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Kevin Borland 1977

NEW IDEAS FOR OLD CONCEPTS Design parti SINGLE DWELLINGS PERMANENT FORMWORK LINEAR DRAINAGE DOOR HARWARE ROOFING TECHNOLOGY + MORE

Mihaly Slocombe 2015


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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HE PROJECTS FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE WERE SELECTED TO REPRESENT THE THREE PREDOMINANT APPROACHES TO HOUSE DESIGN—ALTERATION, ADDITION AND BUILDING NEW. BUT WHILE THEY DIFFER IN THEIR CATEGORISATION, THEY’RE ALSO SIMILAR IN MANY WAYS.

Foremost, the presence of new building materials used in conjunction with contemporary design strategies is obvious across all three. For example, new generation prefinished fibre cement sheeting is one of the unsung heroes of Mihaly Slocombe’s alteration project on page 24. The architects used the versatile material to create 3D geometry on facades and ceilings throughout the house. The product is a vast improvement on the fibre cement sheeting of the past and its application in this instance demonstrates how material and design capabilities are complimentary in architecture. The capability of roll-formed standing seam zinc is also on show for all on page 18. The material was used by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design for the firm’s backyard addition to a heritage dwelling in Elsternwick, Melbourne, and has also become a popular roofing and façade material for Australian designers in recent times. In this case, Gibson folded and manipulated the material over the extension’s framework to create an almost seamless monolithic structure. Big cavities that hide downpipes, oversized sliding doors and secret guttering were also specified by the architect – details we’re seeing more and more of in contemporary Australian house designs.

luxury new house. The real point separation from the other projects is in the design and construction methodology that was employed for the home’s architectural roof. It was designed using a state-of-the-art 3D modelling platform that creates exact digital replicas of architecture products that can be changed on the fly, managed by multiple stakeholders and then fabricated and assembled to the strictest of tolerances.

ON THE COVER: MASSING DIAGRAM OF CHAMFER HOUSE (PICTURED ABOVE) BY MIHALY SLOCOMBE. FULL STORY PAGE 24. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW LATREILLE.

The roof is a product of a truly innovative and integrated construction methodology, one generally exclusive to large-scale commercial projects, but one that is increasingly being adopted by designers for components of residential design. The major commonality between the projects is also evident in this issue’s product features. All look at the evolution of fairly regular construction techniques and building materials to demonstrate how advancements are enabling designers to develop new solutions to old methods for building. Two things that are always emphasised in our content is the mutual dependency between designer and supplier, and the inexplicable link between the finished product and the availability of building materials and technologies.

DETAIL

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A zinc-clad addition with secret guttering and glazed bridge

24

Alteration to historic post and beam dwelling

30 Parametric design for a bowl roof

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4 The latest news on building product innovations and the profession

6 In 2017 let’s pledge for no unpaid overtime

7 In conversation with Oliver Steele 9 Australia’s top trusted brands revealed

A new way with old materials is always in the back of the designer’s mind, but so is reinventing old ways with new materials. Whichever is your preferred design method, make sure you keep up to date with the very latest innovations from Australian building product suppliers by reading this publication or jumping into our online directory at architectureanddesign.com.au. Please enjoy.

At first look, the third project on page 30 appears to be entirely different altogether, and in some ways it is. Its size, scale and budget far outstretch the other two, but it really is just a

NATHAN JOHNSON

EDITOR NATHAN JOHNSON EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

DESIGNER JULIA GEE JULIA.GEE@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

CONTENT PRODUCERS NICHOLAS RIDER LUCY MARRETT

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2037 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 ADRIAN.WILSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

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SPECIFY

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35 Permanent formwork 41 Linear drainage 47 Cool roof technology 50 Sliding door hardware 52 Product directory 54 Product showcases

CLIENT SUCCESS MANAGER STUART GEACH PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2035 STUART.GEACH@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 02 9018 2008 ISSN 1039-9704

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN LEVEL 1, 50 MARSHALL STREET, SURRY HILLS NSW 2010 PHONE: +61 (0)2 9368 0150 WWW.ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,071 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION MARCH 2016

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

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MUTUAL RECOGNITION ARRANGEMENT WITH US Australian and US architect registration authorities have reached a mutual recognition arrangement (MRA) for the cross-border licencing of architects.

standards (AS3600), the CRCLCL is comforted by the fact that product is gaining some traction in both the private and public sectors. lowcarbonlivingcrc.com.au

The MRA came into effect 1 January and will allow Australian and New Zealand architects to register with one of 29 participating US architectural licensing boards without further assessment. Under the agreement, signed by US, Australian and New Zealand registration authorities, Australian architects with a permanent residency/citizenship and at least 6,000 hours of post-licensure/registration experience will be able to seek registration from a participating licensor to work as a sole practitioner on US soil. Australians will need to apply for a certificate of registration through the US National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) which will be honoured by all 29 jurisdictions who’ve accepted the arrangement. aaca.org.au

NEW DRAFT CODE FOR MODULAR CONSTRUCTION Australia’s peak body for off-site construction is currently developing a new code of practice for modular construction, which aims to remove misconceptions and pave the way for greater adoption of the technology. The draft code covers the key steps in Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA), including end-of-life, and encompasses structure, building services, facades, durability, transport, erection, temporary site works, traceability of materials, compliance with codes and standards, inspection and documentation, and disassembly and recycling, among other topics. The code is being developed at a time when modular construction is seeing a growing uptake in projects.

density while maintaining its compressive strength to acceptable measures. In his research, PHD Candidate, Ramakrishnan Sayanthanmight, developed a new thermal energy storage composite which uses the commonly used paraffin wax with a protective coating of hydrophobic coated expanded perlite (EPO) which wraps the paraffin and stops any leakage of the PCM. He then studied the structural and thermal behaviour of a number of test concrete panels containing different ratios of PCM versus aggregate and came to the conclusion that substituting 60 per cent of aggregate with PCM in a concrete mix will significantly improve its thermal storage while maintaining a compressive strength (25 MPa at 28 days) that is acceptable for many building applications.

ALGAE FACADES ON THE WAY A research-team at the University of Technology Sydney has been exploring the potential for using algae as a building material in Australia, particularly its use on facades as an energy source and shading device for buildings. The idea grew from a similar project in Hamburg, designed by Arup and Austria-based Splitterwerk Architects, which is a fully functioning algaepowered building. BIQ House is clad in a number of bioreactor façade panels or ‘pools’ which have microalgae growing inside. The algae grows in bright sunlight, providing additional shading, and also produces biomass and captures solar thermal heat, both of which can be harvested and converted into useable energy for the building. Despite the associated costs and relatively unknown feasibility of the project, the team has secured funding to develop a prototype façade panel and has a number of big industry stakeholders involved in its development; including Arup, Lendlease and Steensen Varming engineers as well as G-James window manufactures and Viridian glass.

PARLOUR LAUNCHES PUBLIC REGISTER Australian research and website collaboration, Parlour opened a new public register for the women of Australian architecture and the built environment at the end of last year. The database will help those looking for expert commentary or input from women in the industry, or those seeking to involve a wider range of people in architecture’s public culture, encompassing talks, panels, juries, teaching, and much more. Marion’s List is named in honour of Marion Mahony Griffin (1871–1961), the trailblazing Chicago architect who made a substantial contribution to Australian architecture. Parlour is an Australian research and website collaboration designated to discussion, education and resources for women and equality within the Australian architectural field. archiparlour.org/marion

It is scheduled to be released for industry comment early in the first half of 2017. prefabaus.org.au

GEOPOLYMER CONCRETE HITS CITY STREETS The City of Sydney could be using low carbon geopolymer concrete for paving stones and precast structures very soon, but it could be a while before the private sector parts ways with its long-time friend in Portland cement. The news comes as the CRC for Low Carbon Living (CRCLCL) continues to explore ways to remove barriers inhibiting the uptake of low-carbon geopolymer concrete in Australia. While a number of barriers still remain, like a lack of standard specifications, track records and exclusion of geopolymer concrete from current

“OUR GOAL IS TO SUCCESSFULLY INTEGRATE ALGAE INTO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND USE IT TO HEAT BUILDINGS, FERTILISE ROOFTOP GARDENS AND FILTER VEHICLE EXHAUST FUMES.” – SARA WILKINSON, UTS.

