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MAY | JUN 2018 | VOL 54 | NO 3 PRINT POST APPROVED PP100007333

THE CHANGING NATURE OF COMMERCIAL DESIGN FIRE SAFETY & CLADDING WINDOWS & FAÇADES GREEN WALLS & ROOFS


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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FTER 12 YEARS, OVER 1000 ENTRIES AND ALMOST INNUMERABLE COCKTAILS, OUR SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS HAVE FINALLY REACHED A LEVEL OF MATURITY WHERE I CAN HONESTLY SAY THAT THEY ARE NOW WELL AND TRULY ENSCONCED IN THE PANTHEON OF THIS COUNTRY’S BEST INDUSTRY AWARDS PROGRAMS.

I say this not from a sense of myopic prejudice, but rather from the facts and figures we have collated over the years. From eight categories in 2007 to 15 today. From 100 or so attendees at the awards presentation night in 2008 to almost 300 last year. And let’s not forget the fact that now we have an all-day event that starts off with seven Q & A panels in the morning and ends with the final award being announced near midnight.

It is, I am told, going to shake up the design industry like nothing else before it, or at least, like nothing else in living memory. Add to that our upcoming INDE Awards, which are set for the end of June, then it could be safe to assume that 2018 will be the Year of Awards, or at least as far as our architecture and design industry publications are concerned. In this issue of Infolink | BPN, the overarching theme is commercial, and as such, we have been able to showcase a wide variety of builds and technologies that can and do see use in the ‘broad church’ that is Australia’s commercial built sector.

Fire control is also looked at, as is the plethora of ideas and designs that surround windows and their associated fittings and furnishings.

Of course, that is not the only awards that we are hosting throughout the year. This year also marks when the inaugural FRONT industry event will take place.

Overall, this issue of the magazine is a treasure trove of designs, case studies, interviews, and of course new products, all of which have been presented to ensure that the job for those that work in the architecture and design industry is made better, easier and more in tune with the actual needs of their end users.

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS DEBORAH SINGERMAN BONNIE VAN DORP JASMIN O’DONOGHUE PRUE MILLER

INDUSTRY

04 News PEOPLE interview with 08 Exclusive NSW Planning minister Anthony Roberts

50

10 Women architects

leading city redesign

SPECIFY

Having said that, one of our fastest growing features, that which concerns green walls and roofs, along with all things digital, looks at some interesting applications in this issue.

Overall, this year’s Sustainability Awards program is literally packed chock-a-block to the proverbial rafters.

Described as a first-of-its-kind specifier event for the commercial and hospitality sectors, the format has been designed as the most direct way to get products and services in front of leading specifiers and end users.

ON THE COVER: A SIGNIFICANT AND STRIKING ADDITION TO THE BRISBANE SKYLINE, THE 126,800SQM 1 WILLIAM STREET PROVIDES A NEW INTEGRATED WORKPLACE FOR THE QUEENSLAND PUBLIC SERVICE. POSITIONED AT THE FRINGE OF THE BRISBANE CBD, 1 WILLIAM STREET IS THE TALLEST COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN BRISBANE AND HAS REVOLUTIONISED WORKPLACE STANDARDS FOR THE PUBLIC SERVICE IN QUEENSLAND AND SET THE BENCHMARK FOR OTHER GOVERNMENT ACCOMMODATION ACROSS AUSTRALIA.

BRANKO MILETIC

real face of 26 The commercial façades

30 The growth of the timber façade the world to 36 Opening smart windows plants the seeds 40 BVN of a green future

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12 Brisbane’s new Highgate Tower Mascot Airport gets 20 Sydney’s a corporate makeover

DESIGNERS JULIA GEE TRACEY HEIN LOUIS WAYMENT

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Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,071 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION MARCH 2016

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

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INDUSTRY

THE NEW SHIFTS IN HIGH-RISE TENANCY EXPECTATIONS

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N SYDNEY, WHERE THIS YEAR’S AUSTRALIAN SMART SKYSCRAPERS SUMMIT WILL BE HELD THIS COMING JUNE, A NEW FIVE-BUILDING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERLOO WILL BE DOMINATED BY THE ‘GREEN’, PLANTED EXTERIOR OF ITS 19-STOREY TOWER, DESIGNED BY KENGO KUMA AND KOICHI TAKADA.

CAPTION CAPTION QUANTITATIVE DATA VARIABLES PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN DESIGNING HUMAN-FRIENDLY TALL BUILDINGS.

Looking beyond the aesthetically quirky or pleasing elements of any tall building’s architecture and design, it becomes clear just how complex and all-encompassing the art of its design becomes, from inception all the way to delivery.

These technological innovations are strongly tied to broader societal shifts in workplace and living culture, which in turn feed into the changing needs of tenants occupying high-rise buildings, be that of the residential or office variety.

But it also needs to be immaculately presented, functional, and filled with open spaces that enhance wellness and encourage social interaction between tenants.

Stoller says that across all buildings commercial or residential, tenant expectations for the quality of the indoor environment have increased substantially, adding that “occupants increasingly appreciate the value of good daylight, rather than simply more daylight (which can lead to glare and eyestrain) - similarly, they are demanding more social space in workplaces, and a broader range of environmental conditions”.

The plentiful innovations in technology, in part, propel us towards designing multifaceted and smart tall buildings. Australasia research leader of Arup Alexandra Sinickas says that in many cases, these innovations effectively co-mingle with elements such as environmental sustainability. “Innovation is at its best when at the intersection of disciplines, especially when these disciplines constrain your design.”

Quantitative data variables play a significant role in designing human-friendly tall buildings. Such data is especially accessible as a result of today’s technical innovations, enabling building managers to understand, in real time, how the conditions of their building are affecting each and every tenant. But Sinickas stresses that before data and technology can be utilised to solve potential problems, we must first define what kind of problems there are to solve. “You first need to understand which elements of a building (or the journey to and through it) are unfriendly - we call these pain points,” she says.

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Inside the high-rise, its functionality can also be positively impacted with the aid of new and innovative technologies. Paul Walter, director of urban design practice Atlas Urban says that the advantage of new towers is that technology can be built in. “A visitor to the PwC tower (in Barangaroo, Sydney) can use an app, so that the building knows that the visitor has arrived and will arrange the meeting space, lifts and doors are opened along the path to the meeting room,” he says.

Especially today, each feature and element responsible for a commercial or residential building’s existence demands optimality. A tall building needs to be eco-friendly, in an effort to counter any harmful impact it has on the environment.

She adds that “sustainability has matured in the last few decades into a design approach that provides social and economic benefit – people want to live, stay, work, play in beautiful, calm, sustainable buildings, within a vibrant precinct or city.”

technologies to both design and deliver,” states Paul Stoller, director at Atelier Ten.

Domino Risch, HASSELL principal, says that when it comes to tenant usage within high-rise office buildings, “the only constant we can rely on is that there will be change”. “Once you had a set of these points, you’d then figure out which ones would have the most impact on improving the human experience and set that as your problem - every building will be different, because they have different people in them.” The façade of a tall building is critical when creating these healthy, human-friendly indoor environments, and such outcomes are often aided by specific technological innovations. When creating healthy, human-friendly indoor environments, it is important to consider the impact that a tall building’s façade has on its exterior. Utilising innovative technologies can often help lead to positive outcomes. “The innovation is sometimes formal: technically advanced systems to control daylight, admit natural ventilation, or dynamically provide shading from the sun all require advanced

She adds that “the idea of work/life balance has shifted dramatically and is no longer about work vs life, but that work is part of life – this is changing the nature of experiences and spaces that are offered as part of tower precincts, to attract the best tenants and the best talent for those tenants”. Sinickas is currently working with HASSELL to determine how to meet changing expectations within high-rise workplace contexts. “We’re looking at how we might redesign workspaces to improve collaboration and productivity through architectural, acoustic, building physics and lighting design.” The various needs related to designing an efficient and successful high-rise building are shifting in much the same way that society, technology, workplaces, and life is shifting. But ultimately, each facet of a tall building exists to help house its human tenants. n

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ADVERTISING FEATURE – HP

AN ARCHITECT’S GUIDE TO SELECTING THE RIGHT PRINTER

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RINTERS ARE AN ESSENTIAL PART OF EVERY DESIGN OFFICE, AND CAN SPELL THE CRITICAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PROJECT’S FAILURE AND ITS SUCCESS. AS SUCH, THE IMPORTANCE OF SELECTING A PRINTER SUITED TO THE INDIVIDUAL NEEDS OF A PRACTICE CANNOT BE OVERSTATED. ARCHITECTS MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT A NUMBER OF KEY CONSIDERATIONS TO ENSURE THAT THEY ARE SELECTING THE BEST POSSIBLE OPTION FOR THEIR NEEDS..

print speeds are often quoted as the fastest attainable by the device, regardless of print quality – architects must also be mindful of the “throughput time” and the time taken for a printer to warm up from ‘cold’ standby mode.

PERFORMANCE

Furthermore, the printer should be robust, with few moving parts and low maintenance requirements. Where possible, consider the supplier’s ability to provide comprehensive post-sales service and support.

Printer performance is assessed in four categories: technology, speed, quality, and reliability.

Print quality is essential for delivering clear, high quality renders and other graphics, and must be considered in terms of line accuracy and guaranteed minimum line width. In both cases, lower figures denote higher accuracy, and indicate precise line placement and that even very fine line weights will be preserved.

Not all printers have the same printing capabilities, and the individual needs of a practice will determine technology requirements. For some offices, a black and white only printer may suffice, whereas for others a full colour model may be the best option of producing clear, high quality prints. Offices must also bear in mind the printer’s compatibility with different printing substrates, alongside its software capabilities and suitability for upgrading down the track.

EASE OF USE

Speed is another leading driver of printer specification. Printer manufacturers often note speed in terms of images per minute (IPM) and pages per minute (PPM). Notably,

Architects are not legally required to expressly note copyright over drawings and other design materials. As such, it is critical that drawings are kept confidential to prevent

The printer must be intuitive, fast, and easy to use. Today’s technology-driven architecture offices require seamless integration of the printer interface into the existing office workflow and infrastructure. In a practical sense, this means wireless compatibility, universal cables, and an ability to print from mobile devices.

copying or unauthorised production. This can be achieved by ensuring that wireless printers provide a reliable, secure connection and encrypt all data stored on the machine itself.

COST Cost must be considered in four parts: the cost of hardware; the cost of replenishing consumables such as ink, toner, and paper; operational costs in terms of energy consumption and maintenance; and labour costs, or the time for which staff are idle while waiting for the printer to warm up and complete a job.

HP AUSTRALIA For over 30 years, HP has led the international market in printer technology. The brand has earned a reputation for fast, reliable, and easy-to-use printers that streamline workflows and produce prints of unmatched quality. Included in HP’s wide catalogue is the PageWide XL portfolio of printers, which are designed to meet the specific demands of architecture and design offices, and are invaluable additions to any busy design team.

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PEOPLE

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INDUSTRY

NSW PLANNING MINISTER: I WANT MY LEGACY TO BE THE GREENING OF SYDNEY

Do you think we are sacrificing good design over speed and cost of build? Good design is essential for the future of planning in NSW. But so is speeding up the bottlenecks in our planning system. That’s why we have intertwined good planning and reducing wait times in a number of recent announcements. I recently announced the introduction of the State Design Review Panel (SDRP) pilot program, ensuring good design will be front and centre for all new State Significant Developments (SSD).

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N AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN, NSW PLANNING MINISTER ANTHONY ROBERTS GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO HOW HE JUGGLES HIS EVERY GROWING LIST OF SIGNATURE CAPITAL PROJECTS.

The panel will work with the Government Architect NSW to review and consider key elements of the assessment process such as local character and design excellence. The State Design Review Panel pilot program will provide expert advice on the most significant developments in the state and will help ensure better design and planning outcomes for NSW. Having a diverse group of expert and experienced voices guiding the decisions of the Department will not only ensure that we continue to have a strong assessment process, but also ensure the community has an even greater say on the future direction of planning and design. What is the signature piece of infrastructure that you would like to be remembered for? I want my legacy to be the greening of Sydney and other parts of NSW. This is a passion with me and as planning minister, together with the premier, I have taken concrete steps to ensure

this legacy. Premier Gladys Berejiklian and I recently launched the Five Million Trees for Greater Sydney Initiative. This initiative are a great win for the people of Sydney. This partnership program between local and state government and the community will more than double the tree canopy from 16.8 percent to 40 percent by 2030 in areas where it’s needed most. And to kick things off, we will be giving away 15,000 trees over three years to homeowners who have a fast track complying development approval for a new home in new land release areas in Western Sydney, as part of a new Greenfield Housing Code which requires a tree to be planted in both front and backyards. This will be supported with $37.5 million of government funding over four years that will assist with the establishment of tree canopy cover. Green open space is a fundamental element of planning for future communities. A planned network of parks, rivers, bushland and street trees supports a good quality of life in an urban environment and is as crucial to cities as transport, road upgrades, schools and health facilities. Pretend your department had access to unlimited funds – what would you build in NSW first and why? I would love to build a fast train connecting Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne. The idea of connecting Australia’s major cities by very fast trains is exciting and has great benefits for the nation and its citizens.


