information on subscriptions, editorial guidelines, advertising rates and more visit www.indyschild.com.

Sean, age 13

What does our 96% success rate mean to Sean? It means being able to live with autism and overcome a variety of behavioral challenges. It means communicating with gestures, sign language, and words instead of physical and emotional outbursts. And it means enjoying activities that were once very challenging. For more than 40 years, Damar has served thousands of children and adults, with 96% achieving more independent lives. And Sean is just one shining, smiling example. For volunteer or donor opportunities, please visit damar.org

6067 Decatur Boulevard Indianapolis, IN 46241 317.856.5201 26176.DAM 2009 Print_INDCH_7.375X6.125 4C.indd 1

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N E WS & SHO PPING

news you can use

NEWS you can use *

1500 Moms to Receive Free Fisher Price Toys for their Babies The World’s Biggest Baby Shower returns to the Bellies and Babies Expo Saturday, September 26th at the Indiana Convention Center from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The first 1500 people to enter and attend one seminar receive a FREE Fisher Price baby gift. In addition, all attendees have a chance to win strollers, car seats, high chairs and more in each seminar. The goal of the event is to “Get Informed, Get Inspired, and Get Motivated!” Last year, the Bellies and Babies Expo held over 3000 of Indy’s hippest and trendiest moms. Also, last year’s expo featured Reality TV star Trista Sutter from The Bachelorette just months before announcing her 2nd pregnancy. This year at the Bellies and Babies Expo you will find: • Over 15 childbirth and early parenting classes from St. Vincent Women’s and Indianapolis Healthy Start • The Bellies and Babies Fashion show • “GO GREEN MOMMA” area sponsored by Indiana Living Green • Demonstrations on how make Preggatinis ™ with The Liquid Muse • The Baby Chef will be on hand to teach moms how to make their own natural and healthy baby food from home ESCforIndysChildSep2009.pdf

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2009 Son and Women’s Camp Returns

• The Gymboree Playdate Area sponsored by McDonalds • Mom-to-Mom discussion (live onstage with local moms and experts including One Chic Momma from North Carolina) • Unique vendors selling baby clothes, maternity wear, nursery decor and more “The expo provided a perfect venue for expecting and new moms…I would highly recommend it!” says Carole Harris, Nestle/ Gerber Representative. Helping to contribute to the success of the event are sponsors: St. Vincent Women’s Hospital, Indy Moms Like Me, Indianapolis Healthy Start and WISH TV. Admission is only $10 for moms, moms-tobe, and grandparents. Participants can register online at www.belliesandbabiesexpo. the day of the event.

The Indianapolis Colts will once again host the popular Father/Son and Women’s 101 (Beginner and Advanced) and 201 clinics in 2009 at the Indiana Farm Bureau Football Center at 7001 W. 56th St. Indianapolis, IN 46254. Fans must register at www.Colts.com/events. The Father/Son camps offers fathers and sons (moms and son/daughters are welcome, too) the opportunity to get an “inside” look at Colts football, not to mention tips on improving your game by the pros. Activities include drills on the field, coaching and interaction with Colts players and alumni, great food from McAlister’s Deli and more. Camps are $100 for one parent and one child and $50 for each additional child. Open to kids 6-14 on Sept. 29th and Nov. 10th from 5-9 p.m. The Women’s Clinics in three separate groups (101 Beginner, 101 Advanced and 201) will give women the opportunity to learn basic vocab, player positions, line ups, day to day routines and more from the pros. Camps are $70

com or on-site

for each clinic and open to everyone. Food provided by Abuelo’s. Camps are Oct. 20, Nov. 3 and Nov. 17 from 5-9 p.m.


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Carmel Parks Offering Doggie Days & Summer Splashtacular Join Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation for “Doggie Dayz” as the Outdoor Aqua Park goes to the dogs. The summer season has ended but the Outdoor Aqua Park will remain open to the canines for one day only. This special open swim for dogs will be a treat for both you and your dog(s). Doggy treats will be available. Sorry owners, there is no swimming for you; this event is only for dogs! All dogs must be on a leash until they reach the water. Doggie Dayz will take place on Monday, September 7, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Fee is $ 6/dog. The Outdoor Aqua Park is located at 1195 Central Park Drive West. For additional parking, please park at the east building of The Monon Center at 1235 Central Park Drive East. A lso taking place is Splashtacular. Activities and games will be spread throughout the day to encourage guests of all ages and abilities to participate. Whether you take part in the water balloon toss, build a cardboard boat and participate in the boat race, or help your team f ill the bucket to the brim with water in the bucket game, The Monon

Center Outdoor Aqua Park ensures that ever yone w i l l have a g reat time. Splashtacular will t a ke pl a c e on Monday, September 7, from 12:004 : 0 0 p.m . Fee i s t he price of daily admission into the Outdoor Aqua Pa r k ( $ 5 Yout h / Sen ior; $ 8 Adu lt). T he Outdoor Aqua Park is located at 1195 Central Park Drive West. For additional parking, please park at the east building of The Monon Center at 1235 Central Park Drive East.

For additional information, please call 317-848-7275.

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news you can use

Wheel Fun Rentals Opens New Outlet in Indianapolis If the words “cruising along the bike path” bring to mind freedom, fun, and your carefree days of youth, then you have got to come and check out the newest addition to good oldfashioned recreation, located at Eagle Creek Pa r k Marina in Indianapolis. Wheel Fun Rentals has a brand new full fleet of exciting pedal dr iven cycles, g iving you the oppor tunit y to discover that “everything old is new again,” with a menu of strictly 21st century bicycles to satisfy the whims of even the most hard-to-please personalities. W heel Fun Rentals sports a logo reminiscent of a 1950’s family riding hudd led together to take a joyful ride. How many of us remember that we used to ride bikes just for fun? If your memory fails, here’s

a refresher course with just a sample of the many types of fun vehicles Wheel Fun Rentals has to offer at Eagle Creek: Kayaks - Looking for an invigorating experience? Kayaking is a great way to get up close and personal with Mother Nature and reflect while taking in beautiful, uplifting sights and sounds. The nature of paddling allows you to take your time and appreciate your surroundings while getting a great workout. Also available: Mountain Bikes, Tandems, Row Boats, Sunfish Sailboats, Pontoon Boats and more! Get ready to land right in the middle of fun yourself when you go to Wheel Fun Rentals newest location at 7840 W 56th Street in Ind ianapol is. To f ind additional WFR out let s, product s, hour s and other general information, please visit www. wheelfunrentals. com. 

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ages & stages

Safety Precautions for Toddlers Dangers Lurking in Every Room

Keeping your toddler safe is a lot more than just locking up chemicals and eliminating corners. There are so many dangers lurking around every corner that it’s important keep a checklist to make sure your bases are covered. To help, the Home Safety Council has offered up several checklists to help keep your toddler and your family safe.

Choking and Suffocation: Always make sure that you put your babies on their backs to sleep and remove any and all blankets, toys, bottles, etc. from the bed. Don’t attach or hang anything in the crib and don’t keep mobiles up that babies can reach. Use the “toilet paper tube” test—if it f its in the tube, it’s too small. Read labels, cut up food, tie up window blind cords, move refrigerator magnets out of reach. Fire: L ock up m atches a nd l ig hter s, repl ace a nd test smoke a l a r m s i n or nea r ever y bed room , pr act ice d r i l l s, repl ace bat ter ies a nd alarms older t h a n 10 yea r s. Falls: Attach gates with screws for a more secure f it, always use safety belts in highchairs, strollers, etc., clean up spills, use window guards and lay down a thick layer of padding, mulch, etc. in playgrounds. Poisons: Remove medicines from purses, pocket and drawers and always check the labels. Check your heaters and stoves every year to make sure they’re in working order to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning, add carbon monoxide alarms near your bedrooms and, of course, call 1-800-222-1222 if you have any poison control questions or emergencies.

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PARENTING PUBS

PARENTING 4C

Drowning/Burns: Always stay with a swimming child. Lock toilet lids and bathroom doors when not in use. Keep buckets upside down—all it takes is 1-2 inches of water for a child to drown. Keep a high fence around your pool and always make sure it’s locked. Make sure your water heater is set at 120 degrees to prevent burns and you can even install units that prevent hot water burns. For this and more answers to ways to keep your family safe, visit www. Homesafetycouncil.org.


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ages & stages

Predators: Stranger Danger or Not? Real Tips to Keep Kids Safe

Child safety for kids 4-7 can be a little difficult. Kids are trusting and often welcoming of others. There are important tips that parents convey to their children to make sure he understand measures he can take to be safe and exactly how to define what being safe is. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (www.missingkids.com) lists several checkpoints that parents should follow when discussing public safety with kids.

1. 2. 3.

Make sure she always check with a parent, guardian or other close family member to make sure that it’s safe. Don’t ever get into the car or accept anything from someone other than this close safety net. Always make sure that she takes a friend with her when going outdoors or in public. The buddy system can’t prevent everything but it can certainly provide a detraction or distraction. Make sure that your child understand that she should always say no if someone tries to touch them (speak openly but gently), makes them scared, makes threats or makes them uncomfortable or confused. She should learn the mantra, “No! Go! Tell!” Once she is out of the situation, make sure that she knows that even if she was threatened, that it’s important to tell a parent or guardian anyway. ESCWalkWithMeAdforIndysChild08-2009.pdf

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Based on the identity of the perpetrator, there are three distinct types of kidnapping: kidnapping by a relative of the victim or “family kidnapping” (49%), kidnapping by an acquaintance of the victim or “acquaintance kidnapping” (27%), and kidnapping by a stranger to the victim or “stranger kidnapping” (24%). Source: Parents.com

4. 5.

There will always be someone, be it a parent, friend, relative or police off icer, who will be there to help. Make sure to teach them from an early age how to dial 911.

on their safety and welfare as we do on teaching manners at least will help your children make safer life choices.

Don’t teach “stranger danger.” Kids don’t have the same concept of strangers as adults have so the concept that “all strangers are bad” is a bit misguided when the fact is that those who do the most harm to children are typically friends or family members. Children need to be taught that even if it’s a relative or friend and even if the predator makes threats against her or her family members, that she should always try to get out of the situation and tell someone immediately.

We can’t keep our kids in protective bubbles around the clock, however, helping your children understand safety, practicing what we preach and placing as much emphasis

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ages & stages

Communicating for Safety’s Sake

Why Communication is Key for Keeping Tweens Safe With your tween children comes a new sense of invincibility, need for freedom and experiences. They’re testing limits and boundaries and expressing their individuality. Understandably, it can be difficult to get them focus on listening to you about dangerous situations they

Telling your child “this is wrong” or “this is dangerous” is only the first step. It’s imperative to talk about the variety of situations that could harm them but more so how to prevent them, how you can help them, etc. may find themselves in. Here are a few ways you can initiate discussion and open the lines of communication:

Be willing to talk to your tween about tough situations. Other kids can coerce your child into situations she might not know how to get out of, let alone know anything about. They might be embarrassed that they are being pressured and will likely be even more embarrassed to call and ask for help. Make your child aware that you will be there for them at all times—even if the situation is uncomfortable for you. Take advantage of teachable moments. Watching movies and news, discussing situations other friends have talked about or been through or seeing a dangerous situation firsthand are perfect teachable moments. Talk technology. Cell phones and social networking have opened up the lines of communication, but with it comes predators and equally as disturbing—bullying and teenage vengeance. Teach your child how to protect herself online by utilizing security measures. Discuss why self-respect is

Splashtacular Bir thday Celebrations! Caribbean Cove Indoor Water Park is celebration station! Kids of all ages love our gigantic indoor water park, Crazy CoCo’s Arcade and Calypso Cafe. Contact our Celebration Coordinator to learn more. We’ll take care of everything so you can sit back and enjoy your child’s birthday. Party packages available to suit every budget.

Call our Celebration Coordinator at 317.872.9790.

A 50,000 Sq. Ft. Tropical Explosion of Water Fun! 317.872.9790 • CaribbeanCoveWaterPark.com Holiday Inn North at the Pyramids • 3850 DePauw Blvd. • Indianapolis, IN 12 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

important and how just one person getting their hands on a cell phone she has been using improperly could cause them irreparable harm.

Who, What, When, Where and Why. Telling your child “this is wrong” or “this is dangerous” is only the first step. It’s imperative to talk about the variety of situations that could harm them but more so how to prevent them, how you can help them, etc. Discuss why the situation is dangerous. Ask your child what she would do, how she should get out of such a situation and what you would do for your child should such an situation occur. Your tweens are growing and becoming young adults before your eyes. Mentally, however, you’d be surprised how hard it is as adults to remember what we knew at their age and what they know today. And remember, the best way to keep your tweens safe is to open the lines of communication and trust early and often. Don’t be afraid to talk to your child. Chances are you can both work through the awkwardness of certain subjects and learn more about one another, too.


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teens & tweens

Assertiveness and Teens

Encouraging an I CAN Confidence It’s fairly clear when children are ready to feed themselves, dress themselves, or bathe themselves. But what about speaking for themselves?

At some point during the young teen years, a child becomes able to ask her own questions, speak her mind and stand up for herself in various situations outside the home. When she was six and didn’t know when and where the Girl Scout picnic was being held, you got on the phone and figured it out. When she was 8 and came home with a poor grade on a test, you consulted with the teacher. But as she matures, these are the types of tasks that she can begin to do for herself. Advocating for themselves in their expanding world empowers young teens to care for themselves both physically and emotionally, which builds their self-esteem and prepares them for independence. Developing this skill is a healthy component of maturing, but learning to use it effectively can take some practice on their part and coaching on yours. As with other developmental changes, readiness for self-advocacy will vary by individual. Your child may show an ability to speak for himself as early as age 9, or may not achieve this confidence until he is well into his teens.

Take your cues from him; when he begins to speak out naturally, encourage him. It is normal for a child to feel shy about approaching an adult. Help him to understand that he has a legitimate right to his thoughts, feelings and opinions, even if they are different from someone else’s—especially an adult’s. Explain the difference between being passive (not speaking up for yourself,) aggressive (not caring if you hurt others when you act on your opinions,) and assertive (standing up for yourself without hurting others.) You can use the “I CAN” guidelines to help children gain confidence, whether it’s a matter of calling the piano teacher to reschedule a lesson, or approaching the basketball coach about their amount of playing time. Explain these steps to your child and help her apply them to her own situations. I: Identify the problem. Be specific and clear. “Miss McDougal? I need to reschedule my piano lesson.” Or, “Coach Johnson, I would like to have more playing time in our basketball tournament.” C: Communicate facts and feelings objectively. “My piano lesson is usually at 6 o’clock on Friday night, but I have been invited to Jenny’s slumber party, which starts at 5:30. I really want to go to the party.” Or, “For the whole basketball season,

I have only been allowed to play during the last ten minutes of each game. I didn’t play well at the beginning of the year, but in the last three games I’ve scored 8 points, and that shows improvement. I feel disappointed that I’m not playing more.” A: Ask for what you would like. “Could I change my lesson to 4 o’clock on Friday instead?” Or, “Could you put me in at the beginning of the game next week?” N: Negotiate if necessary. “If 4 o’clock is taken, I could come at 5 o’clock and get to the party a little late.” Or, “OK, if I can’t start, how about if I come to an extra practice and then go in after half time?” Help your child to understand that, like any new skill, repetition will lead to improvement and increased confidence. Encourage him to practice being assertive with family members or other adults with whom he already feels comfortable. Negotiating with you about chores or curfew can give him the confidence to ask for a raise in his lawn-mowing job. Asking the familiar next-door neighbor about gardening may make it easier for the child to raise his hand in class when he is confused.

bus driver about her lost book, let her practice her “lines” on you. Hearing her own words out loud will help her make choices about exactly what she needs to say. Taking the role of the bus driver, you can supply possible responses to further the conversation. If it helps, have her write down what she plans to say, then read it. Let her practice as many times as she needs to until she feels comfortable. If your child is still hesitant about speaking up for himself, help him make a gradual transition. You can wait outside the classroom while he talks to his teacher, letting him know that you can come in if he needs you. Or you can stay in the car within his view while he approaches the park district counselor. Keep in mind that young teens can waver between high and low confidence in speaking up for themselves, depending upon the situation, the people involved, and even how they feel when they get up in the morning. Encourage them to speak for themselves, but don’t push them past their limits.

Let your child rehearse assertive communication through role-playing. If she needs to ask the school

Lisa Schab is a licensed clinical

social worker in Libertyville, Illinois, and the stepmother of two, ages 25 and 29. She can be reached at 847-782-1722.

ore than a fair m s ’ , It

it’s fantastic

Experience the Country Fair September 19 & 20 presented by

Join us for a celebration of Indiana’s farm heritage at Conner Prairie’s Country Fair. From an antique tractor parade to the Tent of Wonders there’ll be lots to keep the whole family entertained. Even Sid the Science Kid from PBS KIDS will be there on Saturday to join in the festivities.

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my parent, my mentor.

Mentoring at the Mall

Making the Most of Teachable Moments I was talking to another mom the other day and she shared with me one of her favorite tools for preparing her daughter for life. Watching life itself. Here was the situation she described to me. She and her daughter, a tween, witnessed a very young duo in a very passionate kiss. Instead of rolling her eyes, or pointed her daughter the other way, she seized the opportunity to mentor. In her case, she told her daughter, “Don’t ever think that behavior is okay.” She went on to explain that the behavior was disrespectful to people in view and that they were too young to be participating. A simple chance encounter that would have made many look away became an in-action learning tool. Just like that.

How do I do it? 1. How are you feeling? You will know when an opportunity affords itself because either you or your child will be uncomfortable. Your child might share something with you at the playground, or you might see something that is upsetting. Take a look at that situation with different eyes and see if it is an opportunity to mentor your child.

So, this got me thinking. How often do life’s lessons present themselves to us—front and center—without us grabbing onto the opportunity? I have been to so many birthday parties in which kids tear apart gifts and forget to thank a soul. How easy would it be for me to mention to my kids, “Remember when Johnnie was tearing open gifts and didn’t thank anyone? Well, I want you to always remember to thank people. And this is the reason why….” Simple, really.

3. Show the positive. Try and stay away from only the negative. Look for good things and also ways you can help your child shape an experience into a positive. For instance, “When we thank people for gifts, we show that we really care about them. We show respect.”

Why is this such a good idea anyway? 1. Real life works. We all learn better from real life examples. It just sticks better. When we see life happening and attach a lesson to it, our kids are going to learn more. 2. Short and sweet. When you are out in the real world doing your mentoring of your kids, there is no time for an

14 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

2. No shame, no judgment. Forget the “What a bad, bad child!” and go for “I don’t like the way Johnnie is talking to his mother. I don’t ever want you to treat me or anyone else that way because…”

hour-long debate. What you are sharing is going to have to be quick and to the point because you are out there in the middle of your life. And we all know that the more we talk, the less our kids listen, so this works for everybody. 3. Limit setting for the future. Our kids are eventually going to become adolescents. Rue the thought. Little life lessons can also be used to set limits for the future. My friend was beginning her daughter’s sexual education. Sex Ed is not just mechanics; it is also the dynamics of relationships. And that is best taught right in the middle of life.

So, have fun in the mall or at the playground, or even in the doctor’s office. The world is your oyster and your kids are your pearls. Enjoy them and enjoy mentor them every day.

To learn more about Maria Murphy, a mom, psychotherapist and writer, go to her wellness site, www.simplyputtogether.comAsk for her FREE chore charts to get your school year started out right.


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museum notes

Science Journals Teach Kids that Science is for Everyone Everyday Encounters Can Become Adventures in Science

Kids and science are a great combination. This is especially true in Indiana where we have backyards and woods as our science lab. Our state is filled with opportunities in life, physical, earth, and space sciences. Most children want to do science, but many parents are reluctant to try science because they feel unprepared. However, science is for everybody. What makes science easy for parents is that science begins with questions — not answers.

Create a science jou r n a l w it h a no t e b o ok , or purchase a special journal for e ach of your children. Encourage ch i ld ren to keep track of the quest ions they have, that All great scientists use journals to record t h i n g s have their observations, notes, and discoveries. t h e y We know about scientif ic discover ies seen, or places f rom Isaac New ton to Jane Gooda l l they ex plore. because they kept science journals. Notes, A jou r n a l is observations, drawings and questions are a per fect place to make drawings of backyard birds, or to tape a special leaf how scientists record their work. from a walk in the woods. Share with Today is a perfect time to explore science your children that a science journal is a w ith your children. It is natura l for diar y of discover y — f illed with things children to have many questions about the that they think are important. They are world around them, and this curiosity is writing their own discoveries. The best the foundation of science inquir y. Parents way to introduce a science journal is for can nur ture science by helping their parents to use one with their children. children ask and ref ine questions as they Your ch i ld ren w i l l appreciate your 08305 VT_INDY ADthem. 12/11/08 10:58 AM as Page efforts you 1model good science. explore the worldCHILD around

Does your child have a learning problem? Your child may have 20/20 eyesight and have a hidden vision problem affecting the ability to learn up to potential.

There are many cool things to record in your journal. I like to start with the sky. My daughter once asked me, “Dad, when can we go to where the sky is always red? ” She had not iced t h at near sunset, to the west the sky is very red. This started a great conversation about the sky and how light changes. Her question about the red sky and a drawing made an excellent science journal observation. Encourage your children to use their science journals to keep track of something based on a question they have. For example, they might want to know how many and what type of birds visit the backyard. How does the moon change every night? When and where does the sun come up? What types of clouds come

over the house? What attracts ants — sweet or sour foods? Let your child’s questions direct what goes into the science journal. Make sure to encourage drawings and questions, and record the date of the observations. Science is for everyone. Making and using a science journal is a great way to do science and have fun exploring the world. For more information about Science Journals and family science activities, visit www.childrensmuseum. org/teachers/unitsofstudy/scienceworks/ index.htm to explore the ScienceWorks Unit of Study. This unit includes lessons, activities, and templates for Science Journals that you can make at home. Families also can go to http:// www.wfyi.org/indianaExpeditions.asp to view shows, lessons, and activities featured on WFYI’s “Indiana Expeditions with Rick Crosslin.”

Rick Crosslin is the lead science educator for The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, host of “Indiana Expeditions” on WFYI Indianapolis and an educator with the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township in Indianapolis.

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one chic mama

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JEANS, BELTS& HANDBAGS­­­— Oh My! Finding the Right Fit 1 Get Caught Red-handed With a modern take on traditional styles Redhanded handbags are making an eco-friendly splash in the marketplace. Created by a hip North Carolina mom, these bags are made from non-PVC and VOC-free vinyl and are lined with lovely organic cotton, bamboo and hemp fabrics. Redhanded bags are long on form and function while leaving behind only a small carbon footprint. Try the tote or messenger styles for carrying the mother lode, or the clutch for just the essentials for a night out on the town. Being eco-friendly never looked so good! Find Redhanded bags (priced from $30 - $167) at www. redhandedbags.com.

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2 Head Over Heels Ladies, if you love to wear heels then you’re gonna love this fall’s lineup of shoes that are reminiscent of skyscrapers! But if heels just don’t suit your lifestyle, don’t despair.There are plenty of stylish options for you, too. Why not try these Coby distressed leather ballet flats ($69) from Nine West’sVintage Americana collection? They’re comfy enough for the playground yet stylish enough to satisfy your inner fashionista. Find them at Nine West stores and at www.ninewest.com. 3 No More “Mom” Jeans As busy moms, jeans are one of the most versatile and useful items of clothing we can possess. Providing not only the comfort and durability we need to keep up with the kids, jeans are great for both daytime and evening looks. Simply change your top, shoes and accessories and you have a whole new look! Take the time to choose your fit wisely and you’ll be blessed with a pair of jeans that makes you look fabulous without conjuring up the term “mom jeans.” Here are our tips for finding the perfect pair: Be prepared to spend an afternoon trying on jeans. Sometimes

finding the best pair can take several hours. Take along a friend who will be honest, or find a salesperson you can trust. Have jeans hemmed properly. A skilled tailor can cut off the hem and reattach it to keep the original look of the jeans. A bad hem can ruin a great pair of jeans. The hem of your jeans should almost reach the floor. Decide on heels or flats before you have them hemmed, then stick with your choice of heel height or the length will be all-wrong. If you really love the jeans consider buying two identical pairs and hem one for flats and one for heels. Make sure your jeans have well-proportioned back pockets. Oversized

pockets that hang too low look sloppy and pockets that are too small will make your rear end appear larger.Welt pockets on trouser jeans are especially flattering but steer clear of jeans with no back pockets at all. 16 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

Select a pair of jeans that fits you at the waistband. If a muffin top forms around your waist, go up a size. If the jeans fit through hips and thighs but gap at the waist, call on your trusty tailor to take them in and give you the perfect fit. Go for darker denim. It elongates your figure, gives a chic and contemporary look and is more slimming and flattering than lighter colored denim.

So toss away your old and unflattering jeans and invest in a pair that makes you look and feel fantastic – because you’re worth it!

4 Stress Busters School’s back in session and your family’s schedule is back in full swing. Lessons, meetings and a list of to-do’s can be enough to stress any mom out. Why not treat yourself to a nice, relaxing massage? Karen Bernard of Massage Heights in Cary, NC says that “Studies have shown massage to be one of the top three stress relievers, yet it’s one that is underutilized.” She recommends that women (and men) get a massage at least a couple of times a month for prolonged and lasting benefits. While treating yourself to an afternoon out for a professional massage is a wonderful experience, we don’t all have the budget or the childcare to make it a regular occurrence.Why not trade giving massages with your spouse or partner? You can also teach your older kids to give you a quick neck/shoulder rub to diffuse some stress quickly, and even pay them for doing it.Whatever you do, don’t underestimate the power of touch and the healing properties it has. With regular rubdowns you can reduce your stress level and feel more relaxed in no time. 5 Belt One On This fall, one accessory I am thrilled to see making a comeback is the belt. Shown on everything from dresses to jackets to untucked blouses, the belt has risen to more than just something to hold your pants up. Find belts in all colors, textures and styles to complement your look. When choosing a belt here are a few pointers to help find the right style for you: Scale – keep your belt proportional to your own size and you’ll

look great. If you’re big or tall, opt for a bold, wide belt. If you’re petite, opt for a smaller, more delicate belt. Style – your belt doesn’t have to “match” your outfit but it does have to coordinate. Choose something that adds value to your outfit and isn’t just a belt for belt’s sake. Impact – Is your belt the focal point of your outfit? If so, go

easy on the other accessories. Perhaps you can skip a necklace and just add earrings or bracelets.Your goal is to create balance. Staying Power – Does your belt fit properly? You don’t want to have to readjust your belt, you want something that’s going to fit you well without being too tight or too loose. A belt with a bit of stretch is a great way to get a secure fit outside a bulky jacket.