PCM IN CONCRETE New research emanating from Swinburne University demonstrates how Phase Change Materials can be injected into concrete to significantly improve its thermal inertia and thermal energy storage at a lower

MULTI-MATERIAL 3D PRINTING A team of MIT researchers has developed a unique 3D printing interface that will help users design multi-material objects. The researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have followed up last year’s introduction of the multi-material 3D printer, MultiFab with a new interface, Foundry that is expected to become 3D printing’s equivalent of graphic design’s Photoshop. Designed to be accessible to non-programmers, without the barriers of cost or operational difficulties, the Foundry platform allows the


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designer to assign distinct material properties to each part in a composite print during rapid prototyping. For example, it could produce a dental appliance containing a rigid, tooth-like material connected to a softer and more malleable material to merge with the gums.

developments that included sustainability features attracted more buyers. She explained that developers providing a product that offered more in terms of sustainability better matched consumer demand with the sustainable product being viewed as a premium product.

Compatible with any commercially available multi-material printer, Foundry currently requires users to import geometry from traditional CAD software to designate material composition. However, the researchers are looking into integrating Foundry within CAD programs. The research team also plans to add the capability to preview a part’s behaviour.

SUCCESS IN ARCHITECT ALTERNATIVE PATHWAYS

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENTS IN FAVOUR Western Australians are increasingly assessing the green factor when buying apartments, with sustainability being considered alongside price and location. The Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute recently conducted a survey to determine whether people in Perth would buy into green developments. Along with the usual criteria of affordability, location and size, findings indicate buyers are also looking for ‘sustainability characteristics’ in apartment projects. Research fellow from the Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute Jemma Green, who conducted the survey, said research indicated

Sixty-seven per cent of candidates who attempted the alternative, competency-based pathway to the Architectural Practice Examination (APE) in 2015/2016 have been successful. The National Program of Assessment is a competency-based assessment authorised by the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia for practitioners wishing to take the APE but don’t have the recognised qualifications to do so. The program isn’t open to everyone and has a strict eligibility criteria and large assessment by project component, but even so, more than half of those who participated in the past two years have been successful. Successful candidates included those with qualifications ranging from undergraduate degrees in architecture and/or design, as well as people with significant technical experience in building design and drafting.

in architectural, planning, building or other related fields, and have completed these within the last ten years. While this doesn’t seem like much to the average building designer, the kicker is that three of those seven years required to enter the program must be under the direction of an architect in an architect’s office, and at least two years of the three years must be in an architect’s office in Australia. The NPA Assessors and Management Panel commended the standard of submissions received from applicants and said they look forward to the continued success of candidates who utilise this pathway to registration as an architect in Australia. Applications for the National Program of Assessment 2017 open on 3 February and close on Friday 26 May. n

“THE AACA SHOULD BE CONGRATULATED FOR MAINTAINING THIS “ALTERNATIVE ROUTE”. AN ADDITIONAL ACCELERATED PROGRAM ON THE THEORY/ LANGUAGE OF (ARCHITECTURE) DESIGN WOULD FURTHER BENEFIT THE CANDIDATES.” – ALEX NJOO, ARCHITECT

They also had work experience to the tune of a minimum seven years full-time (or equivalent) in

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IN 2017 LET’S PLEDGE FOR NO UNPAID OVERTIME: CLINTON COLE worked. Conversely, when important design and strategic decisions are made outside regular hours, people unable to work late may systematically (often inadvertently) become sidelined. Economic overtime firms are firms which either aggressively underquote fees to win work, or propose a fee which is simply too low for the amount of work required. This can be due to inexperience in estimating the time required, client scope creep, or the emergence of more complicated requirements. These firms then attempt to make up the difference with additional (unpaid) hours from their staff. This model effectively uses staff time to subsidise the delivery of the project. This creates a huge financial benefit to the firm and its partners, while eroding the long term viability of the industry. After all, if architects routinely undervalue the design and time of their staff, why should anyone else agree to pay for it? Unrealistic fee proposals and unpaid overtime are friends to no one.

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RCHITECTS OFTEN TALK ABOUT ARCHITECTURE AS A CALLING, A PASSION AND A PRIVILEGE, BUT VERY RARELY AS A COMMERCIAL ENDEAVOUR. WHAT STARTS IN DESIGN STUDIOS AS “ALL-NIGHTERS” TO DELIVER THE PERFECT PROJECT CAN BECOME A CULTURE OF LONG HOURS AND UNPAID OVERTIME IN THE WORKPLACE. AT BEST THIS IS A SELF-DESTRUCTIVE TENDENCY, AT WORST IT NORMALISES WAGE THEFT IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE. Partly because of the dominant framing architecture as an artistic pursuit, the commercial side of architecture has long been either overlooked as an important teachable skill, or ignored all together at university level. Lacking formallytaught financial literacy, small sole practitioners often fall into the habit of treating all business income as a personal income, and ignoring or undercalculating the costs involved in generating that income. Undertaking long hours to complete projects which give professional satisfaction as well as direct financial benefits can often delay the realistic evaluation of business profitability. This, linked with challenges in accurately estimating time to undertake design work, can undermine the viability of a small firm in ways that may not be immediately visible to their proprietors. When these small firms start to expand, architects can find themselves employing others for the first time. Employment is a complicated and confusing area of law, and it’s one that’s important to get right. Many architects appear

to be ignorant of their responsibilities - in 2016, approximately 10 per cent of the responses to the ACA Salary Survey were for rates that were below the award. Common challenges for employers includes finding the right award and classification, understanding how superannuation is calculated (tip: it’s on top of award minimums), withholding tax rates, leave loading and, a big one for architecture, overtime. While the award allows for some flexibility to be negotiated with individual employees, the general expectation of the award is very clear: overtime is to be paid at one and a half times the base rate or taken as time off in lieu. In over a decade interviewing staff, this clause is widely ignored within the industry. As disappointing as it is that so many people experience underpayment through ignorance and incompetence, there is a worse category of employer – deliberately exploitative firms which run on unpaid overtime, or less euphemistically, wage theft. These seem to fall into two categories, which I refer to as cultural overtime and economic overtime respectively. Cultural overtime firms are firms in which there is an unspoken expectation and agreement that “hometime” is much later than the agreed minimum. This can evolve slowly over time. What starts as a well intentioned “firm buys dinner” policy and an undertaking to reimburse late-night travel expenses can become a core of workers who frequently work late. If overtime is recorded on an ad hoc or informal basis, it can be difficult for staff to take the appropriate leave, further increasing the number of hours

At present, there are over 1,700 students of architecture in NSW. In comparison, there are approximately 3,500 active, registered architects in NSW. Even assuming many graduates will find work as ‘para-architects’, the requirement of many architectural schools to undertake work experience prior to enrolment in post-graduate study ensures that there is likely to remain an oversupply of architectural labour in the market at entry level. With many graduates indoctrinated in regarding architecture’s central skill as design rather than problem solving, this attitude may have its roots in the origins of architecture as a profession and the role of patronage, which required a certain amount of toadying. By linking architecture tightly to creative pursuits which are connected in popular imagination with recreation and poverty, architects unwittingly set themselves up for financial failure. Architects would do much better to tie themselves to professional services, in which the value of advice is not linked to a tangible physical intervention. As part of the new year, I am challenging architectural employers all over the country to pledge “no unpaid overtime”. While the old cliché that architects earn the least of any person on site, we should at the very least be looking to the construction industry which has a well-established tradition of all hours worked being paid. n

CLINTON COLE IS THE MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SYDNEY ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION OUTFIT, CPLUSC ARCHITECTURAL WORKSHOP. HIS COMPANY EMPLOYS OVER 15 STAFF RANGING IN SKILL AND EXPERIENCE FROM SKILLED LABOURERS AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS TO PROJECT MANAGERS AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGERS.


