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FALL 2016

FALL FUN GUIDE THE BEST THE SEASON HAS TO OFFER

All About Mom Inte rest in g acti v it ies just for yo u !

HANDLING

SEPARATION ANXIETY

25 CONVERSATION STARTERS THAT REALLY GET KIDS TO OPEN UP

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT Lin dy & Com pa ny

TIPS FOR CHILDREN (AND THEIR PARENTS) TO PART LESS PAINFULLY

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CONTENTS

inside //

FA L L

AGES & STAG E S

FA M I LY

08 BABIES PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

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18 MOMS

TODDLERS & PRESCHOOLERS HANDLING SEPARATION ANXIETY

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SCHOOL AGERS 25 CONVERSATION STARTERS THAT REALLY GET KIDS TO OPEN UP

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TWEENS/TEENS FOUR TIPS TO COMBAT CONCUSSIONS

ALL ABOUT MOM

20 DADS

STAYING CONNECTED TO KIDS WHEN YOU MUST TRAVEL

22 PETS

COULD MY DOG BE A THERAPY DOG?

CO LU M N S + G U I D E S 24 LOCAL SPOTLIGHT: LINDY & COMPANY THE GOURMET DOG TREAT BAKERY WITH A HIGHER MISSION

28 GET OUT AND CAMP!

ENJOY THE OUTDOORS TOGETHER WITH FAMILY

32 FALL FUN GUIDE

THE BEST THE SEASON HAS TO OFFER!

36 5 PLACES TO GET A NEW VIEW OF FALL FOLIAGE

I N E V E RY I SS U E 39 WACKY CALENDAR

A FEW DAYS WORTH CELEBRATING THIS FALL!

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GREETINGS

MEET THE STAFF PUBLISHER Mary Wynne Cox | Mary@daytonparentmagazine.com

A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R Katy Mark | Katy@daytonparentmagazine.com

E D I TO R Susan Bryant | Susan@daytonparentmagazine.com

AC C O U N T E X E C U T I V E S Katie Clark | Katie@daytonparentmagazine.com

W E B D E V E LO P E R Wendy Cox | Wendy@daytonparentmagazine.com

A DV E R T I S I N G C O O R D I N ATO R Karen RIng | Karen@daytonparentmagazine.com

A S S O C I AT E A R T D I R E C TO R Kahlie Cannon | Kahlie@daytonparentmagazine.com

B U S I N E S S M A N AG E R Roxanne Burns | Roxanne@daytonparentmagazine.com

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FALLING FOR FALL

ure, summer has its fun (despite the tropical heat), and spring is always a hit (even with its rainy days) and winter’s got its fans (just not me), but fall… doesn’t everybody love fall? What’s not to like about the burst of autumn color, a cool sunny day, a warm sip of apple cider or a crisp apple picked right from the tree. If you’re like me, this season can’t last long enough. And what better place to live during this time of year than the Dayton area? From pumpkin patches to corn mazes and festivals to spooky nights, there is no shortage of fun to be had. Need a few ideas to get you started? Check out our Fall Fun Guide for some suggestions to make the most of the season.

Megan Bohrer, Kristen Wicker

C A L E N DA R O F E V E N T S

along the way. For some tips to make the transition a little smoother, take a look at our article on Handling Separation Anxiety. (It gets better, really!) Speaking of new experiences, when is the last time you had one Mom? Sometimes we get so focused on providing interesting, enriching activities for our kids, we forget that we could use some fun too! Good thing we compiled a list for you… All About Mom makes it easy to find a new pursuit when you need some “me time.” There’s so much more – I hope you’ll keep flipping! As always, if you have suggestions for what you’d like to see in future issues, please let us know. We value your feedback in making Dayton Parent a resource you’ll want to pick up again and again.

C O N TAC T U S daytonparent@daytonparentmagazine.com

COPYRIGHT Dayton Parent Magazine is published monthly. Copyright 2014 by Midwest Parenting Publications, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of products, commentary, or services herein. For information on subscriptions, editorial guidelines, advertising rates and more, visit daytonparentmagazine.com.

PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION

2015 Silver Award Winner

S USA N BRYA N T E DI TO R su sa n @ d ay to n p a re n tma g a z in e.co m D AY T O N PA R E N T M A G A Z I N E // f a l l

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Andrea Limke, Melissa Glidden, Jennifer Thompson,

calendar@daytonparentmagazine.com

On another note, do you have a little one who is starting preschool this fall? If so, you know what a big deal this is – for you and your tiny student. Sometimes this new experience comes with a few tears (or meltdowns)

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INTERN Meg Wynne | Meg@daytonparentmagazine.com

Design Awards Competition

PARENTING MEDIA ASSOCIATION

2015 Bronze Award Winner Editorial Awards Competition


ON THE COVER ALLISON (AGE 4) A llis on wa s ou r Cove r K ids Con te st Win n e r !