So find a belt that punctuates your look and you’ll look fabulous!

6 Sweetness and Light If you’ve had it with artificial sweeteners and their long list of chemicals you can’t pronounce you may be interested in something new. Truvia™ is an all natural, calorie-free sweetener created from the stevia plant. The secret to Truvia™ is that it’s made from rebiana, the sweetest leaves of the Stevia plant, so there is no bitter aftertaste. Only a smooth, tongue-pleasing sweetness that works as well in your coffee as it does in baked goods, making it perfect for diabetics and those who want to cut down on sugar. Look for Truvia™ at your local grocery. For more information and recipes go to www.truvia.com. Mary Michele Little is a mother of two, wife, entrepreneur and blogger who lives in Raleigh, N.C. Read more of her tips at www.onechicmama.com.


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profile: international talent academy

Growing Young Minds, Developing Big Talents Why Education Time With Parents is Imperative for Growth

Imagine seeing your threeyear old reading music before reading books, counting different note values before recognizing numbers and learning Italian as a music language! Or your four-year old setting a dinner table and eating with a knife and fork. How about your five-year old reading his own monologue on stage in two different languages?

Research studies find that the first three years of life are critical to the emotional and intellectual development: a newborn’s brain is only 25% of an adult size. It grows to 80% by age three and 90% by age five. That’s why children learn more facts during the first three years of life, than during the remainder of their lives. Stronger neural connections within the brain develop only if the brain is used and once-in-alifetime windows of opportunity are opening to learn certain tasks. For example, in between eight months and two years of age, four educational foundations (language, curiosity, intelligence and sociability) are developing. Therefore, the earlier you start teaching your children, the greater opportunities they would have to reach their full potential. A young child is like a sponge: the more he is exposed to new situations, the more that will matter to him and the more he will want to learn. The effects of this emotional and intellectual development will not be seen, in many cases,

until your child reaches the third or fourth grade. But what you do now will greatly affect whether your child is ready to learn when he enters school. The advantage that infants and toddlers have is that their brains develop much faster—they can acquire information with tremendous speed and they love learning. For example, a child whose parents read him books, play games, teach values and engage in social and intellectual activities would develop to a greater capacity in contrast to the child who does not have this stimulation. This child would learn very little and therefore would have minimum brain development. It is up to you, the parent, to decide which path to the future your child will take. “Parents are always the best teachers,” says Tatyana Komarova, the founder and Executive Director of the International Talent Academy in Carmel, IN. “They know their children’s strengths, unique interests and potential. We want to teach

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parents the importance of early child education and inspire them to get started early. I’m not talking about a traditional classroom setting; the key is learning through play.” The uniqueness of the Academy is in international curriculum, which is based on classical studies and contemporary research on early brain development. The parents are the big part of the program, as they are involved in the learning process and encouraged to work with their children at home after each class. “We truly believe that intellectual programs for preschool children are very important and would be especially beneficial and helpful in preparation for formalized schooling.” The ITA programs that include music, theater, ballroom dance and intellectual development are educational, creative and fun and designed for young children who would like to be challenged.

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ndianapolis-area private schools are a great educational option, offering top-notch academics. So does it really matter which one your child attends? Absolutely, educators say. Thanks to all the great choices, parents can select the perfect match for their child’s educational needs.

Private school options abound. Religious or secular? Elementary or high school? Small or large? Emphasis on the arts, community outreach or travel? Traditional, classical or Montessori? The choices are as diverse as the students enrolled. “There really is a wealth of private, independent options in Indianapolis,” says Susan Karpicke, director of admissions at Sycamore School. “There’s really something for everyone.” Melinda Fisher of St. Richard’s School agrees. “I believe at every (local private school) a child can get a good education, but they all have a different personality,” says Fishers, director of admission and communications. “I encourage families to find a place that feels like home because this will be your school home for a long time.” To help with your private school search, we called a host of local educators to ask: “What makes your school unique?” While each school has a wealth of programs and special qualities — much too many to list in one article — you’ll find some of the highlights below. Check out the school directory listings for more information about each school, and use the contact information to discover much more for yourself.

Educational Philosophy While a traditional educational approach works well for many students, others thrive in a different environment. Fortunately, Indianapolis offers options — from classical to Montessori. In its second year, Coram Deo Academy, located in Carmel, offers a Christian, classical education to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. The classical curriculum draws deeply from the history and culture of Western Civilization to produce students who can think thoroughly and maturely. Beginning in third grade, students study Latin. Instruction in formal logic begins in middle school, while high school students receive instruction in formal rhetoric. “It’s very old fashioned liberal arts,” explains Headmaster Scott Taylor. “Our school is for families who want a very distinctly and purposeful Christian environment and a very strong academic program. We are committed to integrating our faith and our Christian worldview into all of our subjects and all of our teaching.” The Montessori philosophy, developed by Dr. Maria Montessori, supports each child’s unique development and is offered locally at a number of private schools.

U nique P rogr ams

and

O ptions

for

Every C hild

Maria Montessori International Academy serves the broadest range of ages — from toddler (12 months) through sixth grade. The small school, small class sizes and state-licensed and Montessori-certified teachers allow children to learn at their own pace, says Executive Director Vivian Cain. “If a child is in first grade, he can do third or fourth grade work,” Cain explains. “Students don’t have to move to a different grade to do that work.” The school takes pride in its international diversity of students, teachers and programs. Group Spanish

20 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009


lessons begin in preschool, while elementary students learn conversational Spanish and/or French from a native speaker. The International Montessori School, which expands this year to serve children in preschool through third grade, also celebrates diversity and has a strong cultural awareness program and diversity of staff and students. A French teacher will lead the new lower elementary program, where both Spanish and French are taught to students. Opened in 1966, Montessori Centres is the oldest continually operating Montessori school in the area. Its central location on Westfield Boulevard is an advantage to both students and families. “We’re able to take advantage of all the opportunities a rou nd dow ntow n,” say s Ta m my Ca st lem a n, communications director. The Orchard School was founded in 1922 to provide a progressive education, a commitment that still stands today, says Joe Marshall, head of school. A tenet of progressive teaching is to engage the natural curiosity of children by emphasizing the process of learning in balance with the product.

Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School is the only Jesuit high school in Indiana and offers a college preparatory curriculum for about 800 students — about half are Roman Catholic, while about 19 percent represent minority populations. School focus is on both education and care of the whole person — spiritually, intellectually, emotionally and physically — says President Matthew Hayes. Five ideals — characteristics of graduates at graduation, known as “Grad at Grad” — form the cornerstone of the Jesuit education. According the Hayes, they are: 1. Intellectually competent 2. Open to grow: a dedication to lifelong learning and understanding of how to learn 3. Religious: search and discover the basic truths about the meaning of life, regardless of your religion. “If you are Catholic, you will be more Catholic when you leave,” Hayes explains. “If you’re Jewish, you will be more Jewish.”

The Orchard School strives to provide well-rounded academic, social, emotional, physical and ethical learning with challenging, child-centered and innovative teaching. “We develop the whole child,” Marshall says. “The process of learning is just as important as the f inal product.”

Not on ly is Kingsway accredited by the State of Indiana but also by the A ssociat ion of Christian Schools International (ACSI). All teachers are licensed and certif ied in the areas they teach. Biblical teaching is also the foundation at Traders Point Christian Academy.

4. Loving: of yourself and others.

“This is what sets us apart,” Hayes says. “The bottom line is that we are a Jesuit school.”

“Every student receives daily Bible instruction as part of their core classes,” says Toni Kanzler, director of admissions. “But beyond that, our faculty integrates Biblical concepts and values into every subject area. Students learn to look for and recognize God in science, art, literature and history.”

Religious Emphasis

Continuity

A number of private schools offer a faith-focused curriculum.

Park Tudor’s challenging academic program is designed to progress sequentially from junior kindergarten through 12th grade. The full-day junior kindergarten program feeds young children’s curiosity with a variety of programs, including Suzuki violin, trips to the museum, an annual art show and Spanish.

5. Committed to justice.

“Children come to the classroom with an innate curiosity, and it’s our job to inspire them to foster and develop that curiosity,” Marshall explains.

“We address body, mind and spirit and try to teach kids Biblically based decision-making skills,” Hoover explains.

One is Kingsway Christian School, which includes daily Bible classes, along with complete academic, athletic and artistic programs, says Randy Hoover, development director.

Educating students with high-functioning Autism in grades 5-12. A customized educational environment providing • Academic achievement • Emphasis on life skills • A community of peers • College or job counseling and planning Find out how we can make a difference for you and your child: 317-926-0043 www.TheIndependenceAcademy.org 612 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208 The Independence Academy admits students of any race, religion, color, and national or ethnic origin.

INDYSCHILD.COM 21


Challenging programs continue, culminating in the Global Scholars Program, modeled after the international baccalaureate program, for highly motivated juniors and seniors. Nineteen advanced placement courses are available, and college counseling begins with freshmen. Park Tudor includes Spanish instruction for all grades. Latin and French are offered to 7th through 12 graders, while Chinese is available in high school. “We have a curriculum designed to flow from junior kindergarten all the way up to grade 12,” says Lisa Hendrickson, director of communications. But academics are not the only priority. Students are encouraged to participate in sports and other extracurricular activities of interest. “We allow students to participate and explore what they’re interested in.”

Unique Programs In addition to its core Montessori program, International Montessori School offers a variety of unique options for students. A greenhouse on site allows students to explore the life cycle of plants, while a strong arts and music program brings in local professionals and introduces students to artistic styles and classic works. “This is all on top of the regular Montessori education. The core program is absolutely essential,” says Ranee Dhadialla, school owner and director, as well as teacher in a preschool classroom. “These kids are not just walking. They are flying.” As part of its curriculum, Montessori Centres stresses a peace curriculum, with lessons on grace and courtesy. “We work very hard to teach our children to be peaceful and to be peacemakers,” Castleman says. “I think that’s more and more important everyday.”

Another extra at Montessori Centres is an annual progress check using the California Achievement Testing standardized test. While not required by Montessori, which doesn’t assign traditional grades, or the state, this testing helps parents gauge their child’s progress and provides a record when children must enroll in a more traditional school after third grade. “This is a great measure of where kids are; our kids routinely come out at or above grade level,” Castleman says. “That’s comforting for parents. We provide a tool to show that their child is learning.”

Meeting Special Needs The Independence Academy of Indiana, which opened last year, is designed specifically for students in grades 5 through 12 with high-functioning autism. With very small classes — a student/teacher ratio of just 6:1 — educators combine an academic track with daily life and social skills training to meet individualized needs and goals.

Midwest Academy of Indiana offers willing, but frustrated, students a place to thrive academically and socially. In particular, two types of students thrive here, says Edy Stoughton, Ph.D., head of school: 1. Students who face school anxiety — perhaps they have been left out, picked on, bullied or become tense in a highpressure school situation. “They are good students,” Stoughton says. “They want to do well, but they’ve gotten to the point where they say they just can’t walk back through the school doors. Families just want a place where their child can feel safe and succeed.” 2. Students with Asperger’s Syndrome. “They typically have trouble finding a good fit.”

Founders chose to begin the program with fifth grade because they found students with autism face more difficulty as they enter middle and high school. Socially, new challenges arise with adolescence; while classes often become more lecture based, a challenge for visual learners.

Midwest Academy features a traditional Core 40 curriculum with personalized education to meet the individual needs of each student. About 90 percent of its graduates continue with higher education. Staff members also emphasize community involvement and extracurricular programs.

“We level the playing field,” says Susan Le Vay, director and co-founder of the academy. “For many of them, this is the first time they felt like they made friends and that they fit in.”

“This give students a chance to shine in another area besides academics,” Stoughton says. “We are a place that values individual goals and passions. We encourage students to find what they love and develop that.”

Academy staff is passionate about working with children on the autism spectrum, Le Vay says. All have experience with special education students and have knowledge of autism in particular. Transitional support and resource referrals are offered to students and families preparing for college.

For nearly 30 years, Cathedral High School has offered the Language Support Program, pioneering services for students with language processing disabilities, such as dyslexia and reading comprehension or written expression.

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“These are bright, college-bound students,” says Director Marcia Reynolds. “Families are looking for a private school option that’s going to support them and yet prepare them for the next level.”

school, St. Richard’s families host students for two weeks and then are able to travel to France for two weeks. “They come back with much more self-confidence and a bigger global perspective of the world,” Fisher says.

Department educators teach English courses in a small-class setting. This direct instruction allows teachers to find gaps in learning, discover what caused the interference and provide strategies to meet those needs. These learning strategies can then be applied to all other courses.

Beginning in sixth grade, students have the option to continue with French or study Spanish. All middle school students also study Latin.

“It’s not the typical special education program where students have different instruction and materials,” Reynolds explains. “They complete the same curriculum as other Cathedral students. It’s important for us to help kids develop inner strengths and develop that perseverance and stamina. I’m just in awe of these students at how hard they have to work. They have so many assets and so many incredible gifts and talents.”

Students at Traders Point Christian Academy begin learning Spanish in full-day kindergarten, with an accelerated program in 9th and 10th grades. Then students spend two weeks traveling to a Spanish speaking country to experience that culture, participate in language immersion studies and provide ministry to the areas by working with a local church. The school plans to add Chinese as a language option, with a possible travel experience to Taiwan.

Serving Gifted Students Sycamore School is the only private school in Indiana where all academics and activities are designed exclusively for gifted students, Karpicke says. The program allows students to be actively involved in learning, to move through subjects at a faster pace, and to learn broader, deeper, more complex and more abstract concepts than is typically necessary for the average learner. Programs are offered for children as young as 2 years, 8 months. “We find parents of young gifted students don’t know where to turn,” Karpicke says.

Exploring the World At St. Richard’s School, fifth graders are rewarded for studying French since preschool, with the option to participate in a twoweek exchange program in France. Partnering with a French

with their sponsor child, learning about the child’s country and culture. Students then host a Mission Fair, with booths designed to showcase their child’s country, including music, dance and food.

Global Perspective

“International travel has a lasting impact on students,” Kanzler says, “leading them to a broader vision of themselves and their world while helping instill a personal vision for life-long service to others.”

Service Learning Philanthropy is an important aspect at many local private schools. St. Richard’s School partnered with The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University to become Indiana’s pilot for “Learning to Give,” a program for community service initiatives. Philanthropy is integrated into all grade levels. For example, fifth graders used thermal cameras to evaluate energy loss of local homes and provided a report to homeowners. Traders Point Christian Academy partners with Compassion International to provide monetary and emotional support to 10 needy children around the world. Students communicate

The International School of Indiana (ISI) was established 15 years ago against the background of a rapidly changing world to support Indianapolis in its efforts to participate in the global economy. Today, ISI is a 3-year-old through grade 12 school of around 600 students and provides a multicultural education with high academic expectations, a strong foreign language component and an international perspective. Pre-elementary children are taught in either Spanish or French for most of the day. This total immersion approach builds remarkable fluency at a young age. This year, ISI is offering a kindergarten Chinese and English class in which children are taught in mandarin for half the week and English for the rest. English increases in elementary school, with 20 percent used in grades one through three and 50 percent in grades four and five. Middle school and high school classes are taught in English, but students are able to maintain or build high levels of foreign language proficiency in classes taught by native speaking teachers. ISI is an International Baccalaureate World School, and all students in grades 11 and 12 study for the full International Baccalaureate Diploma. Worldwide, the IB Diploma has a high reputation and is accepted as evidence of academic and personal excellence. ISI is introducing the IB Primary Years Programme (for children three years old through grade five) and the Middle Years Programme (for students in grades 6 through 10). Once in place, ISI will be the only school in the Midwest to offer an unbroken continuum of International Baccalaureate education from preschool through high school. Lisa Young Stiers is a freelance writer. She resides in Brownsburg with her two sons and husband.

INDYSCHILD.COM 23


Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School: As the only Jesuit high school in Indiana, Brebeuf is a college preparatory school focused on the education and care of the whole person — spiritually, intellectually, emotionally and physically. 9th through 12th grades. Cathedral High School: A Catholic college preparatory high school, Cathedral provides, to a diverse group of students, opportunities for spiritual, intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth through service and academic excellence. 9th through 12th grade. Coram Deo Academy: Using classical tools of learning and a distinctly Christian worldview approach to education, the school strives to graduate young men and women who are equipped spiritually, intellectually and artistically to engage and shape the culture with the claims of the gospel to the glory of God. Kindergarten through 12th grade. The Independence Academy of Indiana: The Academy is designed specifically for students in grades 5 through 12 with high functioning autism. Using very small classes, educators combine an academic track with daily life and social skills

and students’ families. Infants through sixth grade.

expectations and expand possibilities. Age 3 through 12th grade.

Midwest Academy of Indiana: The Academy offers the willing, but frustrated, learner a place to thrive academically and socially.Two groups who thrive at the school are those with school anxiety and those International School of with Asperger’s Syndrome. Fourth Indiana: Established 15 years ago, through 12th grade. ISI provides a multicultural education Centres: with high academic expectations, a very Montessori strong foreign language component Montessori program is designed to and an international perspective. All develop each child’s full potential students in grades 11 and 12 study for intellectually, emotionally, socially and the full International Baccalaureate physically. The methods provide a firm Diploma. Preschool (age 3) through foundation of self-confidence and selfdiscipline while preserving a child’s high school. innate curiosity, motivation and love for K i n g s way C h r i st i a n learning. Preschool through third grade. School: A ministry of Kingsway Christian Church, the school The Orchard School: A provides a strong education, using a progressive, non-sectarian school, the biblically integrated curriculum for Orchard School guides each student to spiritual, academic, social and physical develop the knowledge, confidence and development. Preschool through character essential for a life of learning, leadership and positive contribution to eighth grade. society. Preschool through eighth grade. Maria M o n tess o r i International Academy: Park Tudor: School provides an The academy provides a Montessori individualized learning environment education and childcare, while where children are encouraged recognizing and celebrating the diverse to explore opportunities, exceed international background of its staff

St. Richard’s School: Independent Episcopal day school offering a community filled with academic rigor, faith based ecumenism and long-standing traditions. Its mission is to instill knowledge and value for a lifetime through the implementation of five Pillars for Success: classic curriculum, leadership, civic responsibility, global readiness and faith. Pre-Kindergarten 3 through eighth grade.

training to meet individualized needs and goals International Montessori School: The school was established to provide a world-class Montessori education to local children. Preschool through third grade.

Sycamore School: The school exists so that academically gifted children can experience the enriched, accelerated education they need to reach their potential and to lead responsible, constructive, fulfilling lives. Preschool through eighth grade. Traders Point Christian Academy: The Academy strives to challenge and education students within the framework of a Biblical worldview. The program includes age-graded academic instruction and learning experiences, instruction in Bible knowledge and lifestyle, and the reinforced practice of principles for Christian living. Preschool through 10th grade, continuing to expand to 12th grade.

For more than 90 years: • rigorous academics • thorough faith formation • vibrant student life • dynamic relationships Learn more at our Open House, Nov. 19. www.gocathedral.com

Lifelong Connections.

How to get the educational tradition that Georgetown, Boston College and Xavier deliver in college from an Indianapolis school. At Brebeuf Jesuit, college-bound students of all faiths get the proven, 450 year-old Jesuit philosophy of teaching that guides some of the nation’s most respected universities. It’s a philosophy that instills Magis (Latin for “more”) – always searching and striving for beyond what is expected. Join us for our annual Open House Sunday, November 1, 2009 / 11 am – 1:30 pm Mass celebrated at 10 am Brebeuf Jesuit preparatory school • 2801 W. 86th Street Indianapolis, IN. 46268 Admissions Office: 317.524.7151 • admissions@brebeuf.org • www.brebeuf.org

QUALITY CHILD CARE

849-9551

9709 Allisonville Rd. Castleton

❋ ❋

558-1130

116th & Allisonville Fishers

Age-Appropriate Academic Programs... 2 yrs - Kindergarten (Full Day) Loving Christian Environment - Caring Staff Ministry of Trinity Wesleyan Church

Serving Families for 29 Years 24 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009


R E SO U RC E S 317-926-3640 Ages: 4 weeks+

CHILD CARE Meridian Kessler

A Nanny Referral, Solutions Home Staffing

We come to you! Machelle Hartford 317-319-0027

m@SolutionsHomeStaffing.com

SolutionsHomeStaffing.com

Quality in-home child care serving caring families for 20 years. (CPR, 1st aid certified, and state licensed). Two meals and one snack provided daily along with baby food and regular formula. We provide quality learning through play in a non-smoking Christian environment. Preschool program providing Kindergarten prep is available. $130/week. 7:15-5:30 M-F.

Nannies for all schedules and needs. We place professional nannies who have been meticulously screened for experience, background and character. Our nannies are educated women who love to work with babies and children. A nanny can Maria Montessori offer the one-on-one care that nurtures International Academy your child’s individual needs. Allow your 431 E. Northfield children to learn, play, and rest at their Dr. Brownsburg own pace, in the comfort of their own 317-852-3900 home. We place permanent nannies for full-time and part-time; and short-term www.mariamonnannies for new mother’s, summer care, tessori-intl.org vacation and sick child/ parent care. All Ages: 12 months to 6 years nannies have a minimum of three years, Maria Montessori International full-charge nanny experience. Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children AYS Inc. to learn at their own pace and are Several locations in treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the Central Indiana minimum, but also their best, where 317-283-3817 learning should be a happy, joyous www.ayskids.org experience! Children learn how to Ages/Grades: 3 years think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways old to 6th grade AYS operates youth programs At-Your- and have a positive self-image. Children School, including before- and after- participate in math, language, music, art, school, early childhood, kindergarten, practical life, science, geography, and and summer programs. At AYS, children foreign language. Discover the Difference receive homework help, hands-on learn- at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting ing, art & music enrichment, exercise, applications for all ages toddlers, Pre-K nutritious snacks, socialization and FUN! and Kindergarten. Our highly trained staff makes AYS the safest place for kids. Visit our website to see if we are at your school! Carmel Montessori Schools, Inc. Wee Folk Child Care

SCHOOLS Brownsburg

Carmel

The Montessori 317-580-0699 info@carmelmontessori.com Learning Center Elizabeth Williams www.carmelmontessori.com 1402 W. Main St. Carmel Ages: Pre-school 317-846-8182 through Kindergarten. elizabeth@themontessorileCarmel Montessori School is located on the beautiful campus at St. Christopher’s arningcenter.com

Church on the NE corner of Main St. www.themontessorilearningand Meridian in Carmel. Our directress center.com is American Montessori Certified with Ages: Grades 1-3 10 years head-teaching experience. We offer a beautiful, peaceful and positive The Montessori Learning Center Montessori learning environment. Elementary program focuses on Extended days available. developing the whole child through interaction with an interdisciplinary curriculum. Our program specifically Clay Montessori meets the needs of each child and is Peggy White aligned with Indiana State Standards.

463 East Main St. Carmel 317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-6

Call for more information. (Affiliated with Fisher’s Montessori). Morning, afternoon and full-day programs. Coram Deo Academy

651 W Main St Mr. Scott Taylor 317-645-6397 scottbtaylor@att.net www.CoramDep-IN.com Ages/Grades: K-12 Grade

SeekingSitters

Back-to-School Tutoring Education Solutions

www.IrvingtonMath.com

TUTORING Kindergarten - Grade 12 + Small groups or one-on-one + On-line support + Monthly enrichment seminars + Monthly topical seminars for parents + Test prep courses ACT, SAT, GQE Great Job! 5535 E. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46219

317-602-3733

13096 Moultrie Street Julie Gayes 317-873-0123 jgayes@primrosewestclay.com www.primrosewestclay.com Ages/Grades: Our programs are offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age.

Brain Building and Kickstart to Reading

Give them the head start they deserve Classes and One on One Tutoring Available 4yrs. Old and Up Classes are Filling Up Fast! 1030 E. 86th Street, Indianapolis 46240

(317) 819-0390

ww w.abcsofphonics.com

1950 E. Greyhound Pass, Ste 18-301 Kristin Slade 317-985-9505 kristins@seekingsitters www.seekingsitters.com

ing the student to stretch academically. Working with the IUPUI SPAN program allows students to take college classes when they are ready for more challenging educational opportunities.

East

Irvington Math Center, IMC

5535 E. Washington St 317-602-3733 GMcDermott@IrvingtonMath.Com www.irvingtonmath.com Ages/Grades: Kindergarten thru- grade 12

Our mission at IMC is to enhance mathematics learning for all ages. We offer tutoring services in small groups or one-on-one k-12 students; on-line support; monthly enrichment seminars for k-12 students; monthly topical seminars for parents; test preparation courses ACT, SAT, GQE.

Ages/Grades: Pre-school for ages 3-5yrs & K-8th

Our school is a loving environment. Our main goal is to teach and show our children and families the love of Jesus! Faith-Compassion-Achievement! Our students strive academically and spiritually in a faith enriched enviroment.

SeekingSitters Indianapolis North is the solution for all of your childcare needs. We are an on-demand Fishers Montessori service for families seeking babysitPeggy White ters. Whether your need is last min12806 Ford Rd and 131st ute, one-time, part-time, or full-time, we can solve your childcare dilemma. and Allisonville Rd. Visit SeekingSitters.com for more inFishers formation and to sign up!

Fishers

Carmel - Zionsville

Maria Montessori International Academy

4370 Weston Point Dr. Zionsville 317-769-2220 www.mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 6 years old

Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Stonegate, Zionsville, IN.

Central

Todd Academy, Inc.

302 N. East Street, In-

education directory

dianapolis, IN 46202 Geist Sharon Todd My Backyard Fine Arts 317-636-3100 Preschool at Geist director@toddacademy.com Sports Academy 11960 East 62nd www.toddacademy.com Street Indianapolis Ages/Grades: Age 10 or 317-823-7734 5th grade thru -grade 12 www.geistsportTodd Academy serves gifted middle and high school students who are sacademy.com seeking a learning challenge. Classes Ages: 2 year-Pre K (5 year) are designed to be fun while motivat-

The Primrose School at WestClay is dedicated to providing outstanding Coram Deo Academy exists to assist parents educational care to students ages 6 in their duty of biblically training their chil- weeks through 12 years of age. Our dren by offering academic instruction that curriculum is NCA accredited and is distinctly and consistently Christ-cen- offers many extras such as Spanish, tered and classical. Utilizing classical tools technology, sign language, character Trinity Lutheran School of learning and a distinctly Christian world- development, music appreciation, art 8540 East 16th Street view approach to education, we desire to appreciation, science, social studies, graduate young men and women who, as reading, English, and math. Please call Amanda Hoover servants of Christ, are equipped spiritually, today to learn how more than 90% of 317-529-0138 intellectually and artistically to engage and Primrose students out performed the eliwhit9799@yahoo.com shape the culture with the claims of the national average. www.trinityindy.org gospel to the glory of God.