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INDUSTRY

ABOVE “The idea of connecting Australia’s major cities by very fast trains is exciting and has great benefits for the nation and its citizens.” IMAGE: www.au.fcm.travel

With an explosion of population expected in Sydney and Melbourne in particular, one of the factors that can alleviate the problems associated with population growth are high-speed trains, which, as the Australian Financial Review’s Brian Toohey wrote, “make it more attractive to live in new population centres and still be in easy reach of Sydney or Melbourne and later Brisbane”. I would also love to develop a major transport corridor to the Central West of NSW by tunnelling through the Great Dividing Range.

How much green space do you think Sydney needs, and is this a priority for your department?

200 new or upgraded playgrounds that are more inclusive and engaging.

Securing green spaces is key to making Sydney a liveable city.

Having access to green open space is crucial in making communities thriving and enjoyable places to live.

That’s why communities will have access to more open spaces and playgrounds, as part of a $290 million funding injection from the government to make NSW communities more liveable and green.

What are some of the sustainability strategies your department is applying to new builds?

These changes will improve the energy efficiency of homes in NSW, resulting in lower utility bills for residents, and lessen impact on the environment. Part of the Development Application (DA) process for homes in NSW, BASIX ensures proposed designs are sustainable. Currently, homes use approximately 17 percent of the state’s total energy consumption. With 1.8 million new homes expected to be built over the next 40 years, it’s important these are designed in a way that maximises energy efficiency. Energy targets for houses and low-rise units will increase by approximately 10 percent, and by 5 percent for mid and high-rise units. Thermal comfort heating and cooling settings will also change.

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We’ve also released a Greenfield Housing Code will speed up the delivery of new homes in new land release (greenfield) areas will meet the needs of NSW’s growing population and deliver faster approvals for new homes. The Greenfield Housing Code will reduce the average time taken to approve new houses in new release areas.

Building a sustainable Sydney is a key focus of the Department of Planning and Environment. The NSW government recently introduced new Building Sustainability Index (BASIX) energy targets, part of the government’s initiative to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

But that’s only part of the picture.

WE ARE COMMITTED TO NOT ONLY CREATING THE JOBS AND INFRASTRUCTURE OUR COMMUNITIES NEED, BUT ALSO THE VITAL OPEN AND GREEN SPACES SO THAT FAMILIES CAN HAVE THE BEST QUALITY OF LIFE.

Is affordable housing a main focus for the NSW government, and if so, can you give examples? The government is committed to facilitating affordable rental housing, and supply to address affordability in the wider housing market. To help increase the supply of this type of housing we are currently reviewing a number of housing state policies to improve their effectiveness, and to create a modern and easy to use planning system that supports streamlined approvals. This includes examining ways to help increase housing diversity and affordable housing across the state.

The NSW government has committed $100 million to secure strategic open green space while also setting aside an extra $20 million to build more than

The draft District Plans propose a 5-10 percent affordable rental housing target, subject to viability, in areas subject to up-zoning to determine the most appropriate and effective approach to delivering on this target while also accounting for local character. n

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WOMEN ARCHITECTS LEADING THE WAY IN CITY REDESIGN

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RCHITECTS ARIANA RODRIGUEZ AND MARIA GUARDALA AT CRONE ARCHITECTS EXPLAIN HOW THE KEY TO THEIR SUCCESS IS THE COMPLEMENTARY SKILLSET OF THE TWO ASSOCIATES. In 2016, Crone Architects won a design excellence competition for 230 Sussex Street with associate, Ariana Rodriguez leading the design. The vision for the landmark site integrated the existing heritage-listed Foley Brothers Warehouse with a new tower and incorporated serviced apartments and residential. The adjacent heritage warehouse will be adapted to host a striking courtyard and lobby for the building, creating a focal point while activating the heart of the Meriton development. Ariana’s fellow associate, Maria Guardala is the project architect and together with Rodriguez, led the team throughout the detailed design and construction stages. When responding to the design competition, a key challenge for the team was also to respond to the local context and ensure their concept design enhanced the value of the existing heritage building. This was done through seamlessly blending past and present, ensuring a strong connection between the heritage warehouse and the new tower together with references to the streetscape. “230 Sussex Street is a once-in-a-career type of opportunity to work on a building that connects the past with the present and delivers truly exceptional design. The tower also responds to its context and program by presenting from both a heritage historical context from the city side, and a commercial current context from the Harbour side of the tower,” says Rodriguez. “From the outset, my focus was the creation of the concept design and the incorporation of strong design principles. On the other hand, Maria’s expertise lies in the delivery and ensuring the design principles are accurately referenced through the construction process – as a result we’ve been able to work efficiently to bring the project towards fruition,” she says. According to Maria Guardala, “The site presented an exciting opportunity to create a truly distinctive building, celebrating the site’s rich heritage while seamlessly blending timeless modern elements. Meriton’s desire to create a building that achieves the height of luxury and their commitment to high quality design enabled the Crone team to first imagine and then deliver a truly exceptional new destination for Sydney.”

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ARCHITECTS ARIANA RODRIGUEZ (LEFT) AND MARIA GUARDALA (RIGHT)

“Since I was a child,” says Ariana Rodriguez, “I dreamed about places like New York, Egypt, or Rome, where the built environment created a place that was distinct, with character and told the story of the place.” “I wanted to be a part of that, so I decided to become an architect at a very young age, and at 18 I moved to Barcelona, where I studied architecture and urban design within a city that breathes good design on every corner,” she says. “This gave me a new appreciation of space and place: now I have an ability to read and understand different cities at a whole different level, paying attention to details from the scale of the urban strategy to the materials and textures that people touch and feel in their everyday life, and learning new things on a daily basis.” “For me, being able to make a positive impact on the quality of life of people by making the right design decisions at this scale is priceless, and I hope I can make meaningful contributions to our society through my work.” “I fell into architecture somewhat by accident,” says Guardala. “As a naive 17-year-old I didn’t really understand what an architect did. I tossed between various design fields and finally took a punt and settled for studying architecture. I fell in love with it – the ability to turn an idea on paper into an environment that is experienced in many dimensions is thrilling.” “I wake up every day loving every aspect of my job; the formation of a vision, the spatial planning, “crafting” of the building, and thinking about how edges and junctions come together, the production of drawings and the management of people and relationships; we balance many skills

and the challenges are immensely rewarding. For me, I truly enjoy running projects and want to continue doing that in the future,” she says. Rodriguez says, “Architects have a bigger task than what many people are aware of, balancing the priorities of the many different parties involved in a project – sometimes what the city wants doesn’t necessarily align with the client’s vision or financial capacity, or even the requirements of engineers, authorities, etc.” “Our role is to understand and consider all those different forces that shape a project, and to transform them into a meaningful contribution to our built environment and society. One of these constraints is obviously related to the sustainability, and we need to consider it from the urban design scale, to the level of the passive design of a building, material selection, etc.,” she says. Guardala notes that, “I think at times we operate in a fast-paced environment and as such our clients can sometimes forget to think that the building should be designed to last and not be considered disposable within 20 years.” “I feel that architects should always be educating their clients on how to design for longevity, which involves getting the fundamentals right (orientation, ventilation etc.), choosing good quality and honest materials and allowing the planning to be flexible.” “Men and women bring different values and perspectives to a project and the more diversity we have, the better outcomes we get.” “Diversity in our future designers means that assumptions and pre-conceived ideas can be challenged, and that design can be more inclusive, open-minded and accurately reflect relevant issues in society,” she says. n

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DETAIL

BRISBANE’S TALLEST COMMERCIAL TOWER: DESIGNED FOR BOTH STYLE AND SUSTAINABILITY ARCHITECTS: WOODS BAGOT

WORDS: BRONWYN MCCOLL

PHOTOGRAPHY: LUKE MAHONEY, TREVOR MEIN, CHRISTOPHER FREDERICK JONES

A SIGNIFICANT ADDITION TO THE BRISBANE SKYLINE, THE 126,800SQM NUMBER 1 WILLIAM STREET PROVIDES A NEW INTEGRATED WORKPLACE FOR THE QUEENSLAND PUBLIC SERVICE. A MAJOR CATALYST PROJECT FOR THE WIDER WATERFRONT PRECINCT, THE PROJECT OFFERED THE OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP A LANDMARK COMMERCIAL OFFICE TOWER AND REINTEGRATE AN UNDERVALUED SECTION OF THE FORESHORE BACK INTO THE PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL FABRIC OF BRISBANE CITY.

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LEVEL 12 FLOOR PLAN LEVEL 12 FLOOR PLAN 0

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ositioned at the fringe of the Brisbane CBD, 1 William Street is the tallest commercial building in Brisbane, setting the benchmark for other government accommodation across Australia. Take the Scott Carver-designed ‘Kyubi Modern Asian Dining’, for instance. Designed as the new workplace for the Queensland public service, key to the client’s brief was the creation of a compelling workplace and unified workplace culture that would transform the operations of the Queensland public service.

CONNECTIVITY AND CONNECTIONS

atrium to encourage greater interaction and equitable access to natural light and views. A series of laneway connections through the porous core allows for easy movement from one side of the building to the other with breakout spaces integrated through these to enhance the opportunity for impromptu collaboration. The project vision for 1 William Street was to design a landmark commercial office tower to accommodate the Queensland Public Service while providing a symbol of Queensland’s strong sense of purpose, identity and confidence in its future.

A RIPARIAN DESIGN

Connectivity on and between floors was a key driver to fulfilling the brief. The integrated fitout is arranged around a series of vertically stacked three-level atria that form a series of community sky gardens.

A key design feature is the acknowledgement of the building’s location on the Brisbane River. The tower’s design abstracts the sinuous line of the river up the façade, around the crown and down to the ground.

A series of laneway connections through the porous core allows for easy movement across the floor plate with integrated breakout spaces providing opportunity for chance encounters to extend into impromptu collaboration.

The building is rotated off the CBD’s street grid pattern, with the north-orientated tower designed to look outwards toward the interior of the state of Queensland – sending a strong message from the state government and a commitment to reflecting the needs of the people of Queensland.

The resilience of the floor plate was analysed and tested against efficiency and user experience criteria. Social, collaboration and meeting spaces are centralised around the

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The tower’s crown is defined by a sharp chamfer that provides a distinctive skyline statement instantly recognisable from a distance.

Creating a striking visual profile, the roof is splayed with rooftop terraces allowing guests to experience the Queensland climate and panoramic view.

USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE SUSTAINABILITY Through clever design and innovative solutions, 1 William Street provides an energy efficient building that contributes to the health and wellbeing of users. The building features practical sustainability measures to maximise energy efficiency and take advantage of Brisbane’s subtropical climate. The building is rotated off the city’s street grid pattern, acknowledging the optimum aspect of north for passive sun control, sunlight penetration and sky glare. The building incorporates innovative features that contribute to its impressive performance including façade sunshades that vary in length and depth depending on aspect and sun exposure, automatic blind controls, LED lighting throughout the office areas, rainwater and condensation collection for landscape irrigation and lift energy regeneration. The tower has achieved a 6 Star Green Star Office As Built v3 rating, a 5.5 star NABERS office energy rating and a 4 star NABERS office water usage rating.

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DETAIL

The project posed a number of design challenges. Two of the key design challenges involved the awning and crown. The key design challenge involved dealing with a significant cantilever supported by only two super columns, tilted forward, and clad with flat glass that is faceted to accommodate a curve in two directions. While the building height is below the Brisbane Airport flight path limit of RL273 by 6m, construction cranes had to extend into the aviation airspace to enable construction of the crown. To overcome this, a three-month period was granted to allow construction at that height above the ground. This period included an allowance for the estimated 50 percent loss of time due to wind that would prevent cranes working. Given the geometry of the building, it was essential that the design integrated a perimeter access way behind the façade and ribbon connection points. A Meccano system of parts was developed that could be craned into place and bolted together. The construction was always going to be a race against time, but the design and construction methodology ran flawlessly and was completed albeit the lost time due to wind that exceeded expectations.

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A MECCANO SYSTEM OF PARTS WAS DEVELOPED THAT COULD BE CRANED INTO PLACE AND BOLTED TOGETHER.

The tower’s façade references an archetypal feature of Queensland architecture through the provision of horizontal and vertical louvres. Using parametric software, the louvring depth was precisely calculated to vary in length according to the angle of solar incidence peculiar to this site according to the specific longitude and latitude of its position. The louvres achieved an optimal solar shading co-efficient and glare control allowing passive means of sun control. The louvre length varies around the whole building – the horizontal louvres are at their longest in the northerly orientation and more vertical in a westerly and easterly orientation – ensuring optimum use of materials and a resultant building expression that transitions as one moves around the building.

The tower’s lightly-bronzed cladding and glass façade reflects and changes with the time of day and quality of sunlight, apparently adjusting to seasonal and climatic variations. The lobby space is enclosed by clear, louvre-free glass providing connection with the outside and view corridors to nearby buildings. The lobby’s feature sandstone walls recognise the intimate relationship the new building has with Parliament House, with the textural finish of the lobby walls resonating with the window details of the nearby historic building.