FAVORITES MOV I E: S e cre t L i fe of Pe t s CO LO R : P in k FO O D: Spa gh e t t i A N I MA L : Ele ph a n t AC TI V I TI ES: Da n ce / B a lle t SO N G : M e To o , by Me gh a n Tra in or PH OTO K RYSTAL COVI NGTO N PHOTO GRAPHY

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BABIES

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY GET YOUR BABY’S ORAL HEALTH OFF TO A GOOD START

IF MY CHILD SUCKS HIS THUMB OR USES A PACIFIER, WILL THAT NEGATIVELY AFFECT HOW HIS TEETH DEVELOP? If a child sucks his thumb or uses a pacifier (nonnutritive oral habits) it may apply forces to the teeth and dentoalveolar structures (bone) creating a malocclusion (bad bite). While nonnutritive oral habits are considered normal, they can contribute to deleterious changes in the occlusion and facial development depending upon the frequency, intensity and duration. It is important to wean the child from these habits before these changes occur. Doing so can lessen the chances for the need for orthodontic intervention. S UB MI TTED BY DR. G OR D ON WOM AC K, D.D.S ., BEAVERCREEK P ED I AT R I C D EN T I ST RY

WHEN DOES MY CHILD NEED TO SEE THE DENTIST FOR THE FIRST TIME? WHAT TYPICALLY HAPPENS AT THIS APPOINTMENT? The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends the first dental visit by the age of one. Four out of ten children have cavities by the time they are three years of age. Establishing a dental home by 12 months of age will help facilitate good oral health for a lifetime. The first visit will include a comprehensive examination. We try

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GET TRUSTED I M M U N I Z AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N AT YO U R FINGERTIPS Fast VAX Facts is a free new app created by the Ohio Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics in partnership with the Ohio Department of Health. Search for answers to your questions, find out what vaccines are due at your child’s upcoming well visit, learn about outbreaks in your county and more – all from the convenience of your mobile device! Fast VAX Facts is brought to you by pediatricians and provides the credible, easy-to- understand and trusted information you need to make the right decisions for your children.

to make it as comfortable as possible for the child and parent. Usually the child will sit on the parent's lap to do the exam. In conjunction with the exam, there is also an educational portion of the visit. We will discuss cavity susceptibility, diet, hygiene, growth and development, Fluoride uses, teething and habit (pacifier/thumb) issues. We will specifically design a home care routine for the parent and child to help promote healthy teeth and gums for a life time.

their teeth effectively. Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing. C I TE D F R O M TH E A M E R I C A N AC A D E M Y O F P E DI ATR I C D E N TI STRY W E B S I TE : WWW. AA P D.O R G / R E S O U R C E S / F R E Q U E N TLY _ AS K E D_ Q U E STI O N S .

S UB MI TTED BY DR. JODY L . W R I G HT D.D.S ., WRIGHT SMI L ES P ED I AT R I C D EN T IST RY

WHEN SHOULD MY CHILD BEGIN USING TOOTHPASTE? The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as they erupt and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size dollop and perform or assist your child’s toothbrushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush

DOWNLOAD FAST VAX FACTS TODAY AT THE APP STORE OR ON GOOGLE PLAY! HTTP://OHIOAPP.ORG/FVF D AY T O N PA R E N T M A G A Z I N E // f a l l

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TODDLERS & PRESCHOOLERS

HANDLING SEPARATION ANXIETY TIPS FOR CHILDREN (AND THEIR PARENTS) TO PART LESS PAINFULLY BY M EG A N S. BOHR ER

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t’s a moment that many parents eagerly anticipate and dread simultaneously – the first day of preschool. Parents of toddlers know all too well that these tiny humans are not by nature fans of change, and while moms and dads view this day as a momentous step in the right direction, it also reminds them that their babies are growing up. (Cue the emotions, all of them.) Most experts agree that some degree of separation anxiety, for both preschoolers and parents, is completely normal, but there are ways to mitigate these concerns to ensure that a child has a positive first experience with school.

EXPECTATIONS Even the most well-adjusted preschoolers and parents will feel some level of anxiety and nervousness about the first day of school. After all, this is a big adventure for the whole family. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) website advises, “Remember that separation is a process. Expect that your child (or yourself) will need time to feel comfortable with the new situation.” Give it a week or two of adjustment time and be realistic about the process.

EXPOSURE Make sure that your little student is familiar with their new school before the first day. Christina Miller, Founder and Director of A Great Start Preschool in Dayton, says it is crucial for parents to familiarize their children with their prospective school several times before they enroll. Miller, an educator for over twenty years, has her school schedule several open house and meet the teacher events. A Great Start Preschool even invites parents to attend the first day with their children. The NAEYC also encourages parents and children to participate in back-toschool activities and open houses, or if unable, to arrange a time for the child to meet the teacher. For children who have a particularly hard time adjusting to change or have demonstrated separation anxiety in previous situations, Miller’s school will print a copy of the schedule for the child with illustrations so that she can know what to expect throughout the day and can count off the number of activities until pick-up time.

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EXCITEMENT Building enthusiasm is key to getting kids ready for preschool. Miller suggests that parents talk to their children about all of the fun things they can expect to do in the classroom and to ask them about these experiences once the school year is underway. Shopping for school supplies and reading books about the first day of school can be a very tangible way for preschoolers to build positive anticipation. Books such as Llama Llama Misses Mama by Anna Dewdney and How Do Dinosaurs Go to School by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague make the idea of school fun and relatable, and can begin a positive dialogue about the experience.

ENLIST THE EXPERT Rely on the teacher’s expertise and experience, urges Miller. Allowing the teacher to console an upset preschooler cements the teacher’s role as an authority figure and care provider and helps build their bond. The teacher has seen the full range of emotions and reactions to starting school and will be well-equipped to handle them, not to mention more emotionally

objective than mom or dad. Parents should establish a quick drop-off routine, says Miller, and then introduce their child to the teacher before exiting the classroom.