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IN CONVERSATION: OLIVER STEELE, OLIVER STEELE ASSOCIATES You have academic and trade-based qualifications. How does that influence your work, compared to if you just had the one qualification?

mindful of the pollution impacts of such things as rigid foam insulation, thermal mass materials, and electronic components.

I’ve learned a lot about design from building things, and a lot about building from designing things. The divide between architects and builders has always struck me as an artifice resulting from the 20th century industrialisation and division of labour approach to buildings. This was an inevitable evolution of the industry, but not the only or even the best method.

If you could see one thing change in the industry in regards to sustainable design, what would it be?

When I’m in the concept design stage, I’ll often have a thought about a specific construction detail and how that will breathe life into the overall form. Then when I’m building I constantly review and refine elements of the design to make sure we get the best outcome. I must admit that sometimes I get lost in one or the other mindset and get on site to look at my own drawings and curse, ‘Bloody architects! How do they think we’re going to make this work?’

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LIVER STEELE, DIRECTOR AT STEELE ASSOCIATES, IS A LICENSED BUILDER AND REGISTERED ARCHITECT, WITH STEELE ASSOCIATES WHICH RECENTLY WON THE SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS BEST OF THE BEST PRIZE FOR ITS 88 ANGEL STREET PROJECT. Architecture & Design spoke to Steele about how his builder and architect training influences his work, how different sectors view sustainability, and why we need a new economic model to account for the environmental impact of the building sector.

You recently won the Sustainability Awards. How do you think the industry views sustainability now? With infinite diversity. Generalising, I’d say that the creative, professional players such as architects, some engineers and designers are dead-keen on sustainability, be it as a modus operandi or a seat on the bandwagon. It’s in their enlightened self-interest to be that way. The highly financially-exposed players such as builders, developers and financers are more conservative and tend to see sustainability as a risk to financial stability, which is nonsensical in the big picture, but makes perfect sense when you’re looking at your one tree in the whole wood. Again this is driven by self-interest, as is all group behavior. Our aim is to help the conservative players to see that, counter-intuitively, the only way to ensure financial stability is to take sustainability very seriously, very quickly. What is the biggest influence on sustainable design these days? Climate change is fairly universally accepted as the most pressing risk, and other concerns like habitat loss, pollution, and biodiversity are a little closer to the backburner while the earth is being tossed around in the flaming wok of global warming.

Simple: update our flawed economic model to account for environmental impact, rather than treat the environment as an ‘externality’ to the system. This is the crux of the problem we face. We’re using an old economic model developed in a time when it was inconceivable that the earth’s resources could become effectively finite. So obvious, yet such a big change to so many vested interests it’s a tough ask. Why is sustainability important to you? Because of all the people ever to be born onto the earth, I’m amongst the luckiest in terms of time and place. I’ve always felt a deep-seated need to make the most of the investment made in me by doing all I can to ensure similar opportunities exist in future. What is your philosophy when it comes to sustainable design? Remain open to new ideas and concepts. Test everything against the knowledge you have; mesh, replace and expand as best you can. Technology and context change constantly, so the response needs to as well. I’m currently falling in love with Passivhaus. It makes so much sense in a city living environment where well-oriented glazing and shading isn’t always possible, where relying on open windows for ventilation means noise and dust, and thermal mass means high embodied energy. What other project were you impressed by at the Sustainability Awards? Many. Junglefy’s breathing wall that uses soil microbes to filter air; CPlusC’s house with an edible fishpond; Archiblox’s house built in six weeks; the innovative student housing – what wasn’t I impressed by? So inspiring and encouraging to be part of such groundswell. Makes me feel like we can do this thing! n

So there’s a big focus on reducing carbon emissions in material and building production, and in occupation. This is the correct priority in my view, but we do need to be

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CLADDING COMPANY STUNS COMPETITORS TO WIN TITLE OF AUSTRALIA’S FAVOURITE BUILDING PRODUCT BRAND

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RCHITECTURE & DESIGN ANNOUNCED THE RESULTS OF ITS ANNUAL TOP TRUSTED BRANDS SURVEY IN DECEMBER, ONCE AGAIN REVEALING THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMMUNITY’S FAVOURITE BUILDING PRODUCTS AND BRAND NAMES. The 2016 survey received a remarkable 13,456 votes for over 300 brands, signalling its growing reputation as the industry benchmark for tracking the tried-and-tested building products being specified around the nation. The survey revealed the common themes associated with a trusted brand, including great service, products and reliability – as well as other socially driven themes of eco-friendliness and Australian made.

Companies competed for a place in the overall Top 10 Trusted Brands for 2016 with survey-newcomer, Weathertex Australia placing first, Dulux Australia placing second and Bluescope Lysaght placing third. “The results this year confirm that being socially and environmentally responsible is closely linked to trust,” says Group Sales Manager for Architecture & Design, Adrian Wilson. “People want to make purchase decisions that benefit the wider community – that can be seen in this year’s winner, Weathertex Australia whose offering ticks all of these boxes. This is a clear message that Australians are looking for quality products and service, and that brands offering a way for them to make ‘responsible’ purchasing choices will certainly have the competitive edge.”

Companies offering products or services were nominated for recognition in one of 25 categories to highlight their innovation, application or quality in a particular area. Architecture & Design readers voted for their favourite brands by allocating a maximum of 10 votes to 10 different nominated brands between 14 October and 25 November 2016. The Top 10 winners receive a range of prizes including an award certificate acknowledging their position, placement of the Top Trusted Brands 2016 badge on their architectureanddesign.com. au profile, editorial coverage in Architecture & Design’s media publications and more. Read on to see the full list from the 2016 Top Trusted Brands survey or visit trustedbrands.architectureanddesign.com.au.


GREAT BUILDINGS ARE BUILT ON TRUST. John Phillips Library, Western Sydney University Architect: Alan Jack + Cottier

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TOP 1OO 1

Weathertex

25 Adbri Masonry

50 Clark

75

Knauf Insulation

2

Dulux Australia

26 Breezway Australia

51

Monier Roofing

76

Resene Paints (Australia) Ltd

3

Bluescope Lysaght

27 USG Boral

52

Asko Appliances (Australia)

77

Knauf Plasterboard

4

Caroma

28 Supawood

53 Hewlett Packard

78

Global GreenTag Pty Ltd

5

Alucobond

29 Autodesk Australia

54 Bowral Bricks

79

Methven Australia

6

CSR Gyprock

30 Kennards Hire

55 Autex

80 BCG Fibre Cement

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Laminex

31

56 Raven Products Pty Ltd

81

Advanced Roof Systems

8

James Hardie Wall & Floor Products

32 Rondo

57

82

Pryda

33 Daikin Australia

58 Ardex Australia

83 Austral Masonry

Hafele Australia

34 Bluescope Steel Direct

59 Dorma Australia

84 AFS Systems

Austral Bricks

35 Fairview

60 Polyflor Australia

85 Adis Automatic Doors

11 Innowood Australia Pty Ltd

36 Academy Tiles

61

Wattyl

12 Architectural Window Systems

37 CSR Hebel

62

Vergola

38 Rinnai Australia

63 Gunnersen

88 Brickworks Building Products

39 Carter Holt Harvey

64 Gainsborough Architectural Hardware

89 Stramit Building Products

CSR Cemintel

65 Ezy Jamb

91

Intergrain

Cabots Australia

66 Wilsonart

92

Dulux Acratex

9 10

13

Kingspan Insulation

14 Blum Australia 15

Assa Abloy

16 Armstrong Flooring 17

Bradford Insulation (CSR)