SPACE – THE FIRST AND FINAL DESIGN FRONTIER To overcome the tight site constraints, the building is lifted at ground level so that the building appears to float over a dynamic network of pedestrian and view corridors that connect the site to its surroundings. A series of eight distinct platforms cascade around the building, each with a unique design quality such as an urban retail laneway, intimate sub-tropical botanical spaces and a formalised entry space off William Street. Each platform relates to the adjacent footpath and natural ground level, mediating between the open space and the building.

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HEIGHT TO TIP OF SPIRE

HEIGHT TO TIP 254.76 OF SPIRE metres 835.83 feet 254.76 266.76METRES metres RL 266.76 METRES RL

HEIGHT TO ARCHITECTURAL TOP

HEIGHT TO ARCHITECTURAL TOP 218.13 metres 715.65 feet 218.13 METRES 230.13 m e t r e s R L 230.13 METRES RL

HEIGHT TO HIGHEST

OCCUPIEDTO FLOOR (LEVEL 41) HEIGHT HIGHEST 173.96 metres OCCUPIED FLOOR 570.73 feet (LEVEL 185.96 m e t r e s41) RL

173.96 METRES 185.96 METRES RL

BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN The building withdraws behind the ground level columns, allowing the landscape to enter into the perimeter of the tower zone. The enclosed part of the ground floor is designed to be as porous and transparent as possible, ensuring visual connectivity across and over the site. The network of external spaces offers a series of habitable spaces that promote activity at street level. The success of the project can be seen in how these external spaces are being used on a daily basis by Queensland Government employees and visitors. The site and particularly ground plane has already become a hub of activity during the week with people occupying spaces and utilising the shade and cool respite provided by more than 60 trees planted across the site. Overall, the client brief was very specific about materiality, maintenance requirements, durability and expected life. All materials were selected based on fulfilling the design intent and addressing the client brief. n

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NORTH-WEST SECTION SCALE 1 : 500

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: CBUS PROPERTY CBUSSUPER. COM.AU ARCADIS ARCADIS.COM EMF GRIFFITHS EMF. COM.AU WSP WSP.COM MCKENZIE GROUP MCKENZIEGROUP.COM.AU WT PARTNERSHIP WTPARTNERSHIP. COM ASPECT STUDIOS ASPECT-STUDIOS.COM/AU/

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NORTH-WEST SECTION SCALE 1 : 500

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Registrations open now

Over 2 days in August the Australian design industry of architects, designers, real-estate professionals, property developers and end-users will converge to create a new ecosystem driving a revolution in commercial design buying. Key figures across the Australian commercial design industry have already thrown their weight behind FRONT. Now it’s your turn. 9-10 AUGUST 2018 CARRIAGEWORKS, SYDNEY REGISTER NOW: www.front.design EXHIBIT AT FRONT: Adrian Wilson Architecture & Design Brand Director  adrian.wilson@architectureanddesign.com.au (+61) 417 779 215

Event Partners

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5/17/18 2:12 PM


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New retail space takes off at Sydney International Airport Architects: Cox Architecture, Design Inc and GroupGSA

Words: Stephanie Stefanovic

Photography: John Gollings

Sydney International Airport’s new “Marketplace” looks like it’s ready to take off, with its elevated position, glass ceiling cutouts and water views giving the illusion of a plane ready for flight.

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ompleted in 2017, the design and delivery of this new space for Sydney Airport’s International Terminal 1 was the joint effort of Cox Architecture, Design Inc and GroupGSA. Known as the “Marketplace”, this project was conceived out of a master plan process to reorganise airport interiors to provide reconfigured security space, an expanded retail offering and a cohesive international dining precinct. The result is a signature retail, food and lounge space within the airside precinct of the International Terminal. The space has been developed at the nexus of two gate lounge piers and the duty-free pier. The interior volume rises 17m above the departures level. It is flooded with natural light from above and to the east, where a 45m x 10m window provides unrestricted views across the airfield and Botany Bay. The 2,500sqm space has a steel-framed diagrid structure that rests on only four perimeter columns. According to Cox Architecture, the design inspiration was two-fold. The first element establishes a clear wayfinding solution for passengers by using interior height and natural light to attract and guide passengers. The second design element is an attitude

towards lightness in structure that captures an essence of flight, and by its geometric formation encourages passengers to dwell and pause. The new space was built over an existing 1960s structure, and was constructed largely offsite to allow continuous passenger operations at all times and outside curfew hours for construction. The curfew hours (construction between 11pm and 3am only) and a restricted footings footprint encouraged a structural design response with minimal ground impact, minimal structural and roof material weights, allowing for offsite prefabrication and assemblage. “The design uses the best in exposed structural steel technology to provide an innovative signature space within the evolving International Terminal precinct,” says David Holm, director of transport and infrastructure projects at Cox Architecture. “The result is an efficient structure that speaks to an Australian attitude towards admission of natural light and lightness in structure.” “[Overall] the design represents a marker point within Sydney Airport that exemplifies quality design, references an Australian attitude towards natural light and showcases Australian retail and food & beverage.” n


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EAST ELEVATION


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PREVIOUS: The new space was built over an existing 1960s structure. Its geometric design is not only visually striking, but also allows natural light to filter through the building. LEFT: Light and water views make the space an inviting place to eat, shop and relax.

LEFT: Exposed structural steel technology is used to provide an innovative signature space within the International Terminal precinct. OPPOSITE: The space has been developed at the nexus of two gate lounge piers and the duty-free pier.


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AIRPORT MARKETPLACE FLOOR PLAN


Find additional space where you never knew it existed.

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5/16/18 6:53 PM


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The SecureLap® system is significantly easier to install than current lapping alternatives removing the need for sealant and butyl tape which is both messy and difficult to assure a secure seal. This patented and cutting edge technology is designed to provide the additional water ingress security while preserving the integrity of the existing roof warranty. SecureLap® is the only option for the ultimate in end lap protection.

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MULTI-STOREY TIMBER BUILDINGS: A RENAISSANCE IN TIMBER CONSTRUCTION WORDS: DR FRED MOSHIRI*

THE EVER-INCREASING RANGE OF ENGINEERED WOOD PRODUCTS AND SYSTEMS IS GENERATING GLOBAL INTEREST AND DRIVE FOR GREATER INNOVATION IN NEW ON-SITE AND PREFABRICATED BUILDING SOLUTIONS. AT THE SAME TIME, MORE PEOPLE ARE REALISING THE BENEFITS OF TIMBER CONSTRUCTION FOR MULTI-STOREY BUILDINGS, LEADING TO A RESURGENCE IN ITS USE.


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he use of timber in multi-storey commercial timber buildings is not something new. It has a relatively long history and in fact, it was one of the only choices available in Australia up until the early 20th Century. This can be observed from the number of permanent timber structures such as existing industrial warehouses from the 1800s. The popularity of timber construction at this time can be attributed to the widespread availability of both high-quality native hardwoods and framing material manufactured by softwood plantations.

Modern construction Engineered wood products such as crosslaminated timber (CLT); laminated veneer lumber (LVL); glue laminated timber (glulam); plywood; and laminated strand lumber are now available in a wide variety of thicknesses, sizes and grades, and have a wide range of applications as structural materials in construction. These products are manufactured from veneers, strands or flakes to meet application-specific performance requirements. These manufactured components are then bonded together utilising adhesives under heat pressure to form value added structural members, making them an attractive option for construction. There is currently a growing list of multistorey heavy timber and timber hybrid buildings being constructed in Australia and across the globe. These buildings are pushing the boundaries of technology, utilising engineered timber products and timber composite structural systems. One example is 25 King, a 45m-high CLT office building currently under construction in Brisbane. It is Brisbane’s first engineered timber office building and once completed, will be the world’s tallest engineered timber office building. Another example is International House in Sydney, which was the first engineered timber multi-storey office in Australia. Its unique construction used more than

Off-site prefabrication and integrated construction of timber buildings can reduce construction programs significantly. Other benefits include:

Knowing that Australians generally spend 90 percent of their time indoors, the quality and character of the indoor environment has a great influence on the wellbeing of occupants.

• B  uildings can be disassembled and relocated at end-of-life • R  educed site labour, lower environmental nuisance and disruption to local residents • R  educed weight of the overall building as timber is around a fifth of the weight of concrete • D  ecreased dead-load on the foundations which greatly reduces the construction cost, particularly in sites with poor ground condition • M  ore architectural design flexibility offers more design options without sacrificing structural requirements

2,000m³ of CLT for the floors and cores, and 930m³ of glulam in the columns and beams. Reclaimed ironbark timbers were also used for the distinctive two-storey wooden pilasters that support the CLT. The office was built in just one year, as the engineered timber was prefabricated in a factory in Austria, then shipped to Australia and assembled on site. And being timber, it did not require drilling or concrete-pouring, which made it a quiet building site with minimal wastage.

Key drivers and facts There are many reasons for timber’s resurgence, but key market drivers include strong international demand for low- to medium-rise commercial buildings due to demographic changes; demand for sustainable design and Green Building annotation through the use of environmentally sustainable materials which are renewable, recyclable and carbon-friendly; and low embodied energy.

• T  he natural warmth and timeless beauty of the timber structure provides a structural system and a decorative feature in the one element Moreover, new studies show that timber buildings cost less to construct compared to conventional buildings such as steel and reinforced concrete. For example, Commercial Building Costing Case Studies – Traditional Design versus Timber by the Timber Development Association for Forestry and Wood Products Australia demonstrated that timber buildings would be 10-15 percent more cost-effective to construct compared to other conventional construction methods. The study found the following cost savings: • Commercial office building: -12.4 percent • Aged care facility: -13.9 percent • Apartment building: -2.2 percent • Portal-framed industrial shed: -9.4 percent


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PREVIOUS: Working in a timber office can help employees reduce stress, while also decreasing blood pressure, heart rates and anxiety. Pictured is Macquarie University’s Incubator building. Image: Architectus ABOVE: 25 King is part of the growing list of engineered timber towers in Australia. Image: Lendlease LEFT: International House was a finalist for the Commercial Award at the 2017 Sustainability Awards. Image: Architectus


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OTHER FACTORS

CHALLENGES

The health and wellbeing benefits of timber construction and interiors in businesses, educational facilities and hospitals are well-investigated. Knowing that Australians generally spend 90 percent of their time indoors, the quality and character of the indoor environment has a great influence on the wellbeing of occupants.

The shift away from concrete and steel towards timber in Australia’s multi-storey commercial buildings is not without its challenges. Steel and concrete products are well-established and accepted in the Australian market by designers, contractors and developers, for example. It is also essential to have an alignment between forestry and the supply chain, as well as the Australian timber industry’s ability to respond to the demand of manufacturing and fabricating building elements required for the construction of multi-storey commercial timber buildings. n

In particular, timber contributes naturally to moderate humidity by absorbing air moisture when the humidity in a space is high, and releasing it when the humidity is low. This moisture-buffering minimises the impact of pathogens and chemical interactions on human health.

* DR FRED MOSHIRI IS A SENIOR STRUCTURAL ENGINEER AT ACOR WITH EXPERIENCE IN R&D, DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Some studies such as Planet Ark’s Wood – Housing, Health, Humanity report have also found that timber and wood products have a significant de-stressing effect and can enhance the psychological wellbeing of occupants. The warm inviting feel from wood and timber decreases blood pressure, heart rates and anxiety, according to the study.

MANAGEMENT OF RESIDENTIAL AND NON-RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS, AND HAS WORKED AT THE FOREFRONT OF DEVELOPING TIMBER BUILDINGS IN AUSTRALIA.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: FORESTRY AND WOOD PRODUCTS AUSTRALIA ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/ SUPPLIERS/WOOD-SOLUTIONS/AUSTRALIAN-FORESTRY-STANDARD-IS-NOW-RESPONSIBLE-WO ACOR ACOR.COM. AU LENDLEASE LENDLEASE.COM/AU/ ARCHITECTUS ARCHITECTUS.COM.AU PLANET ARK PLANETARK.ORG


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Timber Effects Range The new range of InnovaTM Timber Effects cladding gives the natural flair and warm colours of timber with all the fire resistance and longevity of fibre cement. DuragrooveTM panels and StratumTM weatherboards come with the timber effect embossed on the fibre cement that:

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Up to BAL 40 as per AS3959:2009

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On the face of it: faรงades come to the fore words: Prue Miller

In considering the value of a building faรงade, so many aspects must be LOOKED AT; energy efficiency, fenestration AND structural loads.

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5/17/18 1:35 PM


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MetecnoInspire® conforms to Australian Standards and is locally manufactured. Available in a range of finishes and selected colours.

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he beauty of the envelope is what makes us stop and look and consider and admire. It is the cream on top, the final coat of lacquer and a designer’s last chance to put their mark out there for the world to see. Of the many new delights in construction options, the reinvention of the glass wall has come back to join us. This time however, it is sleek, proportional and offers none of the bulky joins that marred its introduction to mod architecture in the 70s. Poesia (Italian for poetry) is a range of bricks manufactured in Italy but - and here’s one of the big plusses - they are made to Australian brick dimensions. However, that sounds too utilitarian when talking about these blocks of glass that offer a moving lightshow to those on the inside and a glittering jewel to those passing by.