Emily & Scott Rudicel 1402 W. Main St. Carmel

Meridian Kessler Neighborhood Indianapolis

Primrose School at WestClay

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317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-9

NOW ENROLLING FOR 20082009. Children will discover their unique selves and learn about the world around them through exploring the visual arts, creative movement and music appreciation. 9-11:45 a.m. M-Fri; MWF 9-1:30pm.

Meridian St. Michigan Rd.

Maria Montessori International Academy

7507 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis 317-291-5557 www.mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 9 years old

Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Stonegate, Zionsville, IN.

Multiple Locations

Indiana Council of Preschool Cooperatives: ICPC

Multiple Locations in Indianapolis Area For schools, see below. ICPC Line: 317-767-7596 Ages: Preschool classes for ages 2-5; other programs vary - Kindergarten, Stay & Play, Enrichment/Extended Days.

A quality learning environment offering preschool, kindergarten and elementary. Certification through American Montessori Society. 9-12, Indianapolis Area Preschool 12:30-3, 9-3. and Kindergarten Cooperatives Cooperative Preschools: great for your child, great for you! Children and Primrose School parents learn and grow together in the at Gray Eagle classroom with caring, experienced teachers. Indiana Council of Preschool Mindy Smith Cooperatives (ICPC) member schools 12290 Olio Road (Olio are: Apple House: 6121 E. County Road between 116th street Rd 100 S, Avon, 797-5925 Butler: 2411 Indianapolis Ave, Indy, 226and 126th street) Fishers 4287 Downey: 111 S. Downey Rd, 317-577-9480 Indy, 359-5304 Edgewood: 4040 E. mindy@primrosegThompson Rd, Indy, 767-7730 Fishers rayeagle.com Point: 9959 E. 126th St, Fishers, 7674312 Geist Orchard: 7879 N. 700 West, Ages: Infants thru full day McCordsville, 336-7008 Meridian Hills kindergarten. Before/ Nursery School and Kindergarten: 7171 after care available. N. Pennsylvania, Indy, 255-0831 Meridian At Primrose School at Gray Eagle Street: 5500 N. Meridian St, Indy, 767we offer much more than a daycare 3003 Northeast Cooperative Preschool experience. Our exclusive Balanced and Kindergarten: 5805 E. 56th St, Indy, Learning curriculum prepares 592-9790 Parkview: 4550 central Ave, your child for academic success Indy, 380-0628 Speedway: 3000 N. High while fully integrating character School Rd, Indy, 356-2804 Willowcreek: development - creating a well- 8170 Hague Rd, Indy, 578-5488 rounded young individual. Our safe, secure environment will provide you Noblesville with peace-of-mind, knowing that Christian School your child is safe, happy and growing 1687 N. 10th Street everyday! Full Time: $220 - $320 per Rolland Abraham week depending on age. Visit www. PrimroseGrayEagle.com for more 317-776-4186 information.

rabraham@

INDYSCHILD.COM 25


R E SO U RC E S

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education directory 6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467 emills@JCCindy.org www.JCCindy.org Ages: 6 weeks - Grade K

noblesvillechristianschool.org NoblesvilleChristianSchool.org

Ages/Grades: Preschool - 9th Grade

Affordable Christian Education in Hamilton County. State accredited, NCS combines academic excellence with Christ-centered teaching. The result: students who are loved and motivated everyday. Our full-day Kindergarten is 25-66% less costly than other programs, with music, art, library, gym and music weekly. Come share the excitement at Noblesville Christian! Polly Panda Preschool and Bridgford Kindergarten

2944 E. 56th St. and 17645 Oakmont Dr., IndianapolisNoblesville Gail Hacker & Tammy Clark & Mandy Galle 317-257-9127 (Indy) 317773-0387 (Noblesville) pollypandaindy@ sbcglobal.net Ages/Grades: Six weeks through Kindergarten, summer program also available.

Polly Panda provides a safe and healthy environment which enhances each child’s total growth. Our theme-based hands-on preschool program provides a wide-range experiences that foster learning, creativity and problem solving in all areas. A child’s sense of self-worth, independence and growth in social skills are developed through positive interaction with peers and our well-qualified and loving staff.

Our loving caregivers and teachers demonstrate by example and encourage children to behave according to these values as the children are learning, playing and socializing with one another. The JCC embraces a learning-through-play teaching method to engage children in activities that promote creativity, accelerate learning and stimulate social interaction, all at each child’s individual pace. Beginnings Preschool and Parents’ Day Out

18 mos.+, 2’s+ (8:50 am to 12:30 pm or 3:00 pm and choice of days). 3’s+ (8:50 am to 3:00 pm and choice of days). 4’s+/PreK and Kindergarten (5 full-day program 8:50 am to 3:00 pm) OPTIONS FOR ALL: Flexible early drop off at 7 OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Full Academic Curriculum and Innovative Arts’ Enrichment. Our Program recognizes that intellectual, social, emotional and physical development are interwoven. Our children will thrive on exploration, creativity, curiosity, discovery, spontaneity and more important, lots of love!

Children’s Day In First Baptist Church of Nursery School and Indianapolis 8600 N College Traditional Preschool Carol Mann Christy Whaley 317-574-6454 5500 N. Meridian cmann@fbcindy.org St. Indianapolis www.fbcindy.org 317-253-0472 Ages/Grades: 6 cwhaley@msumc.org months - Preschool www.msumc.org Offering flexibility for days of choice, Ages: Nursery School Beginnings strives to meet the physical, and Preschool spiritual, social and emotional needs of children from six months through age five. Beginnings is designed to provide secure, loving care for young children and to offer parents a consistent time to care for themselves. Openings available now. Beth-El Zedeck Early Childhood Center

North

Arthur M. Glick JCC

600 W. 70th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Joanie Waldman 317-259-6854 jwaldman@bez613.org Ages/Grades: 12 mos.+,

The Children’s Day In Nursery School is a fully inclusive early childhood program with an emphasis on Christian values. It is designed to offer children 9 months to 3 years a positive and developmentally appropriate experience in the care of experienced caregivers. Classes are offered weekdays from 9 am to 2:30 pm. CDI Preschool program provides a quality developmentally appropriate education for 3, 4 and 5 year olds. Program includes weekly Christian Life Skills, First Steps in Music (ICC) and Book Club. 3’s: T & Th, 4/5’s MWF. 9-2:30 pm. Summer Camp available.

Children’s Circle of Second Presbyterian Church

7700 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Regina Covey for Registration; Director Susan Stewart for Curriculum 317-252-5517 rcovey@secondchurch.org Ages/Grades: 7 months to 5 years

Children’s Circle is a weekday, developmentally appropriate, activity-based Christian program. We meet the needs of the whole child in a fun, creative, nurturing environment. Here, children can develop the skills necessary to live in today’s world. Our experienced faculty leads children toward discovery of who they are and what they can do. We embrace excellence in education by nurturing the whole child -- physically, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually. Early Childhood Center, The Church at the Crossing

John Drake or Kelly Belt 9111 N. Haverstick Rd. Indianapolis 317-575-6508 jdrake@churchatthecrossing.org www.churchatthecrossing.org Ages: 12mos - Pre-K 5’s

woven through each study unit. Need longer hours? Try our childcare ministry, The Neighborhood designed for 2-PreK 6:30-6pm M-F. Call for information and to schedule tours.

Associate Leveled from the AOGPE. and licensed Educators. Hutson is a member of AOGPE & a provisional member of ISACS. Children travel from across the state to attend.

Fairview Early Childhood Program

The Independence Academy of Indiana, Inc.

Melissa Peterson 4609 N. Capital Ave. Indianapolis 317-253-4990 mpeterson@fairviewpresbyterian.org www.fairviewpresbyterian.org Ages: 12 mo-5 yrs. (or up to Kindergarten)

612 West 42nd Street Ruth Padgett 317-926-0043 ruthpadgettTheIndep endenceAcademy.o Website: www.TheIndependenceAcademy.org Ages/Grades: Grades 5 - 12

7245 E. 75th Street Janet George, Principal 317-377-0544 fellowjanetgeorge@ gmail.com http://www.hutsonschool.org Ages/Grades: 1-12

Denise Wagner, CFRE 4330 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis 317-923-1951 ext. 316 www.isind.org Ages: 3 years old12th grade

Created specifically for students with highfunctioning autism and Asperger’s Syndrome, The Independence Academy helps Fairview ECP has a developmental, students achieve their highest level of inexperienced based curriculum in a dependence and academic success. Dediwarm and inclusive environment. cated and trained staff teach math, sciences, Curriculum is designed to promote language arts, global studies, social and life positive social behavior, respect skills, and more.Very small classes. Beautiful for diversity, positive self-concept, campus. A place to belong. independence, creativity and critical thinking skills. Come and visit us! International School of Indiana The Hutson School

The Hutson School, a pure Orton-Gillingham School serves children in 1stOur Mothers Day Out (12-35mos) 12th grade with dyslexia, dysgraphia, 9:15-2:30 and Preschool (3yrs- dyscalculia, ADHD. Students may have PreK’s) programs provide relaxed, difficulties with organization and time playful, secure environments that management. The program complies nurture creativity and encourage with Indiana academic standards. The the exploration of God’s world, a High School offers two academic paths: wide variety of learning materials, & College Preparatory & General Diploma. friendships, with readiness activities Faculty are OG Fellows, Certified, and

ISI is founded on the belief that an introduction to a second language, exposure to different nationalities and ethnic backgrounds and an International Baccalaureate-driven curriculum all work together to foster critical and independent thought. $12,250 pre-k through 8th grade and $12,960 for High School. Financial aid available for qualifiers.

Licensed Early Childhood Education Center (serving children ages 6 weeks to 12 years)

Now enrolling for Fall 2009 • Private Full Day Kindergarten

- Who We Are First Years Parenting Program is a not-for-profit that strengthens families through education, support, and play-based programs that focus on the first five years of life.

- What We Do We offer two different parenting programs, each structured for the parent and child to attend together.

Now offering full and part time infants (full only), toddlers and preschool Indpls: 2944 E. 56th (1 1⁄2 miles east of Keystone Ave.) 257-9127

• State of the Art Security System • Nutritious Meals & Snacks • Excellent Teachers

• Hands on Learning

• Curriculum exceeds

• Enrichment Programs

Foundations to the Academic

(Dance, Gymnastics,

Standards for Birth to Five

Music and Spanish)

• Paths to Quality Provider

Family owned for 25 years

www.pollypanda.com

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF INDIANAPOLIS

Both parenting programs are offered according to the child's age, ranging from newborn to 5 years.

- Where St.Luke's United Methodist Church (100 W. 86th St.)

- Visit Us Online At www.firstyearsfamilycenter.org Email: Peg@firstyearsfamilycenter.org or Phone: 317-201-6485 26 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

• Flexible schedule- choose your days • Extended day option • Convenient location • Caring for ages 6 mos.- 5 years • Theme-based curriculum with experienced staff Mention this ad and 1st Semester Supply Fee is Free with paid registration by August 26, 2009.

8600 N. College Ave. Indianapolis 317-574-6454 www. FbcIndy.org


R E SO U RC E S KinderCare-Woodfield Crossing

Meagan Koeneman 8485 Woodfield Crossing Indianapolis 317-257-3911 070739@klcorp.com www.kindercare. com/070739 Ages: 6wks - 12 years

Monday-Friday 6:30am - 6:00pm. Tuition varies with phonics and math programs. Meridian Hills Cooperative Nursery School & Kindergarten

7171 N. Pennsylvania School phone 255-0831 Ages/Grades: Ages 2, 3, 4 and Kindergarten

3rd grade. Our classroom structure and materials allow children to be self-directed and self-paced. Our well-rounded curriculum includes French and Spanish, art, and computer labs. True Montessori environment serving children at all levels from gifted to special needs. Pre/K: 8:30-11:30 or 8:30-3:15. Park Tudor School

7200 N. College Ave. David Amstutz 317-415-2777 info@parktudor.org www.parktudor.org Ages/Grades: Junior Kindergarten (ages 3-5) - Grade 12

Park Tudor School’s exceptional educators and extraordinary opportunities prepare students to become confident and resourceful lifelong learners. The school Founded in 1960, Meridian Hills Coopera- community creates an inspiring collegetive School is dedicated to helping children, preparatory learning environment for parents and teachers grow together. Classes highly motivated young people. Twoprovide a positive, nurturing environment year Global Scholars program for juniors for 2-year-olds through Kindergarten with and seniors; 19 AP classes; full-day kina special emphasis on parent education. Par- dergarten; Spanish beginning at age 3. ents help daily in the spacious classrooms, on a beautiful half-acre playground and with a caring, experienced staff. Northside. Sycamore School Montessori Centres

Lynne Boone, Director 563 Westfield Blvd. W. Dr. Indianapolis 317-257-2224 montessoricentres@ sbcglobal.net Ages: 2 1/2-3rd grade

Stressing peace and respect for all, we’ve worked with children to develop critical-thinking and time-management skills since 1966. Montessori-certified lead teachers serve children aged 2 1/2-

Dr. Susan Karpicke, Director of Admissions 1750 W. 64th Street Indianapolis 317-202-2500 skarpicke@sycamoreschool.org Ages: 2 years 8 months - 8th grade.

Field trips, athletics, and a wide Indianapolis variety of after school activities are 317-251-0560 offered. Admission testing required. ijacademy@comcast.net Scheduled parent tours most www.ijacademy.com Wednesdays throughout the school year. Private tours may be arranged. Ages: Preschool $4,900-$13,155 (08-09). Financial - 8th Grade assistance available. Please contact Founded in 1963, Indianapolis dridings@sycamoreschool.org Jr. Academy provides a wellrounded educational program The Orchard School with emphasis on spiritual, mental, Kristen Hein, Direcphysical, and social development. Our teachers are dedicated tor of Admissions Christians who desire to prepare 615 W. 64th St. Inchildren academically and socially dianapolis in an accepting environment 317-713-5705 where Christian principles are modeled and taught. Offering khein@orchard.org grades Pre-K-8th and 3’s Prewww.orchard.org School program M-Th 8:15-3, Fri Ages: Preschool 3/4 8:15-2:30 with before/after care. Admission is subject to review through Grade 8 The Orchard School, an independent, by School Board. We participate non-sectarian, progressive school, in the Educational CHOICE emphasized experiential learning. Charitable Trust Program, call for Orchard teachers engage the natural rates. curiosity of children, develop academic excellence, and provide leadership experience through well- The Children’s House rounded education. Orchard’s diverse 2404 W. 62nd St. (near community and commitment to Michigan Rd.), Indiamulticultural education inspires responsible, global citizenship. napolis, IN 46268 Founded in 1922. NAIS, ISACS, Susan Catania or NAEYS accredited. Call to schedule Mary Sexson a personal tour, and check our Web site for the date and time of our 317-253-3033 annual Open House. Applicants childrenshouse08@ are selected without regard to their gmail.com ability to pay tuition. Every effort is www.thechildrenshouseindianapmade to provide financial assistance olis.com where needed.Tuition is all-inclusive. Before/after care available. Ages/Grades: 2 1/2

West

years - 14 years of age

Northeast

At Sycamore, teachers trained in gifted education deliver a Indianapolis curriculum designed to challenge Jr. Academy and engage gifted learners. Art, Crystal Willis music, Spanish, PE and computer 2910 E. 62nd. St. technology are taught at all levels.

The Children’s House offers a Montessori preschool. The four areas of our preschool are practical life, sensorial, math and language. The Montessori preschool is available on a nine or twelve month calendar. The elementary level is an ungraded, continuous-progress school

where children discover and pursue their unique talents and needs. Each child is provided with an individual learning experience based on the assumption that children are naturally inquisitive and want to learn. The Children’s House has helped shape the lives of hundreds of Indianapolis Children since its founding under a Lilly Endowment grant in 1971. Montessori School of Westfield, Inc.

800 E. Sycamore Street, Westfield Mary Lyman, Directress 317-867-0158 montessoriwestfield@gmail.com Ages/Grades: Toddler15 months to 3 years; Ages 3-Kindergarten; Elementary 1: Grade 1-3; Elementary 2: Grade 4-8

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education directory

mreed@primrosebridgewater.com www.primrosebridgewater.com Ages/Grades: Our programs are offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. The Primrose School at WestClay is dedicated to providing outstanding educational care to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Our curriculum is NCA accredited and offers many extras such as Spanish, technology, sign language, character development, music appreciation, art appreciation, science, social studies, reading, English, and math. Please call today to learn how more than 90% of Primrose students out performed the national average.

Located on 3 wooded acres in Central Indiana, the Montessori School of Westfield adheres to the academic traditions of Montessori while serving the present day child.

Westfield

Primrose School at Bridgewater

14711 N. Gray Road, Noblesville, IN 46062 317-8480123

INDYSCHILD.COM 27


CO MM E NtA RY & PA R E NtING

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dear teacher

Middle School Education, Dental Checkups, Skipping a Grade and Library Visits Teachers Answer Your Pressing Education Questions

Being Involved in Your Middle Schooler’s Education Question: How can I stay involved in my son’s education as he enters middle school this year? In elementary school, I was a room mother and very active in the PTA. Now, he wants me to back off and stay away from his new school. – Concerned Answer: Being involved in your children’s education definitely becomes trickier and trickier for parents after they leave elementary school. Many, like your son, are no longer eager for their parents to come to school or to talk to their teachers. Nevertheless, your involvement in his education remains a key to his success in middle school just like it was in elementary school. Here are some ways to help you stay involved in your son’s education: • Read the handbook that the school sent to your home. It will help you understand how things are done at your son’s new school. Pay particular attention to the sections on attendance, grading, contacting teachers, and all the rules and regulations. For example, if your son says he needs to stay after school for a detention, you will know the approximate reason why this could have occurred. • Keep up with what is going on at your child’s school by reading all the information that the school sends out. Be sure to sign up for e-mail newsletters. If the school has a Web site, it will be a great source of information. And possibly some of his teachers may have pages on the Web site telling what is happening in different classes. • Continue to be involved with the PTA. It will let you know so much about what is happening at the school and to play a role in implementing policies to improve the school. • Attend events in which your son is involved as well as those for parents. This includes such things as science fairs, sports events, choir performances, and PTA meetings.

LEARNING TIME PRESCHOOL • Full and Part-time Preschool

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CO MM E NtA RY & PA R E NtING • Volunteer to help in whatever ways your schedule will allow. This allows you to learn even more about how the school works. • Very important: Talk to your son every day to learn about his day at school. Make sure it’s a real conversation – not one that seems like an inquisition. Many families use the evening mealtime to discuss what everyone did that day. • When problems occur at school, don’t rush to resolve them unless your immediate involvement is necessary. Instead, talk with your son asking him to devise ways that he can resolve them. This will help him learn how to handle school problems.

Have Your Children Had a Dental Checkup? Parents: Hopefully you remembered dental checkups before you sent your children back to school this year. Mouth pain and tooth complaints are a big reason why children miss school. Here’s another thing for you to consider. Clinical Associate Professor Gardner Beale of the USC School of Dentistry says that any child participating in sports with any degree of contact should use a mouth guard during play. They can prevent a lot of serious injury. Right now, there is a big push for children to consume healthy snacks at school. Fresh fruits and veggies make the healthiest

ones. However, according to Beale, snacks sweetened with xylitol, an artificial sweetener, actually discourage cavities and are good alternatives.

Is Skipping a Grade a Good Idea? Question: The school year has scarcely started and already the fifth grade teacher is talking about having my daughter skip to sixth grade. This will mean moving her from elementary to middle school. She isn’t too enthused about leaving her friends behind, but she obviously has mastered the fifth grade material already. Are there any studies on accelerating students that might guide us in making this decision? – To Skip or Not Answer: Most research shows that gifted students who are accelerated typically do well academically. In fact, it may improve their motivation and scholarship. Some researchers even advocate skipping extremely gifted children more than one year. A few accelerated students are unhappy, nevertheless, because they are no longer the best students in their classes. Parents tend to worry about the emotional effects of skipping a grade. They are concerned that their children will be riding bikes while their older classmates are driving cars and dating. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted on the emotional consequences of skipping a grade. Some researchers think that the skipped students could be more mature than their agepeers and not affected by skipping. Others are in favor of keeping gifted students with their peers and enriching the curriculum.

*

dear teacher

The Importance of Library Visits Parents: “It is never too early – or late – to start visiting the library. Go on a library safari with your children and you’ll be amazed at all there is to discover,” according to the International Reading Association. Here are things to explore with young children: • Infants – sturdy board books, picture books, and books or CDs of songs and rhymes • Toddlers – picture books and storybooks • Preschool Children – books catering to their specif ic interests such as airplanes, animals, dinosaurs, and trains • Kindergarten to second grade – the different events that children can sign up for at the librar y

By Peggy Gisler and Marge Eberts. Parents should send questions to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ Web site at www.dearteacher.com.

INDYSCHILD.COM 29


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CHILD’S PLAY:

IT’S ALL IN A DAY’S WORK In Choosing a Preschool, Experts Recommend Child-Centered Play

W

ith so much information about preschools available to parents, it can be difficult to choose the right program. One approach to evaluating a school that can help parents choose is the level of emphasis on learning through play. For young children, play is the natural way to learn, according to the experts. In fact, research studies confirm that children who are allowed to play function better later in life, both socially and academically. “Young children who learn through play are more prepared to make their own decisions, advocate for themselves and use creativity to solve problems as they grow,” says Dr. Kyle Pruett, a Yale University child psychiatrist and advisor to The Goddard School®. Dr. Pruett points out that play helps children learn to solve problems, promotes flexibility and motivation, teaches regulation of emotions and builds resilience and confidence. Play is also essential to the development of children’s brains, triggering trillions of neural connections that form the basis of healthy cognitive function and mastery of their physical world. Playing alone and with others not only builds brain development, it also helps children develop social skills and a sense of ethics. The most effective play is free of

evaluation and correction (after all, throwing a ball shouldn’t be “right” or “wrong”), while promoting autonomy. As parents themselves, the on-site owners of The Goddard School® recognize and support Dr. Pruett’s assertion and create an environment in their school where children are encouraged to explore learning centers for imaginative play, creative art, science, blocks, puzzles, math and quiet reading. Each of these centers provides opportunities for children to discover independently and confidently. Whether gently holding infants, encouraging toddlers to share or providing preschoolers with a wide-range of enriching activities, teachers at The Goddard School® understand each child’s needs. The Education Director, at each school, works with the teachers to offer children the opportunity to develop their natural curiosity, creativity and develop their lifelong love of learning. To supplement Goddard’s comprehensive core curriculum, a variety of enrichment programs are provided at no additional cost.

These enrichments, including yoga, manners, sign language, fitness and Spanish, develop the whole child by encouraging children’s imagination. The enrichment programs are written and designed specifically for preschool children using age-appropriate equipment and activities. Each Goddard School offers open communication with families in an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust. Parents are welcome to visit their children throughout the day. A Daily Activity Report is prepared for every child each day. Teachers emphasize learning activities, care-taking information and, most importantly, a ‘Memorable Moment’ which highlights a special part of each child’s day.

Choosing the right school means children will make friends, discover that learning is fun and feel safe every day. Goddard’s year round program provides consistency for children, while the choice of either a half or full-day schedule offers flexibility for families. To learn more about The Goddard School®, please call 1-800-GODDARD or visit on the web at: www.goddardschool.com.


BTW dont txt & drive TYVM Kids at play are easily distracted, so it’s up to drivers to pay attention. Texting, using a cell phone or changing songs on an MP3 player increases the chances of an accident. In fact, according to the American Automobile Association, every two seconds a driver’s eyes are off the road, he or she is twice as likely to be involved in a crash. For more information on distracted driving and to find yard sign events and pickup locations near you, visit KidsDart.org.


V iewing the W orld T hrough

Multi-Dimensional

L e ns e s

Experiencing Life One Field Trip at a Time Do you ever need to get out to do something new for yourself? When you finally do, aren’t you glad you took the time? The same goes for kids. Young minds sometimes simply need a new environment in which to explore, experience and learn. They need field trips to help free their minds. I recently met two moms who have been on a f ield trip mission for the past six years for this ver y reason. Their goal is to take their kids on a new adventure ever y weekend. They say the different experiences are helping prepare their kids for life’s challenges by forcing them out of their comfort zones. It’s also their hope that their kids will be better equipped to face the unknown with a sense of optimism versus fear.

K im Rose, after school and enr ich ment prog ram coordinator for the International School of Indiana (ISI), agrees that there is more to f ield trips than meets the eye. “One of the things I think is ver y important is for kids to take what they have been discussing or working on in the classroom, that to the children is a two-dimensional idea, and going out and putting their hands on it.” If you, like Rose, have a mind to help kids see the world through multi-dimensional lenses, then you are in luck as f ield trip hot spots abound in Central Indiana. As you get started, here are a few common sense tips to keep in mind:

Do your research.

Know where you are going. Know how much the trip is going to cost. Know how long

34 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

it is going to take to get from beginning to end and plan accordingly. This will make momma happy, kids happy and the same for whoever is along for the ride.

Have a Plan B. You never know what your kids are going to like or not like. In case your bright idea to check out a local music festival does not go over well with your kids, have a back up plan and keep the day moving. So they don’t think the free folk music concert is the hottest ticket in town? Good thing there is a playground nearby. Ask your kids questions.

ISI’s Rose advises “to just ask questions. Get the kids interested and thinking before they go with some sort of thought inspir ing questions like ‘What do you think you are going to see here? ’ When they come back, just let them talk and say, ‘Well, tell me more.’ That is the best way for kids to get the most of out of a f ield trip.” You may be surprised at what peaked their interest. As you set forth on f ield trip adventures this fall, you may check out visitindy.com or IndysChild.com to learn what’s new and going on around town. In the meantime, following are a few f ield trip ideas you may f ind inspiring.

• Children’s Museum:

Children in Indiana really don’t know how lucky they are to have a children’s museum as f ine as the one in downtown Indianapolis. This, the largest children’s museum in the world, is a fantastic hands-on destination for kids and parents alike to learn about dinosaurs, K ing Tut, inspiring kids of the 20th centur y and so much more in an exciting, kid-friendly environment. Childrensmuseum.org

• Fire Stations:

Most f ire stations will give you a tour if you simply ask for one. Taking your kids to the local f ire station to meet the local f iref ighters is a great way for kids to learn about f ire safety, see f ire trucks and other equipment up close and see f irsthand that f iref ighters are not scar y. Stop by a nearby station or call 327-6093 to schedule a tour of a specif ic f irehouse.