18 Dyson

Aneeta Window Systems

40 Bosch Hot Water & Heating 41 42

67

Eco Timber

Hettich Australia

86 Buildex 87

Porters Original Paints

90 Smartstone

93 Airstep Carpet Underlay

19 Viridian New World Glass

43 Altro Safety Flooring (Altro APAC Pty Ltd)

68 Rogerseller

94 Allplastics Engineering

20 Enware Australia

44 Dorf

69 Billi Pty Ltd

95 Kohler Co

45 Corinthian Doors

70

Schiavello Group

22 PGH Bricks & Pavers (Boral Bricks)

46 Kingspan Insulated Panels

71

Fletcher Insulation

97

47 Armstrong Ceiling Systems

72

Earthwool

23 Polytec

98 Vertilux

48 Woodform Architectural

73

Big River Group

24 Rockcote Enterprises

99 Think Brick

49

74

Xero Australia Pty Limited

100 Skydome Skylight Systems

21

Taubmans

Stormtech

96 Above Left Dist. Ability Building Colours


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CATEGORY WINNERS CATEGORY

WINNING BRAND

Accessibility ....................................................................................... Sayfa Systems Bathrooms & Laundries ................................................................................Caroma Ceilings .................................................................................................... Supawood Coatings, Paints, Sealants & Adhesives ............................................. Dulux Australia Cooling & Heating ............................................................................. Daikin Australia Doors ..............................................................................................Corinthian Doors Exterior Wall Materials............................................................................. Weathertex Floors & Flooring ......................................................................... Armstrong Flooring Insulation.................................................................................... Kingspan Insulation Internal Wall Materials & Partitioning ....................................................CSR Gyprock Kitchens & Kitchen Equipment.......................................................... Hafele Australia Laminates, Solid Surfaces & Veneers .......................................................... Laminex Landscaping & Outdoor ..................................................................... Adbri Masonry Lighting ................................................................................................... Brightgreen Office Equipment ............................................................................ Hewlett Packard Roofing ....................................................................................... Bluescope Lysaght Security....................................................................................................Assa Abloy Signage & Display Systems ............................................................................. DTAC Software ......................................................................................Autodesk Australia Storage ......................................................................GarageSafe (Help Enterprises) Structural Elements............................................................... Bluescope Steel Direct Sun Control & Shades....................................................................................Vergola Waterproofing .............................................................................. Waterproofingstuff Window Furnishings .......................................................................................Vertilux Windows & Glazing ................................................... Architectural Window Systems

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VERY KITCHEN AND LIVING AREA HAS DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS IN TERMS OF DESIGN AND FUNCTIONALITY. BLUM’S COMPREHENSIVE PRODUCT OFFER PROVIDES ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES AND EXCITING SCOPE FOR NEW CREATIVE INTERIOR DESIGNS.

Today handle-less furniture is in demand for the kitchen and many living areas throughout the home. Furniture fronts without handles, large expansive surfaces, clear cut design and minimal gaps create a smooth uninterrupted look and are beautiful characteristics of handle-less design. Blum offers fitting solutions that inspire and support this trend allowing unique design ideas to be carried through to furniture interiors. Blum also realises that the functionality of furniture is particularly important for everyday use; it needs to promote ergonomic workflows, provide enough storage space and be easy to use. Blum’s innovative motion technologies not only make furniture more practical, but when combined with Blum fittings create endless possibilities for handle-less furniture design and achieves high quality of motion with impressive ease of use. Blum’s motion technologies enable a small front gap of just 2.5mm for handle-less lift systems, doors and pull-outs.

All four motion technologies, BLUMOTION soft-close, SERVO-DRIVE electrical opening support system, TIP-ON BLUMOTION 100% mechanical opening and soft closing support system and TIP-ON mechanical opening support system can be combined, as required, extending the possibilities for handle-less designs throughout the kitchen and home. Blum’s SERVO-DRIVE functionality also extends to built-in appliances providing a complete solution for handle-less design throughout the entire kitchen. With SERVO-DRIVE flex integrated refrigerators, freezers and dishwashers can be elegantly concealed behind furniture fronts. Designed specifically to suit the demands of everyday kitchen use; integrated appliances can be used easily and conveniently with fronts opening with a single touch. Design freedom supported by the right technology allows you to realise the potential for handle-less design and combining modern furniture design with high quality of motion assures that furniture is impressively easy to use “Blum have expanded the options for designers to realise their vision of handle-less furniture. With the introduction of the highly anticipated TIP-ON BLUMOTION for LEGRABOX and MOVENTO; designers, cabinet makers and

consumers will experience more design opportunities, ease of manufacturing and quality and performance that will last the lifetime of the furniture” explains Kylie Peterson, National Marketing Manager Blum Australia. For additional support with the design or specification of Blum products; Blum’s digital services platform provides access to industry leading online software 24/7. Blum’s online software DYNALOG aids the industry in the specification and ordering process, making it faster, easier and more compatible than ever to flow from initial planning stages to ordering Blum products. Blum’s Online Product Configurator supports the correct selection and ordering of Blum fittings, and supports designers with cabinet planning information, 2D and 3D files along with extensive information on Blum products through product videos, brochures, installation drawings and complete part lists.

For the latest information on Blum’s LEGRABOX and MOVENTO TIP-ON BLUMOTION visit blum.com


THE NEXT

GENERATION VRV IV-S SYSTEM FIRST LAUNCHED IN JAPAN IN 1982, THE DAIKIN VRV SYSTEM HAS BEEN EMBRACED BY WORLD MARKETS FOR OVER 30 YEARS. The slim compact design offers improved energy savings, comfort and can be connected to a range of domestic indoor units, with outdoor units measuring as low as 990mm in height* for ease of installation. VRV IV-S capacity ranges from 9kW to 24kW to meet an even wider variety of needs.

Find out more today. Visit commercial.daikin.com.au or call us on 1300 368 300

*Applies to 9, 11.2 and 14kW models


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ZINC-CLAD ADDITION WITH SECRET GUTTERING AND GLAZED ROOF VALLEY ARCHITECT: MATT GIBSON ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHY: SHANNON MCGRATH

THIS ADDITION TO A HERITAGE EDWARDIAN DWELLING IN ELSTERNWICK, MELBOURNE IS A RECESSIVE ZINC-CLAD FOLDED FORM, SET WITHIN ‘THE SHADOW’ OF THE EXISTING WHITE DETAILED BRICK STRUCTURE. IT’S DESIGN WAS DEVELOPED BY MATT GIBSON ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN THROUGH A SERIES OF FOLDED COMPUTATIONAL MODELS WHICH EXPLORED THE ORIENTATION OF THE SITE AND HOW THE NEW ADDITION WOULD INTEGRATE WITH THE EXISTING LAYOUT. THE RESOLUTION IS A HIGHLY CUSTOM BUILDING THAT REFLECTS THE CLIENT’S LIFESTYLE WHILE TACTFULLY EMBRACING THE VIRTUES OF EDWARDIAN ARCHITECTURE.