ENOUGH ALREADY “Kids always adjust,” says Miller, but sometimes it’s the parents that need a little more help. The longer the goodbye takes, the harder it is for the child. Don’t hang around in the hallway. Tell your children what you will be doing and remind them you will be returning. “Try to suck it up and don’t cry in front of your kids,” says Miller. Chances are by the time mom or dad has made it back to the car, their child will be having a great time. No one ever said that saying goodbye was easy, and when it comes to your little one, emotions are often multiplied. Know that others have treaded these waters before you. With some advance preparation and a little tough love, you’ll both make it to the other side!

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SCHOOL AGERS

LOOK WHO’S TALKING! 25 CONVERSATION STARTERS THAT REALLY GET KIDS TO OPEN UP BY SUSA N BRYA N T

PARENT: How was your day at school? KID: Fine. PARENT: What did you do? KID: Nothing.

W PARENT: (sigh)

ho hasn’t had an “exchange” like this with their child at some point? As parents, we want to truly know what’s going on in the lives of our children. What’s happening in their social circle? How do they view themselves? What interests or passions do they have that we can help develop? Unfortunately, in our efforts to get kids to open up and share their thoughts, we can inadvertently fire questions at them that feel more like an inquisition than a conversation. How can we start a dialogue that children will actually want to participate in? It may help to pose questions that they find interesting to answer. Here’s a few to try next time you have dinner together, are shuttling off somewhere in the car or find a quiet moment before bed. 1.

If you won the lottery, what’s the first thing you would do?

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What are three things you absolutely cannot live without?

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What would you want to be famous for?

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What’s the worst day at school you ever had? The best day?

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Is there anyone you would like to switch places with for a day?

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What’s the best thing anyone has ever said about you?

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What are the most important qualities a friend should have?

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Do you think you would want to have a family of your own one day?

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What do you think the best job in the world would be?

10. If you could be any character in a book or movie, who would you choose?

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11. Do you think you are shy? Outgoing? Somewhere in the middle? 12. Do you think movies are ever like real life? 13. What’s the hardest thing about being a girl? A boy? The best thing? 14. What three words describe you best? 15. What’s your biggest pet peeve? 16. What’s the scariest dream you’ve ever had? 17. If you had your own house, what would you have in it and how would you decorate it? 18. If you were the parent, and I was the child, what’s the first thing you would do? 19. Describe what your perfect day would look like. 20. Have you ever picked up a skill really fast? 21. Do you think adults have forgotten anything about what it’s like to be a kid? 22. Is there any one sound that drives you crazy? 23. If you could be invisible for a day, what would you do? 24. If you had to change your name, what would you change it to? 25. Would you want to see what your future holds or not? Remember, this is a conversation so be sure to give your answers to these questions too! Your child may be surprised by what you say, which might just spark another conversation.


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TWEENS/TEENS

FOUR TIPS TO COMBAT CONCUSSIONS KNOW WHAT TO DO IN CASE OF A HEAD INJURY

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BY DAY TO N C H I L DR E N ’ S H OS P I TA L

t’s time to break out the cleats, mouth guards and water bottles because fall sports season is here and kids can’t wait to get their first touches on the football and soccer ball. In the midst of all this excitement however, it’s important for parents to keep the possibility of sports injuries in mind. Football and soccer are two of the most commonly played fall sports, and are also some of the biggest creators of concussions. Throughout the season, be aware of how to take action should a head injury occur. “Anyone who takes a hit to the head which causes symptoms like a headache, confusion or dizziness should stop sports immediately and be evaluated for a concussion,” says Lora Scott, MD, Medical Director of Dayton Children’s sports medicine. “Any injury which affects the brain should not be hidden or pushed through.” So what can you do to be aware of a possible concussion and be sure your child recovers properly? Listed below are four tips for concussion safety:

REMOVE THE ATHLETE FROM THE FIELD. Be sure that the athlete is moved to the sideline immediately after a head collision of any kind and does not return to the field until a concussion is ruled out. A concussion can still occur even if the athlete is not knocked unconscious upon colliding. Many times the symptoms of a concussion are mild and do not show up right away.

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LOOK FOR THE SYMPTOMS. Although most symptoms are not as severe as losing consciousness, this does not mean that the concussion should be treated any less seriously. Anyone with any concussion symptom after a head collision should see a doctor right away. Concussion symptoms can develop anywhere from 24 to 72 hours after an injury, and can include: • • • • • • •

Severe headache Blurred vision Confusion Fatigue Dizziness Nausea and vomiting Mood/behavior changes

BE SURE TO FOLLOW DOCTOR’S ORDERS. Rest is key when recovering from a concussion. “The more the brain can rest completely (avoid video games, TV, school, homework, etc.), the higher the chance of a faster recovery,” says Dr. Scott. Sometimes concussions require a break from both sports and school, and often bright lights and loud noises as well. Help your athlete follow the specific instructions for their particular case to ensure a complete recovery.


DON’T RESUME PLAY TOO SOON.

to wait for the doctor to approve your athlete’s return to play.

It may be difficult, but necessary, for your athlete to stay away from the thrill of the game longer than originally planned. “The length of days to return to play isn’t one-size-fits-all,” says Dr. Scott. It is not uncommon for teens to tell their parents and coaches that they are “just fine” if it means they will get back into the game, but don’t let your athlete’s eagerness be a barrier to their health. The risk of a second injury is higher if a person with a concussion returns to the playing field too soon. It is possible for kids to feel better even though their thinking, behavior and/or balance have not yet returned to normal, which is why it is essential

Baseline concussion testing before the season is a great way to determine if your athlete is ready to return to the field if they do suffer from a concussion. This test compares pre and post-concussion scores and is offered free for children 10+ from Dayton Children’s.