BRICKS BY THE GLASS Brett Warren, general manager of marketing for Poesia says the uptake has been fantastic, with many at the showroom, including Penelope Seidler, amazed at the sleek mortar joins, which are generally around 7mm. Although a standard mortar mix can be used, Warren stands by the company recommendation of Mortex with bonding agent Meld Crete.

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At around $52 a brick, the numbers for extensive use can be seen as prohibitive, but as a glittering moment in the building envelope, it is surely a hard concept to beat. “It’s very much a feature product,” says Warren. “But that hasn’t stopped architects and designers in both Sydney and Melbourne looking at using the brick extensively in large projects currently on the drawing board.” Having said that, while Poesia offers design glam, one cannot go past the new product from Roberston Facades, Alusion. Officially called ‘Architectural Stabilized Aluminium Foam’, it is a unique and ever changing profile created in standard sized sheets created from 50 percent recycled content. The art is created by injecting air onto molten aluminium – with no two sheets exactly the same, though there are standardised formulas. The ‘bubbles’ can be open on both sides, or one side, or neither side, and the size of the cell (or bubble) is also graded into three general sizes and then subsets from there. The result is a building sheath, somewhat reminiscent of ladies’ millinery, where a fine net is drawn over the eyes of a beautiful woman. A lustrous cape of metal that gleams

under a range of lighting and perhaps looks even more remarkable when the metallic skin is backlit through an open cell sheet. Imaginative designers have also taken the sheets and painted them, encrusted them and bejewelled them in any number of ways when used as an interior feature. But in each event the structural integrity and finish of the Alusion base has remained impervious.

THE SHEATH EFFECT Peter Roberston of Robertson Facades first spied the concept at the Prada Museum where the exterior is covered in Alusion in its natural state, placed rather dramatically beside gold finished panels. Although aware of the product Roberston says, “There is nothing like seeing it in situ”. It was three years until Roberston saw the museum once again. “I saw it in February this year and it had sustained no damage at all. It still looked as good as it did the first time I saw it.” The product is created in Canada and sent here in sheets on order. With so many variables it’s hard to get a handle on price, but for a general idea a less than ten sheet order of 25mm thick, small cell Alusion is around $600 per square metre. Large cell at 12mm thick comes in at around $250

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PREVIOUS: Prada Museum with the exterior is covered in Alusion. IMAGE: Robertson Facades FAR LEFT: PGH (Corium ) bricks City Park West Chelmsford. IMAGE: Corium LEFT: Poesia Facade bricks for commercial applications. IMAGE: Austral Bricks BELOW LEFT: Poesia Glass bricks. IMAGE: Austral Bricks BELOW RIGHT: PGH glazed brick range. IMAGE: Brickworks

per square metre. It is an amazing, some might say sexy option at a comparable price and while clearly a product that leans to the commercial arena, may break into the residential market as it has in the United States.

It’s another Cemintel product called ‘Territory’ and can be seen with striking effect at the seaside location of Dee Why in NSW, where a large apartment complex called Allure has been clad in the panels.

Another point in the envelope design spectrum is the adaptation of a romantic, almost heritage design style product.

BY THE SEASIDE

The composite ‘weatherboard’ is a way of hanging onto our ‘cottage sized’ heritage (and perhaps happier times), but now created in a fibrous material of wood chip and cement that will not, unlike those boards of long ago, lose structural integrity any time soon. The Cemintel Scarborough weatherboards answer the call to heritage design and also fit very nicely into the popular Hamptons look in new builds. Kim Roughan, national marketing manager with Cemintel says this product, which arrives onsite pre-primed and ready for a weekend paint fest, is spiking in popularity - especially in Victoria and Queensland. What is new here though is this ‘look’, this woodgrain, weatherboard kind of vibe now seen in high density construction.

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Seaside locations are notoriously tough on buildings, however this product, seen in a combination of the woodgrain patterned ‘Territory Woodland Smoked’, with other smoother products, gives the complex a rather nautical look, plus a welcome longevity with a 10-year guarantee.

which means it is also an option in updating existing ugly-as-sin masonry projects. Where masonry is not appealing, or where smooth and silky is called for, the Equitilt product from Bondor is the coup de grâce. A perfect three-way marriage of structural integrity, fire rated insulation and colours galore, it has an obvious use in commercial and even government applications, however the residential envelopes are also taking up the cause. n

High-rise cladding applications present many problems from a construction point of view – especially in high density situations. PGH Corium has taken on this sector with a brick cladding system that comes in quick install panels. The panels are still comprised of a PGH brick product – including the colourful glazed range – but in a tile format attached to steel panels.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: POESIA AUSTRALBRICKS.COM. AU/NSW/PRODUCT/POESIAGLASS/ ROBERTSON FACADES ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ROBERTSONFACADE-SYSTEMS/DECORATED-CONCRETE-FACADE-SYSTEMS

It opens up the design possibilities, while still offering quick construction, with panels being suitable for attachment to a range of substructures from wood to masonry,

CEMINTEL ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ CEMINTEL PGH CORIUM ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/ SUPPLIERS/PGH-BRICKS-PAVERS/WHAT-IS-CORIUM BONDOR ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/BONDOR

5/17/18 1:36 PM


CASE STUDY

DEAKIN UNIVERSITY, BURWOOD CAMPUS MELBOURNE, VIC

NESTLED INTO A LEAFY MELBOURNE SUBURB AND CATERING FOR 26,000 STUDENTS AND 1500 STAFF, BURWOOD CAMPUS IS DEAKIN UNIVERSITY’S BUSIEST CAMPUS. In 2016, Environmentally Sustainable Design consultancy, Cundall, in conjunction with AE Smith, undertook significant infrastructure upgrades by way of the installation of air conditioning services in five campus buildings. Working closely with the University, Cundall designed a centralised plant system to service the five buildings and developed the infrastructure to extend the air conditioning to other buildings on campus. The thermal upgrade project was recognised for its excellence at the 2016 AIRAH (Australian Institute of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning, and Heating) Awards, where it was a finalist in the “Best HVAC&R Retrofit or Update” category.

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Since the project was slated for delivery within a single academic year, tight timelines and the interests of multiple stakeholders needed to be closely managed. The five buildings undergoing upgrades were required to remain operational with minimal disruption to teaching and exam activities during the installation schedule. Alongside the project’s logistical constraints, the equipment itself needed to meet specific requirements including longevity, reliability, and high performance. In buildings containing critical testing equipment sensitive to noise distortion, air conditioning was also required to have a minimal impact on harmonic distortion. Limitations on roof and electrical infrastructure meant that equipment had to have the smallest possible footprint without compromising efficiency or performance. The five buildings were originally designed for natural ventilation and the floor slab height was extremely narrow, necessitating careful coordination of the structure, fit-out, and building services to ensure that ceiling heights were left intact.

Very successful… post occupancy surveys indicate both staff and students enjoy using the spaces significantly more than previously thanks to improved comfort conditions. JAMES HEPI DEAKIN UNIVERSITY PROJECT MANAGER

To manage the project’s unique challenges, all involved parties worked together in ongoing consultation to understand one another’s needs and manage expectations. During the design and installation stages, Daikin staff used their extensive expertise in specifying air conditioning systems for commercial and public infrastructure projects to systematically deliver the upgrades within the timeline and under budget. The University was also able to remain fully functional during the upgrade works. The University liaised directly with Daikin to procure six chillers that were delivered on site within 12 weeks,

addressing the project’s critical lead times. Daikin’s European-made VSD Screw Chillers, whose Variable Volume Ratio (VVR) technology has since been recognised with a Frost & Sullivan Manufacturing Leadership Award, were installed to ensure maximum efficiency with minimum footprints. Chillers were fitted with IEEE-519 compliant Active Harmonic Filters to limit harmonic distortion, whilst two campus substations were upgraded to facilitate the addition of 3MW of cooling plant. Careful management of the works by all parties involved and negotiation with the power authority allowed strategic upgrading of the transformers, minimising supply shutdowns.

To learn more about Daikin’s commercial HVAC products and services, visit commercial.daikin.com.au

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DON’T JUST LOOK THROUGH THE WINDOW: SMART TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMARTER PROJECTS WORDS: JASMINE O’DONOGHUE

WINDOWS AND WINDOW FURNISHINGS HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO TRANSFORM THE ENVIRONMENTAL LOAD OF ANY PROJECT AND GREATLY IMPROVE THE FUNCTIONALITY AND EFFICIENCY OF A SPACE.

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5/16/18 6:31 PM


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ommercial spaces have a massive role to play in the green movement. Research shows employees are less motivated to act environmentally responsibly in the workplace than at home because they don’t have a financial interest in doing so. In addition, equipment is often shared so there can be a lack of responsibility and elements such as heating or lighting is often out of their control. At work employees are also often heavier users of heating, lighting, air conditioning, ventilation and computers and generate more waste. Many corporations are taking responsibility for their environmental impact by putting into place initiatives to improve the sustainability of the business. This corporate responsibility should - but doesn’t always – stretch to the technology of the building in which the business operates. This extends to retail projects, where there is a combination of people using the space for work, and also for day-to-day tasks and leisure. Windows are hugely important in the overall aesthetics, efficiency and security of a commercial project. The connection between maintaining a link to the outdoors and productivity is well documented, but it can lead to excessive space conditioning loads. Currently the window market is dominated by insulating glass units, which are typically two panes of glass held apart by separators and often a custom gas between the two panes, but this technology is just the tip of the iceberg. The window is much more than just a barrier to separate the inside from the outside. What if it could be used to improve efficiency, productivity and security? When cutting-edge research and the latest technology collides, things start to get interesting. Dr Robert Tenent, researcher for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory says most of the current window research can be broken down into a few key areas.

Improving thermal performance Improving thermal performance is mainly pursued through triple pane designs. The third pane often takes the form of a lightweight

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film or thin glass layer in the middle of the insulating glass units. A supplier in the US has been able to produce a unit with multiple layers of plastic films to achieve an “R-10” window. The second approach is the ongoing development of vacuum insulating glass. “This concept is similar to the multipane designs, however the gas between the two panes is removed to create a vacuum which dramatically improves thermal performance,” explains Tenent. A key benefit is the system can be very thin, which makes it acceptable for retrofit of single pane units. Tenent also says that the technology is “finally starting to emerge from major suppliers” noting that many major commercial glass companies are actively researching the technology and evaluating partnership options, while multiple start-up companies are active in the area.

Smart windows The two main strands of smart window technology can be broken down into electrochromic and thermochromic technologies. Electrochromic units control their tint through application of a small voltage which provides flexibility for the user in how they control the unit. However, that flexibility comes with a high price point, which is currently limiting adoption. Thermochromic technologies tint based on temperature. “This more passive approach carries the benefit of not having to wire your windows into the building system…however you do lose some of the flexibility,” Tenent says. Thermochromic technology is designed to switch at a certain temperature which is either set at the factory or built into the materials. Since it is more difficult to customise, it could limit the scalability of the technology. Research into smart windows is taking place at Griffith University, where professor Huijun Zhao, director of Centre for Clean Environment and Energy is leading a $1 million project into a low-cost, energy-saving “smart window”. The initiative is working to develop a window that contains a glass that can change its

colour and the amount of light or heat that it transmits. Zhao says windows play an important role in energy efficiency and the new smart windows would provide significant energy savings by reducing reliance on air conditioning, heating and artificial lighting. “This is particularly important for office buildings, hotels, and schools where the energy consumption for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are more than 70 percent of the total energy consumption,” he says. “The intended outcomes of this project will facilitate the widespread adoption of energy-saving smart windows, alleviate pressure on the rising energy demand and contribute to the goal of a sustainable working and living environment.”

Solar windows Solar windows could have a massive impact in commercial projects, where often the roof size provides a limited opportunity for traditional solar panels, compared with the overall floor space. “By developing a solar technology that can be effectively integrated into a glass unit, you greatly increase the potential for development of ‘zero net energy’ commercial buildings,” Tenent says. The difficulty with this technology is finding a balance between harvesting the solar energy and allowing the light through so people can see through the window. To get around this, some researchers are developing solar materials that absorb energy outside of the visible light spectrum – typically either ultraviolet or infrared radiation. Researchers at Michigan State University developed transparent solar cells which they argue that together with rooftop units could nearly meet electricity demand in the US. “By harvesting only invisible light, these devices can provide a similar electricitygeneration potential as rooftop solar while providing additional functionality to enhance the efficiency of buildings, automobiles and mobile electronics,” says Richard Lunt, the Johansen Crosby Endowed associate professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at MSU.

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PREVIOUS: Bethany-Leggr. IMAGE: Unsplash LEFT: Solar windows could have a massive impact in commercial projects, where often the roof size provides a limited opportunity for traditional solar panels, compared with the overall floor space. RIGHT: Ripley Town Centre is a new shopping centre in Ipswich, Queensland uses custom engineered and manufactured products by Shutterflex which can diffuse, control and moderate the heat and glare.