• Survive Alive:

This educational program is staffed by fire department personnel and teaches general fire safety in the home. Kids can learn about the dangers of fire, how to


stop, drop and roll and what to do should a fire break out in their home. Located at 748 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, Survive Alive resides in the same building as the Indianapolis Firefighters’ Museum. So take your kids to learn about fire safety in the home and stop by the museum to learn about the history of Indianapolis’ fire department and see old tools, yearbooks, steam pumper, ladder truck and more. Survivealive. org

Conner Prairie Interactive History Park: Conner Prairie hardly needs

the United States. Next month older kids may be interested in the site’s Victorian Theatre by Candlelight that features ghost tales of Indiana. Presidentbenjaminharrison.org

Crown Hill Cemetery: More than 200,000 people have been laid to rest in this magnificent piece of land at 38th and Michigan Road including some well-known characters like President Benjamin Harrison, James Whitcomb Riley, Eli Lilly and John Dillinger among many others. Including

an introduction, but it shouldn’t be overlooked. It’s the only Indiana affiliate of the Smithsonian Museum Institution and is recognized by the American Association of Museums as a national leader in quality learning. But enough about its pedigree as Conner Prairie is simply a fun way to bring Indiana’s heritage to life. To make your trip easy, you can go onto the website and select “Build Your Adventure” to tailor your trip to your child’s age and interests. Be sure to consider the new 1859 Balloon Voyage exhibit that not only takes you back into history but up 350 feet! Connerprairie.org

President Benjamin Harrison Home: Tour the residence of Indiana’s only President and you will be pleased to find that the home is furnished with many of Harrison’s paintings, furniture and political memorabilia. Be sure to check out the reconstructed carriage house, which features a First Ladies display and a Women’s Suffrage exhibit. Through October, tourists of the home can also see an exhibit featuring Harrison’s grandfather, William Henry Harrison, who was the first governor of the Indiana Territory, the Commanding General of the War of 1812 and the ninth President of

• Indianapolis Art Center:

The Indianapolis Art Center, located in Broad Ripple off the Monon Trail, is a great field trip destination. Kids can have a great time exploring the building and grounds, exhibitions and outdoor sculptures and gardens. Groups can even add a demonstration by the art center’s artists in glass blowing, ceramics, painting, collage books, mixed media sculpture, jewelry making or fiber arts. This month the center will host

“One of the things I think is very important is for kids to take what they have been discussing or working on in the classroom, that to the children is a two-dimensional idea, and going out and putting their hands on it.” - Kim Rose, after school and enrichment program coordinator for the International School of Indiana

its storied personalities, the cemetery boasts beautiful monuments and architecture and is the third largest nonmilitary cemetery in the nation. Public and private tours are available and include a view of the sunset from Marion County’s highest point, dubbed “The Crown.” Crownhillhf. org

a Great Art Escape to Chicago on the 19th, which includes a tour of the new Modern Wing of the Chicago Art Institute, time at Millennium Park and a river cruise narrated by the Chicago Architecture Foundation. Next month the center hosts a popular Day of the Dead altars and shrines exhibition. IndplsArtCenter.org

• Butler University Tree Walk: A little known • Hunter’s Honey Farm: secret is the Butler campus tree walk. Touted by the university as “a wooded oasis in an urban setting,” this is one all-natural field trip your kids will love any season. There are about 30 tree species on campus and the university website is kind enough to post pictures of the trees in case you are not sure what a Devil’s Walking stick looks like. Butler.edu

Kids are sure to be drawn to this honey farm, especially with all the news on the disappearance of honeybees. A stones throw from Indianapolis in Martinsville, Hunter’s Honey Farm has been producing honey in Indiana for nearly 100 years. On Sept. 19, the farm will be celebrating their honey crop by offering free-guided tours of the honey barn, presenting live beehive demonstrations and more from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Huntershoneyfarm.com

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Indianapolis Museum of Art:

The Indianapolis Museum of Art truly is a class act area kids should not miss. And you can’t beat the price—it’s free! The museum even makes field trips easy on those in charge by offering lesson plans that explore the art of different cultures around the world and that are tied to the collections of the museum. Check online for schedule of free docent-led public tours. Thirty-minute family tours for children of all ages are set for Sept. 12 and 26. Imamuseum.org

• James Whitcomb Riley Museum: This national

historic landmark and Riley’s beloved house, which was home to the Hoosier poet and entertainer for 23 years, is found in the beautiful Lockerbie neighborhood. As the country’s only lateVictorian preservation, almost everything within the museum is original save for a few things in the kitchen. It’s open 5 days a week, including Saturdays, and costs just 50 cents for students, $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and is free for children under 6. At that price the entire family should go! Rileykids. org/museum

• 911 Presentation: The Marion County Sheriff’s Department,

Communications Division, is a great resource for teaching kids about 911 calls. According to Sharon Tabard, community liaison supervisor, the Sheriff’s department is available to talk with kids about the difference between an emergency and a non-emergency, why they should not play on the phone and what to look for if they ever have to call 911. indy.gov/ eGov/County/MCSD

• Whitewater Canal State Historic Site:

Less than two hours southeast of Indianapolis is Whitewater Canal, one of the state’s remaining canals. Visitors to the historic site can ride on the canal, visit the gristmill,

take a carriage ride or take advantage of one of the many special events held throughout the year. For instance, the canal is hosting a program titled Differently-Abled Program in which visitors discover the capabilities of people and animals that are differently-abled, and the program How the Little Red Hen Took Her Corn to Market focuses on transportation, animals and work. In.gov/ism/StateHistoricSites/WhitewaterCanal

• Indiana State Museum:

If you want to learn about the best of Indiana, there may be no better place to start than at the worldclass Indiana Sate Museum located downtown in the White River State Park. The beautiful structure itself is even made entirely from Indiana limestone, steel, sandstone and glass. Current collections include RCA Televisions and Consumer Electronics, Reviving a Rumely, The Finer Side of Indiana, A Pop Culture Education and more. Indianamuseum.org

• Traders Point Creamery:

What kid doesn’t love chocolate milk from Trader’s Point Creamery? Why not take him to the family-owned dairy to learn about how the milk made it from the pasture into the glass? Self-guided, open-guided and private tours allow visitors to walk out to the pasture to see the herd, see the milking parlor and watch production. On Sundays, Traders Point offers offroad safari rides so visitors can see their friendly cows up close. It’s a great experience that ends with a scrumptious Safari Sundae! Traderspointcreamery.com

• Eiteljorg Museum:

The only museum of its kind in the Midwest, the Eiteljorg contains what is said to be one of the best Native American and Western art collections in the world, exploring Indiana’s indigenous peoples as well as Native American art and artifacts from throughout North America. With a mission to inspire an appreciation and understanding of the art, history and cultures of the American West and the indigenous peoples of North America, Hoosier youth should not miss this gem. Watch out for the WestFest Student Preview Day on Sept. 25 where kids can experience bits of the Old West. Eiteljorg.org

• Indianapolis Zoo:

No kid wants to miss out on the zoo, especially the Indianapolis Zoo where they can feed giraffes, pet sharks, have close encounters with elephants, see amazing dolphin demonstrations and so much more. This month the zoo will host Party with the Penguins on Sept. 10, a Back to School concert on Sept. 12 and Hispanic Fiesta on Sept. 20. indyzoo.com

Heritage

• Kelsay Farms:

Take your kids to a sixth-generation dairy and crop farm in nearby Whiteland. Group tours are available in the spring and fall and focus on the milking, feeding and caring for the animals and include a brief lesson on the benefits of dairy foods. The farm even hands out cheese and farm coloring books during the tour. Throughout most of October, Kelsay Farms will celebrate its annual Experience the Farm event with a corn maze, Bale Mountain, Moo Choo Express rides, pumpkin slingshot and more. The farm is also open to the public all weekends in October and available for group reservations during the week throughout October. Kelsayfarms.com

• Meridian Music:

Meridian Music is well known for its comprehensive showroom, but did you know they also offer field trips? It’s true. A well-planned tour commences in the store’s recital hall where kids can look inside a piano and discover for themselves how it actually works. A harpist can also be on hand to demonstrate the similarities between a grand piano and a harp. Percussion instruments, a violin, guitar and more are also part of the hour-long experience too. What a cool way to introduce kids to music. meridianmusic.com

Make it up as you go:

Roll down hills. Watch cars drive by. Sometimes it’s the stuff of everyday that is really exciting.

Happy exploring and happy trails. Carrie Bishop is a freelance writer and mother of two young sons, whose daily antics inspire her work and her life.

Your Dreams Begin Here! Give your child the tools to handle social situations with ease. Ensure that they will have leadership skills to last a lifetime. Classes are starting for fall, please call or email to enroll. Licensed teacher and certified etiquette consultant. 317.873.4786 msmunson@IndianaEtiquette.com www.IndianaEtiquette.com

How does my child join the Indianapolis Children’s Choir?

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Open to kids grades 4 – 8 No musical experience required! Only the ability to match pitch

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Call the ICC office at 317-940-9640 to schedule an audition

www.icchoir.org


A RO U ND TOWN

*

arts & enrichment

When a Black Belt is More than a Black Belt How to Get Your Child Involved In the Martial Arts

Martial arts, literally translated to mean military arts, has a storied past of violence and brutality. To modern students, however, martial arts are anything but violent and brutal. It’s about self-discipline, confidence and fitness.

In fact, Ken Piper, instructor and owner of Ken Piper’s Family Karate Academy says, “For children, it’s great for focus, balance, discipline, coordination and memory.” Piper has experienced the positive effects of karate firsthand. “I went through a lot of changes as a young person,” he recalls, saying that he tried team sports like basketball and soccer but ultimately felt he was only letting the teams down with his lack of perceived talent. Then he got involved in martial arts, which for him was a whole new concept of focusing on improving the self instead of the team. “I had no confidence at first, then I got it.” He says he went on to join the military, got married and had children and he credits karate for influencing these stages of his life by having taught him patience and how to relax. It’s true that skills taught through martial arts reach beyond the training room to help kids

improve their academic performance and even socia l interactions. For instance, concentration exercises done through martial arts will help a child focus more clearly on complex problems and improve reading comprehension. It’s certainly been touted for kids who struggle with attention problems. When you weigh these benef its alongside the improved self-esteem and other personal boosts that often come from training, it’s clear that a black belt is more than a rank. So how do you f ind the right program for your child? Surprisingly, the experts I have spoken with seem to agree that the style of martial art is less important than practical matters like convenience and cost. The rationale being that a beginning student is going to acquire life skills in any well-instructed school. As your child advances, then he can carry those life skills into whichever art he wishes to continue with. That said, the f irst thing you need to do is obviously locate a few area schools. Ask friends and conduct an online search for Indianapolis martial arts programs, then get answers to the following questions directly from the schools:

2009 Carmel Public Safety Day

1. Is the school close to home? Face it, if it’s not convenient, then sticking with the class for the long haul is not likely. An effort like martial arts is beneficial to those who stick with the program rather than try it once or twice before calling it quits. 2. Will your child be able to relate to and respect the instructor? It is important that your child likes the instructor, feels comfortable with the person and will respond well to his or her teaching style. It’s also important that you like the teacher. You need to feel that your child is safe in this person’s care. You will also want to find out about the instructor’s qualifications and background.

3. Is the school willing to focus on the individual needs of your child? Talk with the instructors about your child’s goals or needs before signing up for a program. Whether you are exploring the martial arts to help your child gain self-esteem, improve fitness or out of plain old curiosity, the training must help your family meet your individual goals. Of course, once the goals have been discussed, step back and let the instructor do his or her job.

It is a commitment of time and money. Get the facts up front so you aren’t surprised by monthly fees or other costs that may be associated with competition, belt tests and the like. Some schools even offer free introductory courses. Piper, for instance, says his school offers a free orientation class so that prospective students can see how they are going to be taught.

5. How does the school view competition? While martial artists will say the bulk of martial arts’ benefits lie within the training, your child may be a competitor at heart and gain from competition. If this is the case, inquire about the school’s view on competition as some schools encourage competition while others do not support it at all. One other thing to keep in mind: martial arts are not for kids only. While you will find schools that train children as young as 3, martial arts is great for individuals of all ages. In fact, some families even train together in the same class. Perhaps martial arts are not just what your kid needs, but what your entire family needs. Carrie Bishop is a freelance writer

4. What is the cost? Like anything else in life, a good martial arts program is not free.

and mother of two young sons, whose daily antics inspire her work and her life.

Visit the IU Natatorium this school year!

Saturday, September 19th 10:00am-3:00pm St. Vincent Carmel Hospital (Back Parking Lot) Schedule of Events 10:00am - Event Begins 10:30am - Big Wheel Race 11:30am - Extrication Demo - CFD 12:30pm - K-9 Demo - CPD 1:00pm - Family Balloon Toss 1:30pm - Big Wheel Race 2:00pm - Cooking Fire Demo - CFD 2:30pm - Rappelling Demo - CFD 11am to 1pm - Car Seat Checks

GRAND PRIZE DRAWINGS! FOOD SERVED ALL DAY! Learn vital health and safety information! Join the fun and activities with other kids, friends, and families!

For more information go to: www.carmelfd.com

Special thanks to our Corporate Sponsor:

Want to See a Positive Change in Your Child? Give Us Just Two Lessons – And They’re Free! With just two martial arts lessons, you’ll notice an impressive change in your child’s behavior. Our curriculum teaches respect, focus, concentration and the power of a positive mental attitude. Best of all, our professional instructors make it fun and safe! Call us now for a FREE, no-obligation, two-lesson trial course that will make a difference in your child.

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INDYSCHILD.COM 37


R E SO U RC E S

Field Trips

*

Eiteljorg Museum

500 W. Washington St. 317-636-9378

field trip & enrichment guide

Enrichment Guide

The Eiteljorg Museum, which opened in 1989, was founded by Harrison Eiteljorg. The museum showcases Western and Native American art and cultural objects. The museum’s design is also inspired by the land, people, and architecture of the American Southwest. The mission of the Eiteljorg Museum is to inspire an appreciation and understanding of the art, history and cultures of the American West and the indigenous peoples of North America.The Eiteljorg Museum collects and preserves Western art and Native American art and cultural objects of the highest quality, and serves the public through engaging exhibitions, educational programs, cultural exchanges and entertaining special events. Gymboree Play & Music

12524 N. Gray Rd., Carmel, IN 46033 317-574-9626 carmelin@gymboreeclasses.com

Gymboree offers unique Play & Learn, Music or Art events & parties. These events are lead by our

38 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

professional teachers in our clean, creative and colorful environment.We can also bring the event to you with our mobile program. Ages birth5years. Gymboree Play & Music

1001 N. SR 135, Greenwood, IN 46142 317-574-9626 carmelin@ gymboreeclasses.com

Gymboree offers unique Play & Learn, Music or Art events & parties. These events are lead by our professional teachers in our clean, creative and colorful environment.We can also bring the event to you with our mobile program. Ages birth5years. Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana

1204 North Park Avenue 317-636-5409 indytours@historiclandmarks.org

Experience Indianapolis history through educational downtown Indianapolis walking tours, including the Historic Downtown, Capital City Critters, and Indiana War Memorials tours. Watch history come to life through hands-on educational programming at the 1865 Victorianera Morris-Butler House Museum. Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana’s tours and programs satisfy many Indiana academic standards. Indianapolis Art Center

820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis, IN 46220 Amanda Walters 317-255-2464 AWalters@IndplsArtCenter.org

Kelsay Farms

6848 N. 250 E., Whiteland, IN 46184 Amy Kelsay 317-535-4136 amy@kelsayfarms. com

Visit a real working dairy farm! Kelsay Farms is a 6th generation family farm milking 500 cows 3 times every day. Trips include a 1-2 hour farm tour, dairy foods lesson, dairy snack and our farm coloring book to take home! Open to field trips in April and October. Kiln Creations

918 Broad Ripple Avenue & 60 North 9th Stree, Indpls & Noblesville, IN 46220 & 46 Shannon Gondol 317-251-2386 & 317-774-8982

Pottery Painting is fun, easy, and educational! We Year-round, the Indianapolis Art Center offers will provide a great experience and everything tours of its building and grounds (designed by needed to create a unique, hand-painted work of internationally known architect Michael Graves). art or a gift for someone special. You and your Groups may add a demonstration or hands-on art class can come into the studio, or for groups of 25 activity in glass blowing, ceramics, printmaking, or more, we’ll gladly bring the field trip to you! mixed media sculpture, jewelry making or fiber Meridian Music arts.

12725 Old Meridian Street,


R E SO U RC E S Carmel, IN 46032 Hillary Blake 317-575-9588 hblake@meridianmusic.com Come and visit Meridian Music for a FREE field trip. This is a great field trip for preshool and kindergarten students. Students learn how a piano works, perform in a rhythm band, and more. The President Benjamin Harrison Home

1230 N. Delaware St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 317-631-2717 education@pbhh.org OR distance@pbhh.

Students experience history first-hand when they visit Indiana’s only Presidential Home. We offer a broad selection of age/grade appropriate programs and guided tours, available for all elementary grades, which are specifically designed to coordinate with and enrich the State of Indiana’s social studies curriculum. Check website for costs/group size requirements. Traders Point Creamery

9101 Moore Road, Zionsville, IN 46077 Gail Alden 17-733-1700 events@traderspointcreamery.com

Enrichment

Arts & Sports JCC

6701 Hoover Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467 lbaier@JCCindy.org www.JCCindy.org

317-251-3007 BJZWdance@att.net foxhilldanceacademy.com Professional staff, friendly atmosphere,competitive prices,parents can observe all classes from the closed circuit Thirty percent reduction in rates for adult students who join our performing tap company. Students ages 6-14 may audition for scholarships.

The JCC welcomes families and individuals of all faiths and backgrounds. More than three usic and nstrument generations have grown up in the JCC’s early erformance childhood education and camp programs. IUPUI Music Academy Thousands walk through the JCC’s doors each 535 W. Michigan Street, IT 378 week to work out in the modern fitness center, Bill/Tina Budai/Everts participate in leagues and exercise classes, swim, 317-278-4139 enjoy family programs and so much more. The musacad@iupui.edu JCC – Good for life!

M P

I

www.musicacademy.iupui.edu

Choral Music

Indianapolis Children’s Choir

4600 Sunset Ave. Laura Neidig 317-940-9640 lneidig@icchoir.org www.icchoir.org

The Indianapolis Children’s Choir is now scheduling auditions for fall choirs! This is a very simple assessment of a child’s ability to match Take a Tour. There’s nothing like a tour of Traders pitch - no preparation nor singing experience Point Creamery Organic Dairy Farm! See the required! Join a choir that rehearses on the cows as they graze in the pastures or as they’re campus of Butler University or one of our being milked in the Milking Parlor. Pet the ten regional choirs! Call the ICC or visit our baby calves and watch our free-range chickens. website for more information. Self-guided tours are available from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily ($2 each). Come on Sunday and experience the adventure of Safari Sundays, a ance tour in our new Safari Car followed by a one- Fox Hill Dance Academy, Inc. of-a-kind ice cream sundae ($10 each). Guided 2255 Fox Hill Drive, tours pricing varies and require reservations. Indianapolis, In 46228

D

The IUPUI Music Academy is a non-profit, educational organization whose mission, purpose, and primary activity pertain to arts education. The Academy is committed to providing high quality, professional music instruction to area residents of all ages and levels of ability. Meridian Music

12725 Old Meridian Street Hillary Blake, Director of Education 317-575-9588 hblake@meridianmusic.com www.meridianmusic.com

Meridian Music offers private lessons on almost every intrument. Harmony Road courses are also offered for children between the ages of 18 months and 6 years. add your enrichment listing here!

Contact Rachel at Rachel@indyschild.com

Betty Wright

Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday party at the world’s largest children’s museum!

Parents, teenagers, and young adults!

Party Includes: H Private use of the birthday party room for 1.5 hours H Admission to the museum for up to 20 guests H Twenty Carousel ride tickets H Gift for the birthday child

H A themed birthday cake from Taylor’s Bakery (Serves 20) H Free gift registry in our award-winning Museum Store H Family friendly food prices H Themed party ware

To schedule your party or for more information, please contact the Museum at (317) 334-4000 or birthdayparty@ChildrensMuseum.org

The Institute of Psychiatric Research at Indiana University Medical Center is seeking families to be Healthy Volunteers for a series of interviews and questionnaires; a small blood sample is also required. Monetary compensation is available for your time and travel.

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field trip & enrichment guide

Fall Festivals & Fun Friendship Flea Market

6491 E. St. Rd. #62, Friendship, IN 47021 812-667-5645 friendflea@insightbb.com www.friendshipfleamarket.com Hours or Dates: Open daily 9AM, closing time varies

What to Expect:Almost 500 ventor spaces, all balcktopped roads makes it eashy for strollers and wheelchairs. Come early and shop, horse drawn trolley rides to and drom town, also campsites available, restrooms with showers. International Festival presented by AAA Hoosier Motor Club

1200 East 38th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208 Pat Hubley (317) 236-6515 phubley@familyevents.com www.IndyInternationalFestival.org Hours or Dates: November 19 – 22, 2009 SPECIAL SCHOOL HOURS: Nov. 19th 10 AM – 2 PM; Nov. 20th 10 AM – 2 PM. GENERAL PUBLIC HOURS: Nov. 20th 2 PM – 9 PM; Nov. 21st 10 AM – 9 PM; Nov. 22nd NOON – 6 PM

What to Expect: Explore your world, without ever leaving Indiana. The International Festival is a great way to explore your ethnic roots, learn about your cultural neighbors and taste your way around the world at an affordable price! The 2009 INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL will feature exhibits from the 50 + ethnic groups represented in Central Indiana as they gather to share their rich cultural histories and traditions. Highlights of the festival include authentic foods from 20+ ethnic vendors; Kahn’s Fine Wines International Beer & Wine Tastings; continuous ethnic music and dance by local and national performing groups; Culture Booths hosted by volunteers in traditional dress.

TIME TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS. Local, affordable, personal photography instruction Small classes designed for your schedule Indiana’s unique, handson photography school

Photo by Gillian Spring

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Please call 1-888-750-2201 or email bipolar@iupui.edu for further details. INDYSCHILD.COM 39


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pediatric health

Understanding the Tween Years Changing Tastes, Changing Attitudes

One day your daughter is hugging you; the next she’s pulling away. Your son is helpful with chores today, but tomorrow he’ll act like he had no idea you wanted him to pick up after himself. Your wellmannered child now answers adults with a slightly smart-aleck tone. What’s going on? Your child has become a tween.

Tweens – named because they’re at that stage “in-between” a child and a teenager – are not grade-schoolers anymore; yet they are not teenagers either. Caught in the midst of those two stages, these “man-cubs” are experiencing changes— changes that sometimes they don’t even understand themselves. “It’s not uncommon for tweens’ tastes to change, or for them to have upand-down mood swings,” explains Lynette Brown-Jones, a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent (and an experienced mother of a tween and teenagers). Additionally, on top of the emotional changes, more tweens are developing earlier,

and physically looking more like teenagers as moving, regardless of your tween’s a result. However, Dr. Brown-Jones cautions body size. that while tweens may look older, they are still relatively young emotionally. “When I tell a patient that they need to exercise, they think I mean that “Tweens don’t think like older teens, they have to get up, go to the gym and who are developing into abstract run three miles. It’s much simpler than thinkers. Older teens are thinking that,” she says. She suggests activities about career choices and starting to that get the heart rate up for about 20exercise responsible independence,” 30 minutes, such as biking, hiking, she says. “But tweens are still concrete swimming or another fun activity that thinkers—that is, what happens right doesn’t even feel like exercise. now is what’s most important to them. It’s difficult for them to see She also encourages patients to eat healthy beyond that.” foods. “Sometimes tweens and teens have crazy diets—with many wanting to As parents of tweens, our goal, then, skip breakfast. But breakfast is the most is to help them begin the process of important meal of the day,” she shares. being able to make healthy choices for Also on her list: a fruit or vegetable with their body, mind and spirit. every meal, six to eight cups of water a day, and two cups of milk. It may seem like a Get moving Both boys and lot, until you consider that most tweens girls need to develop and maintain only receive half the daily-recommended good fitness and nutrition habits, amount of nutrients. particularly as their body starts adjusting to adulthood. Dr. Brown- A positive sense of self Tweens Jones encourages all her young face many social changes as well. In fact, for patients to exercise three times a many, it can be a challenging time. They may week. She says it’s important to get not feel good about themselves, and if that’s

reinforced by anyone else in their circle, it’s a double whammy. Counter your tween’s negative comments about themselves with positive remarks, and keep your child focused on the importance of what’s inside, not outside.

“I think given the influences in today’s world, it’s important to practice caution and stay one step ahead of your child,” she shares. “But at the same time, don’t let that stop you from thinking the best of your tween or teen. They’ll test the limits because that’s a normal part of the developmental process, but it’s also a time for them to learn good habits, figure out their interests and values, “Kids are exposed to a lot today. If your and begin to discover themselves— child is on a social network, such as all which can be exciting to witness.” MySpace or Facebook, you should monitor their activity and have shared access to Lanette Brown-Jones, who their accounts. Kids don’t seem to grasp has been practicing medicine just how many people can access their for 16 years, is board certified in information,” she says. pediatrics and adolescent medicine. A key way you can help your tween is to help them find ways to deal with changes in a positive way, such as through music, reading or time alone. Dr. Brown-Jones says parents can counter many of the negative messages kids receive by keeping a tight rein on what your child views—on the television, radio and Internet.

She also encourages boundaries with cell phone and computer use. “Too many kids sit at the dinner table texting. In our house, the rule is that phones are off. I tell my kids, ‘If I’m a doctor and I can turn mine off for dinner, so can you,’” she says.

Weekdays at 6 am on WFYI 1

40 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

Looking for the best While the tween and teen years may seem to include lots of challenges, Dr. Brown-Jones encourages parents to think positively.

An adolescent medicine physician focuses on the problems of patients who have reached puberty and are in adolescence. This physician specializes in the care of adolescents, including illness, substance abuse prevention and counseling, psychosocial disorders (depression and self-esteem problems, eating disorders), reproductive health and sexuality issues.