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MOMS

All About Mom WHAT NEW INTEREST OR ACTIVITY WOULD YOU LIKE TO PURSUE? BY ANDREA LIMKE

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chool is back in session and kids are off expanding their minds and discovering new challenges – which makes it the perfect time for moms to do the same! Dayton offers many unique experiences to pursue an existing interest or perhaps find a new one. This fall, check out these local classes and activities and make it all about you!

TOXIC!, Women Only Self-Defense, OSU Extension Office Food & Nutrition Classes, DIY: How To Relax on a Budget and a Writing Series.

THE YOGA LOFT www.yogaloftdayton.com

BLUME HOME

Did you take tap dancing lessons as a child? Relive those shuffle, ball change days with an Adult Tap class. Dayton Performing Arts also offers Adult Ballet and Zumba. The best part? Absolutely no previous experience is required.

www.facebook.com/blumeshophome

Have you ever tried Aerial Yoga? The Yoga Loft offers traditional yoga classes at their two Dayton area locations, but you can also stretch your limits (pun intended) and take your poses to the sky. A comprehensive class schedule is offered as well as private instruction.

DECOY ART STUDIO

Blume is a beautiful shop in the heart of Lebanon that offers many unique workshops to feed your creative side. Fall offerings include flower arranging, chalk painting, metal sign decorating and cupcake/cookie decorating. Blume is also a great place to spend time browsing locally handmade items and connecting directly with vendors for inspiration.

TITLE BOXING CLUB

www.decoy-art.com

www.kettering.titleboxingclub.com

Whether you’re an experienced artist or haven’t picked up a paintbrush since third grade, Decoy Art Studio is a great place to express your artistic self. The studio offers walk-in hours, allowing you to just show up and start painting, or you can receive more instruction by signing up for a class.

Courses change each semester, so contact registration for updated information.

If you’re looking for a physical challenge and a chance to blow off some steam, try a boxing class. Title boxing provides traditional boxing and kickboxing classes (try one for free) that will surely help with the stress of back-to-school and the upcoming holidays.

DAYTON METRO LIBRARY

THE LEARNING KITCHEN

It’s so important for moms to take time for themselves and Dayton provides opportunities to do just that! Women are always encouraging their children to try new things to feel challenged and it’s great to know that our city invites moms to do the same.

www.daytonmetrolibrary.org/events

www.thelearningkitchen.com

UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON – MINI COURSES

This fall is a great time to take advantage of the free events offered by the Dayton Metro Library. September and October offer some excellent enrichment opportunities for moms, including: Learn the Art of Zentangle, How to Discover Your House History, Stop Cleaning Your House

Does the opportunity to cook a meal without multi-tasking sound appealing to you? The Learning Kitchen provides a fun environment to learn how to prepare new dishes – and you can eat your creations! Take another mom along for some extra fun.

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DAYTON PERFORMING ARTS www.daytonperformingarts.org

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www.udayton.edu Get in the back-to-school groove yourself! Previous courses at the University of Dayton have included stargazing, wines of the world and sustaining the environment.


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DADS

Staying Connected to Kids When You Must Travel SIX TIPS TO FEEL CLOSE WHEN YOU’RE FAR AWAY BY J E N N I F E R TH O M P S O N

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  raveling for work can be hard on a family. When you parent together as a team, it’s difficult when one of the star players is missing. Not only is it an adjustment for the kids, but a challenge for the parent traveling and the parent left behind to hold down the fort. With a little planning and preparation though, it is possible to make your time away a little easier. By employing a few strategies prior to leaving, and while you are away, your whole family can stay better connected during your absence. Whether you’re traveling for one night, or for a couple of weeks, try these tips next time you find yourself saying good-bye.

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GET THE MAP OUT

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Before you leave, gather around a map or globe and have a conversation about where you are going. Talk about how far you will be traveling. Discuss some of the landmarks you will fly over or drive past along the way. Kids can get a mini geography lesson while feeling more involved with your trip.

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LEAVE LITTLE MESSAGES BEHIND This strategy works especially well if you are traveling for an extended period of time. Leave a note to be opened every morning before school or every night before bed. For a special touch, tuck a piece of candy inside the envelope. Notes don’t need to be long; it really is the thought that counts.

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CREATE A COUNTDOWN CALENDAR For little ones who might not have a good understanding of time yet, make a calendar to help explain when you will be back. Have fun creating it together with stickers, markers, drawings, etc. Explain that each time they cross off a box, you are one day closer to returning home.

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TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SKYPE, FACETIME, HANGOUTS OR TANGO

Kids love to see where you’re staying, what you’re doing and their own face on the screen too. Give them a view from your room – unless it has a pool, in which case you might see a bunch of grumpy looks from everyone you’ve left behind!


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READ A STORY TOGETHER Use technology to share storytime. Pack a book you can read to your child over the computer before bedtime. He or she will undoubtedly look forward to this special time you’ve planned together.

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of these strategies, a quick phone call or text message saying “I love you and miss you” can still go a long way. Every family is different and what works for one may not for another. With a little trial and error, you’ll find out what works best for you – one trip at a time.

BRING HOME A SMALL GIFT Most children enjoy free gifts just as much as store-bought ones. If you’re by a beach, pick up some seashells. Attending a tradeshow? Grab some trinkets. Candy mints from the hotel and brochures about local attractions can be exciting for the younger set too. Everyone will appreciate knowing you thought about them while you were away.

Thankfully, we live in a time when connecting with family and friends is easier than ever before. Take advantage of all the ways technology can bring us together. If busy travel schedules don’t allow for some

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PETS

Could My Dog Be a Therapy Dog? FIND OUT IF YOUR POOCH HAS THE RIGHT STUFF!