WORDS: NATHAN JOHNSON


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SITE PLAN

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n the context of its neighbourhood, Shadow House challenges the concept of building low quality replica additions that attach themselves to heritage fabric and compromise, confuse and diminish the integrity of the original. Instead, the new works analyse and enter the spirit of the heritage building through a contemporary interpretation that acknowledges its context and history. The Elsternwick heritage area contains many detached early 20th century villas, set within garden settings and characterised by picturesque steep asymmetrically-hipped roof-forms. Shadow House takes a modern spin on some of these attributes. It features two flush-hip roof forms, one with five sides and another with seven, that wrap and fold like origami around the existing building’s southern and western elevations.

FRONT ELEVATION


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Rather than simply attaching the new addition to the existing building and generating potential for a clunky junction, the architects instead chose to join the two with a glazed bridge that runs the entire length of the valley between the old and new roofs. An incision was saw cut into the existing brickwork to hold the glass in place on one side, while the other side rests on top of the guttering on the new roof. Plasterboard butts neatly into the underside of the glazing and a caulk beading hides the join. Besides glazing, the addition is clad top-to-toe in an Anthra standing seam zinc from VM Zinc that folds over and hides the rafter and joist junction, and flows uninterrupted from ridge to slab. This monolithic effect is benefitted by the architect’s choice for secret guttering and the provision of large wall cavities which house and hide stormwater downpipes and the western orientation’s massive top hung cavity sliding doors. The Anthra zinc chosen has a stone-like finish that is capable of blending with various materials, such as the black slate tiles on the existing building. It is designed to patina with age. 2

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PELMET/WINDOW/RIDGE DETAIL Vertical section (L), Plan section (R)

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1. Standing seam at roof ridge 2. Galvanised bracket 3. Battens align with rafters to allow for 40mm ventilation gap required for plywood

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4. Air gap

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5. Roof structure 6. Insulation 7. Ceiling packed out to achieve faceted heights

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8. Stud framing to suit ceiling shape 9. Box gutter fall (min 150mm) 10. Plasterboard lining 11. Double lock standing seam VM Zinc cladding 12. Concealed aluminium window channel

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13. Lintel 14. Rigid board substrate

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15. Aluminium pelmet for blind motor concealed by zinc cladding

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16. External blind: Warema 80mm flat edge slat 17. Window 18. Vertical guide channel 19. Flat VM Zinc window sill with fall for runoff 20. Square cut silicon seal at window junction

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22. Concealed aluminium window channel 23. Hydronic in floor heating

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24. Concealed aluminium channel, Zinc and PB to butt glazing and join to be silicon sealed 25. Vertical guide channel to match blind 26. Structural column 27. Existing brick face retained 28. Glazing channel concealed in brickwork 29. Glazing channel concealed, zinc and PB to butt

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SKYLIGHT DETAIL Vertical section 1. Roof structure 2. Stepped ‘foot hold’ Nom. 300mm continue flashing to box gutter below 1

3. Representative of overflow downpipe beyond

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4. Representative of downpipe beyond fall towards opposite wall

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5. Ceiling pitch 44 degrees

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6. Sump Beyond 7. Flat section of ceiling aligns with wall nib thickness

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8. Plasterboard to underside of glazing, junctions caulked 9. Frameless glass rooflight with 1 degree slope

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10. Concealed glazing channel within saw-cut incision in existing brickwork

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12. Steel reveal to opening

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PELMET/WINDOW/RIDGE DETAIL Vertical section Scale 1:10 1. Plasterboard lining

15. Double lock standing seam VM Zinc cladding

2. Ceiling packed out to achieve faceted look

16. Roof structure

3. Downpipes concealed in ceiling and fall towards opposite wall

18. Minimum 250x250x100 Sump

4. Sump

19. Steel angle, finished flush with soffit

5. Overflow

20. Ventilation gap

6. Downpipe

21. Drip groove

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22. 8mm steel plate

Hydronic in floor heating

17. Fibre cement soffit painted

8. 70mm concrete screed

23. Soil fill to appropriate level

9. Slab

24. River rocks on soil

10. Exposed concrete floor finish

25. Garden light

11. Flashing over upstand

26. Splayed concrete footing

12. 50mm slab setdown to suit window

27. Steel angle frame fixed to footing

13. Steel bifold window by Skyrange

28. Steel angle frame

14. Top-hung window track concealed

29. Plant creeper wires


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A steel shrouded ‘breezeway’, adjacent to the entry, provides openness and interaction with the street and front garden. The steel bifold doors are from Skyrange and sit on a standard rebate sill which appears flush thanks to the grass within the planter box which grows roughly to the height of the sill. The planter box is steel, fixed to concrete footings that are splayed to encourage plant growth right to the perimeter. Within the new addition, white faceted ceiling planes appear as a ‘crumpled piece of paper’ draped over a series of internal material ‘objects’ - brick (existing house), timber (utilities), zinc (guest bed and carport). A series of interstitial living zones meander within this field of textured ‘objects’ offering a journey bookended by vignetted views to gardens. The ceilings were formed simply by packing out from roof rafters. The design of Shadow House as a whole fosters the utilisation of the entire site and especially the engagement with garden aspects. The architects have retained the landscaped coverage at the same time as increasing the size and functionality of the living spaces. Skylights bring light into the centre of the dwelling, cross ventilation is aplenty and the building is super insulated thanks to the oversized cavities and attic space. Garden views are incessant and the sky is rarely out of site. Financially, the family will benefit from this robust addition as it maximises the site’s potential and ensures the longevity of habitation. n


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ALTERATION OF ICONIC VICTORIAN POST AND BEAM DWELLING ARCHITECT: MIHALY SLOCOMBE

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW LATREILLE

WORDS: NATHAN JOHNSON

CHAMFER HOUSE INVOLVED THE ALTERATION OF A 1977-BUILT, KEVIN BORLAND-DESIGNED POST AND BEAM DWELLING AT OLIVERS HILL IN FRANKSTON, VICTORIA. THE HOME OWNERS ENGAGED MELBOURNE PRACTICE, MIHALY SLOCOMBE FOR THE PROJECT, SEEKING AN UPDATE TO ITS LIVING ARRANGEMENTS IN LINE WITH THE NEEDS OF THEIR YOUNG FAMILY. THE RESULT IS A SENSITIVE YET THOROUGH INTERVENTION, WHEREBY BORLAND’S DESIGN HAS BEEN RECONFIGURED AND MODERNISED, WITHOUT SACRIFICE TO ITS CORE PERSONALITY AND PHILOSOPHICAL INTENTION.


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GROUND

LEVEL 1

KEVIN BORLAND

MIHALY SLOCOMBE

1977

2015

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he original dwelling followed a typical single-storey living layout, and was based on a rational 5x5 metre grid. A large studio took up the entire ground floor while a kitchen, living and a main bedroom were spread across level one. Mihaly Slocombe inverted and extended this arrangement. Three bedrooms and two bathrooms replaced the studio downstairs, while an enlarged kitchen and living space now take up level one. Corners of the original square grid have been trimmed (chamfered) and extended in parts to create new pockets of space which are also a nod to Borland’s own affinity for triangular geometry in architecture. The triangle is a motif that informs the design of Chamfer House on both a macro scale—as seen on the reconfigured plan—and a micro scale—through the shaping of windows, walls, ceiling tiles, furniture and custom door handles. It was a device used regularly by Borland but was developed into the threedimensional chamfer by Mihaly Slocombe. The faceted balcony soffit at the master bedroom is the most obvious example of the chamfer, but as you move throughout and around the house you can see its application in several locations, mostly at thresholds or against internal walls.