The technology is recording efficiencies of above five percent, while traditional solar panels are about 15-18 percent. Their creators argue that despite their lower efficiency than traditional solar panels, they could be applied to a lot more surfaces. Given that the visible light spectrum is where most of the beneficial solar energy is, another approach is to harvest a specified amount of energy from the visible light spectrum, but not too much of it. “This is done through development of very thin solar cells that have some degree of transparency,” Tenent says. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have gone a step further by developing a solar cell material that has a thermochromic response. At low temperatures the material is clear, but when heated, it tints and simultaneously begins generating energy as a high quality solar cell. “There is a fundamental trade-off between a good window and a good solar cell,” says Lance Wheeler, NREL scientist. “This technology bypasses that. We have a good solar cell when there’s lots of sunshine and we have a good window when there’s not.” The technology provides a solar power conversion efficiency of 11.3 percent.

such as screens and shutters. Shutterflex owner Peter Ryan says architects use these products to minimise direct sunlight onto the glass, leading to a reduced heat load on the building, and to create an aesthetic appeal. “We see too many glass façade or high-rises that are boring in appearance and have a huge heat load to them,” Ryan says. “It just doesn’t make sense to have a huge glass façade with a big air conditioning unit sitting in the roof…There’s ways to make a tall high-rise look quite attractive and reduce its heat load in all in the same process.”

RIPLEY TOWN CENTRE CASE STUDY Ripley Town Centre is a new shopping centre in Ipswich, Queensland. The centre used custom engineered and manufactured products by Shutterflex which can diffuse, control and moderate the heat and glare. A total of 300 Elliptical Sun Blades were fitted horizontally and vertically and 150mm Elliptical Sun Blades were fitted horizontally. The blades provide sun shading from the harsh Queensland sun, diffuse the light and heat coming through the glass and reduce the temperature internally, lessening the carbon load. They also allow enough light in to make the space pleasant for its customers. n

WINDOW FURNISHINGS Solar control in the local market is dominated by tinting and using window furnishings

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SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: SHUTTERFLEX ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/SHUTTERFLEX

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU Combining the best in new projects, industry news and expert commentary with the country’s most comprehensive archive of new products, suppliers and their educational resources. Go online today and discover what’s new.


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BVN PLANTS THE SEEDS OF A GREEN FUTURE WORDS: DEBORAH SINGERMAN

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PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT BOARDMAN

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raised platform displays office chairs, from the traditional chrome and leather to a new mobile, ergonomic stackable chair, the Aula, recently launched with a new folding table further inside the space, the mAx. “Our tasteful display is not like a jar of boiled sweets,” says Adrian Nicolini, Wilkhahn’s managing director, Asia Pacific. One of the world’s best-known furniture manufacturers, Wilkhahn, recently celebrated its 111-year anniversary, with the March 2018 opening of a new Surry Hills showroom at the Elizabeth Street end of a gradually revitalising Wentworth Avenue. The custom-built showroom follows the new Asia Pacific regional headquarters for operations and production in Riverwood (80 percent of Wilkhahn products destined for Asia are still manufactured in Sydney). BVN was responsible for the last showroom in Alexandria, where Wilkhahn was based for well over 10 years. Now the long-time collaborators have achieved “a more residential look” different from a traditional executivechair, commercial dominance, says BVN’s senior practice director Sally Campbell, who worked extensively on the project. Both she and Nicolini agree that they wanted a repositioning that would acknowledge the company’s established “gravitas” while also allowing it “to show the brand in a contemporary way”. BVN and a tenant representative had scouted around possible sites for a new showroom that could conjure up a mixture of past, present and future. With the gritty Wentworth Avenue having an overhaul, there was no better time to transform a 19th century industrial building that had previously been a motorcycle repair store and then a gym. Ripping out the original façade and seeing the possibility of an alluring shopfront made a Wentworth Avenue entrance far more attractive than the other option, from Foster Street, Campbell explained. The client and BVN were “passionate about playing up the character of the building”, she says. They loved the “central atrium with its double height space” (and next to an internal courtyard, since enclosed by a light-well glass box), and the “potential of the quality of the space it could be”.

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With Nicolini believing in the social responsibility of wellness – “care for clients is a strong part of what Wilkhahn is” – the company is Australia’s first retail space to target the health and wellbeing WELL certification. Having achieved the first Office WELL certification for Frasers Property, BVN was right behind the decision. Daylight flooding the working office’s sit-stand desks, air quality and fitness programs are just some of the WELL factors, but it is the variegated greenery that stands out. BVN had first spotted Plant Society and its self-described “plant cultivator”, Jason Chongue, on Instagram. Campbell could not get the possibility of a partnership out of her head, contacted him, “got to know his business aspirations” and realised Wilkhahn and Plant Society even had some of the same clients. For Chongue, the resulting collaboration with Wilkhahn and BVN “… was naturally perfect to achieve WELL certification as our core value of reducing human pollution and providing natural solutions to indoor spaces is important to us”. There are seven plant varieties indoors, suited to natural light and (softening) “the architectural edges to highlight the space even more,” he says, and numerous plants outdoors. Examples he describes include the fruit salad plant’s organically shaped leaves; the fiddle leaf fig’s bursts of tall greenery; the African milk tree’s sculptural qualities; and Mistletoe cactus, elegant smaller plants to provide breathing space on windowsills and between furniture. Wilkhahn thinks of the space as not simply a showroom but also as a community space for holding events, talks and functions about design. It will also partner with compatible people. As such, the Melbourne-based Plant Society holds weekend workshops and has a retail outlet in the courtyard. BVN interior designer Marc Hine refers to other collaborations, too, where “they share similar values, views and direction with their business and design”. These include mural artist, Daimon Downey, whose unusual forest wall brightens the ramp to the back of the space, Nanda Hobbs with a rotating, artwork program throughout, and Kvadrat Maharam’s acoustic panelling.

I have worked on a project where the policies and culture of a company have been crucial to the success of the final outcome,” she says. Retail for Wilkhahn is about client experience, “less transactional and more relationship-based,” Campbell says. “They also have a reputation of being fantastic hosts.” Helping them on their way is another creative outlet – a large, square stone bar in the backroom. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: BVN ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN. COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/BVN-ARCHITECTURE WILKHAHN ASIA

WELL Certification lead Eminè Mehmet expects the certification process to be completed in the next few months. “This is the first time

PACIFIC ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ WILKHAHN-ASIA-PACIFIC THE PLANT SOCIETY THEPLANTSOCIETY. COM.AU KVADRAT MAHARAM KVADRATMAHARAM.COM

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THE GREEN ROOF REVOLUTION SPREADS TO AUSTRALIA WORDS: JASMINE O’DONOGHUE


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“Living” roofs and walls are fast emerging as important and sought-after additions in the Australian building industry. Their role in creating healthy, ecologically responsible buildings is becoming more widely acknowledged both locally AND overseas.

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reen roofs are an accepted part of modern building in Europe, where their use has become mandated by some city and national governments. They are commonplace in the Austrian city of Linz, where green roofs are required on all new residential and commercial buildings with rooftops larger than 100sqm. In the United States, Denver has joined San Francisco in making green roofs compulsory on certain buildings. In November, an initiative was passed which mandated that 20 percent of rooftop space on newly constructed buildings over 2300sqm must be covered by gardens or solar panels. The revolution has spread to Australia, where the eco-friendly design is being increasingly utilised to take advantage of the benefits. Green roofs provide longer roof life span and minimise heating and cooling costs due to increased thermal insulation. They reduce stormwater runoff, improve air quality, provide an urban habitat for wildlife, mitigate the urban heat island effect and increase property value and amenity. In a commercial environment, green roofs provide all of these benefits and more. Research has found workers in an office with greenery were 15 percent more productive than those without. It was also found to boost employee engagement, concentration levels, workplace satisfaction and perceptions of air quality.

The benefits of green roofs were recognised by Infrastructure Australia recently, in a report recommending the Australian government maintain and enhance green infrastructure through a combination of taxation, planning incentives and policy and regulatory reforms. Meanwhile, the NSW government has released its ‘Greener Places’ draft policy which reinforces that green roofs are not only an asset to the built environment but essential to the design and development of healthy urban environments. Despite the myriad of benefits of green roofs, their growing popularity is fuelled by commercial interests. “The key trends for green roofs are commercially driven by increasing realty value and improving tenancy loyalty in a competitive market,” says Matthew Dillon, president; Green Roofs Australasia and director, Verdant Solutions Australia. Incorporating a green roof is a means of giving a project an edge over its competitors, particularly in an era where demand for urban living is rising and space is at a premium. However, the presence of green roofs in Australia is still a long way off some cities overseas. “Unfortunately, the current national building codes, State SEPPs, local government DCPs and LEPs do not include requirements which promote BIV (Building Integrated Vegetative) systems such as green roofs and living walls,” Dillon says.


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“In my opinion this is a lost opportunity for the community which lacks futureproofing foresight by government.” The answer, Dillon says, is a mandate. “I believe that all new residential developments and large scale industrial developments need to be mandated on, including green roofs and made solar ready, similar to new legislation by the City of San Francisco,” he says. Dillon has been promoting and lobbying for green roof use for 11 years, and he says their uptake comes down to economic benefits. “Due to a rapid global expansion of incorporating green roofs and living walls into the urban fabric via the built environment, we now have quantifiable and qualifiable data which substantiates the economic rationale required for investment,” he says. “Green sustainable buildings are now in demand and worth more...what’s lacking is the supply.”

GREEN ROOF DESIGN Green roof design ranges from extensive green roofs which have a thin growing medium, to intensive green roofs which have deeper soil and are much heavier. Fytogreen Australia designer, botanist and quality manager, Erik van Zuilekom says green roofs are increasingly becoming popular for

high-rise and small-scale commercial office space and large-scale industrial applications. Van Zuilekom says the key trends in commercial green roof design include the use of shallow profiles, the utilisation of green roofs for thermal and acoustic insulation and using different species to provide aesthetic benefit to surrounding areas. Many designers are also creating trafficable green roofs to provide increased amenity, using the space for food production and merging roof gardens with a range of living architecture technologies and biophilic design solutions. They are also more frequently combining them with solar panels to keep the panels cool and therefore lessen exacerbated heating to increase efficiency. As research enhances the understanding of green roofs and how they perform, many designers are branching out and utilising a higher diversity of species to optimise the desired benefits of green roofs. They are also merging green roofs with vertical gardens and green facades to make the most of space and create a more aesthetically pleasing and functional area. Looking forward, Van Zuilekom can see the use of green roof technology becoming more extensive and used in a wider range of exposures. He believes there will be a greater responsiveness to architecture and species selection will improve, allowing for a wider range of applications.

PREVIOUS: Many designers are creating trafficable green roofs to provide increased amenity, using the space for food production and merging roof gardens with a range of living architecture technologies and biophilic design solutions. ABOVE LEFT: Despite the myriad of benefits of green roofs, their growing popularity is fuelled by commercial interests.


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CASE STUDY: SOUTH EAST WATER HEADQUARTERS, FRANKSTON, VICTORIA

Fytogreen Australia installed an 800sqm roof garden on the South East Water office headquarters in Frankston. The green roof was installed on Level W1, the ground floor, and the tiered entrance garden, which contains trees up to 5m high at planting time. Due to all areas being in a complete rain shadow, the company worked with landscape architects Aspect Studios to refine a suitable species list for the roof gardens. “This rain shadow aspect meant that the irrigation design had to be very robust and supported by a flow rate monitored alarm system,” says Fytogreen managing director Geoff Heard.

NAB HEADQUARTERS, MELBOURNE

HASSELL designed a series of landscape spaces for NAB’s Melbourne headquarters project at 700 Bourke Street in Melbourne Docklands. The building features flexible green workspaces both inside and outside of the building. The roof terrace is equipped with an extensive green roof which forms a lower terrace garden. The green roof employs plants indigenous to the site and provides a continuous seating edge with views of the skyline. The terrace also has a communal garden where vegetables and herbs are grown, and it is suitable for informal meetings and larger social gatherings. n

“The irrigation design is with sub-surface drip irrigation at 400mm wide spacing within the Hydrocell extensive media profile, supported by a 60mm layer of Hydrocell RG30, which acts as a water reservoir holding up to 30L/m²,” Heard says. Green roof water and rainwater from the roof are also recycled into a 90,000L tank, adding to the irrigation efficiency and sustainability. The emerging challenge has been the impact of salt laden winds from southerly storm events causing leaf burn. With the gardens all under the roof line, standard cranes could not be used for moving material easily to the respective areas. “This required material to be placed where possible by Franna crane horizontally and the bulk of the material was blown in by We-Blow,” Heard adds. SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: FYTOGREEN FYTOGREEN.COM.AU

“The project was completed in stages as areas became available and access was still possible.”

VERDANT SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA GREENROOFSAUSTRALASIA. COM.AU/VERDANT-SOLUTIONS-AUSTRALIA ASPECT STUDIOS ASPECT-STUDIOS.COM/AU/ HASSELL STUDIO HASSELLSTUDIO.COM

BOTTOM LEFT: As research enhances the understanding of green roofs and how they perform, many designers are branching out and utilising a higher diversity of species to optimise the desired benefits of green roofs. OVER: Transparent and otherworldly green “tree” structures allow for hanging plants, creating a new field of flora.