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BY J E N N I F E R TH O MP S O N

o you have the type of dog people flock to? Is your dog able to lie patiently on the ground while many hands stroke his or her fur, and maybe even pull on a tail? Is your dog mild-mannered, gentle and obedient? Does he or she play well with other dogs, and not react aggressively in their presence? Does your dog have self-control? If you answered yes to these questions, then your dog may just have what it takes to become a therapy dog.

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Therapy dogs are brought to different facilities for the purpose of bringing joy, comfort and peace to those they encounter. They are often found at hospitals, nursing homes, libraries, group homes and schools. Therapy dogs are different from service dogs in that they are personal pets that are usually trained by their owners. They are not taught to help people with specific disabilities like service dogs, who are highly trained for that purpose. Service dogs travel throughout the day with their owners. Therapy dogs do not go everywhere with their owners, but instead travel to certain locations for the primary purpose of bringing a smile to people’s faces.


According to Corky Andrews, Vice President of the Dayton Dog Training Club, when considering if your dog would make a good therapy dog, ask “is he well-behaved?” instead of “does he love everybody?” She says, “Therapy dogs need to be comfortable around a lot of different types of equipment, like walkers and wheel chairs. They also need to be able to walk past food on the floor without stopping to eat it. They need to be able to respond well to loud, startling noises. They need to have a lot of self-control.” She also states it is important to know your dog’s limits. For her dog, she knows that one and a half to two hours is all she can handle at a time. “There are a lot of people coming at the dog. It can take a lot out of them, and be stressful.” If you are interested in having your dog become certified as a therapy dog, what should you do? “Therapy Dogs International (TDI) requires the dog to receive an AKC Canine Good Citizen certificate,” says Andrews. “Once this is achieved, if the owner feels the dog is ready, then they may contact TDI to have the dog tested. If they do not feel that they are ready for the test, then they may take the class offered by the Dayton Dog Training Club called The Therapy Dog Class. This class will prepare the dog, and handler, for the test they must take through TDI. In order for a dog to participate in this class, first they must have completed either the Intermediate Class, or a skills evaluation performed by the Dayton Dog Training Club.”

leave their dogs behind and were really missing them. I think they loved hugging and petting Daisy, and reminiscing about their beloved pet. The best thing we did was to hold her birthday party there. We handed out invitations, a room was decorated and approximately sixty people came for the party. There were cupcakes set out in the shape of a dog bone, while Daisy had a pupcake with cream cheese icing. During the party, Daisy sat in a rolling swivel chair. I moved her next to each person as she had her picture taken with them. I put the pictures in small frames for everyone to keep. People came in wheel chairs. One man even showed up in his bed. It is a very special memory.” There were difficult times as well though, says Andrews. Sometimes she and Daisy would go to see a favorite person and the room would be empty. “I always felt sad that we didn’t get to say goodbye,” says Andrews. “I tried to focus on the joy of our visits and the friendship of a person I would never have known if it weren’t for Daisy.” Interested in finding out more? Visit the Therapy Dogs International website at www.tdi-dog.org/ or the Dayton Dog Training Club at : www.daytondogtraining.com.

Becoming a therapy dog team can be a very rewarding experience for both the owner and dog. Andrews shares a story about her dog Daisy, a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. She and Daisy would visit a nursing home each week. “Some of the people we met had to D AY T O N PA R E N T M A G A Z I N E // f a l l

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SPOTLIGHT

Lindy & Company THE GOURMET DOG TREAT BAKERY WITH A HIGHER MISSION BY M ELI SSA GLI D D EN

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mployees at Lindy & Company on Wayne Avenue are hard at work crafting what their customers call “the best baked goods Dayton has to offer.” At least, that’s what their customers might say – if they could talk.

In October of 2012, the company opened its doors and began selling homemade, gourmet dog treats to the city’s furriest, four-legged citizens. But the treats, as beloved as they are by their target market, aren’t the only thing that makes this business stand out. Lindy & Company is partnered with Daybreak, a non-profit organization founded in 1975 with a mission to help eliminate youth homelessness in the Miami Valley. Not only do 100% of Lindy’s profits help fund Daybreak’s mission, but the pet treat bakery also serves to employ homeless youth. “The youth learn many skills during their time at Lindy’s, including time management, responsibility, leadership, customer service and much more,” says Noelle Brown, bakery manager for Lindy & Company. Brown spent eight years with Daybreak before becoming the bakery’s manager upon its establishment. “My favorite part of being here is meeting and working closely with our young people,” says Brown. “Seeing them grow as people, discussing their goals with them and watching them become more confident in their work skills is truly inspiring.” Brown gives these statistics about Daybreak: between 2014 and 2015, over 200 youth resided in Daybreak’s emergency shelter where they received food, clothing and counseling. Over 100 youth resided in their transitional apartments, allowing them to prepare to become independent, self-supporting adults. Ninety-four youth were employed by the time they left Daybreak, and nearly 200 accomplished educational goals.

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secure work. “Despite those limitations, she still had a strong desire to work and gain her independence,” says Brown. After the young woman completed Daybreak’s employment program, she enrolled in AmeriCorps and used Lindy & Company as her dedicated work site. In the end, Daybreak and Lindy staff were so impressed with her drive and quality of work, they offered her a permanent position with the bakery. Additionally, Brown recalls a former employee who says Lindy & Company helped jumpstart their career as a chef. “The client told us that through their training at Lindy’s, they were able to gain the resources and confidence to continue their education in culinary arts,” says Brown. “I thought that was a pretty darn nice thing to say!” Of course, while the bakery is hard at work serving community youth and churning out top-notch pet treats, someone has to serve as the spokesdog. That dog would be Lindy, the golden retriever, whose “parents” helped fund the bakery’s inception. To find out more about Lindy & Company (and order treats online,) visit www.lindyandcompany.org. To find out more about Daybreak, or to make a contribution to their mission, visit www.daybreakdayton.org.