H E ALT H & W E LLN E SS

special needs awareness

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Scouting for Youth with Special Needs The Benefits of Scouting for All Children

Picture your typical scouting program. If you’re like most people, you’ll imagine highintensity programs populated by kids of certain physical attributes. And – again, if you’re like most people – you won’t put in that snapshot kids with emotional, neurological and physical disabilities.

disabilities already enjoying new and programs, allowing your child to exciting experiences and successes participate at his or her own pace, instilling routine and consistency, and through scouting. exposing your child to activities he or Why Scouting? Scouting’s she might not otherwise experience. strength lies in its core focus: the holistic development of each youth’s Sure, your child might not accomplish mind, body and spirit. Opportunities things at the same pace or in the same to advance and earn badges or ranks manner as other youth, but he or are built around these core areas, she can be successful by developing using special interests – from sports adaptive skills and confidence that and fitness, wilderness and outdoor will be useful forever. And, besides, skills to daily living skills and personal you and your child can teach other management, citizenship, hobbies, and scouts and families about the world of disabilities and inclusion. more – as a platform for life lessons.

That’s where you would be mistaken. Scouting offers a wonderful place for special-needs children. In fact, in recent years, many programs have gone to great lengths to implement programs promoting accommodation With this approach, scouting offers and inclusion. something for every youth, regardless That’s why I encourage all parents of personality or needs. Furthermore, to consider scouting for special needs scouting provides small social peer children. Put aside worries that your groups and experiences that can help child would not enjoy it, could not special needs youth enjoy success Because fully participate or would be faced and accomplishment. with yet another arena in which he advancement is based on individual or she would not fit in. Also put aside achievement, not on competition, worries about going into unchartered each child is measured against his or territory. Once you get involved, her own goals. Unlike sports, many you’ll find youth with a variety of troops and packs run year-round

Once you have connected to a local child (and with yourself ), enjoy the group, request a meeting with the new successes your child will find and, committee chair to communicate the finally, have fun. needs and behaviors of your child. Shannon Bess is the This is imperative in getting the Director of Transitional support your child needs. Services at Damar Services, Inc. She also

And then get involved yourself as serves as an assistant an adult volunteer/leader. This will scout master for Troop help with the transition process for 701, Pathfinder District, and has your child, while also allowing you been happily parenting two special and your child to enjoy some quality needs scouts for the past 8 years. time together. Be willing to help train other adult leaders on what works best for your child. Ask for CENTRAL INDIANA an individualized advancement plan, BOY SCOUTS CONTACT INFORMATION: How do I get my child and/or request accommodations to the involved? Professional scouting achievements if needed. organizations such as the Boy Scouts of Boy Scouts of America America are well prepared to meet the Remember, the purpose is not needs of your child; many have special to compare your child to others Doug Brown, needs councils for this purpose, and but to help him or her grow. So, Special Needs Resource they provide ongoing adult leadership help to set realistic goals for your Committee Chair training on disabilities and inclusion. child, encouraging independence, accentuating the positive and dbrown@ To get involved, start simply by anticipating some frustration on crossroadsbsa.org. contacting your local scouting office your child’s part. Above all, be to identify programs in your area. compassionate and patient with your

Riley Hospital for Children Needs Your Help!

Bringing Hope to Your Child’s Education Grades 5 through 12

317-843-9500 Specializing in: • ADHD

Riley Hospital for Children needs healthy full-term infants between 2 and 36 months of age to evaluate how the lung grows. The evaluation takes approximately 2-3 hours. You will be compensated for your time participating in the evaluation. If interested in obtaining more information, please call (317)274-3604.

• Learning Disabilities • Asperger’s Syndrome • School Anxiety

Midwest Academy offers a personalized teaching approach where students can find success through small class sizes and individualized instruction geard to their learning needs. Skilled, caring teachers committed to studentsʼ success and close partnerships with families make Midwest Academy a unique learning environment. 801 Congressional Blvd. Carmel, IN 46032 www.MidwestAcademyofIndiana.org

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INDYSCHILD.COM 41


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pediatric health

Emergency Preparedness Month Plan, Prepare, Practice!

Telling your child “this is wrong” or “this is dangerous” is only the first step. It’s imperative to talk about the variety of situations that could harm them but more so how to prevent them, how you can help them, etc.

September is Emergency Preparedness Month, a time for all to step back and consider—are you prepared for any and all kinds of emergencies? The unpredictability of fires, natural disasters, severe weather and power outages makes it critical for all families to plan and prepare for a safe escape in the event of an emergency. The problem? “Most families don’t make the time to plan for emergencies,” says Cara L. Fast, MSW, manager of the Riley Safety Store. At the Riley Safety Store, your family can get free education materials and low-cost safety products that will help make your emergency planning a little bit easier.

To begin creating your family’s disaster and evacuation plan and ensure your family’s readiness, please follow the quick tips below. Knowing what to do is your best protection.

Plan! Use Riley Hospital for Children’s free Safe Escape Family Emergency Evacuation Plan as your guide to

42 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

assessing progress in building your family’s plan. While at the Riley Safety Store or at home, simply check off the steps that meet your family’s specif ic needs, and regularly review and assess your progress to determine your family’s readiness for any emergency.

Prepare! Collect all necessary supplies for your family’s emergency preparedness kit. Install any emergency evacuation products or have them readily accessible. Make sure everyone in your family is familiar with the location of the emergency preparedness kit, as well as its contents. Of special importance, make sure all family members have medical information and records that can be easily transported in an emergency. The Riley Safety Store offers several products to help provide safe, eff icient storage and transport of medical records. Practice! There’s no time like the present to practice. Practice before an emergency ever takes place. And practice your family’s emergency evacuation plan at least twice a year—once at night and once during the day. Also be sure to test your family’s emergency preparedness kit

during those practice sessions to determine if you need to add additional resources to the kit. If a child in your family has disabilities or special health care needs and is a Riley Hospital patient, call the Safe Escape program at the Riley Safety Store to schedule an appointment to assess, identify and receive adapted safety products that will accommodate your child’s evacuation needs. Be sure family members of all ages and abilities have planned for a safe escape. To receive a free copy of the Safe Escape Family Emergency Evacuation Plan that will help guide your family in putting together an evacuation plan and emergency kit to always have at the ready, visit the Riley Safety Store at Riley Hospital in Indianapolis or call 1-888-365-2022 (toll-free). Karen Bruner Stroup, PhD is director, Riley Hospital Community Education and Child Advocacy.


There are dozens of festivals that take place in the fall, capitalizing on the Midwest fall foliage and harvest traditions. Other festivals celebrate hobbies and interests of their creators including the Civil War and music enthusiasts. These festivals date back decades as organizers boast the thousands who turn out for the events. Other festivals take advantage of the cool weather and relaxed time of year to celebrate their heritage. These are the Irish fest and Greek fest, to name a few.

Following is a brief overview of some of Indiana’s most popular festivals and a few you should consider visiting if you haven’t already. 44 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

Irish Festival If it’s Irish, you’ll experience it at the 14th annual Irish Festival held at Military Park in downtown Indianapolis September 18-20. “We’ll have four stages of live music from Irish to traditional and rock and over 25 booths in the Irish market with imported and authentic Irish goods. There will be several exhibitions including dancers, bagpipes and a hurling competition and rugby tournament,” said Terry Sweeney, chairman of the Irish Festival. “We have a great kid’s area. For a five dollar wristband kids can ride carnival rides and play games or climb the rock wall.” Free admission promotion is Friday 4:30-5:30, Saturday 10-11 and Sunday with three canned items from 10:30-11:30. For more information visit www.indyirishfest.com.

Back roads of Brown County Artist Studio Tour It’s as festive as you’d like to make it. Design your own event including a self-guided tour of Brown County’s breath-taking fall foliage. “Studios are open to the public for the entire month of October. Each studio has its


own hours, some by appointment. There are 17 artists all from Brown County using mixed media, recycled materials, clocks and more using a wide variety of artistic techniques,” said Chris Gustin, Homestead Weaving studio owner, participant and organizer of the artist studio tour. “This unique event allows people to go to the studios they are interested in and purchase original artwork. I recommend people stop by the visitor center to help them make a plan including good eats between stops.” Visit www.backroadsbrowncountystudiotour. com for more information.

Parke County Covered Bridge Festival in Rockville, Indiana This is by far one of the largest, most anticipated fall events in Indiana. Nestled in the beautiful southwestern part of Indiana, the Covered Bridge Festival has been warming hearts and bellies for 53 years. “Parke County doesn’t have a Convention and Visitors Bureau. The entire festival is ran by volunteers and really pulls the residents together. The heart of the festival is at the town courthouse lawn, where the festival started in 1957. We have over 20 local food vendors, like Tri Kappa, who use their proceeds to award three scholarships to our three high schools,” said Cathy Harkider, 53-year volunteer with the festival board. Like the studio tour, you’ll benefit from planning your time seeing the historic covered bridges as well as making stops at any of the rural towns like Tanger which boasts the best pulled beef around. Farmers band together to cook beef underground for the fest and flavor it to perfection. Visit Bloomingdale for homemade apple butter. Rosedale entices visitors with their famous pumpkin flavored soft serve. “There are three covered bridges in Billy Creek Village where people can experience a living museum, school and war reenactments. Mansfield is the place to stop and shop. The festival has old-fashioned choices with a wide variety of entertainment,” said Harkider. Visit www.coveredbridges.com for more information about Parke County Covered Bridge Festival.

James Whitcomb Riley Festival Enjoy one of the largest craft festivals in the state of Indiana with designated areas for food, commercial and flea market booths, plus Fine Arts, Home Arts/Quilt, Photography and decorated pumpkin shows. The Riley Festival follows years of tradition by celebrating the birthday of the “Hoosier Poet”, James Whitcomb Riley. Riley Festival is a showcase for a wide variety of talent that runs continuously Friday through Sunday. “The Riley Fest is in its 40th year with a mission to have a festival to celebrate the work and life of James Whitcomb Riley in Greenfield where he was born and raised. There are over 465 booths with fine arts, photography and competitions and art shows. We have a Poet on the Podium contest and living history for families to enjoy,” said Sarah Kesterson, vice president of the Riley Festival Board. “We expect up to 70,000 people to entertain. All the food is local with homemade custard, breaded tenderloins, oriental foods and more. We have special entries in our contests for James Whitcomb Riley themes like in the home arts and fine arts and photography. Grade school children have a poster contest, which is ran by the Rotary club. Really everyone gets very involved in the festival and is proud of James Whitcomb Riley.” The festival is held in Greenfield from October 1-4. Visit www.rileyfestival.com for more information.

Date night suggestions

Mississinewa 1812 It was the morning of December 18, 1812, the morning of the Battle of the Mississinewa. Above the sound of fighting, smell of gunpowder and feel of death rose one of the most significant chapters in the War of 1812 and dramatic moments in the history of Grant County, Indiana. All Civil War and history buffs must experience one of the most authentic war reenactments in the country in Grant County. The event takes place October 2-4 in Marion.

October 17-18 Chili Cook-off at Chateau Thomas Winery 317-837-9463. Ask about touring the Indy Wine Trail: Visit seven award-winning wineries all within minutes of downtown Indianapolis. The Indy Wine Trail is an organization of seven area wineries, each with something different to offer. From urban settings to sprawling vineyards, you’ll experience the many faces of Indiana vintners and a variety of wine styles. Pick up a Trail Passport at any Trail winery. Visit all seven wineries and receive a free gift, compliments of the Indy Wine Trail.

“This is a living history event in its 22nd year. The War of 1812 is a midwestern event with participants coming from California, Canada and the east coast. We do reenactments twice a day. We are set apart from other reenactments because of our attention to detail,” said Martin Lake, founder and CEO of the Mississinewa 1812 Festival. “There are a number of film crews from Canada or the U.S. or the History Channel and TV movies who come to shoot our reenactments because of the authenticity and production. The detail is like no other. We are well thought out and did a major amount of research at the Indiana Historical Society and State library and we follow that after fine tuning over the years.”

After speaking with so many event organizers, volunteers and participants they all relished the fact that generation after generation come to fall festivals and events. For Hoosiers, fall is a time to experience the best Indiana has to offer from the spectacular turning of the leaves to handpicked pumpkins. Fall is the twilight of the year. Spring blooms have fallen. Summer heat has subsided. Fall is the time families reset their schoolyear schedules and f ine-tune the chip dip for football games. We all savor the outdoor weather as it cools to a pleasant degree making us long for one-tank getaways to local festivals. Festivals conclude the busy fun of being outdoors before we welcome winter’s serenity.

On over 21 acres, the festival welcomes a new attraction; the river pirate battles of 1812. “Highway men were river pirates who would rob and destroy. We are reenacting history with this new event,” said Lake. Visit www.mississinewa1812.com.

Nikki Keever is a freelance

Get your fresh cider, pumpkins & popcorn

children.

Stuckey Farms in Sheridan is a working orchard and farm that welcomes visitors. Come and pick 27 different varieties of apples from our 4,000 trees, take a free wagon ride through our orchard, watch us press cider, eat in our covered picnic area, or browse through a Country Market full of in-season Indiana produce, honey, jellies, gifts – and of course, Indiana’s tastiest apples and cider. We also have a big th u-pick area, where you’ll find the freshest produce for your 5PM–11PM dinner table, and 15 acres of the plumpest pumpkins you’ve ever seen

writer and festival lover living in Noblesville, Indiana with her husband and three festival loving

st. lawrence

s e t F i v l a l l Fa Friday sept. 25

saturday sept. 26th

sunday sept. 27th

3PM–11PM

1 PM–6PM

4650 N. Shadeland Avenue Under the Big Tent Rain or Shine

Headliner Bands

October 2 - 4 Popcor n Festival of Clay County in Brazil 812-243-1250

FRIDAY

October 3, 4 Sheridan Harvest Moon Festival 317758-5293 x134 October 3, 4, 10, 11 Heartland Apple Festival Danville 317-745-4586 October 8-11 Fall Foliage Festival in Martinsville 765342-0332 October 10 Hunter’s Moon Celebration in Madison 812273-2409

8–11PM

SATURDAY

8–11PM

SUNDAY

Dave & Rae 2–5PM

events For all ages

Carnival Rides • Kids Games • Food Vendors • Miller Lite Beer Garden Teen Band Jam • Latino Music & Food • NASCAR Show Car • Inflatables Fri/Sat: Black Jack • Over Under • Texas Hold ’em • Texas Poker Sun: Family Day • Free Kid’s ID BMV

Sponsored by: Festival License Number: 118486

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CO MM E N TA RY & PA R E N T ING

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growing up online

Raising Savvy Social Networkers

Teaching Your Kids the Dos and Don’ts of Social Networking

“Don’t talk to strangers in public.” ”Don’t open the door to someone you don’t know.” “Don’t give out personal information to someone who calls on the phone.” Kids learn these real world rules as soon as they can walk and talk. Most parents want to extend the same kind of common sense rules to the Internet but it is, as they say, complicated. What spaces are public? Who is a stranger? What kind of information makes children vulnerable?

Social networking sites like Facebook were supposed to make the Internet a little safer by creating a community of people who knew each other, but it hasn’t quite worked out that way. According to Ryan Naraine, a security expert from Kaspersky Labs, these sites create “a façade of trust where end users feel comfortable enough within their network to clink on every link they receive and post the most intimate details of their lives.” In his white paper called Friend or Fraud, he points out that the comfort level many people feel on social networking sites makes it very easy for criminals to “manipulate these trusted networks for malicious purposes.” The best way to protect kids is to teach them to protect themselves. That isn’t really feasible for children under 13 who simply aren’t sophisticated enough to make good decisions about who can be trusted. Their online interactions should be limited to virtual playground sites like Poptropica.com where they can “chat” without revealing personal information or security enhanced networking sites like My Secret Circle, which requires a USB stick before kids can have access. Once a teen seems mature enough for social networking, talk often about its risks. Most teens won’t respond well to lectures or scare tactics. Instead, help your child develop the online equivalent of street smarts so he or she can spot scams and predators. Here are things you’ll want to stress: Set privacy controls-and recognize their limits. Every social networking site now gives members choices about who can see their personal pages. (Find links to privacy pages for several social networking sites at http://kids.getnetwise.org/safetyguide/ 46 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

technology/socialnetworking). Teenagers should use the most secure settings so no one can see their page without approval. Even with that protection, young people should be wary about what they post, especially if they have a large network. Friends may show the page to others who may, in turn, harvest the kind of details that make it very easy to commit real life crimes including identity theft. Encourage your child to think about how a criminal might make use of posted information. Ahhh, this family will be on vacation at Christmas time... They live on Sucker Lane... This girl drives home from soccer every night at 7:30. And so on. Design strong passwords and change them regularly. A criminal— or a bully—who figures out your child’s password not only has access to personal information but also can also impersonate your child or use the account to make mischief. Encourage your teen to create powerful passwords that include random letters as well as some numbers and a punctuation mark or two. To create a memorable password, try translating the lyric from a favorite song into code: “Sometimes love comes around and knocks you down” might become slca&kud. Then—and this is important— tell your teen not to share the password with anyone! Avoid links and pop-ups. Part of the fun of social networking is passing around links to videos, photos and other cool stuff. Criminals have exploited this enthusiasm with attacks like Koobface (an anagram of Facebook). Victims of this and other attacks get a message from someone they know that includes a link. Clicking on the link downloads badware that gives other people access to the computer and, potentially, private information. To outwit scammers, teach your child to roll the mouse over links to reveal the underlying web address. A URL from a legitimate company will start with the name of the company spelled properly. If the name is misspelled or appears later in the URL, the link is a scam. Teens should also avoid clicking on anything that pops up on the screen including “scareware”

messages that promise a free scan to protect the computer from viruses. These pop-ups often implant the very programs they promise to eradicate. Instead, be sure your computer is protected with updated anti-virus software from a reputable vendor like Symantec, McAfee or AVG. Don’t assume a message from a friend is really from a friend. Even if your child is careful not to download viruses, his or her friends may be less conscientious. If a friend’s account is compromised, your child may receive fraudulent messages from a screen name they believe they can trust. For example, some criminals send out distress messages claiming to have lost a wallet or passport while traveling. Because they include personal details gleaned from the social networking site, these contacts can seem authentic. Some people have sent money-only to learn that their real friend was never in danger. Teens should be equally skeptical of too-good-tobe-true offers that appear to come from friends especially if they involve fees of any kind. Unfortunately, anyone who asks for money online has to be presumed to be a crook until proven otherwise. Investigate before joining a group. Teens regularly get invitations to join groups that can range from silly to serious. Although many networking groups are actually communities of like-minded people, some are established simply to harvest information about people who share a common interest. Tell your child to do a little research before joining a group. Who is the administrator? What is the purpose? How will posted information be used? Every social network both on and offline depends on trust, so every social network is vulnerable to people who are willing to exploit the faith of others. Teaching young people to be skeptical and self-protective makes it more likely they will avoid online miscreants and recognize the people who are true friends. Carolyn Jabs, M.A., has been writing about families and the Internet for over fifteen years. She is the mother of three computer-savvy kids. Other Growing Up Online columns appear on her website www.growing-up-online.com.


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September is All About Culture in Indy

Local Festivals Make Cultural Learning an Exciting Adventure The customs and cultures of other countries are fascinating to children who may think the whole world does everything the same way we do here in America. I love watching their eyes widen when they see native dress from other lands, listen to the music or eat the exotic foods. America has long been known as a melting pot, which makes it easy to teach your kids about all of these cultures without having to travel far to learn about far-off lands.

There are all kinds of things to do here in Indy this month to immerse your family in culture and the traditions of our ancestors. You could start things off with the Chinese American Festival at Military Park on Saturday, September 12. The event runs from 12 noon – 9 p.m. and is free to the public. Call 317-327-3611 for more information. If ye be lookin’ for a bit o’ luck o’ the Irish, the Indy Irish Fest may be more your style. It takes place September 18-20 at Military Park. There are all kinds of activities for the kids including a special area designed just for them with games, rides and a small stage with entertainment. The activities all have fun Irish names such as the Cliff ’s of Moher Rock climbing wall, Blarney Castle Moonwalk, Celtic Bean Bag Toss, Donegal Duck Pond, Limerick Lollipop Tree, Galway Go Fish (plastic fishing rod with which they can hook prizes), Kerry Putt and Go (putt putt) and more. There will also be fun contests for those with the reddest hair, greenest eyes and most freckles. You can also enjoy Irish step dancers, sheep herding exhibitions, a rugby demonstration and Celtic Canine— a show featuring various breeds of dogs Irish Wolf hound, Setters, etc. If you’re in the market to buy something, Irish Market features goods from 30 different vendors and includes shirts, sweaters, kilts, jewelry, woodcarvings, paintings, photography, musical instruments and pottery. Artisans will be on site making some of the items. Kids 13 and under get in free. $5 wristband allows kids to play an unlimited number of games for prizes. Advance sale tickets for adults are $8, $13 at the door. www. indyirishfest.com And it’s no wonder Fiesta Indianapolis is such a big hit each year. The Hispanic population of Indianapolis is so large that it justifies our city having a Mexican Consulate. And it just so happens that this month is National Hispanic Heritage Month. The annual outdoor Fiesta celebration shares the Latino culture through art, music, dance, food and cultural activities. There’s a cultural village along with a children’s area that features hands-on activities. Fiesta Indianapolis takes place Saturday, September 19 from 12 noon to midnight at the American Legion Mall between Meridian and Pennsylvania streets. Event Phone: 317-890-3292. Visit www.laplaza-indy. org for more information. Take a quick trip north and west to WestFest at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians & Western Art on Saturday, September 26. It’s a day full of fun interactive activities designed to show what the West was really like. The family will enjoy singing cowboys, gun twirling and trick ropers. You’ll hear stories about famous cowboys and buffalo hunters and choose from typical foods you might find on a real chuckwagon. There are also plenty of ways to join in the fun for kids of all ages whether they want to pan for gold, throw cow chips, hop on board the stagecoach, decorate bandanas or cowboy hats or create leather bracelets. Admission is $5 for kids and $9 for adults. But those who wear their Western duds will save a buck off admission. www.eiteljorg.org

Then, make sure you mark your calendar for the International Festival that takes place November 19-22 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds featuring more than 50 ethnic groups. Where else could you find foods from around the world, dance performances by local and national performing groups, volunteers in traditional dress to help you connect with your own ethnic heritage, artisans sharing their crafts not to mention the goodies you can buy from around the world. To top it all off, you will be able to watch a real Naturalization Ceremony welcoming over 175 new American citizens. www.indyinternationalfestival.org And, of course, don’t forget about the German American Klub’s annual Oktoberfest, which will be held at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on Labor Day Weekend, September 4, 5, 6 and the following weekend, September 11 and 12. Oktoberfest hours are 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Friday; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday. In its 35th year, Oktoberfest offers something for everyone. Enjoy great German foods like Bratwurst, Knachwurst, Sauerkraut and Frikadellen. Adults can enjoy German and domestic beers at the German Bier and Wein Garten. There will be live music and dancing featuring German and rock ‘n roll bands, carnival rides and games and much more. Oktoberfest trains will be departing from the Fishers Station during all five days of Oktoberfest courtesy of the Indiana Transportation Museum. Also, here are some suggestions from the U.S. Department of Education to help your kids better understand the world. Explore international aspects of the arts— music, film, theatre, visual arts, literature, dance—by creating, performing, or studying artworks with an international component. This could include a field trip to a museum or concert or showing a foreign film in class. • Adopt a school in a developing country and donate school supplies, reference materials, and other items.

• Trade questions and answers with students from another country through the Internet, pen pal clubs, or a Digital Video Conference. • Encourage cultural understanding for students using the online resource One World: Connecting Communities, Cultures, and Classrooms. Sponsored by the National Football League and Scholastic Inc., this unique education resource designed for teachers. The free, web-based program may be downloaded from http://scholastic.com/oneworld. • Organize a cross-cultural potluck lunch in which students bring in or make foods from their homeland or ancestors’ homeland. • Ask students to write essays on countries they would like to visit and why they chose those countries. • Feature local international experts as speakers: Fulbright Students and Scholars, former diplomats or Peace Corps volunteers, business leaders working for multi-national corporations, or journalists. • Participate in a Model UN. • Assign students to produce a video or website about their cross-cultural experiences. The video could explore issues of cultural idiosyncrasies, stereotypes, and/or their own experiences in another culture. • Hold a geography, foreign language, or world history bee for your students. (For ideas, see the IEW Quiz!) KIMBERLY HARMS has four children (ages 4-23) and is the associate director of media relations at the Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association. You can find all of these events and more at www.VisitIndy.com

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Tuesday 1 Computer Programming for Kids Come learn how to make your own interactive computer animations, games, stories, art, and music using Scratch—a computer programming language designed for kids. Find out more about Scratch and see programs designed by other kids at: scratch. mit.edu. Grades 3-6. 4 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833. K Club series: Canine and Feline Friends Can cats and dogs really be friends? Let’s find out by reading James Howe’s Houndsley and Catina stories about “plinking,” “plunking,” and birthday surprises. Plus, make a creative pet craft to take with you. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206.

Inglés para hispanohablantes - English for Spanish Speakers English for Spanish Speakers is a class for Latinos with very basic English skills. A bilingual teacher helps students practice basic vocabulary and grammar. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www. hepl.lib.in.us. For more information, contact Sonya at 770-3251. 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl. lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Concert on the Lawn Take an early rest from your labors and join us for a relaxing evening of music from your very own Franklin Community High School Band. This free outdoor concert will cover musical genres from march to jazz to classical. Bring your favorite lawn chair or blanket. Refreshments and limited seating will be provided. In case of bad weather, the concert will be held in the community room. Band directed by Regina Bollinger. 7 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833.

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HobNob: Meet the Candidates 1 p.m. - 7 p.m. $10 Reception Only/$50 Policy Conference and Reception. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indychamber.com/hobnob.asp. 317-464-2232..

Autumn Equinox Noon - 4:30 p.m. Members $35, Public $50. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. Indiana Fever vs. Phoenix Mercury 7 p.m. $14 - $79. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www. consecofieldhouse.com. 317-917-2500. Roller Derby! Come to the library for a chance to meet “Indy’s” newest roller derby team, the Circle City Socialites! Learn about roller derby, and watch a demonstration by the team members. 6:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin. org. 317-885-1330.

Thursday 3 Clarian Health and the Indiana Pacers present FREE health screenings 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Free. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www.consecofieldhouse.com. 317-917-2500.