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HEAD IN THE CLOUD WORDS: BONNIE VAN DORP

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aul Loh, a lecturer in digital architecture design at the University of Melbourne, told Infolink Magazine that digital design tools are becoming an essential tool for design as they are bringing the profession closer to the manufacturing industry that it already works so closely with. One such digital design trend making waves in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) sector is the adoption of virtual reality and augmented reality technology. While virtual reality and augmented reality are still in its infancy, firms around the globe are already beginning to adopt the immersive tech. “Virtual reality provides an immersive environment for the user,” Loh says. “It allows the user to experience the design as the first person. For architects, it enables the designer to make more informed judgements during the design phase.” “We are now seeing the use of augmented reality in construction and fabrication. This allows the designer to overlay their design with the physical environment to make sense of scale and to ensure the accuracy of the build.” Gensler managing director Tom Owens told Infolink Magazine, “It’s really important in the design process to know when and how to use the right VR and AR tools”. “It’s definitely a lot of fun experimenting with what’s out there, and there’s no question you learn a lot by trial and error, but we always try to start by asking ‘why’ when considering incorporating a certain tool into the design process,” he says. As digital transformation and innovation continues to grip the AEC sector, content and file creation is becoming richer and more complex. And with sophisticated design comes the challenge of collaboration and

transferring large files between internal and external stakeholders. While there are AEC-specific cloud solutions provided by the likes of Autodesk, Bentley and e-Builder, architects are also looking to generic cloud solutions such as Google Drive and Dropbox to facilitate collaboration. However, even ‘generic’ cloud solutions have begun to target AEC industries, with Dropbox paving the way by expanding its partnerships with the likes of Aconex, BulldozAir, Fieldwire and Plangrid to give teams in AEC sectors more freedom to use the tools and platforms they prefer. Aconex’s chief technology officer Tim Olshansky says the partnership with Dropbox would help teams better coordinate on large projects by leveraging data across platforms. “Our goal is to continue driving accountability and insights to teams, with a growing ecosystem of integrations that helps our users build even more amazing things,” he says. The two-way sync with documents stored in Dropbox planned this year with BulldozAir will give construction professionals a more streamlined process for project management commented BulldozAIR co-founders Ali El Hariri and Maxence Leringer. For Fieldwire users, the integration with the cloud-based solution will bring real-time updates to the content that construction teams and professionals rely upon. “Fieldwire users need to know when changes to projects and plans happen, which is why our two-way sync with Dropbox was developed to seamlessly centralise work, whether in the office, on the road, or at the construction site,” says Yves Frinault, founder and CEO of Fieldwire. Following Dropbox’s partnership with Autodesk last year, the cloud-based solution reported that teams and users in the AEC

sectors created and saved more than 250 million files, which translates to 25 million files per month or 800,000 per year. “Technology trends like Building Information Modelling (BIM), Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) are rapidly growing and representing exciting opportunities for the industry,” says Dropbox’s director of Enterprise, Dean Swan. “For architecture, we have opened up our platform for integrations with industry essential tools like AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Cloud and Microsoft Office 365. These integrations enable architecture professionals and teams to update, save and share their work on a single platform while always have a single source of truth,” says Swan. For those looking for an AEC specific cloud-based collaboration ecosystem solution, Trimble Connect is one option. Trimble Connect streamlines workflows and transforms collaborative processes, allowing teams to access, analyse, manage and share project data from anywhere at any time. “Trimble Connect creates communities of collaboration across and within disciplines, integrating data from Trimble’s wide variety of applications and devices to reduce the barriers between teams and tasks,” says Bryn Fosburgh, vice president responsible for Trimble’s Construction Technology Divisions. Tools currently integrated with Trimble Connect include Field Layout, Autodesk Revit, Prolog, Vico Office, Sketchup, Tekla Structures and Penmap for Android. “The industry trend is moving towards more constructability in workflows and prefabrication. With the addition of MIS software, Trimble creates a compelling and complete value proposition for fabricators, enabling them to gain the full benefits of a constructible model-based workflow,” says Jari Heino, general manager of Trimble’s Structures Division. n


ADVERTISING FEATURE – PROMAT

A SPECIFIER’S GUIDE TO STRUCTURAL STEEL FIRE PROTECTION

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CROSS AUSTRALIA, THE POPULARITY OF STEEL FRAMED CONSTRUCTION IS RISING. ITS DURABILITY, DESIGN FLEXIBILITY, SPEED OF CONSTRUCTION, AND RESISTANCE TO WEAR HAS MADE IT THE IDEAL CHOICE FOR LARGE SCALE, MULTI-STOREY PROJECTS ACROSS ALL SECTORS. AS THE POPULARITY OF STEEL FRAMED CONSTRUCTION CONTINUES TO GROW, IT IS CRITICAL THAT SPECIFIERS FOLLOW BEST PRACTICE WITH REGARDS TO ITS USAGE AND SPECIFICATION. IN PARTICULAR, DESIGNERS AND SPECIFIERS MUST PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE PASSIVE FIRE PROTECTION OF STAINLESS STEEL.

UNDERSTANDING THE RISKS The Deemed to Satisfy provisions of Specification C1.1 of the National Construction Code require steel to meet the Fire Resistance Level (FRL) corresponding with the type and class of construction. When in doubt, designers should consult the building certifier or Authority Having Jurisdiction on their project, who will be able to clarify the required FRL level. Steel softens at temperatures of 1000ºC and begins to lose its design margin of safety at around 550ºC. In practical terms, this means that failure to ensure adequate

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fire protection of steel may result in a building collapse during a fire event.

BEST PRACTICE FOR STEEL PROTECTION SPECIFICATION Designers and specifiers must understand the basic principals entailed in specifying steel, and should work closely with an experienced supplier, who can provide guidance and a fit-for-purpose system. Key Considerations The following should be taken into account: The critical temperature of steel,

or the temperature at which it will collapse due to the effects of fire The sizing of structural members: as a general rule, large steel members will require less protection than small ones The section factor, or measure of the speed at which a steel section heats up when exposed to flames and heat

Specifiers must also ascertain:

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ADVERTISING FEATURE – PROMAT

• The steel serial size • The number of exposed sides of each member • The FRL • The critical temperature used by the structural engineer in their design

PASSIVE FIRE STEEL PROTECTION Passive fire protection contains a fire at its point of origin and prevents it from spreading. There are three main types of passive fire steel protection, all of which can be used separately or in combination with one another. • Spray applied vermiculite sprays are

intumescent coatings that are applied using a spray gun and can meet FRL requirements up to 240/-/-.

• Board encasement systems completely

enclose structural steel members and can meet FRL requirements up to 240/-/-.

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• Intumescent paint systems are fire-

rated paints that are applied directly to steel structural members and can meet FRL requirements up to 120/-/-.

PROMAT AUSTRALIA For over six decades, Promat has led the global market in sophisticated fire science technologies. The brand has earned a reputation for reliable, outstanding fire performance across all sectors and project types, and is rightly recognised as an expert in passive fire protection. In line with growing concerns surrounding fire performance, Promat has developed solutions in each of the three major passive fire steel protection categories: CAFCO vermiculite sprays, PROMATECT board encasement systems, and CAFCO SPRAYFILM intumescent coatings. The brand has also developed finely tuned processes for seamlessly interfacing two or more of these into one project.

To learn more goo.gl/fFRbUE

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DESIGNING FIRE SAFETY INTO TALL BUILDINGS NOW AN EVER-PRESENT ISSUE FOR THE COMMERCIAL SECTOR WORDS: BRANKO MILETIC

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Architects have always sought to make tall buildings safe. This can be done in two ways - first by using a range of suppression technologies, WHILE The second is by extinguishing.

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ccording to Dr Mark Tatam, building technology director, Kingspan Insulated Panels, the main elements of fire safety for commercial buildings should be approached from a holistic point of view. “Management of fire load and ignition sources, restricting fire spread and finding ways that occupants can safely and quickly exit the building are amongst the critical factors involved,” says Tatam. “What we have found in recent times is that the external façade can create a dominating role in fire spread and with devastating consequences, especially when other fire safety systems are not designed to cope with such eventualities.” “One of the key design elements,” says Tatam, “which can be used to minimise the risk of fires in commercial buildings is compartmentation, or separating the building into fire compartments to stop fire transferring from one area to another.” “Another is the selection of materials and the use of other fire safety management practices to restrict fire spreading, either internally or externally, in buildings.” “Highly combustible facades for example, have the ability to spread fire from one part of a building to other areas, and very quickly,” he says.

Using compartmentation to stop fires As mentioned, one of the most common of the suppression tactics which is used in almost all tall buildings, is compartmentation whereby thick walls and fire-resistant coatings are used to divide a building into enclosed zones, so if a fire does start, it spreads relatively slowly. Most of the time compartmentation works, but when it does fail, the result are catastrophic.

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If the fore-proofing was done haphazardly, the fire will use these pipes literally as ‘highways’ to go from one end of the building to another Currently across Australia, the number of high-rise towers exceeding 100m has reached 243, with an additional 252 expected to be built over the next few years. With so many tall buildings springing up across Australia’s cities, architects are becoming more innovative in designing options for the overall appearance of a structure, most notably its façade. At the same time, building products manufacturers have also needed to ensure that their products conform to Australian Standards, in terms of fire safety.

Fire resistance level (frl) According to fire protection technology company Greene Fire, the Fire Resistance Level (FRL) is defined in A1.1 General Provisions of the Building Code of Australia (BCA) as the grading period in minutes for structural adequacy, integrity, and insulation. Performance is assessed in accordance with Specification A2.3 of the BCA and given in the format “-/-/-“. For example, an FRL of - / 120 / - means that there is no requirement for structural adequacy or insulation, and that the element will maintain its integrity for 120 minutes in the event of fire. Similarly, an FRL of - / 120 / 120 describes an element with no requirement for structural adequacy but which will maintain its integrity and insulation properties for 120 minutes in a fire event. Greene Fire says there are five main methods of passive protection:

1. Uninsulated fire curtains are cost effective and well suited to the open floor plans that have become the norm in commercial and residential projects alike, but offer no protection against radiant heat. 2. Insulated walls compartmentalise flames and reduce radiant heat, but can be costly and cumbersome. 3. Fire-rated glass is a viable solution where extensive glazing is desired, but is often very heavy and prohibitively expensive. 4. Fire doors compartmentalise flames and quell radiant heat, with the added benefit of easy operation in the event of fire. However, they are significantly limited in terms of available dimensions. 5. Sprinklers and drenchers may cause damage to contents of a space in the event of their use and may be impractical to operate, significantly undermining their efficiency.

Passive Fire and Active Fire Protection? An integral component of Passive Fire Protection is to contain fires or slow the spread of fire through the use of fire-resistant elements, such as walls, floors, doors and other penetration protection and coatings. Using materials that resist fire, and also that do not emit noxious fumes when exposed to fire can assist with the safe evacuation of occupants and can save lives, assets, and even the entire building. Conversely, Active Fire Protection comprises systems that require human intervention in order to work in the event of a fire. Examples include fire extinguishers, sprinklers, smoke and fire alarms, and emergency services. This is a reactive approach to extinguishing a fire.

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Passive fire steel protection According to fire protection systems maker Promat, there are three main types of passive fire steel protection, which may be used separately, although most commonly are used in a combination of two or more. Spray applied vermiculite leaves a low grade finish and is designed for situations that do not require an architectural finish and/ or where cost and speed are critical. Board encasement systems are fireproof and completely enclose structural steel members thereby allowing for the installation of windows, doors, and walls directly adjacent to encased members. These are designed for high-quality, architectural grade finishes. Intumescent coating systems are fire-rated coating systems that can be applied directly to prepared steel structural members. They comprise a primer, intumescent, and top coat. They can be used to achieve a high degree of finish where the exposure of structural steel is required. Intumescent coatings work by expanding when heat is applied to them. The expanding paint forms an insulating layer of fire resistance, which in turn keeps the temperature of the steel down. This expansion is critical to the performance of the system, so while the initial installation of the product is very thin, there needs to be space around the member to allow for any potential expansion. One popular intumescent coating is BOSS FireShield intumescent coatings which, when exposed to heat expand and effectively extinguish the flow of heat to the treated surface. This prevents the spread of fire, providing precious minutes of fire protection and contributes to the saving of lives and property. According to BOSS, its FireShield, with Matt or Low Sheen top coats, intumesce and foam into a thick layer when exposed to high temperatures derived from flames or intensive heat radiation from fire.

Putting the building’s frame in the picture Following the Grenfell in the UK and Melbourne’s Lacrosse tower disasters, the global construction industry is now more

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Following the Grenfell and Lacrosse tower disasters, the global construction industry is now more than ever aware of the risk of fire and building collapse in multi-storey developments.

than ever aware of the risk of fire in multistorey developments. Although in both instances aluminium composite cladding panels were ultimately the culprits, it is now imperative all building construction materials offer adequate protection against fire. In that respect and in accordance with the Deemed to Satisfy provisions of Specification C1.1 of the National Construction Code (NCC), steel must meet the Fire Resistance Level (FRL) corresponding with the type and class of construction. The NCC divides construction into “Class 1” through to “Class 10” dependent on use, and Types A, B, and C dependent on height. FRLs may vary significantly between buildings of different classes and types. As temperatures increase, the strength of steel decreases significantly. At 600 degrees Celsius, it has an effective yield strength factor of 0.47, whereas at 800 degrees Celsius it has an effective yield strength factor of 0.11. In practical terms, this means that failure to ensure the adequate fire protection of steel may lead to the collapse of a building in the event of a fire – a fact vividly demonstrated during New York’s 9/11 tragedy.