PH OTO CO U R T E SY OF LINDY & CO M PANY

Daybreak began developing the concept of a brick-and-mortar pet treat bakery when they realized that the youth they served were in need of more in-depth employment training. The goal was to ensure that young people exiting Daybreak were able to secure and keep jobs independently. “Despite teaching our youth job search techniques, interview skills and proper attire, we realized they were lacking many of the soft skills required to keep employment,” says Brown. “Furthermore, our CEO realized that the pet industry

seemed to be very stable, even throughout the recession.” Today, Lindy & Company exclusively employs young people who are receiving services through Daybreak. Prior to becoming employed with Lindy, youth must follow through with all the traditional steps required of anyone applying for a job. First, an employment counselor determines whether or not the applicant would be a good fit for the bakery based on their job preferences, schedule and long-term goals. Next, the counselor works with the

young person to complete an application and Brown calls them to schedule an interview. Daybreak, together with Lindy & Company, serves as an unwavering force of positive change in the Dayton community. According to Brown, the organization’s success stories are endless, but her current favorite story is that of a young woman who came to Daybreak challenged by varying physical limitations, making it difficult for her to D AY T O N PA R E N T M A G A Z I N E // f a l l

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GUIDES

Get Out & Camp! ENJOY THE OUTDOORS TOGETHER WITH YOUR FAMILY

E adventure.

xplore your wild side this fall by spending an evening under the stars! With the cooler temps and colorful leaves, fall is perhaps the best time of year for a camping

Five Rivers MetroParks offers 23 tent camping sites at four parks. Frontcountry campsites are easily accessible by car, and hike-in backcountry sites are for the more adventurous camper. Both allow you to unplug just a short drive from home.

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BY K R I STE N W I C K E R , F I V E R I V E R S ME TR O PA R KS M A R K E TI N G M A N AG E R

Campsites are close to great park amenities, such as hiking, fishing, paddling, geocaching and more. Recently, all frontcountry sites were updated with new or improved picnic tables, fire rings and firewood boxes. Options are available for families, groups and individuals at these primitive sites that include a vault toilet, fire ring and picnic table. Bring gear, food and water; a limited supply of firewood is provided. Frontcountry camping is available in these MetroParks:

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Possum Creek MetroPark has five easily accessible campsites near fishing ponds, hiking trails, the historical Argonne forest and a sustainable farm where you can visit chickens, sheep, a donkey and other farm animals. Englewood MetroPark offers four sites near woodlands, meadows and waterfalls. Hike 20 miles of trails, fish and paddle in the Stillwater River, play disc golf, enjoy a nature playground and collect fossils. • Germantown MetroPark’s sites offer remote and nature-filled

experiences. Hike 14 miles of trails, collect fossils, fish and enjoy the amazing sights of the Twin Valley. •

The historical Camp Hook area at Twin Creek MetroPark has three campsites with access to the park’s extensive hiking trail system.

Permits are required for camping and fees vary. Make reservations online at metroparks.org or call (937) 275-PARK (7275) during normal business hours.


Fun Activities FOR YOUR METROPARKS CAMPING ADVENTURE

PH OTO CO U R T E SY O F FIVE RIVERS M E TRO PARKS

Do some star gazing in the night sky or even bring along a telescope. Do a little research ahead of time so you can identify a few constellations.

Bring your pole and head to the ponds, lakes and rivers. Some fishing spots don’t require a license. Visit metroparks.org/fishing for details.

Go geocaching: Download coordinates before you leave home and experience a real-life treasure hunt.

Roast marshmallows or make s’mores.

Bring your bikes and ride the nation’s largest paved trail network.

Bring cards or a Frisbee, play flashlight tag or tic-tactoe in the dirt.

Play music around the fire. Bring along that guitar or harmonica and jam around the campfire, but be considerate of other visitors.

Set up a hammock and nap during the middle of the day.

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GUIDES

Family Camping TIPS AND TRICKS

Set up a tent in your backyard to test out your gear and get comfortable sleeping outside with the amenities of home just a few steps away.

Several local places rent camping equipment. Check out the full list at outdoordayton.com.

Keep things organized using colored or labeled bags, tubs and stuff sacks so you can quickly find kitchen utensils or flashlights.

Don’t overschedule your days or bring too many toys and gadgets. You’ll be amazed at how easily kids (and you) can be entertained by playing in the creek, fishing, taking a hike, playing cards, reading books and flipping over rocks to look for critters.

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Keep the kids involved. Give them camp chores, such as helping with tent poles, rolling out sleeping bags or collecting water. A wagon can help kids fetch water and wood or pull the little tikes around the campground.

Bring a map and get familiar with the lay of the land. Make sure everyone knows where your campsite is within the park, as well as the bathroom, water and any other necessities.

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GUIDES

Fall Fun Guide THE BEST THE SEASON HAS TO OFFER! BY AND REA LI M K E

F

all is here and there is no shortage of pumpkin fun to be had in the Dayton area. There are plenty of pumpkin patches, hayrides and corn mazes to explore on these cooler days, so check out this list to take advantage of all the fun!