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Target Free Family Night Famous Hoosiers! Celebrate our Indiana heritage with programs and activities highlighting the contributions of famous Hoosiers to the world. Sponsored generously by Target, the first Thursday of each month The Children’s Museum opens free of charge from 4 – 8 p.m. 4-8 p.m. Free. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www. ChildrensMuseum.org. (317) 334-3322. Werewolf! Two villagers are actually werewolves. Can you figure out who? Can you even survive the night? Join us for this exciting game. Grades 6 and up. 10 a.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560.Zanna Doo! 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www.ScottysBrewhouse.com. 317-5710808. An Evening with America This ‘70s band is still running strong with their signature blend of rock, pop and folk and nearly two hundred songs to their name, including “A Horse with No Name,” “Ventura Highway,” and “Sister Golden Hair.” . 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Saturday, 5 Friday 4 Friday Family Fun series: Crazy About Arthur! Join us as we celebrate some of author Marc Brown’s best loved characters: Arthur, D.W., Buster, and the whole gang. We’ll listen to some stories and watch a movie featuring Arthur, try some poetry activities, and wrap it all up with a craft. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www. jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206. Trader’s Point Creamery Green Market Producing fresh creamline whole milk, chocolate milk, plain and fruit yogurts. Fri. May-Oct 4-7pm, Nov-Apr 9-12noon on Sat. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www. traderspointcreamery.com. 317-7331700. 14th Annual Rib America Festival Fri. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m. midnight; Sun. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Mon. 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Free ages 12 & under & before 5 p.m. Fri. & 1 p.m. on Sat., Sun. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica.com. 317-249-2710. Irvington First Friday The Mosaic Art Gallery, located in the historic Irvington Lodge, will be having an opening art reception in coordination with IDADA’s downtown First Friday. September’s gallery will feature the artwork of Joe Swan, Jennifer Martin, and Theresa Mitchell. Come for a night of local artwork, live music, and food. Other local venues such as Lazy Daze and The Blooming Dragon will also be featuring artwork. This event is free and open to the public. 6-9pm. No Cost. Irvington Lodge. 5515 E. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.facebook.com/irvingtonfirstfridays.

American Idols Live Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www.consecofieldhouse. com. 317-917-2500. Day of the Dead Sugar Skulls Sugar skulls are a must to any Dia de los Muertos celebration. They are a traditional folk art form from Southern Mexico symbolically used on alters to welcome the spirits of the dead back to their home and loved ones. Sugar skulls are typically decorated with icing, foil, beads and other decorative items. This year the Indianapolis Art Center is inviting the community to assist in the creation of hundreds of sugar skulls and icing bags that will then be used and decorated by the community at this year’s Dia de los Muertos celebration held at the Art Center on November 1, 2009. Each attendee will also have the opportunity to decorate their own sugar skull to take home that day. Join us for a fun-filled day that may become a new tradition for you and your family. Printmaking Studio. Admission is Free!!! Saturday 12-3pm September 5 . 12pm- 3pm. FREE. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. Do Run Run 15K & 5 Mile 5 a.m. - 11 a.m. TBD. Indiana War Memorial. 431 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.in.gov/iwm. 317-884-4001. Groovin in The Garden presents Sharlee Davis and Devitt Tuesdays 5 - 7, Saturdays 2 - 5. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery. com. 317-636-4516. Labor Day Parade 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free. Downtown Parade Route. Throughout Downtown, Indianapolis. 317-632-9147. Outdoor Movie MOVIE OUTSIDE! . White River Campgrounds. 11299 E. 234th Street, Cicero. Punt, Pass & Kick with Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation Join Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation at their NFL Punt, Pass and Kick event. This national event tests the skills and accuracy of youth football players.he top scorer in


reso urc es each age division for boys and girls advances to the Sectional Competition. Division age is determined as of December 31, 2009. The boys and girls compete separately. Children must be 8 to 15 years old and show a valid birth certificate for age verification the day of the event. 9 a.m. Free. West Park. 2700 W. 116th St., Carmel. 317-848-7275. Saturday Morning Fall Migration Bird Hikes Saturday Morning Fall Migration Bird Hikes Catch a peek at some beautiful birds as they make their annual trip south this fall. The hikes are led by well-known birder, Keith Starling. Hurry! Some birds will not stay around long. After the hike, stop by the nature center’s wildlife viewing room for coffee and doughnuts. Don’t forget your binoculars! Fall migration bird hikes meet in the north parking lot of Cool Creek Park. Dates: September 5, 12, 19, 26, and October 3 Time: 8:00 a.m. Ages: All Cost: Free Location: Cool Creek Park . Cool Creek Park. WonderLab’s Leapin’ Lemur: A Live Primate Presentation How do two primates adapt to their different African habitats? Find out as you meet a lemur with a fabulous ring tail and a baby baboon. Shows: 11:00 am and 1:00 pm. $3 per person, plus museum admission. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25. 14th Annual Rib America Festival Fri. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m. - midnight; Sun. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Mon. 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Free ages 12 & under & before 5 p.m. Fri. & 1 p.m. on Sat., Sun. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica. com. 317-249-2710. Groovin’ in the Garden Saturday 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516. Metamora Old Time Music Festival Two days of music along the historic Whitewater Canal. Free workshops, demonstrations and performances. Build your own washboard with Bill Bailey, explore a variety of musical instruments with Jeff and Carolyn McKinley, attend Digger Lou’s Song Writing School. Performances all day Sat & Sun, workshops Sat. WWVRR hosts Steam Locomotive, Ben Franklin canal boat on regular schedule. Sat: 10 AM to 10 PM, Sun Noon to 5 PM. free. Back Porch at Lane’s End Barn. Lover’s Lane, Metamora. www.metamoramusic.pbwiki. com. 765-647-2194. River City Brass Band This modified British-style band features 25 brass players and three percussionists whose sweeping repertoire includes big band swing, jazz, classical and contemporary masterworks. Brass at its best! This season finale weekend closes with a dazzling fireworks display. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www. connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

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Holliday Park Summer Concerts: Cynthia Layne Bring a picnic and enjoy the groove R&B music of Cynthia Layne. 3:00 pm. Free. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180. Indiana Fever vs. Wasington Mystics 4 p.m. $14 - $79. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www.consecofieldhouse.com. 317-917-2500. Rathskeller Sunday Summer Biergarten Concert Series presents Igor Lovchinsky 6 p.m. $3. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller. com. 317-636-0396. Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious S u n d a e from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700. 14th Annual Rib America Festival Fri. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m. - midnight; Sun. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Mon. 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Free ages 12 & under & before 5 p.m. Fri. & 1 p.m. on Sat., Sun. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica. com. 317-249-2710.

14th Annual Rib America Festival Fri. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m. - midnight; Sun. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Mon. 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Free ages 12 & under & before 5 p.m. Fri. & 1 p.m. on Sat., Sun. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. ribamerica.com. 317-2492710.

Tuesday, 08 Genealogy Roundtable – Focus on Family Tree Maker 2009 There is so much to learn from those who may have already been down the path you are exploring! Take advantage of this special opportunity to share your experiences, successes and challenges with other amateur genealogists. Participants should come prepared to share their experiences, trials, and tribulations in using Family Tree Maker 2009 as their genealogy software of choice. This is an informal discussion group and registration is not required. 2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www. hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Indianapolis Farmers’ Market at the City Market An outdoor market taking up an entire city block in the street between the City Market and the City-County Building. 10-1:30pm. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266. Plainfield Town Center Farmers’ Market 4-7pm. Plainfield Chamber of Commerce. 210 W Main St, Plainfield. 317-839-3800. WonderLab’s Discovery Time Stop by with your preschooler for a special story or activity with a focus on science! Call for this week’s topic. Older siblings may attend. Call the museum for this week’s topic. (Note: Discovery Time will NOT be held September 2). 10:30 am - 11:00 am (drop-in format). Included with museum admission. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West Fourth Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25. 38th and Meridian Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Thursday Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. 4-6:30pm. Corner of 38th & Meridian, Indianapolis. Adrian Orchards Occurring Daily Through Sunday, January 31, 2010. Purchase fresh fruits/veggies, etc. from Mid-June through August Mon-Sat 9-6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Sept through Dec MonSat 9-7pm, Sun 12-6pm. Jan Mon-Sat 10-6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Adrian Orchards. 500 W Epler Ave, Indianapolis. www.adrianorchards.com. 317-784-0500. After-school Program at The Play Connection, Inc. Ongoing Mon-Fri. After-school care for Robey Elementary 2:30 - 6:30 p.m. lots of fun arts & creative play. We also offer Drop N’ Shop for other school districts during this time as wells as T-TH from 9-2. Check out our website for details. www.theplayconnection.com. 2:30 - 6:30 p.m. $55 week. The Play Connection, Inc. 9221 Crawfordsville Rd., Indianapolis. www.theplayconnection.com. 317-918-4359. Allisonville Nursery Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, June 01, 2010. Fresh flowers, nursery, produce, etc. M-F 9-6pm, Sat 9-5pm, Sun 11-5pm Open year round. Allisonville Nursery. 11405 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.allisonvillenursery.com. 317-849-4490. Art Therapy Ongoing Every Mon & Tue Beginning Monday, August 17, 2009. Using art to explore your grief process following the death of a loved one. Adults only. No fee. Appointments available for Mondays or Tuesdays. FREE. St.Vincent Hospice. 8450 N. Payne Rd., Ste. 100, Indianapolis. www.stvincent.org/ourservices/hospice/default.htm. 317-338-4008.

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Splashtactular Activities and games will be spread throughout the day to encourage guests of all ages and abil-

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ities to participate. Whether you take part in the water balloon toss, build a cardboard boat and participate in the boat race, or help your team fill the bucket to the brim with water in the bucket game, The Monon Center Outdoor Aqua Park ensures that everyone will have a great time. 12:00-4:00pm. $5 Youth/Senior; $8 Adult. The Monon Center West. 1235 Central Park Drive, Carmel. www.carmelclayparks.com. 317-848-7275.

River City Brass Band This modified British-style band features 25 brass players and three percussionists whose sweeping repertoire includes big band swing, jazz, classical and contemporary masterworks. Brass at its best! This season finale weekend closes with a dazzling fireworks display. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www. connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Doggie Dayz Join Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation for “Doggie Dayz” as the Outdoor Aqua Park goes to the dogs. The summer season has ended but the Outdoor Aqua Park will remain open to the canines for one day only. This special open swim for dogs will be a treat for both you and your dog(s). Doggy treats will be available. Sorry owners, there is no swimming for you; this event is only for dogs! All dogs must be on a leash until they reach the water. 6:008:00pm. $6/dog. The Monon Center West. 1235 Central Park Drive East, Carmel. www. carmelclayparks.com. 317-848-7275.

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HOrse Classic The All-American Horse Classic will be held at the Pepsi Coliseum beginning Tuesday evening, September 8, and continuing through Saturday September 12. This annual event, regarded as Indiana’s premier horse show, will feature over 750 beautiful American Saddlebred horses and Hackney Ponies competing for over $700,000 in national championships. Various. Free. Pepsi Coliseum. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair.com. 317-927-7536. Library Kids Adventures For students in grades 3-5. Themes for the month are: Geronimo Stilton, Talk Like a Pirate Day and Fantastic Mr. Fox. Registration is

AWANA is coming to Fishers UMC! Ongoing Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, September 02, 2009. AWANA, a nationally recognized Christian children’s program, will start at Fishers United Methodist Church Wednesday, Sept 2. These classes for 30 months old through fourth grade will run every Wednesday from 6:45 - 8:15. Cost is one time $25 per student for the entire year. Sign-ups for AWANA begin Sunday, Aug. 9. You may stop in the church at 9691 E. 116th St or download a sign-up form from the website www.fishersumc.org. Please call 317-849-1805 with questions. Also on Wednesdays; family pitch-in dinner at 6:00, adult Communion church service at 6:45, adult topical classes run from 7:15-8:15. 6:45 - 8:15. one time $25. Fishers United Methodist Church. 9691 E. 116th St, Fishers. www. fishersumc.org. 317-849-1805. Beasley Orchards and Gardens Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. M-Sat 9-6pm, Sun 12-6pm. Beasley Orchards. 2304 E. Main St., Danville. www.beasleys-orchard.com. 317-745-4879. Binford Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, October 13, 2009. 7:30-11am. Southwest corner of Binford and E. 75th St, Indianapolis. www.binfordfarmersmarket.com. 317-849-5555. Broad Ripple Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, October 27, 2009. Located in the parking lot of Broad Ripple High School. Produce,

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required and begins Tuesday, September 1, online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. 4:00 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317571-4292.

Wednesday 9 Book Buddies For children ages 4 – Kindergarten. Super stories and cool crafts! For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 4:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib. in.us/. 317-571-4292. Witch Hazel Valley Boys 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266. All-American Horse Classic The All-American Horse Classic will be held at the Pepsi Coliseum beginning Tuesday evening, September 8, and continuing through Saturday September 12. This annual event, regarded as Indiana’s premier horse show, will feature over 750 beautiful American Saddlebred horses and Hackney Ponies competing for over $700,000 in national championships. Various. Free. Pepsi Coliseum. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair.com. 317-927-7536.

Thursday 10 7/11 Club Join us for our new 7/11 Club. We will kick off the hour with reading and then gather around three 3 fun activity stations designed for fun, art, writing and thinking. Club members may be able to earn additional credit from Indian Creek Intermediate School classroom teachers. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. Back to School Night Students of all ages and their parents are invited to attend. Enjoy refreshments, giveaways, entertainment by Mr. Kevin of Oogles-N-Googles, and drop-in crafts by KidzArt. Learn more about how the library can help you with school, try out Live Homework Help, and register for a library card, if you don’t already have one. No charge to attend and registration is not required. Call the library at 571-4292 for more information. 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317571-4292. Bubble Trouble Bubbles, bubbles everywhere! Come to Franklin branch as we explore the science of blowing bubbles. Try your hand at blowing the biggest bubble you can! Grades K-5. 4 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206. RIbs N Bone 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www. ScottysBrewhouse.com. 317-571-0808. Children’s Craft Classes The Greenwood Parks and Recreation Department is offering craft classes for children ages 10 and up. The craft classes will be held at the Greenwood Community Center the second Thursday of every month from 6:30pm-8:30pm. Please register one week in advance. Call 317-88150 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

4545 to find out what craft is being offered each month and the cost. 6:30pm-8:30pm. Varies. Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov. 317-881-4545.

6-8pm. No Cost to Attend. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. www.indplsartcenter.org/Visit_Us/Directions_and_Parking/. (317) 255-2464.

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Whale of a Sale Whale of a Sale, an upscale children’s and maternity consignment sale is free to the public and provides families the opportunity to buy and sell gently-used children’s and maternity items in a fun, department store-like setting.Families benefit in two ways. They can buy gently-used items at fraction of retail cost. They can also sell items that their children have outgrown, earning back some of their costs as well as reducing clutter in their homes. Preview Night is Thursday evening but a pass must be presented at the door to attend. Buyers can expect to find clothes (newborn to size 12), toys, equipment, furniture, maternity and more. Many items will be half price on the final day from 1-5 p.m. Fri., Sept. 10 from 9:30-7 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 11 from 8-5 p.m. Village of West Clay Meeting House in Carmel. 2000 New Market St., Carmel. www.whale-sale.com. 317-8696600.

Bunny Hop Playtime Bundle up your babies and bring them to our new creative playtime! We’ll share a story and information about how you can help your little one prepare for reading readiness. And we will cap it off with the opportunity to play or participate in a special activity. Some sessions will be free playtime for just you and your little one. 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www. hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Fancy Nancy For children ages 3-6 & their caregivers. Get fancy with Nancy and attend a fashion show – starring you! Hear your favorite Fancy Nancy stories and enjoy fancy refreshments. Dress up in your fanciest dress-up clothes and join us! Free tickets are required and will be available online or at the Children’s & Youth Services desk beginning Friday, September 4. For more information, call 844-3363. 11:00 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Friday Family Fun series: Sleepyhead Tales! We’ll be entering dreamland as we snuggle up for some snoozing tales featuring characters who snore and want to stay up late! You can wear your pajamas and bring along your teddy bear or favorite blanket too. We’ll wrap it all up with a movie and a craft that are sure to wake you up! . 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206. IUPUI Presents An Evening with Angela Brown at the Madame Walker Theater 8 p.m. TBA. Madame Walker Theatre. 617 Indiana Ave., Indianapolis. www.walkertheatre.com. 317-236-2099. September 11 Community Fair 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. F R EE . Monu ment Circle. One Monument Circle, Indianapolis. w w w.indygov.org. 317-327-57936. Fall Creek Heritage Arts and Crafts Fair 33rd annual art and craft fair. 175 art, craft and food booths of handmade crafts in Falls Park, Pendleton IN. Voted the best festival in Madison County for the last two years. A craft auction will be held on Saturday morning at 11:00 am. Anyone interested in booth information call Lana Barton at 765-778-3183 or email at lbarton@town. pendleton.in.us. n/a. 765-778-3183. Indianapolis Art Center Open House Visit the Indianapolis Art Center on September 11th for an amazing Open House! Faculty of the Art Center will be doing demonstrations in all mediums! So stop by from 6-8pm and enjoy the festivities.

Saturday, 12 150th Anniversary of IFD Parade 10 a.m. Free. Downtown Parade Route. Throughout Downtown, Indianapolis. 317-327-3611. Chinese American Festival Noon - 9 p.m. Free. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica.com. 317-249-2710. Groovin in The Garden presents Acoustic Catfish Tuesdays 5 - 7, Saturdays 2 - 5. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery. com. 317-636-4516. Lucas Oil Stadium Football: Chatard vs. Cathedral $11 in advance (at schools), $15 day of game. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium. com. 317-262-3452. Lucas Oil Stadium Football: Mooresville vs. Franklin $11 in advance (at schools), $15 day of game. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317262-3452. Lucas Oil Stadium Football: New Palestine vs. Batesville $11 in advance (at schools), $15 day of game. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium. com. 317-262-3452. Lucas Oil Stadium Football: Warren Central vs. Ben Davis $11 in advance (at schools), $15 day of game. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium. com. 317-262-3452. Nurses Celebration at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis

Visit interactive displays and talk with registered nurses. Play games, win prizes, have fun and learn. Sponsored by Nursing 2000. 10am-2pm. With regular museum admission. with regular museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N Meridian St, Indianapolis. www.nursing2000inc.org/default.cfm?id=267. 317574-1325. Penrod Art Fair 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. $15; $12 in advance & $11 IMA members in advance. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317920-2659. Saturday Movie Matinee Get ready to be dazzled by Disney’s bigscreen smash hit filled with laughs, adventure, family fun and fabulous music! Come along for the ride and see Miley Cyrus like never before as she returns to her roots and faces the most important decision of her life! Rated G. All Ages Children 7 & under must be accompanied by an adult. 2 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833. Whale of a Sale Whale of a Sale is an upscale children’s consignment event featuring baby, children’s and maternity items. Held twice a year, the sale provides a fun, department store-like shopping experience without the high-end prices. This is your chance to BUY and SELL like-new clothing, accessories, strollers, equipment, toys and much more! Earn up to 75% of the sale price you set. Register today to sell your items - you can’t afford to miss this opportunity. FREE. The Village of West Clay Meeting House. 2000 New Market Street, Carmel. www.whale-sale.com. Fall Creek Heritage Arts and Crafts Fair 33rd annual art and craft fair. 175 art, craft and food booths of handmade crafts in Falls Park, Pendleton IN. Voted the best festival in Madison County for the last two years. A craft auction will be held on Saturday morning at 11:00 am. Anyone interested in booth information call Lana Barton at 765-778-3183 or email at lbarton@town. pendleton.in.us. n/a. 765-778-3183.

Sunday 13 Girls, Try Hockey! Girls, we want you to play Ice Hockey. It is fun, fast, and great exercise! No experience necessary. We provide basic equipment and coaches. Come give it a try! WHO: Girls Only ages 7-17 years 1:00pm: Sign In 1:151:30pm: Equipment Fitting and Off- ice fun 1:30-2:30pm: On- ice with coaches 2:30-3:00pm: Question and Answer information available . 1:00pm to 3:00pm. $10. The Forum at Fishers Ice Arena. 9022 E. 126th St. Behind the Fishers YMCA, Fishers. wwwfishersyouthhockey.com. 8499930x103 or info@fishersyouthhockey. com. Hancock County Farm Festival The public is invited and encouraged to attend the Hancock County Farm Festival, a free driving tour of four different farming operations in Hancock County on Sunday, September 13th from noon-5:00 p.m. Tour sites will include a grain elevator/feed mill, a large modern corn, soybean and cattle farm, a dairy farm and a race horse stable. Each of the four locations will offer family focused activities along with information about how farms operate. Farm owners and others will be available to answer questions and contribute background information about these farms and farming in general. Each site will also offer an opportunity to

sample local farm cuisine for a nominal fee. Activities for children include pony rides, corn hole games, and an educational walkthrough maize. For more information log on www.HancockFarmFestival.org or call 317-462-1113. FREE. www.HancockFarmFestival.org. 317-462-1113. Holliday Park Creature Feature: Monarchs Plants, animals, and insects, oh my! Join a Holliday Park naturalist as we take a look as some of Indiana’s most amazing creatures. We’ll spend time inside and out, and may even be lucky enough to get up close and personal with some of the creatures. All ages, registration required. 2:00-3:00 pm. $3/person. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. 3173277180. Indianapolis Colts vs. Jackson Jaguars 1 p.m. TBD. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452. Sunday Summer Biergarten Concert Series: Dog Tail with Cliff White 6 - 9 p.m. $3. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www. rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396. Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700.

Monday 14 Adoptions of Indiana Golf Classic Join Adoptions of Indiana for the Adoptions of Indiana Golf Classic. All profits will benefit programming for birth and adoptive families alike. In its inaugural year, the event raised more than $20,000. Fee includes lunch, golf shirt, 18 holes of golf, awards banquet and prizes. Golf for a good cause! . 11:12 am registration, 1:12 pm golf, awards banquet follows. $150/ golfer early bird rate. Eagle Creek Golf Club. 8802 W. 56th St., Indianapolis. www.ad-in.org. 317-574-8950. Art Mix series: Fall Fun Explore the world of Lois Elhert, a collage artist who uses bold colors, shapes, and natural materials in her work. Pick up a picture book by Elhert and get ready to make your own inspired collage about the fall season. Grades K-6. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www. jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. Artsgarden Chamber Ensemble 1 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. indyarts.org. 317-624-2563. Tales for Tails Come read aloud to a certified Reading Education Assistance Dog! Dogs are great listeners, and reading to them can build skills and confidence! Sign up for 15 minutes of reading time. 6 p.m. free. Johnson


reso urc es County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin.org. 317-885-1330.

Credit Card Smarts Noon. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts. org. 317-624-2563. Food Matters series: Culinary Mystery PitchIn & Book Discussion Want to try a recipe from one of your favorite mysteries? Join us on the15th to share a mystery book with some suggested recipes. We will set a date at the meeting for a pitch-in. 7 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. Holliday Park Eco-Explorers Come out to Holliday Park and become a true Eco-Explorer! We’ll spend our time hiking the trails, exploring the river, discovering history, getting dirty and making life-long memories in the out-of-doors. Children will be divided into a 5-7 year old group and an 8-10 year old group. Dates for the series are: 9/15, 9/29. 10/13, 10/27, 11/10 and 11/24. Registration required. 3:45-4:45 pm. $24/series. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

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Tuesday 15 Celebrate National Honey Month! How do bees make honey? Learn this and several lesser known facts about this sweet nectar. Plus, sample a tasty honey treat, and pick up a recipe to prepare at home. Grades K-6. 4 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833.

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ers all materials and is payable at the time of class. We must have a minimum of six people to run the class and there is a class limit of 12 students. This class is open to teens and adults. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For further information contact Melissa at 770-3235. 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. $25 fee. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317773-1384. Stitch and Snack For students in grades 3-6. If you want to learn how to knit, join us for this six week program. The library will provide the yarn, knitting needles and basic instruction. By the end of the six weeks, the group will complete a patchwork blanket that will be donated to a charity. Registration is required and begins Tuesday, September 1, in person, online, or by calling 8443363. 6:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Travel Club Series: Cuba This month Trafalgar Airlines transports you south to Cuba! Grades K-6. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www. jcplin.org. 317-878-9560.

3rd Thursday The 3rd Thursday of each month, the museum is open late with free entertainment and a cash bar. Admission to galleries is discounted; $5.50 adults/$5 senior citizens/$3.50 children. 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. 5.50 adults/$5 senior citizens/$3.50 children. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637. Art & Book Adventures series: The Art of Donald Crews Today discover the children’s books created by Donald Crews author and illustrator of the much-loved Freight Train. We will create our own book as inspired by his book Ten Black Dots. Enhance both your literacy and art skills at this program. Grades K-5. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206. Bust this Myth! Do you love the show “Mythbusters”? Join us here at the library to recreate some of their famous experiments. Grades K-6. 1:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. Wild Game Night: Take a walk down Monopoly…Scrabble up some words…Make a few tricks over bridge…and get your best bower up for euchre. Come enjoy an evening of cards and board games at the library. Learn a new game with family and friends. Bring your own game if you or your family has a special game you

flowers, cheese, honey, beef, lamb, poultry and dairy. 8-12 noon. Broad Ripple High School. 1115 Broad Ripple Ave., Indianapolis. www.broadripplefarmersmarket.com. 317-299-7129. Brownsburg Chamber Farmers’ Market Occurring Daily Through Saturday, September 12, 2009. 8-12 noon. 61 N. Green St., Brownsburg. 317-852-7885. Carmel Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Sunday, September 27, 2009. Nearly 50 vendors selling Indiana grown and/or produced products. One of the largest farmers’ markets in the state. 8-11:30am. One Civic Square, Carmel. www.carmelfarmersmarket.com. 317-710-0162. Children’s Craft Classes Ongoing on the second Thursday of each Month. The Greenwood Parks and Recreation Department is offering craft classes for children ages 10 and up. The craft classes will be held at the Greenwood Community Center the second Thursday of every month from 6:30pm-8:30pm. Please register one week in advance. Call 317881-4545 to find out what craft is being offered each month and the cost. 6:30pm8:30pm.Varies. Greenwood Parks and Recreation/ Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov. 317-881-4545. ComedySportz Ongoing Every Thu, Fri & Sat. Two teams of “actletes” take suggestions from the audience to perform hilarious, completely improvised scenes. This battle of wits comes complete with a referee and the “Star Spangled Banner.” All ages. Reservations recommended. $15; $12/students & seniors, $8/kids; Kids 5 and under FREE. Comedy Sportz. 721 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis. www.indycomedysportz.com. 317-951-8499. Copeland’s Family Farm Market and Greenhouse Occurring Mon-Sat Through Sunday, January 31, 2010. A family farm raising and selling our own fresh veggies, bedding plants, house plants and perennials as well as a wide variety of other produce from other growers. Morel mushrooms in season

Primary School Age Program Designed for children kindergarten to fourth grade. This year’s theme is “Dissecting Dewey”. Each month we will focus on the Dewey decimal system and break it down subject by subject. Registration is required. Register by calling the Youth Services Department at 7703216 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. 4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Wednesday 16 Acoustic Catfish 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www. indycm.com. 317-634-9266. CPR Certification Training Learn a life-saving skill! Rex Saltsgaver of the Greenwood Police Department will run the American Heart Association CPR training program. Participants may earn infant/child/ adult CPR certification at the heartsaver/ general public level upon successful completion of the training. All materials provided for an $8.00 fee, which attendees will pay the presenter at the program. 6 p.m. $8. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin. org. 317-885-1330. One Stroke Painting Learn to blend, shade and highlight with one stroke and leave with a finished project. This class will be taught by Marilyn Tentler, a level II OSCI Donna Dewberry One Stroke Instructor. There is a $25 fee for this class which cov INDYSCHILD.COM 51


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would like to share. All levels of expertise (including no expertise) are welcome. Snacks will be served. All ages. 6:30 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833.