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The chamfer soffit was formed by battening out from the existing balcony and is angled to frame views from the master bedroom down Olivers Hill towards Port Phillip Bay. It is lined with a screw-fixed fibre cement sheeting called Barestone from CSR Cemintel which was also used by Mihaly Slocombe elsewhere on the project. The master bedroom and adjacent en-suite façades are almost entirely glazed and comprise a series of custom and irregular Victorian Ash windows from Quantum which fit in and around the valleys of the soffit. A built-in interior pelmet and blind provides sun protection and appears hidden thanks to Mihaly Slocombe’s detailing. The architects carried the ceiling lining boards down onto the pelmet and continued the interior wall lining up into the reveal. The reveal width and thicknesses matches the other beams within the room and, by casting a shadow, also appears to be the same colour.

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ROOF SHEETING + BLIND PELMET – MASTER BEDROOM DETAIL Vertical section

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1. Metal flashing folded down onto roof sheeting. Finished to match sheeting

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2. Blinds

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3. Silvertop Ash lining boards, Radial Timber 4. Caulk junction with downturn 5. Carry timber lining boards down to form blind pelmet. Box out using timber to match lining for support. Supports run in line with edges of window frames 6. Metal roof sheeting on graded battens with minimum 1 degree fall towards box gutter. Turn up at edges 7. Carry wall lining up into pelmet reveal 10

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8. Structural timber support to roof 9. Faceted soffit lining over breathable sarking

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10. Angled window head, Quantum

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11. Thermotech DGU Viridian

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WINDOW JAMB AGAINST ZINC CLAD WALL – MASTER BEDROOM DETAIL Plan section 8

1. External Barestone cement sheeting 2. Cement sheet cladding to wall as per wall type details. Tuck behind window jamb and caulk junction 3. Ex. 140 x 40mm timber window jamb as specified, rebated as shown for glazing 4. Fixed glazing 5. Glazed door 6. Pack out angled junction to conceal steel column with mitred timber to match frames. Finish also to match 7. Fixed glazing 8. Sill 9. Bulk thermal insulation 10. Sisalation sheet 11. Double layer stud wall

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While much of the original text-book Borland design has been retained and celebrated, it’s dramatic structural expressionism has also been reigned in and suitably adapted. The exposed Oregon beams and finger-jointed window frames are as much a feature of Chamfer House now as they were pre-renovation, but the timber posts have been either painted, removed or hidden within new wall cavities and window jambs. The house still adheres strictly to the original 5x5 metre grid, but trimming and extending the corners have changed its geometry. Insulation, upgraded windows, ceiling fans, low energy light fittings and a solar array have also been added to the home, as has a new contemporary kitchen, bathroom and swimming pool. This represents the intention of Mihaly Slocombe to both apply and adapt Borland’s approach to architecture to a world where living arrangements, environmental awareness, building materials and construction methods have changed. Since construction finished, the local council have conducted a survey of mid- century modernist houses in the area. Their heritage advisors have concluded that Mihaly Slocombe were successful in sensitively renovating Kevin Borland’s original, and have recommended Chamfer House receive unique protection.

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WINDOW JAMB WITH COVER TO EXISTING POST Plan section 1. Sill 2. Fixed glazing 3. Timber window jamb 4. 20mm timber cover over post 5. Existing timber post

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PARAMETRIC DESIGN FOR DISH ROOF ARCHITECT: WOOD MARSH

FABRICATION CONSULTANCY: AR-MA

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN GOLLINGS

DESIGNED BY WOOD MARSH ARCHITECTURE, TOORAK HOUSE STANDS AS AN ABSTRACT MERGING OF ROOF AND WALL. A BOWL-SHAPED, DOUBLY-CURVED ROOF SITS ON A RAW, TEXTURED CONCRETE FACADE WHICH WRAPS AND ARTICULATES THE INTERNAL VOLUMES OF THE BUILDING. ENGAGED TO RESOLVE MANUFACTURING AND CONSTRUCTION DIFFICULTIES PRESENT IN THE TECHNICAL DESIGN OF THE ZINCCLAD ROOF, ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH MATERIAL APPLICATIONS (AR-MA) WORKED WITH CRAFTMETALS IN CONSULTATION WITH WOOD MARSH ARCHITECTURE TO PRODUCE A SYSTEM CAPABLE OF REALISING THE ARCHITECT’S FORMAL INTENT.

WORDS: NATHAN JOHNSON


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Developing and implementing an efficient workflow capable of rationalising the complex geometry present in the roof’s curvature and outputting all required set-out and shop drawings, AR-MA worked across multiple software platforms to coordinate all material, fabrication, and design constraints present. This included sheet-metal detailing and the simulation of the folding behaviour of the zinc panels, to ensure the perfect fit of all parts on site.

Working on top of the structural steel which set out the roof, AR-MA developed an intelligent material build-up to adhere to the tight tolerances required to implement the architect’s aesthetic desires. Two layers of timber clad the builder’s steel work, to set out the zinc panels and provide a surface for fixing, over which interlocking zinc panels are positioned. A combination of off-site, factory fabrication and on-site assembly and installation was used to promote project efficiency and reduce waste.

To set out the zinc panels, assembly instructions were Computer-Numerically-Controlled (CNC) milled into the surface of the plywood sub-construction layer, in the form of text and line markings. These markings formed a roadmap locating each individual zinc panel. This approach has been used in many of the office’s projects to substantially decrease panel installation cycle times and eliminate much of the 2D documentation conventionally required on site.

Reproducing the architect’s desired zinc patterning in built form required a complex rationalisation process to move from the double-curved design surface to a construction system inclusive of over 1,800 zinc panels and over 500 plywood elements. First, each panel was modelled as a unique element shaped by the curvature and patterning of the system, as well as any local obstructions, such as abutments.

These unique elements were then grouped into families of identical size by resizing using a tolerance imperceptible to the human eye. Assembly drawings and cutting files required for fabrication of each panel family were then exported automatically from the 3D model and used to fabricate pre-cut, pre-drilled, and pre-folded zinc panels. Panels were then delivered to site in numbered batches to suit the installation sequence.

The result? The expertise and experience of Architecture Research Material Applications allowed Wood Marsh Architects to realise a challenging roof design to a high level of technical resolution and detail. The house recently sold for a record price of $26.25 million for Victoria. It includes an underground private art gallery and basement, and two storeys of living space. It was the home of lawyer and property developer Daniel Besen. n


ADVERTISING FEATURE – CSR CEMINTEL

PREFINISHED POTENTIAL: THE GROWING POSSIBILITIES OF PREFINISHED MATERIALS

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RE-FINISHED MATERIALS ARE EMERGING AS THE SUPERIOR CHOICE FOR CLADDING AND LINING IN THE BUILDING INDUSTRY. WITH A RANGE OF OPTIONS NOW AVAILABLE, BUILDING PROFESSIONALS ARE IN NEED OF MORE IN-DEPTH INFORMATION ABOUT THE USE OF PREFINISHED MATERIALS AND THE UNIQUE POSSIBILITIES THEY OFFER.