40TH ANNUAL FALL FARM PUMPKIN FESTIVAL – YOUNG’S JERSEY DAIRY 6880 Springfield-Xenia Rd, Yellow Springs, OH October 1-2, 11 am – 6 pm www.youngsdairy.com/fall-farm-festival Young’s is a fun fall destination all season long, and the highlight is the annual Fall Farm Pumpkin Festival. Enjoy a full day of family fun with their biggest festival of the year. Take your picture with Humongous Gus, an 800+ pound pumpkin, taste freshly made Pumpkin Cinnamon Sugar Donut Holes, take a tour of the cheese making facility and watch cow milking. And don’t forget to try their latest addition – Pumpkin Bowling!

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APPLE COUNTRY FARM MARKET – FALL FUN AT THE FARM 2323 U.S. Rt. 42, Spring Valley, OH Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 6:30 pm, Sunday 11 am – 5 pm http://applecountryfarm.com/fall-farm-fun Apple Country offers many family friendly activities and farm fresh attractions. Try out a corn or straw maze, visit with barnyard animals and take a hayride in October.

BONNYBROOK FARMS – FALL FARM DAYS & LANTERN LIGHT WAGON RIDE 3779 State Route 132, Clarksville, OH Saturdays and Sundays in October, Noon – 6 pm Saturday Evenings in October, 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm www.bonnybrookfarms.com/fallfarmdays Pick the perfect pumpkin from the pumpkin patch or ride on the Adventure Wagon, among many other activities at Bonnybrook Farms. Also offered is an evening wagon ride down an abandoned country road to catch a glimpse of travelers from the past. Bring your flashlight and try out their Crazed Corn maze!


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GUIDES MCMONIGLE FARMS – FALL PUMPKIN FEST 7441 Franklin Madison Road, Middletown, Ohio Saturdays & Sundays, September 24 – October 30, 12 pm – 6 pm www.fallpumpkinfest.com McMonigle Farms Pumpkin Fest offers an affordable and unique pumpkin patch experience. After picking your own pumpkin, choose from a variety of activities including hayrides, a 4-acre corn maze, a cow train ride and farm animals.

CARILLON HISTORICAL PARK – TAVERN DINNER: HARVEST FEAST

IRONS FRUIT FARM – OCTOBER WEEKENDS

1000 Carillon Boulevard, Dayton, Ohio

Saturdays & Sundays, September 24 – October 30, 11 am – 5 pm Country Applefest, September 24, 10 am – 7 pm

Fridays & Saturdays in October, 6 pm – 9 pm www.daytonhistory.org/event Enjoy an authentic hearth cooked meal in the 18th century Newcom Tavern. Experience seasonal recipes along with hands-on demonstrations such as musket shooting, ice cream churning and making apple pomanders.

HIDDEN VALLEY FRUIT FARM – FAMILY FUN DAYS 5474 North State Route 48, Lebanon, Ohio Various events running weekends September - October www.hiddenvalleyfruitfarm.com/index.html Fall is a busy time at Hidden Valley Fruit Farm! Check out Family Fun Days and Apple Daze in September, and Cider Fest, Fall Fun Days and Pumpkin Days in October. Your family can enjoy hayrides, train rides, a friendly barnyard of animals, children's bounce house and playground and opportunities for U-pic!

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1640 Stubbs Hill Rd, Lebanon, Ohio

www.ironsfruitfarm.com Take a free wagon ride to the pumpkin patch to choose your pumpkin, and then simply pay by the pound. Also, join them at the Warren County Fairgrounds for Country Applefest and enjoy homemade crafts, food and entertainment.

LM&M RAILROAD – THE FALL FLYER 127 South Mechanic, Lebanon, Ohio October: 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, & 30 Saturdays 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm, 4 pm, Sundays 12 pm, 2 pm www.lebanonrr.com/pumpkin Fall is a great time for a train ride! Take an hour and fifteen minute trip on the railroad to enjoy the beautiful scenery. Back at the station, pick up your free pie pumpkin while the kids can enjoy more fun activities.

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE US AIR FORCE – FALL WITH GRAVITY & SPOOKTACULAR AEROSPACE FUN 1100 Spaatz Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH September 24, October 29 www.nationalmuseum.af.mil In September, celebrate the fall season while learning about the force that causes falling. Head back in October to celebrate Halloween by learning aerospace principles through Halloween-themed activities. 

NIEDERMAN FAMILY FARM – FALL FESTIVAL 4972 Lesourdsville West Chester Road, Hamilton, OH September 23 – October 30, check website for times www.niedermanfamilyfarm.com/fall-festival Join in on this annual tradition and take on the 14-acre corn maze after choosing your pumpkin. And don’t miss out on their famous fall treats!

TOM’S MAZE – PUMPKIN DAZE 4881 Germantown-Liberty Road, Germantown, OH September 16 – October 30, Thursdays 12 pm – 6 pm, Fridays & Saturdays 12 pm 10 pm, Sundays 12 pm – 6 pm www.tomsmaze.com Tom’s Maze is the ultimate corn maze destination. Besides the maze, there are several other activities for all ages and plenty of fall fun for the family.

TUKENS ORCHARD & FARM MARKET 15725 Eaton Pike, West Alexandria, OH Open 7 days a week through November www.tukensfarmmarket.com Tuken’s features a 22 acre orchard where the picking is easy with branches that hang low to the ground. Browse their country store for freshly picked vegetables, fruit preserves, pickles, sauces, healthy snacks and an old-fashioned candy counter. Check out the gift gallery for homemade soaps, candles, and more!