The critical temperature, also known as the ‘default limiting temperature’, of steel is the temperature at which the structural member will collapse. The most commonly used default limiting temperatures are 550 degrees Celsius for four-sided applications and 620 degrees Celsius for three-sided composite structures. The higher the critical temperature, the lower the requirement for additional fire protection. The sizing of structural members must also be taken into account. As a rule of thumb, larger steel members will require less protection than their smaller counterparts, offering significant cost and labour savings in terms of fire protection measures. For example, a 100 x 100 x 4mm steel hollow section will require an estimated 75 percent more protection than a steel hollow section with the dimensions 100 x 100 x 9mm. The section factor of the steel must be calculated to facilitate specification of the correct material thickness required to achieve the given FRL. Essentially, it measures the speed at which a steel section heats up when exposed to flames and heat. Having said all that, according to the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB), a new building constructed in Australia, built in accordance with the NCC, provides extremely high levels of safety. Furthermore, based on what we know of the Grenfell Tower fire, such a building constructed today would not comply with the requirements of the NCC. This includes provisions that limit the spread of fire, alert occupants to the detection of smoke, facilitate evacuation and enable fire brigade operations. n

Best practice for steel protection specification According to the NPCAA, in unprotected steel structures, fire temperatures will rise rapidly over an exposed cross-section of steel because of the high thermal conductivity.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: BOSS architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/boss-fire-safety/boss-fireshieldintumescent-coatings Kingspan Australia architectureanddesign.com.au/news/bpn/

After just 15 minutes of heavy fire, a critical limit will be reached whereby the steel’s strength will be reduced by about 50 percent.

kingspan Promat architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/promat-australia-pty-ltd Greene Fire architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/Greene-Fire

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CLADDING COMPLIANCE WORDS: BONNIE VAN DORP

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Combustible cladding and unsafe building products remain a hot topic for the AEC industry in the wake of tragedies such as London’s Grenfell TOWER fire. But how can we prevent history from repeating itself here on Australian shores?

A

warning bell on the dangers of combustible cladding first sounded in 2014, following the Lacrosse Tower fire in Melbourne. The incident, sparked by a lit cigarette thrown from a balcony on the eighth floor, saw flames race up polyethylene backed metal panels to the 21st floor in just 11 minutes. A post incident report prepared by the Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board found that the use of Alucobest aluminium composite panels - which were not approved for external use on high-rises in Australia - were the direct cause the blaze. The warning bell sounded louder still this past November (2017), during London’s Grenfell Tower fire, which killed 71 public housing residents and injured dozens more. The tragedy prompted British Prime Minister Theresa May to call for a nation-wide investigation into the use of cheap, combustible cladding on high-rise towers. As a result, composite cladding was quickly identified as the accelerator, with many experts likening the cladding to wrapping a building in petrol. Documents obtained by the BBC found the zinc cladding originally proposed for the Grenfell building refurbishment was later replaced with a cheaper aluminium model which was less fire resistant.

But is unsafe cladding completely to blame? Dr Giorgio Marfella, a lecturer in Construction Management and Architecture at the University of Melbourne, told Infolink that the controversy surrounding dangerous building materials “goes beyond the issue of combustible cladding”. “The technical problem is easy to fix. Polyethylene is combustible, and should never be used again in façades. Given its widespread use and misuse, architects could easily refuse to specify composite metal panels mounted on

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polyethylene from now on: everywhere, and not only in tall buildings. And manufacturers could stop the production of this backing material and concentrate efforts on their safer, inflammable alternatives,” he says. Instead, Marfella says the industry needs to “face the reality that the root of the problem is not technical, but socio-economic”. “Australian architects, engineers and builders should reappraise their different roles in the industry.” “This is an opportunity to revisit how we procure the construction of buildings today, and question to what extent the building sector can truly prosper by seeing only industrial relations and productivity as its main concern.” Additionally, Marfella believes that the AEC industry needs to rediscover the value of having “thorough and full documentation as well as impartial supervision during all the phases of a project, from the sketch to the construction stage”.

Fire Proofing: Fact or Fiction? Fire proofing buildings is a bit of a misconception, says Marfella. “There can hardly be a ‘fire-proof’ building. Although the term is often used as synonymous with a high degree of fire-resistance, it is preferable to think and talk about fire safety and fire protection,” he says. “Similarly, rather than thinking of techniques on how to fix the issue, it is preferable to talk about tactics and strategies of fire safety and protection.” “A building designed with fire in mind would have some different tactics in place, which should not be standalone but integrated into an overall strategy,” he says.

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PREVIOUS: Grenfell Tower fire, 4:43am, taken on 14 June 2017. Author: Natalie_Oxford on Twitter LEFT: “Specifiers are doing their due diligence to ensure the products they are using comply with Australian standards and the NCC.” - DECO national sales manager David Blackman. Image DECO.

Examples of recommended tactics include a smoke-free means of escape, such as fire-resistant or pressurised stairs; active systems of suppression such as sprinklers; working smoking detectors and alarms and a means to contain fire and smoke such as cavity barriers and smoke seals.

RISKY OVERSEAS IMPORTS Australia has a long history of importing building materials from overseas. However, in recent years, the country has been flooded with lower quality alternatives - mostly from Asia - of the same type of composite cladding which has fuelled the rapid spread of fire in high rise buildings. “Anecdotally and in the media, we hear of failures that are allegedly related to poor quality products imported from Asia,” says Marfella. “While the relevance of some accidents should not be underestimated, there is a more significant problem to face.” “The question is not only about the quality of the materials. When materials are defective, they can be replaced or avoided with due diligence and expert advice during documentation. “The problem is that incidents and failures also occur as the result of lack of documentation, poor specification, faulty installation and not least due to the use of materials outside their intended fitness for purpose,” he says. “If there is any significant lesson to learn from this tragedy it is that we need to be prepared to get to the core of the problem and not limit our inquiries on the rediscovery of the obvious: façades must not be combustible.”

CHANGE IN THE AIR USG Boral’s category manager of Systems and Substrates Victor Avrutis agrees with Marfella and adds that, “If a product is not

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supported by an Evidence of Suitability in accordance with the Building Code of Australia, such a product should not be specified or used on a building project”.

“Forty percent of the wall surface area opens up with bushfire shutters to frame views to the vegetation which includes extremely fire-prone but botanically rich heathland.”

“The Grenfell tragedy has put a spotlight on non-conforming building products and prompted a wide ranging review of product compliance regulations and enforcement around Australia,” he says.

When asked if it’s possible to design an entirely bushfire proof home that still looks and feels like a proper home, Weir says that, “The more extreme the bushfire prone landscape, the less likely the house will be a conventional typology”.

The tragedy has also prompted specifiers to become more savvy on all things fire safety and compliance, says DECO national sales manager David Blackman. “We have definitely experienced an increase in demand for fire safety and compliance certificates. “Specifiers are doing their due diligence to ensure the products they are using comply with Australian standards and the NCC.”

BUSHFIRE-BORNE INNOVATION Dr. Ian Weir, a research architect at the Queensland University of Technology and an expert advisor to the Bushfire Building Council of Australia, specialises in designing houses fit to withstand bushfires. He told Infolink that he likes to treat fire as a “catalyst for creativity” and a “vehicle for change and innovation”. “I aim to integrate bushfire safety with daily life and to do that in a way that connects people to their landscape rather than distances them.” Weir, who has been commissioned to design an array of affordable houses for bushfire prone areas across Australia, is currently working on a BAL-40 steel sheet clad ‘tiny house’ dubbed Camera Botanica that measures 15sqm and is set on a four hectare bushland site.

“And that is not just because of bushfire; site complexity, remoteness and energy efficiency are all factors that contribute to the design of these houses.” “In many cases it will cost homeowners more to achieve the look and feel of a conventional home while being bushfire resilient,” he says. “That is because the bushfire safety features have been treated as an ‘add on’ rather than integrated into the daily functionality of the house as they should be.” “The fire safety requirements in the commercial building industry have already triggered the development of building elements that surpass the requirements for bushfire resilience,” he adds. “Houses are pretty basic things, it is just the selection of materials and how they are put together, so new technology as such is not the solution.” “What we need is more lateral thinking and greater access to affordable fire testing facilities to demonstrate the performance compliance of new elements,” Weir concludes. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: USG BORAL

He says this latest project is a celebration of the landscape’s biodiversity.

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/USG-BORAL DECO DECORATIVEIMAGING.COM.AU/ABOUT/

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65

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62

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66

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65

133AY

Window screen and blind system

64

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65

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65

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Functional louvre windows

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CEILINGS, INTERNAL WALL MATERIALS & PARTITIONING Sustainable plywood

62

110AY

Decorative wall panelling

61

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66

138AY

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STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS PVC formwork system

COATINGS & PAINT FINISHES Accredited powder coatings

66

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61

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63

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Timber effect cladding

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Ventilated rainscreen façade system

64

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Non-combustible cement façade

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Fire-compliant façadesystem

65

128AY

Steel roofing & walling system

65

130AY

Pre-finished wall cladding

66

140AY

Insulated façade and roof systems

66

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IT’S TIME TO REDISCOVER ALTRO In response to market demands, Altro releases a new range of price competitive front of house flooring products. Combined with their renowned back of house products, Altro now offers technically superior, highly durable and customisable wall and flooring products for a total project solution. Altro have been at the forefront of innovation for almost 100 years. Working closely with architects, engineers, designers, contractors and end customers from around the world, our insight and expertise has helped transform everyday spaces into environments that improve the wellbeing of everyone that uses them. By maintaining the highest standards of safety and durability, Altro have become synonymous with quality. Today, we continue to inspire our customers and answer their biggest challenges with the launch of a new range of front of house products that combine the best in contemporary style and functionality. A SINGLE SUPPLIER FOR A TOTAL PROJECT SOLUTION In an ideal blend of form and function, the extensive Altro range now meets both the stringent quality and safety regulations for back of house applications and the high aesthetic and durability requirements of high traffic, front of house public areas. TRUSTED OUT THE BACK, ADMIRED OUT THE FRONT. Contact Altro 1800 673 441 rediscoveraltro.com.au

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INTRODUCING PROMAT AUSTRALIA’S SPLIT EZY. FIRE PROTECTION FOR AIR-CONDITIONERS PROMASEAL® Split Ezy is an innovative solution for the issue of how to protect the services of a split system air conditioner installed on to a fire rated wall. The PROMASEAL® Split Ezy has been fire tested to AS1530.4 – 2014 for up to 120 minutes in fire rated plasterboard walls. The PROMASEAL® Split Ezy solves several problems for the installer in one product. It will protect services that have been roughed in prior to the wall linings being installed. It provides a datum point for the installation of the head unit, as well as provided a fixing bracket so that you no longer need to search for studs or use wall anchors to install a unit. The most important element of the system is that it will provide a fire rated penetration seal for the services with no requirement for additional sealing of services or patching of the wall linings. All of this means that significant savings in terms of time and cost against traditional methods can be achieved for the split system installer. The product has a universal design that can be used with any brand of split system on the market. Contact Promat 1800 PROMAT (776 628) promat.com.au

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SPECIFY HÄFELE BRINGS YOU THE LATEST PRODUCTS IN NEW CATALOGUES Häfele is now proud to bring you, our valued partner, our extensive collection of Furniture Fittings from around the world gathered into the latest edition of The Complete Häfele - Furniture Fittings. In a follow-up to our earlier release of The Complete Häfele – Architectural Hardware, you now have access to all 13,983 products available from Häfele Australia. In addition to your printed copy of the catalogues the Häfele online experience has been expanded to keep up with the fast pace of your every need and requirement. We know that you need up to date information 24 hours a day, you need to live chat for immediate assistance, you need to know the CAD details of that certain product and want to know what you have ordered in the past to speed up the ordering process. All this and more can be done with our ever improving Häfele Online platforms. At Häfele we will continue to invest in product innovation and development to ensure you are always up to date with world trends and the latest technology available. Contact Häfele 1300 659 728 hafele.com.au

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EASYCRAFT IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THEIR NEW DECORATIVE LINING RANGE - THE EXPRESSION SERIES With a proud history of being an innovator of modern interior design, Easycraft have developed a new range of decorative finishes which provide the latest in contemporary styling, offering stunning and versatile aesthetics for any project. The Expression Series features unique, grooved patterns as a decorative wall panelling to provide designers new opportunities in commercial and residential projects. All patterns are available in a range of veneers or pre-primed boards making it easy to find the right style and finish to fit your grand design. The Expression Series slots seamlessly into a variety of spaces; from restaurants to office interiors, commercial foyers to residential projects, making it easy to create the perfect atmosphere and design feature. Ensure you are an innovator of design and explore our full range to discover how the Expression Series can enhance your next project. Our website Expression Selector allows you to view all available designs, providing a simplistic platform to find your favourite style. Contact Easycraft 07 3906 7200 easycraft.com.au/expression-series