Initially, prefinished materials encountered a somewhat tough initiation to the market due to a certain lack of knowledge. The adversity of building professionals towards prefinished materials is largely unwarranted and has been a source of continued discussion. At a 1961 conference in Washington D.C., Thomas H. Creighton, editor of magazine Progressive Architecture, commented on a ‘counter-revolution’ of architects against the ‘revolution of prefinished materials’, suggesting that the insurgency demonstrated their ‘desire for enrichment of our architecture, and a revolt against repetitive monotony.’ This early distaste for prefinished materials was perhaps understandable, when early iterations paid little attention to colour and texture, and suffered from a lack of flexibility and durability. However, much has changed since those early days. Today, prefinished materials offer architects and designers a range of choices and there are growing examples of buildings that are incorporating prefinished materials into

their design. A large amount of research and development goes into prefinished materials from the manufacturer enabling companies to develop more sophisticated textures and finishes. According to Australian interior designer Kathy Demos of Supermaquette Pty Ltd, the Melbournebased company ‘works best with a concise and considered range of colours, materials and textures that correspond to emerging trend patterns. We admire and support manufacturers that invest in research and expertise to ensure their ranges are relevant to specifiers and the market’. The companies that produce prefinished materials solely focus on these areas, making them of a superior quality, as they don’t have to consider other factors such as the entire design impact or limitations that finishing onsite may produce. As well as the range of choice in materials and textures for designers, prefinished materials offer a myriad of other benefits. By integrating

prefinished materials in a project, the length of time spent onsite can be dramatically reduced. In addition to this, once installed, prefinished materials require virtually no ongoing maintenance. While the initial cost of prefinished materials can seem high in comparison to traditional materials, more explanation needs to be given to the installation and lifetime costs savings. Ultimately, the home or building owner reaps the biggest benefit of low maintenance. All architects, builders and specifiers in Australia must adhere to the rules laid out by BCA and Australian Standards. All products used in Australia must comply and conform with Australian Standards.

Download the full whitepaper here. http://bit.ly/2k8vhU8


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The pros and cons

OF PERMANENT FORMWORK SYSTEMS FOR SINGLE DWELLINGS

THE STRUCTURAL SIDE OF THE CRONULLA HOUSE BY REG LARK ARCHITECT INVOLVED THE USE OF THE RITEK XL WALL PERMANENT FORMWORK SYSTEM. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DL PHOTOGRAPHY


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[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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ermanent formwork systems have become an attractive alternative to conventional masonry block, precast concrete and in-situ building methods for both builders and designers in Australia, particularly in the multi-residential space. Suppliers and manufacturers of the systems herald them as the next big thing in construction, promising quicker project turnarounds, reduced costs, and cleaner and safer construction sites. While they do vary slightly in their size, assembly methodology and capability, systems generally come as lightweight hollow panels or blocks that join together to form walls that are then core filled with concrete and steel. They require little bracing compared to in-situ pours, erase the need for bricklayers and their materials, and require no specialised trades to erect—although in some instances warranties are voided if accredited installers are not used. While the systems are comparatively new, they have been around for long enough now to provide sufficient time for the industry to assess their performance against promises from suppliers. So we put the question out there to the industry—do they live up to the hype and are they suited to single dwelling construction?

going for growth When asked, Cameron Lovett of Sydney-based construction outfit, Lovett Custom Homes initially said yes. But that soon changed to a “well, sort of”, and then an “actually, not quite”. “Look, I love the idea of the system, or using anything that can replace the messy trades of brick and blockwork on site,” he says. “But I just don’t think they’re quite there yet.” Like a lot of Australian residential builders, Lovett and fellow Sydney builder Mitchell Levett of Cadence & Co, a luxury design and construction company, are seeing permanent formwork systems on construction drawings more and more, and are also aware of their increasing popularity around building sites in general. “We almost always use Dincel now,” says Levett, who has worked on some of the most expensive new houses on Sydney’s Northern Beaches including the recently completed Palm Beach House (pictured page 38). “And I don’t see us ever going back if we can help it.” Dincel, as Levett refers to, is one permanent formwork option available in Australia that claims to be a fast, cheap, and easy alternative to block/brickwork and precast and in situ concrete building methods.

It comes as a set of lightweight hollow polymer panels, floor tracks and specialist pieces that click together to form a waterproof structural wall that is then core-filled with concrete and steel. It comes in either 100 or 200mm thicknesses and has built-in vertical conduits which enable services (except some plumbing) to be installed after all structural elements have been completed, without the need for chasing. AFS has similar versions called Rediwall and Logicwall and, like Dincel, they’re also becoming increasingly popular among Australian designers. They’re offered in 150 or 200mm thicknesses and erected in a simple channel track system, but unlike Dincel they are not advertised as fully waterproof. There are others as well which are attracting the attention of some of Australia’s leading architects, some with high insulating properties and others with easier-to-finish substrates. Ritek’s XL Wall system, which has been used by Reg Clarke Architect (see opening image of Cronulla House) and Steele Associates Architects to award winning effect, is one, while Insulated Concrete Forms (ICF) are another altogether. Unlike PVC versions, Ritek’s systems use fibre cement sheets for the outer layers of the walls which provides a more traditional surface to finish. These sheets are separated by plastic spaces and bonded to an aluminium track which Ritek guarantees won’t rust. The Thermal Wall version also includes an integrated thermal insulation layer which helps it achieve a healthy R-Value of 4.0. Made popular in America, ICF’s are also making inroads into the Australian market. They come as a set of polystyrene blocks that click together like Lego and laid horizontally like traditional blockwork. The EPS provides insulating properties and is also easily cut with a hot knife or grinder to chase services. Zego Building Systems’ ICF is seeing increasing uptake in Australia, particularly by eco architects and designers, and was used on the recently completed Blue Mountains House by Blue Eco Homes which was the recent recipient of a 2016 HIA Green Smart Award. It features a dovetail groove for render and plasterboard support which solves some of the finishing issues associated with PVC permanent formwork. It comes in 300mm heights and doesn’t need to sit on a slab rebate which makes it easy to make standard wall sizes like 2.7 and three metres. Another that’s new to the Australian market is Eco Block, an American-born insulated foam wall system similar to Zego which goes further by incorporating structure, vapour barriers, and battens into one system. Thermacell and Insulbrick are other highly trusted ICF’s that have been used throughout Australia.

IRONING OUT THE ISSUES Like a lot of designers, both Lovett and Levett were first attracted to permanent formwork because of its associated benefits, and although they’ve come across a few issues with the system since, they still suggest that the positives far outweigh the negatives. These shortfalls have mainly been around speed of construction, bracing requirements, sizing restrictions, waterproofing performance and ease of erection. “First off, I don’t believe they’re waterproof,” says Levett, who insisted on this despite CSIRO tests that show that Dincel is in fact completely waterproof. “We’ve had so many problems with water getting into the channels and filling up that we’ve even had to drill out holes in the bottom to empty them of water. We now waterproof, no matter which system we use.” The promise of “minimal bracing” and “easy to install” are also cases of choice words according to Lovett whose high-end residential projects feature a lot of custom windows and doors. “Propping at every window, door, T-intersection and on top of walls can take a lot of time, and we often have to prop full height gaps in a wall because the panels don’t meet perfectly in the middle,” he says. “And feeding corner, horizontal and vertical bars isn’t as simple as it looks.” To be fair, most manufacturers offer joiner, male/female adapter and spacer panels to solve the very problem Lovett first described, and using systems like Zego, which are horizontally-laid, basically erases this issue. To explain further, Lovett follows manufacturer directions by building his formwork from the corners-in. Because they come in set widths, in Dincel’s case 333.3mm, they don’t always meet in the middle. And while manufacturers are aware of this and offer spacers and joiners as solutions, they too come in set widths so naturally you can run into the same problem. “They’re not always perfect and it’s too time consuming to make up a custom panel when a joiner or spacer doesn’t work so we just back prop and fill the whole wall,” says Lovett. “Manufacturers also recommend building walls that fit their products, but of course this isn’t something residential architects want to hear.” Erecting from scaffolding is also out of the question says Lovett, who likened an unfilled Dincel wall to a boat sail on a windy day. “Trying to click a three metre PVC wall together from scaff in a howling southerly is suicide. We only work from decks.”