WINDMILL FARM MARKET – SPOOKTACULAR HAYRIDE 1454 OH-73, Springboro, OH Saturdays & Sundays, September 24 – October 30, 11 am – 5 pm www.windmillfarmmarket.com Enjoy a 30-minute hayride while learning about pumpkins, checking out animals and finishing up at the pumpkin patch. The market is also open to the public during the week, but hayrides are by appointment only on those days.

Pull out the sweaters, scarves and boots and head outside. Autumn is all about family fun and Dayton has plenty to offer!


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GUIDES

PLACES TO GET A NEW VIEW OF FA L L F O L I A G E

F L AT F ORK CREEK

BY KATE BURKHA R DT, COM M UN I C AT I ONS CO O R D I N ATO R , H A M I LTON COUN T Y TOUR I S M , I N

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ists delivering options for the “top 10 scenic drives for leaf peeping” are as plentiful as pumpkins this time of year. While these options are, no doubt, majestic, spending a long time in the car over a fall break can leave the kids feeling a bit restless and unenthusiastic about the flashes of reds and oranges whooshing past their windows. Instead, take to the treetops to experience fall colors in a new way with a one-tank trip to several spots around Central Indiana!

THE BALLOON Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers, IN An “oldie but goodie,” Conner Prairie’s tethered helium balloon elevates guests 350 feet above the prairie to behold acres of autumn leaves in the fall. On clear days, the Indianapolis skyline rises above the landscape 20 miles away.

KOTEEWI AERIAL ADVENTURE PARK AND TREETOP TRAILS

TREETOP OUTPOST

11800 Koteewi Drive, Noblesville, IN

Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers, IN

Trail systems are no longer confined to ground level at Strawtown Koteewi Park in Noblesville. Families can clip in and take to the trees for five different obstacle courses that range from 15 to 50 feet above the forest floor. Unlike other courses of its kind, the Koteewi Aerial Adventure experience was custom built to the existing forestry. Kids must be 7 years old to complete the trails.

Conner Prairie, an outdoor, living history museum in Fishers, just opened a new experience area, reminiscent of Swiss Family Robinson-esque architecture. The 6,000-square-foot exhibit, featuring a four-story tree house as the centerpiece, aims to educate families on the bounty of Indiana’s natural resources. After viewing the Nature Walk trail and White River vista from above, kids can dig in a recreated archaeology site and build a log cabin like Hoosiers from the past.

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FLAT FORK CREEK PARK 16141 E 101st Street, Fortville, IN Forget the playground – Flat Fork Creek Park encourages kids to use their explorer

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sensibilities with three tree houses scattered along a wooded trail. Climb the 60-foot “mountain” (or sledding hill, depending on the season) for more aerial views of fall foliage!

GO APE Eagle Creek Park, 5855 Delong Rd., Indianapolis, IN The zipline and treetop adventure at the almost 4,000 acre park continues to draw scores to ride the ziplines and brave the treetop obstacles. The surrounding park offers plenty of space and trails for more

ground-bound leaf peeping! Guests must be 10 years old or above to participate. So hop in the car and take a short drive to Indiana to discover some exciting and unusual ways to take in this year’s fall foliage!


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FUN & WACKY FA L L C A L E N DA R 2 0 1 6

DID YOU KNOW THAT THERE IS AN OFFICIAL HOLIDAY FOR JUST ABOUT ANYTHING YOU CAN THINK OF? HERE ARE A FEW FUN DAYS WORTH CELEBRATING THIS FALL!

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

9/2

10/5

LAZY MOM’S DAY LET’S GIVE MOM A BREAK TODAY.

9/5

BE LATE FOR SOMETHING DAY YOU HAVE A VALID EXCUSE!

9/13

KIDS TAKE OVER THE KITCHEN DAY CLEAN UP IS INCLUDED TOO!

9/16 PLAY DOH DAY WHAT WILL YOU MAKE?

9/22 ICE CREAM CONE DAY BETTER GET AT LEAST 3 SCOOPS!

9/26 JOHNNY APPLESEED DAY EAT AN APPLE IN HIS HONOR.

9/29

ELEPHANT APPRECIATION DAY GIVE PACHYDERMS SOME PRAISE!

WORLD TEACHERS DAY WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER?

10/11 IT’S MY PARTY DAY A GREAT REASON TO CELEBRATE YOU!

10/12

TAKE YOUR TEDDY BEAR TO WORK DAY SEND TEDDY OFF WITH MOM OR DAD.

10/17

WEAR SOMETHING GAUDY DAY YOUR CHANCE TO GO CLOTHES-CRAZY!

11/14 PICKLE DAY DO YOU LIKE SWEET OR SOUR?

11/15

10/25

PHILANTHROPY DAY

SOUREST DAY

11/24

PUCKER UP FOR SOME SOUR TREATS.

10/30 CANDY CORN DAY TRY EATING THEM WITH PEANUTS!

10/31 HALLOWEEN TRICK OR TREAT!

NOVEMBER 11/6 NACHOS DAY MAKE SURE TO ADD EXTRA CHEESE!

11/6 SESAME STREET DAY WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTER?

11/11 ORIGAMI DAY WHAT CAN YOU MAKE OUT OF PAPER?

FIND A WAY TO GIVE BACK.

THANKSGIVING DAY GOBBLE UP LOTS OF TURKEY TODAY!

11/28 FRENCH TOAST DAY TRY IT WITH SOME FRESH FRUIT ON TOP. SOURCES WWW.DAYSOFTHEYEAR.COM, WWW.HOLIDAYINSIGHTS.COM


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