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PLYWOOD EXHIBITS ITS FLEXIBILITY, BEAUTY AND ECONOMY In a small space architecture exhibition at the University of Sydney Tin Sheds Gallery, exhibition curators and architects, Anita Panov and Andrew Scott of Panovscott took their long love affair with plywood and turned it into an art-piece. Each project in the exhibition is small in scale yet big on ideas and was selected, “to actively engage in a discourse of how we can live more efficiently,” said Scott. Aptly titled ‘A small exhibition,’ it celebrated projects that economically and environmentally have improved the lives of their inhabitants within very small spaces. Inside the gallery two structures were constructed using Ecoply plywood and finished in a striking, blue-wash. And in future months, Panov expects to see sky blue models in the architecture department as the exhibition materials are re-used by the students. In their architecture work, Panovscott endeavour to be sensitive to the environment and efficient in design and construction, “to use structure as finish” where appropriate. Materials like Ecoply plywood (made from sustainably grown Australian and NZ plantation pine) provide that option as it’s structural and can be left raw or finished in numerous ways Photographer: Brett Boardman Photography Enquiries 13 23 21 ecoply.com.au

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CSR BRADFORD’S SPACERX FASTEST SPACER FOR METAL ROOFS Bradford SpacerX is a patented roof spacer system for concealed fixed metal roofs. SpacerX improves speed of construction by allowing the spacer and the concealed fixed roof clip to be assembled with around half the number of fasteners, and is the fastest roof spacer for concealed fixed metal roofs. Suitable for non-cyclonic and cyclonic applications, SpacerX is available in 40mm, 60mm, 80mm and 120mm, to help achieve the required BCA total roof system R-Value. Key features that make SpacerX the fastest roof spacer: • Fasten Clip and Spacer to Purlin with just 3 screws • Vertical, Centre Fix on Top Face for Fasteners • Connects Quickly and Self-Aligns • Fast to Start and Fast to Finish • No Cardboard Packaging SpacerX is versatile and can accommodate most 700mm concealed fixed metal roofing profiles including: Lysaght Klip Lok®, Steeline LokDek, Stramit Speed Deck Ultra®, Stratco TopDek®, Metroll Metlok®, Fielders KingKlip®, Apex Apdeck and Revolution Roofing® Revklip. To see why SpacerX is the fastest metal roof spacer system, visit spacerX. com.au or subscribe to CSR Bradford on YouTube to watch a comparative study conducted by CSR Bradford to compare the installation time required to install the SpacerX system against four other roof spacer systems in the market. Contact Bradford 1300 850 305 spacerX.com.au

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HAVWOODS PERFECT PAR-KY TIMBER FLOORING FOR ANY BUDGET Made in Europe, Havwoods’ Par-ky engineered timber flooring planks and herringbone blocks are crafted for exceptional value, making a genuine hardwood floor an option on even the tightest of budgets. Pricecompetitive, stress-resistant, click joint profile for fast, easy installation, Par-ky is available in an array of gorgeous colours and finishes. A primegrade European Oak top layer, bonded to an ultra-strong HDF core and sealed with 8 layers of UV-cured lacquer makes Par-ky ideal for high-traffic spaces such as residential, commercial and retail fitouts and it can be fitted as flooring, cladding or bespoke joinery. Available with 15-year or 20-year residential warranty, Par-ky is perfect for your timber flooring needs. Contact Havwoods 1300 428 966 havwoods.com.au

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AHEAD OF THE CURVE – NEW COVET EVER ART WOOD® EXPRESS CLADDING PANELS Standing among the grassy parklands of Bundoora, the fluid architectural design of Parc Vue multi-residential apartment complex blends the built and natural environments. The beautiful curved, timber look façade was made possible by Covet’s newly released Ever Art Wood® Express cladding panels. Using curves to soften the building, the aluminium timber-look panelling encases the exterior facade. The photorealistic finish also lead the architect to incorporate Ever Art Wood® Mokuzai panelling into the interior lobbies of the apartment complex. Lightweight and quick to install, the Express cladding panels are crafted from Covet’s fire tested 1mm aluminium Ever Art Wood® Mokuzai panels in a variety of profiles, and can be used on flat or curved surfaces. Contact Covet +61 3 9398 8128 covet.com.au

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ARAMAX FREESPAN STRUCTURAL CLADDING SYSTEM THE BENEFITS OF FIBRE CEMENT, THE LOOK OF TIMBER The new range of InnovaTM Timber Effects cladding products gives you the visual warmth of timber you want but the fibre cement benefits you need. A timber grain is embossed into the fibre cement, providing the durability and low maintenance that is impossible to achieve with natural timber. Don’t compromise on the desired aesthetic but reap the benefits of a quick and easy installation, low fuss for the end user and the added safety of fire resistance.

Brought to you by Fielders, ARAMAX FreeSpan roofing and walling is unlike any other. Bringing together new ideas that work, ARMAX is at the head of innovation. ARAMAX FreeSpan is bigger, bolder, and can go deeper than conventional roofing and walling profiles, allowing for huge roofing spans of up to 20 metres with no purlins or grits. This eliminates the cost and complexity of secondary structures, saving money without compromising on performance.

The finish is available across two products, DuragrooveTM panels and StratumTM Weatherboards that:

A visually stunning and structural component with multiple cover widths available, ARAMAX FreeSpan can accommodate your unique project requirements by tapering the sheeting along its length to produce spectacular curves and designs.

// won’t rot // won’t twist // is easy and fast to install // is non combustible // is low maintenance

Specialist engineering assistance is available for design of ARAMAX FreeSpan structures.

Contact BGC Fibre Cement 1300 652 242 bgcinnovadesign.com.au

Contact Fielders 1800 182 255 fielders.com.au

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PRORAIL ® PROFESSIONAL MODULAR HANDRAIL SYSTEMS

CORIUM from PGH Bricks & Pavers is a break through brick look, ventilated rainscreen façade system that combines the natural beauty of real brick, with cost effective, fast track installation of ‘system’ based cladding. It offers a genuine brick finish for projects where a lightweight cladding system is required rather than traditional brickwork.

Miami Stainless sells the quality ProRail® post system manufactured by ProRig. In round and square post designs these high quality 316 grade systems are available in readyto-install systems or can be fully customised in the Miami Stainless in-house fabrication department.

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SURFACE MOUNTED DOOR CLOSERS BY ALLEGION The Briton Surface Mounted Door Closer Series is designed for commercial interior and exterior applications. By minimizing the resistance encountered when opening a door, the series provides easy opening and reliable closing.

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TRACTILE ECLIPSE SOLAR ROOF TILE Tractile is the designer solar roof. It provides a 4-in-1 combination of composite roof tile, electricity, hot water and insulation in an appealing, seamlessly integrated package.

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WINGLINE L: THE LATEST IN FOLDING DOOR TECHNOLOGY FROM HETTICH The best of German design and engineering in storage solutions is now available in Australia with Hettich’s WingLine range of folding sliding door systems for wardrobes and cupboards.

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SINGLE RUN RANGE FOR STRAIGHT SLIDING PANELS WITH ZERO CLEARANCE SOLUTIONS Brio’s Single run range is designed for interior and exterior sliding shutters and panels from 80kg up to an incredible 350kg in weight for residential or commercial applications. Hangers use four precision bearings which have reinforced nylon tyres to ensure high performance and smooth operation.

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CENTOR S6 ALUMINIUM SCREEN AND BLIND SYSTEM FOR WINDOWS With a slim aluminium frame, the Centor S6 is a screen suits windows up to 1800mm high and 2400mm wide. As vertically retractable, chain-operated system the screen or blind is simply rolled away when not needed, keeping views to the outside clear and allowing windows to be easily cleaned.

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SWISSPEARL INCORA – STYLISHLY AUTHENTIC NONCOMBUSTIBLE COMPOSITE CEMENT FAÇADE The innovative Swisspearl composite cement Incora façade range stands out through a vivid spreading pattern of marble granules throughout the sheet, which allows a balanced interplay of colours.

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SPECIFY ALUCOBOND ® FROM ALUCOBOND ARCHITECTURAL FOR EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR APPLICATIONS ALUCOBOND ® from Alucobond Architectural offers architects and designers product versatility for innovative and individual project planning.

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COLORBOND ® STEEL LAUNCHES MATT COLLECTION IN FIVE COLOURS COLORBOND ® steel, Australia’s favourite steel building material for over 50 years, introduces an elegant matt finish to complement the latest building design trends.

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3M™ THINSULATE™: THE ORIGINAL THIN, LIGHT AND WARM SYNTHETIC INSULATION

THE ULTIMATE PLANTATION SHUTTERS FROM OPENSHUTTERS The Ultimate Range by OpenShutters is for those who appreciate the finest. The culmination of over 25 years’ worth of continued innovation and improvement, the OpenShutter Ultimate Shutter range is custom made and designed with purpose and functionality in mind.

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THE MODERNLIFE™ COLLECTION, CLEAN LESS, LIVE MORE KOHLER’S ModernLife™ toilet suite has been recognised for its revolutionary approach to hygiene and ease of cleaning with a prestigious international 2017 Red Dot Design Award.

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AFS REDIWALL® PVC PERMANENT WALLING FORMWORK

3M™ Thinsulate™ Insulation offers virtually invisible insulation. Enhance comfort and efficiency year round with 3M™ Thinsulate™ Window Film Climate Control 75 and Thinsulate™ 40.

AFS REDIWALL® is a PVC permanent formwork system for concrete walls designed to help save on time, cost and labour. It’s extruded components feature Snap-InTM panels, creating a permanent and attractive concrete formwork that in many applications doesn’t require any finishing.

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THE BRITEX CARE RANGE OF HYGIENIC PRODUCT SOLUTIIONS FOR ACCESSIBILITY AND INDEPENDENCE BRITEX Care - we make sense with a complete range of bathroom care products. The Britex Elsa Arm Rest and the Care toilet suite makes it an ideal comfort and safety accessory.

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SANIACCESS 3 MACERATOR PUMP ALLOWS FOR THE EASIEST MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING ON THE MARKET Installing an extra toilet and vanity has never been easier thanks to the SANIACCESS 3 macerator pump! If you’re looking to add wet areas to a shed, granny flat or unused space in your house – Saniflo has you covered.

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SPECIFY LOUVRE WINDOWS BY SAFETYLINE JALOUSIE – EXTRA WIDE SPANS, IMPENETRABLE SECURITY & WEATHERPROOF SEALS Safetyline Jalousie louvre windows are amongst the safest, strongest, widest, most functional and versatile louvre windows on the market.With an inbuilt impenetrable security system, Safetyline Jalousie louvres can be left open with complete peace of mind.

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KEY-NIRVANA INTERIOR DECORATIVE PANELS Key-Nirvana interior decorative panels are available in a beautiful selection of realistic timber and coloured finishes, giving you endless creativity capabilities.

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LUXEWALL®, LUXURY WALLING SOLUTIONS Australia’s leading manufacturer of smarter building solutions, Bondor, has launched LuxeWall®, a luxury pre-finished wall cladding and exterior wall solution for residential projects looking to achieve an architectural look yet save on construction time and build costs.

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BENCHMARK FAÇADE AND ROOF SYSTEMS Designed using the innovative panel technology known from Kingspan, BENCHMARK is an architectural range of façade and roof systems.

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VERSIDRAIN ® 60 GREEN ROOF SYSTEM A lightweight interlocking modular green roof tray, VersiDrain® 60 is designed for versatility. VersiDrain® 60 allows the addition of optional wall extenders to increase planting depth up to 100mm and for off-site planting to achieve instant green rooftops.

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THE DULUX ACCREDITED POWDER COATERS PROGRAM IS YOUR ASSURANCE OF QUALITY FOR YOUR NEXT PROJECT The Dulux Accredited Powder Coater Program has been designed to give industry professionals the confidence that they are getting the best result for their next project.

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THERMOBREAK ACOUSTIPLUS ACOUSTIC INSULATION Thermobreak AcoustiPlus acoustic insulation is a new generation physically cross-linked polyolefin foam developed by Sekisui as a low profile acoustic lining.

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ALAVO MODULAR, TOUCH-FREE, BEHIND-MIRROR HANDWASH SYSTEM When space is at a premium, and energy efficiency is a priority, this modular, touchfree, behind-mirror handwash system from Dolphin has got all the answers - quick to install, easy to replenish, and a pleasure to use.

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Enter now. Entries for the 2018 Sustainability Awards are currently open. www.sustainablebuildingawards.com.au

Event Partner

Interior Architecture

Commercial

Single Dwelling (Alteration or Addition)

Education & Research

Public & Urban Design

Emerging Architect of the Year

Green Building

Landscape/Biophillia

Multiple Dwelling

Healthcare

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How will you conform to changes in the NCC from March 2018. There is only one choice.

MetecnoKasset

®

FA Ç ADE , C URTAIN & W INDOW WALL SYSTE M

TESTED and PASSED all aspects of AS5113

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MetecnoKasset®, the breakthrough curtain wall and façade system available in a range of colours and finishes in Colorbond® steel. Can be installed in half the time of other systems and does not require scaffolding. Take the risk out of your next high rise project and save money at the same time.

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27/4/18 12:59 pm

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