Friday 18 Comedy Central Live: Mike Birbiglia 8 p.m. Various Prices. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469. The Art of Kabuki with Shozo Sato Combining dance, music and drama, Kabuki is a flamboyant Japanese art form that originated in the 1600s. Theater director Shozo Sato—a master of Japanese tea ceremony, flower arrangement and classical dance—visits the IMA to perform and demonstrate Kabuki technique. Known internationally for his cultural fusion of Kabuki style with classical European stories, he has written and directed such productions as Kabuki Medea and Kabuki MacBeth. Shozo Sato is Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois and currently teaches at Northwestern University. Copresented by the IMA Asian Art Society. 7 p.m. $5 Members / $9 Public / $7 Students with ID. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis. www. imamuseum.org. Purchase tickets at www. imamuseum.org, by calling 317-955-2339,. 14th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest TBD. TBD. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. indyirishfest.com. 317-257-55610. Antigone on the IMA Grounds 6:30 p.m. $10 members and students with ID, $15 public. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. INDY KIDS CONSIGNMENT SALE Indy Kids Consignment is now registering consignors and volunteers for our Fall 2009 sale. The Fall sale is SEPTEMBER 18-19 from 9am-5pm at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds, Expo Hall A Indy Kids Consignment started in 2005 and has had two sales a year since then. We have grown from a sale in the front yard to offering 4,000 square feet of high quality, new and gently used children’s clothing, gear and furniture, as well as maternity clothing. Register now to sell your items at a sale with experience that draws over a thousand shoppers and over 100 consignors at each sale. For complete details visit

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our website at www.ikcsale.com. 9am5pm. Free. Hamilton County 4H Fairgrounds. 2003 Pleasant Street, Noblesville. WWW.IKCSALE.COM.

Saturday 19 Apple and Popcorn Festival Come eat apple and popcorn treats while browsing crafts and participating in activities such as bobbing for apples and kernel art. 9:00 am- 12:00 pm. Free Admission. Learning Kidnections. 110 N Mulberry St, Fairland. w w w. l e a r n i n g kidnections.com. Fiesta Indianapolis Noon - Midnight. Free. American Legion Mall. 401 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. 317-275-9256. Fountain Square Art Fair & Masterpiece in a Day 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Free. Fountain Square. just minutes south of downtown Indianapolis, Indianapolis. www.discoverfountainsquare.com. 317-634-5079 x 22. Game Space Dance Dance Revolution, Guitar Hero, Risk, Apples to Apples, and more! Play your favorite games with your friends. For more information, call the Young Adult desk at 814-3983. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-5714292. Groovin in The Garden presents Donn & Savannah Smith Tuesdays 5 - 7, Saturdays 2 - 5. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516. International Talk Like a Pirate Day Arrrr! Come aboard as we celebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day. Learn to speak like a pirate and enjoy special activities that will highlight swashbucklin’ pirates o’ old. 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.ChildrensMuseum.org. (317) 334-3322.

Investigating UFOs in Indiana Find out about UFO investigation methods and recent UFO sightings in Indiana! This is the semi annual meeting of Mutual UFO Network of Indiana. All ages. 12:30 - 5 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-738-2833. IUPUI Regatta 9 a.m. TBD. Admiral Raymond Spruance Memorial Basin. North end of Downtown Central Canal, Indianapolis. www.discovercanal.com. Kenny Chesney’s Corona Extra Sun City Carnival Tour $20 - $125. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452. Novel Tea: Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. $30/person, $25 members of historical landmarks. Morris-Butler House Museum. 1204 N. Park Ave, Indianapolis. www.historiclandmarks.org. 317-636-5409. Shop for Awareness Community Yard Sale benefiting the Alzheimer’s Association American Village • 2026 East 54th St., Indpls. • 253-6950 Beech Grove Meadows • 2002 Albany St., Beech Grove • 783-2911 Brownsburg Meadows • 2 East Tilden, Brownsburg 46112 • 852-8585 Clearwater Commons • 4519 E. 82nd St., Indpls. 46250 •

849-2244 Community Nursing & Rehabilitation • 5600 E. 16th St., Indpls. • 356-0911 Eagle Valley Meadows • 3017 Valley Farms Rd., Indpls. • 293-2555 Forest Creek Commons • 6510 U.S. 31 South, Indpls • 783-4663 Forest Creek Village • 525 E. Thompson Rd., Indpls. • 787-8253 Franklin Meadows • 1285 W. Jefferson St., Franklin • 736-9113 Maple Park Village • 776 N. Union St., Westfield • 896-2515 Meadow Lakes • 200 Meadow Lakes Drive, Mooresville • 8341791 North Capitol Nursing & Rehabilitation • 2010 N. Capitol Ave., Indpls. • 924-5821 Riverwalk Commons • 7235 Riverwalk Way North, Noblesville • 770-0011 Riverwalk Village • 295 Westfield Road, Noblesville • 773-3760 Rosegate • 7525 Rosegate Drive, Indpls. • 889-0100 Rosegate (Healthcare) • 7510 Rosegate Drive, Indpls. • 889-9300 Rosewalk at Lutherwoods • 1301 N. Ritter Ave., Indpls. • 356-2760 Rosewalk Village of Indianapolis • 1302 N. Lesley Ave., Indpls. • 353-8061 Spring Mill Meadows • 2140 West 86th Street, Indpls. • 8727211 Washington Healthcare Center • 8201 W. Washington St., Indpls • 2446848 Zionsville Meadows • 675 South Ford Road, Zionsville • 873-5205 . 9:00 am-1:00 pm. www.AmericanSrCommunities.com. Star and Satellite Gazing Tours Star and Satellite Gazing Tours Join Dr. Ronald Weiss, adjunct professor of Astronomy and Earth Science for Vincennes University, for a fascinating evening of star and satellite watching. Amateur astronomer Dan Malone of the Wabash Valley Astronomical Society will be assisting Dr. Weiss as the group learns about and attempts to view the stars, planets, constellations, satellites, and deep sky objects that are visible each month. In the event that the sky is cloudy, an indoor astronomy program is planned. You are welcome to bring your own telescope or binoculars, but we ask that pets are left at home. This program will meet near the Taylor Center of Natural History. Dates: Saturday, September 19 at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, October 17 at 7:00 p.m. Saturday, November 14 at 5:30 p.m. Cost: Free Ages: Best for families with school aged children and adults Location: Strawtown Koteewi Park . Strawtown Koteewi Park.

Youth & Teen Creative Art Sampler Here is your chance to try glass blowing! You will see demonstrations and then be free to try your very own hands-on project. This is a great way to try it out without the long-term commitment. Come by yourself or with a friend and have a fun Saturday at the Art Center. The price of your class also includes the cost of any materials you will use. Dress is casual, creativity can be a messy business! Ages 10-16. Member: $18 Nonmember: $20 . 10am- 12pm. member: $18; nonmember: $20. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. 14th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest TBD. TBD. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. indyirishfest.com. 317-257-55610. Antigone on the IMA Grounds 6:30 p.m. $10 members and students with ID, $15 public. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. INDY KIDS CONSIGNMENT SALE Indy Kids Consignment is now registering consignors and volunteers for our Fall 2009 sale. The Fall sale is SEPTEMBER 18-19 from 9am-5pm at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds, Expo Hall A Indy Kids Consignment started in 2005 and has had two sales a year since then. We have grown from a sale in the front yard to offering 4,000 square feet of high quality, new and gently used children’s clothing, gear and furniture, as well as maternity clothing. Register now to sell your items at a sale with experience that draws over a thousand shoppers and over 100 consignors at each sale. For complete details visit our website at www.ikcsale.com. 9am-5pm. Free. Hamilton County 4H Fairgrounds. 2003 Pleasant Street, Noblesville. WWW. IKCSALE.COM. Country Fair Bring the whole family for a celebration of Indiana’s farm heritage! Head to the re-created 1886 agricultural fair to see the area’s largest hog, visit the zany Tent of Wonders, play a game of historic baseball or taste test delicious homemade pies. Then watch an antique tractor parade to see how tractors have changed through the years. Grind corn, meet the animals, participate in agricultural equipment demonstrations, sample heirloom apples and enjoy festival foods and music. 10 am - 5 pm. Free w/ general admission: $12/adult, $11/senior 65+, $8/youth, f. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., fishers. www.connerprairie.org. 317.776.6006.


reso urc es KidsArt: Creating with Purpose: Come with your child to this creatively fun class. Adults, along side your child, will learn techniques for introducing creative projects into your child’s daily activities, which include expression, exploration, learning and play. Colors, textures, materials and interaction with other adults and children will stimulate your child. Ages 3-5 with adult. Price is listed per person. Taggart Studio. Member: $76 Nonmember: $79 Saturdays 10-11 am Session I: September 19-October 24 . 10am- 11am. member: $76; nonmember: $79. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464.

Sunday, 20 Aidan’s Feast Aidan’s Feast is an annual, family centered, not for profit event raising money for the SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) Center of Indiana. All proceeds raised by the event directly benefit families in Indiana by: •Providing educational material and current research information concerning SIDS. •Providing SIDS risk reduction and safe sleep practices for infants. •Holding regular monthly bereavement support meetings to give emotional support for grieving families that have lost and infant to SIDS. •Keeping Indiana babies alive through the Beds for Babies Program. The SIDS Center of Indiana provides a safe sleeping environment to infants whose families cannot afford cribs. Aidan’s Feast was founded by Sharea Brehm in August of 2003 to honor her son, Aidan Robert Brehm who died of SIDS on Sept 24, 2002. Aidan was 3 months and 3 days old at the time of his death. To date, Aidan’s Feast has raised $55,000 in the fight against SIDS. Come with your family and join us for a fabulously fun time at Aidan’s Feast!! This year Aidan’s Feast is happy to be sponsored by Meijer, Defender Security, and WFMS. It will be held at The Children’s Museum on September 9th from 12:30 – 4pm. Tickets are purchased at the event and include full admission to The Children’s Museum as well as all Aidan’s Feast activities. Aidan’s Feast provides refreshments, activities for children and adults, and a silent auction. The WFMS “Friends & Neighbors” Van will have a live broadcast, music videos, karaoke, and give-aways. Jump for Joy! will provide the Tumblebus and two ‘Mik the Music Man’ shows. In addition, the Colts in Motion Van will be present featuring Colts memorabilia and interactive entertainment. The cost is $20 for adults, $8 for children ages 2 -17, and children under 2 are free. To learn more about the SIDS Center of Indiana, please visit www.insids.org . 317-826-2962. Big Band Dance Series 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. $14. Indiana Roof Ballroom. 140 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indianaroof.com. 317-236-1870.

Holliday Park Summer Concerts: Indianapolis Symphonic Band Bring a picnic and enjoy the music of the Indianapolis Symphonic Band. 3:00 pm. Free. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark. org. 3173277180. Kids, Try Ice Hockey! He/She Shoots, He/She Scores! What a great way to have fun and learn the game of Ice Hockey. We want you, even if you have never played before, even if you haven’t ice skated much. No experience necessary. We provide the equipment and coaches. Come, give ice hockey a try! WHO: All Boys and Girls ages 5-12 years 2:30pm: Sign In 2:30-3:00pm: Equipment Fitting and Off- ice fun 3:004:00pm: On- ice with coaches 4:00-4:30pm: Question and Answer information available . 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $10. The Forum at Fishers Ice Arena. 9022 E. 126th St. Behind the Fishers YMCA, Fishers. wwwfishersyouthhockey. com. info@fishersyouthhockey.com or call: 849-9930x103. 14th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest TBD. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. indyirishfest.com. 317257-55610. Antigone on the IMA Grounds 6:30 p.m. $10 members and students with ID, $15 public. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659..

Monday, 21 Bookworms For children in grades 1-2. Themes for the month: Oceans of Fun and Backstage at the Library. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 8443363. 4:00 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib. in.us/. 317-571-4292. Mad Hatters What do pirates, princesses, and party goers have in common? Hats, of course! Create a few crafty hats of your own to wear and share! Grades K-5. 4:30 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin.org. 317885-1330.

World Alzheimer’s Day September 21st is World Alzheimer’s Day, and the Alzheimer’s Association is asking people in the United States and in Indiana to join those around the world in turning their attention to this disease and joining the fight against it. The Alzheimer’s Association’s commitment to raising awareness on World Alzheimer’s Day is part of an accelerating worldwide effort to find better ways to treat the disease, delay its onset, or prevent it from developing. Join us on the Circle in downtown Indianapolis at 12:30 p.m. as we turn the circle purple. Wear your purple shirt and let’s advance Alzheimer’s awareness! Together we can move a nation. 11:00 am 1:00 pm. Free. Monument Circle. Meridian Street, Indianapolis. www.alz.org/indiana. 3175759620.

Tuesday, 22 Computer Classes: E-mail, the Basics Participants will learn how to send and receive e-mail. Teens to adults. 10:30 a.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin.org. 317-8851330. Time Travel Club Series: Ancient Egypt You’ve traveled around the world with the travel club, but now is your chance to go back in time! Learn about ancient customs, clothing, and daily life! Our first adventure will take us to Ancient Egypt. Grades K-6. 6 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560.

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are also available. 9-6pm. 7312 Copeland Rd., Indianapolis. www.localharvest.org/ farms/M21020. 317-862-1393. Cumberland Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Sunday, October 25, 2009. 8-12 noon. 11501 E. Washington St., Cumberland. www.town. cumberland.in.us. Danville Chamber Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, September 29, 2009. 8-12 noon. Northwest Corner of the Town Square, Danville. www.danville.org. Design & Dinner (Adult/ Child Ceramic): Occurring Each Monday Beginning Monday, September 14, 2009 Through Monday, October 19, 2009. An excellent way to turn dinner time into quality, creative time! A perfect evening for parents and children, friends or just by yourself. Bring a brown bag dinner or swing by your favorite takeout and have dinner while watching a presentation on an exciting clay hand building project. After dinner, roll up your sleeves and get ready for some creative fun.You and your child will learn some basic hand building methods that we will use in creating our projects. Some of the projects may include crazy critters, fancy exposed coil bowls, Mardi Gras masks, and /or coil bird houses. You supply the food and the Art Center takes care of the rest. For children ages 5 & up. Class fee is per person. Ceramics Studio East. Member: $91 Nonmember: $94 Mondays 5:30- 6:45 pm Session I: September 14- October 19 . 5:30pm- 6:45pm. member: $91; member: $94. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. Drop-in Art-making: Creative Visitor Experiences Occurring Daily Through Monday, January 18, 2010. Visitors may drop into the IMA’s Star Studio this fall for the exhibition Smuggling Daydreams into Reality and a free artmaking activity. Visitors can record and contribute a “dream” of their own by using the provided art materials. Visitor’s representations of their dreams will be displayed within the exhibition. All day. FREE. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331. Fall at the Propylaeum Occurring Daily Beginning Tuesday, September 01, 2009 Through Monday, November 30, 2009. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Various. The Propylaeum. 1410 N Delaware St, Indianapolis. 317-638-7881. Fashion in Bloom Occurring Daily Through Sunday, October 25, 2009. Tue., Wed., Sat. 11 am - 5 pm; Thu., Fri. 11 am - 9 pm; Sun. noon-5. FREE. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659.

Wednesday, 23 Ace Lacewig Bug Detectives Don’t miss the delightful story of Ace Lacewing! Inspired by Philip Marlowe and other gumshoe detectives, Ace is hot on the trail of bad bugs and fleeing suspects. We’ll hone our detective skills and watch a film clip for some old-fashioned detective fun! Ages 7 - 11. 4:30

First Friday Evening at WonderLab Occurring on the first Friday of each Month Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. Enjoy extended evening hours until 8:30 pm at one of the top 25 science museums in the US. Reduced admission of just $3 per person after 5:00 pm. Pizza available to purchase at the museum. 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm. $3 per person. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab. org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25. First Friday Family Movie Night Ongoing on the first Friday of each Month. For ages 5-12; must be accompanied by an adult. 6-7:30pm. FREE.Washington Park. 3130 E. 30th St, Indianapolis. www. indyparks.org. 317-327-PARK.

Tickets On Sale Now! KingTut.org

Witness over 100 priceless artifacts from the tomb of King Tut and other Egyptian Pharaohs!

Proud Cultural Partner

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An Exhibition from

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INDYSCHILD.COM 53


Saturday, Sept. 26, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Knee-slappin’ entertainment % Sons of the San Joaquin—Western songs and hymns % Dovie Thompson—traditional Native storytelling % Janet Gilroy—campfire songs from the old West % Return to the Wild—falconry demonstration % Hopalong Cassidy—first-person interpretive storytelling % Mariachi Sol Jaliscience—traditional Mexican folk music

Bang-up family activities % Stagecoach rides % Cow chip tossing % Bandana and cowboy hat decorating % Leather stamping and tooling % Cattle roping % Panning for gold …and a whole lot more— MORE entertainment, MORE handson fun, plus great Western food!

Admission: Member/Adult: $9 Youth (5 to 17): $5 Advance sale tickets available at the Eiteljorg Museum and select Indiana Marsh and O’Malia’s locations or by calling 800-622-2024.

Wear your Western clothing and receive $1 off admission!

White River State Park • Downtown Indianapolis

636-WEST • www.eiteljorg.org


reso urc es p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. School Age Extra series: Back to School Blast! Whether you’re excited about the start of a new school year or not, this program is sure to make you laugh! We’ll be telling tall tales and silly stories all about teachers, principals, and librarians. We’ll play some silly games, watch a goofy movie, and then you’ll have a chance to hear about some of the newest books that have just arrived at the library. We’ll wrap it all up with a craft that will help get your school year started out right! Grades 1-5. 6:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317-535-6206. Shake, Rattle and Read For children ages 19 months – 3 years & their caregivers. Toddlers with a favorite adult will experience the discovery of books. Includes 30 minutes of rhymes, fingerplays, and lots of wiggling, singing, dancing fun. This action packed program encourages the child’s emerging language skills. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 8443363. 9:15 a.m. or 10:15 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib. in.us/. 317-571-4292. Sign Language for Babies and Toddlers Sign language instructor Joanne Soller will teach basic signs and give advice to parents who would like to communicate more effectively with their little ones. Babies and toddlers welcome, but not required. Adults . 6:30 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www.jcplin. org. 317-885-1330.

Thursday 24 Ballroom Dance Experience Anyone can learn to dance! Emily and Matt Collins of OnTrack Fitness will show you how in this fun two-hour introduction to ballroom dance. It’s great exercise, too! Sign up soon! Refreshments Provided. Teens to adults. 6:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317535-6206. Create a Lasting Memoir Learn how to create a lasting and changeable document of your life story. This is a hands-on computer based class and participants should have some typing and Internet skills. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For further information contact Melissa at 7703235. 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www. hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Grossology Want to learn the science behind all things gross? Join us at the Franklin Branch as we explore icky, sticky, gross stuff in your body! Grades 1-5. 4 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: Franklin Branch. 401 State St., Franklin. www.jcplin.org. 317-7382833. Library Laughfest featuring Dave Dugan Advance Tickets: $10.00 (Purchase tickets at Bub’s Burgers & Ice Cream, Bub’s Café, or the Carmel Clay Public Library Friends Book-

store). Tickets at the door: $15.00 Guest Emcee: Julia Moffitt, Channel 13 News Anchor Dave Dugan has been enjoyed by audiences around the country through his numerous appearances at the Comedy Store in Los Angeles and television appearances that include HBO, Comedy Central, FOX, VH-1 and The Arsenio Hall Show. For additional information please call or e-mail Foundation Director Ruth Nisenshal at 317-814-3905 or rnisenshal@carmel.lib.in.us. All proceeds benefit the Carmel Clay Public Library Foundation. 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. $10.00 Advanced; $15.00 at the Door. Carmel High School. 520 E. Main Street, Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317814-3905.

Spanish for Beginners Learn basic Spanish vocabulary and conversation, along with helpful phrases for travel, shopping, and work. Students are encouraged to purchase the book, Communicating In Spanish (Novice Level), a paperback by Conrad Schmitt and Protase Woodford. 7 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

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Mad Anne Bailey, the Huntress Meet “Mad Anne the Huntress” a wife, hunter, scout and messenger during the Indian Wars on the American frontier. Audiences young and old will enjoy this historic characterization which includes period clothing and an interactive display of weapons and accoutrements. All ages. 6:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560.

Madame Walker Theatre 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. $10; $10 buffet. 617 Indiana Ave., Indianapolis. www.walkertheatre.com. 317-236-2099.

Social Security, Long Term Care Insurance and More Whether you are nearing retirement or already enjoying that stage in your life, there are many questions that arise about your finances and how to maintain your lifest yle. Meet with the experts as we look at the hot topics surrounding many Americans today - Social Security, long term care insurance, and fixed and variable annuities. Social Security topics include taxes, inflation, stability and myths. Long term care insurance topics include what is covered, how much is the right amount and the various options. Fixed and variable annuities topics include possible pitfalls, strategies for seniors and terms. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library

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at 776-6939 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For further information contact Melissa at 770-3235. 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Living Proof 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www. ScottysBrewhouse.com. 317-571-0808.

Read ‘N Feed TeenZone Book Club Join us for an hour of disc u s sion and sn acking. September is fantasy month. Come and tell us about your favorite fantasy book. Stop by the TeenZone for more info or to pick up a copy of the book. Registration is requested, and participants must be in grades 7-12...oh, and should probably have read the book! Register by calling the TeenZone at 7703242 or online at www. hepl.lib.in.us. 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www. hepl.lib.in.us. 317-7731384.

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Blood Drive for the Indiana Blood Center Donate blood and save a life! It is easy and generally takes less than one hour. You must be at least 17 years old, 110 lbs., be in good health and pass a brief mini-physical/medical history review. A valid picture ID is also required. All donors at this drive will receive the Library’s 10th Anniversary insulated tote bag, perfect for grocery shopping or picnics. For more information, or to schedule a specific donation time that is convenient for you, please call the library at 571-4292. 11:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib. in.us/. 317-571-4292. Friday Family Fun series: A Hiking We Will Go! Put on your hiking boots and join us as we celebrate the great outdoors! We’ll share stories, songs, and games all about our favorite outdoor activities. We’ll settle down to a short movie and finish with a special craft. All ages. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Clark Pleasant Branch. 530 Tracy Rd., Ste. 250, New Whiteland. www.jcplin.org/. 317535-6206. Holliday Park Family Friday Night: Owls! Tired of spending your Friday night in front of the TV? Come out to Holliday Park to share in adventures that are fun for the whole family. We will start with time around the campfire and then focus on the topic of the evening. Roasting sticks and s’mores provided, you are welcome to bring hot dogs and make a meal of it! All ages, registration required. 6:30-8:00 pm. $3/person. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www. hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

CineLatino: South America on Film Friday; 7 p.m., Saturday; 12:30 - 5 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www. imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. Indiana Disability & Amputee Golf Outing Disabled and Amputee Golfers looking for a challenging, fun, competitive venue will find the third annual 2009 Indiana Disability & Amputee Golf Outing just what they’ve been seeking. Each Golfer will be announced on the first tee. A Saturday evening banquet and awards presentation will conclude the event. For more information, contact John Stack at johnstackgolfdome@juno. com . Lunch, 11:30 a.m.; Shotgun Scramble 1 p.m. $80

Fishers Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, October 06, 2009. 8-12 noon. Fishers Train Station. 11601 Municipal Drive, Fishers. www. fishersfarmersmarket.com. 317-578-0700. Footprints: Balancing Nature’s Diversity Occurring Daily Beginning Tuesday, September 01, 2009 Through Sunday, October 18, 2009. Learning from our past makes a better future for us all.Try to imagine the types of animals that lived in Indiana 200 or 12,000 years ago. Since the Ice Age, our wildlife has grown much scarcer and less diverse.This exhibit draws on the museum’s rich collection of prehistoric and more recent specimens to show how animals and humans depend on one another — and the habitat we must share — for survival. Come learn about your own footprint and what you can personally do to preserve Indiana’s habitats. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637. Franklin Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, September 08, 2009. 8-11am. Johnson County Courthouse. www.franklinparks.org. Free Community Drum Circle Ongoing Each Thursday. Bongo Boy Music School is proud to announce our new affiliation with REMO, Inc. Bongo Boy Music School hosts a FREE Community Drum Circle every Thursday Night. No experience necessary. All ages and levels are welcome. Drums will be provided by Bongo Boy Music School and REMO. Parents bring your kids. Kids bring your parents and friends. 7:30-8:30pm. FREE. Bongo Boy Music School. 8481 Bash St. Suite 1100, Indianapolis. www.bongoboymusic.com. 317-595-9065. Free Family Tours at the IMA Occurring on the second Saturday and fourth Saturday of each Month Through Saturday, May 22, 2010. The IMA offers free, 30-minute tours for families with children of all ages on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331. Friends of the Library Bookshop Occurring Every Wed & Sat Beginning Wednesday, September 02, 2009 Through Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Friends of the Library Bookshop is open to the public. Most materials sell for one dollar. Book bags, calendars, book lights, and bookmarks are also available. Saturdays from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM and Wednesdays from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Garden Walks Occurring Each Sunday Beginning Sunday, August 16, 2009 Through Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Free guided walks through the IMA’s gardens on Saturdays and Sundays. Meet at the main visitor entrance to Lilly House. 1pm. Free. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331. Girls Night Out Ongoing on the fourth Saturday of each Month. Massage, Hand Treatments, Foot Treatments, Chair Massage, Facial Massage, Brow Wax, Food & Fun. Bring a friend and come hang with the girls . 6-9PM. Choose 3 services for $30. Eden’s Pathway. 5496 Emerson Way, Indianapolis. www.edenspathway.com. 317.205.9377. Greenfield Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. 8-12 noon. 620 N. Apple St., Greenfield. www.hancockharvestcouncil.com. 317-462-1113.

Dance Class

for Kids

•Ages 18 mos - Adult •Tiny Tot, Tap, Jazz, Ballet, Lyrical, Pointe •Professional Instruction •Viewing Windows •Performance Opportunities •Online Registration

G. Scotten Talent Center Celebrating 10 Fabulous Years in Fishers! gscotten.com ~ 317-841-1919

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covers both days for Disabled & Amputee Golfers; $100 per da. Valle Vista Golf Club & Conference Center. 755 E Main St, Greenwood. 317-786-2663/317-694-3189.

Saturday 26 Bellies and Babies Expo The World’s Biggest Baby Shower returns to the Bellies and Babies Expo Saturday, September 26th at the Indiana Convention Center from 10am-5pm. The first 1500 people to enter and attend one seminar

receive a FREE Fisher Price baby gift. In addition, all attendees have a chance to win strollers, car seats, high chairs and more in each seminar. The goal of the event is to “Get Informed, Get Inspired, Get Motivated!” . 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. $10. Indiana Convention Center. 100 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. www.belliesandbabiesexpo. com. 317-262-3400.

These program is sponsored by the Hamilton County Mental Health America and is open to the public. For further information contact Mary Halladay of the Mental Health Association of Hamilton County at 776-3455 or e-mail her at maryhalladay@ msn.com. 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Bob and Tom Comedy All Stars 7 & 10 p.m. Various Prices. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www. livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469.

Opening Night Gala: Salute to America 6 p.m. $35 - $85. Hilbert Circle Theatre. 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. www. indianapolissymphony.org. 317-262-1100.

Depression: Out of the Shadows

Brought to you by:

Saturday September 26th Indiana Convention Center | 10am-5pm | $10 www.belliesandbabiesexpo.com

PlayFit: World Wide Day of Play Come play with us! Special activities promoting active play and healthy choices will take place throughout the museum. Visit SciencePort to be one of the first families to discover the new Health House investigation. Learn how you can make healthy choices every day. Funded by Health Care Excel. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.ChildrensMuseum.org. (317) 334-3322. Smithsonian Day Enjoy free general admission for you and a guest to the Indiana State Museum and hundreds of museums and cultural venues nationwide. Present the Museum Day admission card to receive free general admission at participating Museum Day locations. The admission card is available in the September 2009 issue of Smithsonian magazine or downloadable via website. Free. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637. TOEFL Preparation This class is designed to help people prepare for the Test Of English as a Foreign Language exam. Participants will complete listening and writing assignments, and will practice advanced grammar exercises. The TOEFL is for students from other countries who plan on attending an American college or university. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www. hepl.lib.in.us. For more information, contact Sonya at 770-3251. 11:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl. lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Tree Identification 9 - 11:45 a.m. Members $35, Public $50. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. Adult & Child Ceramics: Need something fun and exciting to do with your child? Attend this class with your child/children and learn together. Create with clay making pieces of art using the methods of hand-building, free form sculpture from slabs of clay and the potter’s wheel. The class includes learning the process of firing from greenware to finished glazed pieces. Easy to do with amazing results. Ages 6 & up. Class fee is per person. Ceramics Studio West. Member: $152 Nonmember: $157 Saturdays 1-3 pm Session I: September 19- October 24 . 1pm- 3pm. members: $152; nonmember: $157. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. KidsArt: Creating with Purpose: Come with your child to this creatively fun class. Adults, along side your child, will learn techniques for introducing creative projects into your child’s daily activities, which include expression, exploration, learning and play. Colors, textures, materials and interaction with other adults and children will stimulate your child. Ages 3-5 with adult. Price is listed per person. Taggart Studio. Member: $76 Nonmember: $79 Saturdays 10-11 am Session I: September 19-October 24 . 10am- 11am. member: $76; nonmember: $79. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. CineLatino: South America on Film

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Friday; 7 p.m., Saturday; 12:30 - 5 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317920-2659. Indiana Disability & Amputee Golf Outing Disabled and Amputee Golfers looking for a challenging, fun, competitive venue will find the third annual 2009 Indiana Disability & Amputee Golf Outing just what they’ve been seeking. Each Golfer will be announced on the first tee. A Saturday evening banquet and awards presentation will conclude the event. For more information, contact John Stack at johnstackgolfdome@ juno.com . Lunch, 11:30 a.m.; Shotgun Scramble 1 p.m. $80 covers both days for Disabled & Amputee Golfers; $100 per da. Valle Vista Golf Club & Conference Center. 755 E Main St, Greenwood. 317-7862663/317-694-3189.

Sunday 27 Holliday Park Sunday Afternoon Hike Join us each Sunday afternoon as we hit the trail for a relaxing stroll, discovering what’s new in the park and enjoying the sights and sounds of nature. All ages, registration required. 2:00-3:00 pm. $3/person. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark. org. 3173277180. WonderLab’s Savory Science: Hive to Honeypot Extract honey from its source in the hive and learn about its fascinating health benefits and many flavors as you make a light meal to enjoy. Advance registration is recommended but not required. 1:00 - 3:00 pm. Members: $5 per person | Non-Members: $10 per person (includes m. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25.

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Your Curious Child and You Early Literacy Program This early literacy program is for Early Talkers and Talkers (newborn through four years) and a parent or caregiver. Hear stories and participate in activities that encourage one of the six skills children need to be ready to learn to read. Registration is required. Register by calling the Youth Services Department at 770-3216 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. 11 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.

Tuesday 29 Your Curious Child and You Early Literacy Program This early literacy program is for Early Talkers and Talkers (newborn through four years) and a parent or caregiver. Hear stories and participate in activities that encourage one of the six skills children need to be ready to learn to read. Registration is required. Register by calling the Youth Services Department at 770-3216 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. 10 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.


reso urc es Greenwood Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, October 13, 2009. 8-noon. Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www.geocities.com/ greenwood/farmersmarket. Groovin’ in the Garden Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, September 05, 2009 Through Tuesday, September 29, 2009. Saturday 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516. Home School Skates Ongoing on the first Friday of each Month. Great Family Music Mix $3.50/per person includes skates Immediate family of 6-10 $15.00 11 or more $1.00/per person additional Ask about our special pricing for immediate family groups of 6 or more! . 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. $3.50 per person, includes skate rental. Skateland. 3902 N. Glen Arm Road, Indianapolis. www.skatelandindy.com. (317) 291-6795. Hoosier Salon: The 85th Annual Exhibition Occurring Mon-Sat Through Monday, September 07, 2009. 9 - 5. Museum Admission: $7; $6.50 seniors; $4 children ages 3 - 12; FR. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.IndianaMuseum.org. 317232-1637. Indy Jazz Fest Occurring Daily Beginning Monday, September 21, 2009 Through Sunday, September 27, 2009. TBD. TBD. The Lawn at White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyjazzfest.net. 317-940-6189. Irvington Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Sunday Beginning Sunday, August 16, 2009 Through Wednesday, October 14, 2009. Northwest corner of park. Noon3pm. Ellenberger Park. 5301 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. Junior Gardener Club Ongoing on the second Saturday of each Month. Children ages 6-12 are invited to enjoy a fun-filled time in the Children’s Garden. There will be a different topic each month. Registration required. 11am-12pm. Free. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. www.garfieldgardensconservatory.org. 317-327-7580. Kelsay Farm Tours Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Open to the general public on weekends starting Oct. 3 and ending Oct. 25. (Fridays 6-10 PM, Saturdays Noon – 10 PM and Sundays Noon – 6 PM) Admission is $7/ person and includes all farm activities and tours (children 1 and under are free). Open for group reservations only during the weekdays in Oct. (Groups of 15 or more receive a discount of $5/ person.). Kelsay Farms. 6848 N. 250 E., Whiteland. www.kelsayfarms.com. 317-535-4136. KidsArt: Creating with Purpose: Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, September 19, 2009 Through Saturday, October 24, 2009. Come with your child to this creatively fun class. Adults, along side your child, will learn techniques for introducing creative projects into your child’s daily activities, which include expression, exploration, learning and play. Colors, textures, materials and interaction with other adults and children will stimulate your child. Ages 3-5 with adult. Price is listed per person. Taggart Studio. Member: $76 Nonmember: $79 Saturdays 10-11 am Session I: September 19-October 24 . 10am- 11am. member: $76; nonmember: $79. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. Locally Grown Gardens Personal Produce Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. For questions email lgg1967@gmail.

com. Mon-Fri 9-8pm, Sat 8-8pm, Sun 10-8pm. 1050 E. 54th St., Indianapolis. 317-255-8555.

Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464.

Making it in the Midwest: Artists Who Chose to Stay Occurring Daily Through Sunday, October 18, 2009. Explore the challenges facing working artists in the Midwest and discover the extraordinary talent found throughout Indiana and the surrounding region. Making it in the Midwest will bring together an important array of historical works, many of which are in private collections and have not been seen publicly for decades. By presenting both historical and contemporary perspectives, the exhibit uncovers the ways artists have earned recognition when working outside the centers of the art world. 9a-5p M-Sat; 11a-5p Sun. $7.50 Adults/$4.00 children. Indiana State Museum. 650 West Washington St., Indpls. www.indianamuseum. org. 317.232.1637..

President Benjamin Harrison Home Tour Info Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. Tours are on the hour and half hour, 10 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Sunday tours in June and July from 12.30 - 3.30 p.m. Holiday closings: Harrison Home is closed Jan. 1 - 18, Indy 500 Parade and Race days, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and December 24, 25, 26 and 31, 2009 and Jan. 1, 2010. AAA discounts are available; $5 adults and $2.50 students. Group rates are available; reservations must be made two weeks in advance. Please call to schedule (317.631.1888.) . 10 a.m. - 3.30 p.m. Adults (18-64) $8; Students (5 to 17) $3; Seniors (65 and older). President Benjamin Harrison Home. 1230 N. Delaware St., Indianapolis. www.pbhh.org. 317.631.1888.

National Missing Children’s Day Ongoing Annually each August 12. Child Shield USA offers $2,000 in FREE safety benefits to every parent in honor of National Missing Children’s Day, May 25, 2009. www. ChildShieldUSA/gick. 317-213-7578.

Rita’s Backyard Occurring Daily Through Saturday, May 01, 2010. New this year: locally grown, naturally grown fruits and veggies featuring many heirloom varieties. Open year round. Rita’s Backyard. 12244 E. 116th St., Fishers. 317-842-4011.

Nature Crafts Ongoing Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, August 19, 2009. We’re going to use items from nature to make fun and creative crafts to hang in your home and share with your friends and family. 5:30-6:30pm. $6. Raymond Park/ Indy Island. 8575 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis. 317-327-PARK.

Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery Occurring Each Sunday Beginning Sunday, August 16, 2009 Through Saturday, October 31, 2009.We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/ person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317733-1700.

Noblesville Main Street Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Wednesday, October 14, 2009. 8-12 noon. 205 W Connor St., Noblesville. www.noblesvillemainstreet.com. 317-776-0205. O.K. Program (For Boys) Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Police officers work with boys who want to follow the right path in life. Boys will learn how to address diversity, respond to problems at school and how to handle other issues. 10 am - 4 pm. FREE. Windsor Village Park. 2501 Kenyon Ave, Indianapolis. www.indygov.org. 317-327-7162. Parents Night Out Ongoing Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009. Parents, do you need a night out without the kids? Bring them to Bates on the first Saturday of the month for a few hours of freedom. Kids will be able to swim, watch movies, and participate in other activities. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Don’t forget your bathing suits. 6-9pm. $5. LaShonna Bates Aquatic Center. 1450 S. Reisner St., Indianapolis. 317-327-PARK. Plainfield Town Center Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, August 19, 2009 Through Saturday, October 03, 2009. 4-7pm. Plainfield Chamber of Commerce. 210 W Main St, Plainfield. 317839-3800. Pre-School Mixed Media: Occurring Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, September 16, 2009 Through Wednesday, October 21, 2009. In this class we will use stories and picture books to introduce some of the world’s greatest artists and art. In a fun and entertaining way, we will learn about various artistic styles, techniques, and media. Using our stories as a springboard, we will experiment with various techniques and media to create original works of art. Students may get mess in class, so please have them wear their art clothes. Former students are welcome to this class, projects will be different. Ages 4 & 5. Painting Studio. Member: $76 Nonmember: $79 Wednesdays 4:30-5:30 pm Session I: September 16- October 21 . 4:30pm- 5:30pm. member: $76; nonmember: $79. Indianapolis

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers Occurring Daily (except Tue) Beginning Thursday, August 20, 2009 Through Sunday, October 04, 2009. various. $34 - $57. Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre. 9301 N. Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.beefandboards.com. 317872-9664. Spencer Farm Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, December 01, 2009. Mon-Sat 9-9pm, Sun 12 noon-8pm. Spencer Farm. 7177 E. 161st St., Noblesville. 317-776-1560. Star Wars™: The Clone Wars Exhibition Occurring Daily Through Sunday, January 31, 2010.This spring, a galaxy far, far away comes to The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis when STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS Exhibition opens March 23. The visual exhibition features artwork, costumes and other pieces used in the concept and production for STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS, the first-ever animated feature and television series from Lucasfilm Animation. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.ChildrensMuseum.org. 317-334-3322. Stonycreek Farm Occurring Mon-Sat Through Tuesday, December 01, 2009. U-pick available. Mon-Sat 10-5pm. Stonycreek Farm. 11366 State Road 38 E, Noblesville. www.stonycreekfarm.net. 317-773-3344. Story Time Ongoing Each Thursday. Come listen to stories, do finger plays, and sing alongs. Great fun for pre-school ages. Stay for the Make It Take It Craft immediately following. No registration required. 10:00am. Free. Beech Grove Public Library. 1102 Main St, Beech Grove. 317-7884203. Stout’s Melody Acres Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Purchase fruits and veggies. M-Sat 9-7pm, Sun 11-6pm. Stout’s Melody Acres. 1169 N. State Rd. 135, Franklin.

Take Me There: EgyptOpening Day Ongoing Daily. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Museum Admission: $13.50; $12.50 seniors; $8.50 ages 2-17; FREE. The Children’s Museum. 3000 N. Meridian St, Indianapolis. www.childrensmuseum. org/. (317) 334-3322. Taylor’s Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. 2434 E. 750 N, Whiteland. 317-8819611. The Apple Works Farm Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. 9-7pm. The Apple Works. 8157 S. 250 W, Trafalgar. www.apple-works.com. 317-8789317. The County Market Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, June 01, 2010. Restaurant, craft market, farmers’ market and pumpkin fest. The County Market. 795 S. US Hwy 421, Zionsville. 317-769-4415. The Most Damaging Wound Occurring Daily Beginning Thursday, September 03, 2009 Through Wednesday, September 23, 2009. Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. $15 - $20. The Phoenix Theatre. 749 N. Park Ave, Indianapolis. www. phoenixtheatre.org/. 317-635-7529. The Old Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. 9-8pm.The Old Farm Market. 9613 E US Hwy 36, Avon. www.oldfarmmarket.com. 317-271-3447. Tot-Playgroup Occurring Every Mon, Wed & Fri Beginning Friday, August 14, 2009 Through Friday, April 01, 2011. Tot-playgroup is for parents to use the Greenwood Community Center to workout while their child is in a supervised, structured, playful enviornment.This program is offered for children ages 1-7 on Monday, Wednesday, Friday mornings from 8:30am-11:00am. You can pay by the session or per day. 8:30am-11:00am M,W,F. Six week session: $36/resident $54/ non-resident. Daily fee: $4. Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov. 317-881-4545. Trader’s Point Creamery Green Market Occurring Each Friday Beginning Friday, August 14, 2009 Through Saturday, May 01, 2010. Producing fresh creamline whole milk, chocolate milk, plain and fruit yogurts. Fri. May-Oct 4-7pm, Nov-Apr 9-12noon on Sat. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.traderspointcreamery.com. 317-7331700. Trader’s Point Creamery Weekend Fun Occurring Every Sun & Sat Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Saturday, March 06, 2010. Join us for our new Family Sunday Brunch.The adults will love our Brunch entrees which include a Farm Scramble, Eggs Benedict, Tortilla Egg Stack, Mimosas and more. The kids will go crazy over our kid-sized Belgian Waffles topped with gooey caramel apples, strawberries or chocolate chips, whipped cream and a dusting of powered sugar. Yummy kid-sized omelettes are also available! Wash it all down with our famous Hot Chocolate! Can’t make it Sunday? Bring the kids to our Saturday Farmers Market and stay for either our hearty Breakfast Buffet of our popular Lunch. Sunday Brunch: 9-12pm; Sat Buffet: 9-11:30am; Sat Lunch: 12-3; Market 9-12pm. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.traderspointcreamery.com. 317-733-1700.

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Tuesday Night Street Legal Series Occurring Each Tuesday Beginning Tuesday, August 18, 2009 Through Tuesday, October 27, 2009. Drag racing open to any licensed driver who meets the rules and regulations of the raceway. Gates open at 5 pm, racing at 5:30 pm weather permitting. O’Reilly Raceway Park. 10267 E Us Highway 136, Indianapolis. www.oreillyracewaypark.com. 317-291-4090. Tuttle Orchards Occurring Mon-Sat Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Prepicked produce and upick available. 9-6pm M-Sat. Tuttle Orchards. 5717 N. 300 W, Greenfield. www. tuttleorchards.com. 317-326-2278. Washington Township Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Tuesday Beginning Tuesday, August 18, 2009 Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. 4:30-7:30pm. Washington Township Community Park. 1115 South County Rd 525 E, Avon. www. localharvest.org/farms/M21278. 317-7450785. Waterman’s Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. U-pick available. Open daily. Waterman’s Farm Market. 7010 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis. www.watermansfarmmarket.com. 317-356-6995. Whiteland Orchard Occurring Mon-Sat Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. M-Sat 9-6pm. Whiteland Orchard. 5559 N. Graham Rd,Whiteland. 317-535-8495. Writers Workshop Occurring Each Thursday Beginning Thursday, September 03, 2009 Through Thursday, September 24, 2009. A writers workshop will be offered each Thursday of each month. This group will learn how to provide constructive feedback, how, when and where to submit materials for publication, resources in the library to help direct your search for a publisher. The group will also work on unique, exciting writing exercises. Writers of all genres are welcome. Registration is not required. For further information contact Brian at 770-3229. 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl. lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Y-Teen Zone Ongoing Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009. A sage, fun hangout for teens ages 11-19. Tournaments, guest speakers, basketball, ping-pong, games, music, fitness and nutrition workshops, swimming, other special events adn computers. Participants may enter using their YMCA membership cards; those who are not members of the YMCA must have a school identification card and all must complete a registration form. 7-10pm. Free to members; $5 for all others. Benjamin Harrison YMCA. 5736 Lee Rd, Indianapolis. www. indymca.org/locations/branch.asp?id=18. 317-547-9622. Zionsville Farmers’ Market Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 15, 2009 Through Tuesday, September 01, 2009. 8-11am. Parking lot at Hawthorne and Main, Zionsville. 317733-6343. INDYSCHILD.COM 57


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Your Curious Child and You Early Literacy Program This early literacy program is for Early Talkers and Talkers (newborn through four years) and a parent or caregiver. Hear stories and participate in activities that encourage one of the six skills children need to be ready to learn to read. Registration is required. Register by calling the Youth Services Department at 770-3216 or online at www.hepl.lib. in.us. 11 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. 2009 Father/Son Colts Camp These camps offer fathers and sons (moms and son/daughters are welcome too) the opportunity to get an “inside” look at Colts football, not to mention tips on improving your game by the pros. Perfect your spiral or practice your end zone dance while you gain instruction from the experts on the field. Activities will include drills on the field, coaching and interaction with Colts players and alumni, great food from McAlister’s Deli and more. Camps are open to children ages 6 - 14. 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. $100 for one parent and one child; $50 per additional child. Indiana Farm Bureau Football Center. 7001 W. 56th St., Indianapolis. www.colts.com/events. Andrew Bird 7:30 p.m. Various Prices. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-6327469. Dining with Diabetes Dining with Diabetes is a four-week cooking school for people with diabetes and their families. Classes are designed to

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provide tools for self-management of this chronic disease. The program includes food demonstrations, food tasting, and active participation in learning self-management skills and techniques. Register in-person at any Johnson County Public Library branch, by calling 878-9560, or online at www.jcplin.org. After registering, mail a check for the registration fee ($20/person or $30/couple) to: Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service Johnson County Office 701 W. St. Rd. 144, Franklin, IN 46131. Make checks payable to Purdue Extension Johnson County, with “DWD” in the memo. 6 p.m. $20/person or $30/couple. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560.

Jewelry Design Class for Teens and Adults The instructor will design the project and provide all materials including tools. The materials are gemstones, glass and sterling silver. The class fee is $20.00 and 50% will be due at the time of registration and will be nonrefundable should you not attend class. Class space is limited so please call early! Register by calling the class instructor at 225-1111 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For further information contact Melissa at 770-3235. 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. $20. 50% due at the time of registration. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Terrific Twos Storytime 24-36 mos. 10:30 a.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. http://www.jcplin.org. 317-885-1330.

Wonderful Ones Storytime 12-24 mos. 9:30 a.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. http://www.jcplin.org. 317-8851330. Tuesday Night Street Legal Series Drag racing open to any licensed driver who meets the rules and regulations of the raceway. Gates open at 5 pm, racing at 5:30 pm weather permitting. O’Reilly Raceway Park. 10267 E Us Highway 136, Indianapolis. http:// www.oreillyracewaypark.com. 317291-4090. Groovin’ in the Garden Tuesday 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. http://www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516. Inglés para hispanohablantes - English for Spanish Speakers English for Spanish Speakers is a class for Latinos with very basic English skills. A bilingual teacher helps students practice basic vocabulary and grammar. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For more information, contact Sonya at 770-3251. 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Mini Monet: Explore with your child the colorful and creative world of paint and other mixed media materials. Adults and children

will be introduced and inspired by the work of Monet as well as other master artists. All students will be encouraged to have fun and express their own creativity. Ages 3-5 with adult. Price is per person. Printmaking Studio. Member: $76 Nonmember: $79 Tuesdays 1-2pm Session I: September 15-October 20 . 1pm- 2pm. member: $76; nonmember: $79. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464. Mixed Media for Young Children: A class designed for young children to develop skills and create art while experimenting with various artist’s tools, techniques and media. Ages 5-8. Taggart Studio. Member: $104 Nonmember: $108 Tuesdays 4:30- 6 pm Session I: September 15- October 20 . 4:30pm- 6pm. member: $104; nonmember: $108. Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. (317) 255-2464.

Wednesday 30 Book Discussion: Dewey: the Small-town Cat that Changed the World Adults. 1 p.m. Free. Johnson County Public Library: White River Branch. 1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood. www. jcplin.org. 317-885-1330. .

shopping corner

Your Money Buys MORE at JBF! Be a part of the Nation’s Leading Children’s & Maternity Consignment Sales Event!™ SHOP and get fabulous deals on clothes, toys & more! SELL your items as a consignor and earn 70%! Sign up online! VOLUNTEER and shop the best deals first! Details online!

HAMILTON COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

SEPTEMBER 24TH-26TH Thursday & Friday, 9am-7pm Saturday, 9am-2pm! Half Price Sale!

shop.sell.save.smart!™

jbfsale.com

Check website for details or call 317.379.9343 FREE ADMISSION WITH THIS AD! 58 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2009

Mad Adventure series: Wind Bags Dare you to blow up a three-foot bag of air! Can you float on air? Can you capture fifty feet of air? Find out in an hour of amazing science. Grades 2-6. 4:30 p.m. free. Johnson County Public Library: Trafalgar Branch. 424 Tower Street, Trafalgar. www.jcplin.org. 317-878-9560. Snow Patrol 7:30 p.m. Various Prices. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www. livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469. Using “Ancestry Library Edition” This “hands- on” class will show how to effectively search on Ancestry Library Edition. Participants are encouraged to bring information on ancestors they wish to research as there will be time at the end of the class to work on your own. Each participant will have access to a computer and basic computer skills are necessary to fully enjoy this workshop. Registration is required. Register by calling the Hamilton East Public Library at 776-6939 or online at www.hepl.lib.in.us. For further information contact Nancy at 770-3206. 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Free. Noblesville Library. One Library Plaza, Noblesville. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384.


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Celebrate your BIRTHDAY with us!

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party & entertainment directory

To be part of our monthly

Party & Entertainment Directory HUGE Indoor Party Zone!

Rainbow playsets! Now offeri ng Playhouses! Pay & Play Goalrilla basketball goals! Call for de tails! Huge Rokenbok and Thomas the Tank Engine play areas!

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Contact Rachel at Rachel@IndysChild.com

Indy’s Child Moonwalks and Inflatables

Call today to book your Bounce Zone Summer Special

CLEAN Units COURTEOUS Staff CONVENIENT FREE Set-up,Delivery & Pick-up $20.00 off your next rental when you mention this ad!!!

1 1/2 hour private party for 10 children only $125.00!! **limited time only. Some for a birthday, fieldtrip, restrictions apply. or any occasion party!

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577-5799 R E SO U RC E S

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classifieds

To Place Your Ad Here

contact Rachel at Rachel@IndysChild.com

BUBBLES THE CLOWN N’ COMPANY 317-773-1449 or at dlawallen16@sbcglobal.net

Express Sitter’s

A babysitting and Nanny Service

                  We send a babysitter or                         Nanny to your home,                    anytime that you need one.                     If you looking to run errands,      or just to have some time away, then           Express Sitters is your answer. 

Call 317-581-1182   www.expressitters.com

• Kid and Family DJ Services • Moonwalk Rentals • Inflatable Slide Rentals • Tumblebus Classes - Parties • School Life Skills Programs • Fun Concerts for Kids and Families • Mik by Himself or with the Bounce House Band

317-577-5799

www.jumpforjoyfun.com www.mikthemusicman.com

WANTED CHILDREN FOR LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

Children who do and do not stutter between the ages of 3 years and 5 years 11 months are being recruited for a research study on speech-language development and stuttering at IU. PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE $50 AS WELL AS FREE SPEECH-LANGUAGE TESTING.

To learn more, please visit our Web site www.indiana.edu/~spdislab or contact Dr. Julie Anderson at (812) 856-1240 or judander@indiana.edu INDYSCHILD.COM 59


peytonmanning.stvincent.org

“I have the privilege to care for children and, through medical or surgical treatments, restore them to health.” - chris miyamoto, md

Pediatric ENT Specialist Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent


Indy's Child // 09.2009  

Indy's Child is Indiana's #1 Parenting Magazine! In this issue: "Fun & Frolicking in Indy: Fall Festivals", "Peering into the World of Priva...

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