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VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL REO BAR PLACED ALTERNATE SIDE AT 1500 MAX

AFS WALL COREFILLED TO SPEC

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL FINISH TO SPEC

EXTRA REINFORCEMENT BARS ABOVE AND BELOW OPENING

REBATE WINDOW DETAIL: AFS LOGIC WALL

CUSTOM FORMED BLANK CLOSING STUD TO SUIT HEAD + SITE SECTIONS

20-40MM FRAME EXTENSION FIBRE CEMENT SHEETING

HORIZONTAL JOINT

2ND SLAB POUR

SEAL VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL FC WITH PAINTABLE WATER PROOF MEMBRANE

AFS WALL COREFILL

SLAB TO ENGINEER’S DETAILS

CONCRETE WALL TO SLAB COLD JOINT

SILL SECTION CUT ONSITE AND REBATED WITH TEMPORARY TIMBER MEMBER

OPTIONAL CHAMFER SLAB JUNCTION HOB DETAIL: AFS LOGIC WALL

VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL REO

SLAB AND SETDOWN BY ENGINEER’S DETAIL VOID GROUT FILLER PAINTABLE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE

AFS LOGICWALL PUNCHED FLOOR TRACK

TWO CONTINUOS BEADS OF SEALANT UNDER FLOOR TRACKS ON ALL EXTERNAL WALLS EXTERNAL WALL/SLAB JUNCTION DETAIL: AFS LOGIC WALL

HORIZONTAL JOINT TRATED USING BANDING STRIP OR MEMBRANE EDGE BEAM AND REO BY ENGINEER


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FINISHING CORRECTLY Finishing a polymer based permanent formwork wall can mean rethinking your waterproofing, adhesives and coatings, cladding materials and methods. We’ve heard stories of tradies scuffing the surfaces of the PVC walls with a grinder just to get their render to stick, and others about render actually falling off the wall because adhesives couldn’t hold the weight of a traditional render build. But the problem here could lie in the render products being used. Polymer renders that are essentially sand and cement based renders that come in bags are not suitable for PVC formwork systems and only appropriate for absorbent masonry substrates. Several Australian coating companies now offer products that are guaranteed to stick to PVC formwork, some without the need for polymer primers. These are all acrylic-based coatings and include Astec Armatex, Novatex, Dulux Acratex and Taubmans Armawall. Another alternative is Zego’s system which has a patented dovetail groove that enables render and plasterboard to mechanically adhere to the foam. This means no roughing up of the surface is required prior to finishes being applied and no screw holes to set and sand on the plasterboard because it can be stuck directly to the wall. On the flip side of that, sticking plasterboard to the foam is untraditional and will require new skills separate to simply screwing, setting and finishing.

HERE TO STAY “I AM NOT TOTALLY CONVINCED JUST YET, THERE ARE STILL A FEW ISSUES THAT NEED TO BE IRONED-OUT. THEN I THINK IT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO TAKE OVER THE INDUSTRY ENTIRELY.” – CAMERON LOVETT, SYDNEY MASTER BUILDER.

Contrary to some manufacturer claims, Zego managing director Scott Evans also recommends waterproofing basements, no matter which system you use. “I’ve been a builder for 50 years and I wouldn’t take the chance in a basement,” he says. “We have to justify why we recommend waterproofing our walls, but at the end of the day we all hear the stories about other systems failing.” Like the PVC versions, Zego should be waterproofed with a bitumen-free membrane and there are several products available on the market that suit most permanent formwork systems. Kuniseal, Xypex and Drizoro’s Maxseal Flex membranes are a just a few.

That all said, both Lovett and Levett, and others that we’ve spoken to are certainly on board the permanent formwork freight train. Using permanent formwork for a basement construction instead of a column-slab structural system meant an overall reduction in concrete and steel for a recent job Levett worked on, so he saved both time and money there. Lovett is currently employing Dincel in lieu of brick for a reverse veneer exterior wall at his newest job in Clontarf, NSW and says this system has great potential as a green building solution considering its thermal mass, waterproofing capability and environmental credentials. They’re both also erecting exterior walls at a rapid pace and getting to know how to best sequence trades to come in and work with the walls before or after the concrete pour. Both agree that the systems are faster to erect, easier to handle, provide a cleaner worksite and can be cheaper in some instances. They only hope that some of the previous problems are solved and that custom panels and more options for curved walls become part of the manufacturer product offerings in the future. n


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1 Palm Beach House by Cadence & Co constructed using Dincel and finished with a variety of render, stone, timber cladding and paint products 2 Cadence & Co hard at work erecting a Dincel wall 3 Zego blocks lock together like Lego and have a patented dovetail groove on their finishing surface for render and plasterboard support


A PROJECT AT THE END OF THE WORLD. And a piping system that supplies all of the essentials right from the start. With something as fundamental to the construction of an Arctic research station as the vital supply of warmth and clean drinking water, you don’t experiment, but trust uncompromising quality and absolute reliability. Viega met these high demands using Sanpress Inox for drinking water and Prestabo for heating installation, and also delivered the know how to go with them. Viega. Connected in quality.

Bharati Research Station, Antarctica Š Architects: IMS Ingenieurgesellschaft / bof architekten / m+p consulting; Photographer: Rakesh Rao/NCAOR

viega.com.au/About-us

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ARE LINEAR DRAINS RIGHT FOR YOUR RESIDENTIAL PROJECT? [WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA

T

O CALL LINEAR DRAINS A ‘RECENT TREND’ WOULD BE A MISNOMER. THE PRODUCT HAS BEEN USED IN EUROPE AND AUSTRALIA FOR DECADES, YET IT CONTINUES TO GENERATE SUSTAINED INTEREST WITHIN DESIGN AND BUILD CIRCLES. Also known as trench or channel drains, linear drains differ from other drainage alternatives by lying flush with its adjoining surfaces. In residential projects, this eliminates the need for shower curbs and means the drain may be installed away from the middle or standing area of a shower, offering a range of practical and aesthetic benefits. For example, linear drains only require a single fall (or slope) in the floor, making them easier to install than a traditional ‘dished’ shower floor. “Centre wastes require the floor to slope to the drain from all directions, like a shallow dish,” Stormtech’s managing director Troy Creighton explained. “A traditional centre waste is best in the middle of the floor as this is the shortest distance for any water to travel. The positioning of a linear drain is more versatile – it can be installed across the door, against the back wall, under a vanity, on one side of a shower or bathroom.” This one-directional slope (towards the drain) not only makes for faster installation but builders also typically need less build-up on the floor and have more options on how to arrange the plumbing and waterproofing. Linear drains are also favoured because they allow for large format stone or tiles (600 x 600, 600 x 300, 900 x 900) to be used without requiring cuts to create the correct falls. Compare this to traditional centre wastes, which are suited to smaller tiles since the ‘dish’ formed to guide water flow would require large tiles to be cut diagonally to avoid steps or lipping of the tiles. An ‘add-on’ advantage of having a single fall that drains well in simple directions, is the floor cleaning process said Misho Vasiljevich, principal architect at Hobart practice Misho + Associates. Vasiljevich has specified linear drains both in residential bathrooms (using the Veitch shower channel, sold by Reece), and in commercial projects such as the Hobart Airport Terminal Redevelopment’s new toilets (Stormtech), forecourt expansion and airside drainage (Aco Drains). The same benefits apply to the use of linear drains in commercial or public projects. A 2014 study by quantity surveyor Rider Levett Bucknall, which compared the cost and effectiveness of three drainage methods at a carpark at the Homebush Aquatic Centre in New South Wales, found that a modular grated trench drain system surpassed grated

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pit and pipe systems and cast in-situ trench drains in terms of hydraulic performance, and installation simplicity, and maintenance.

installation even though I had a quote. The client took the QS’ figures and linear drains were pulled from the project.”

The same study also noted that the modular trench drain, the ACO Drain, was the more affordable option – 13 per cent cheaper than cast in-situ trench drains. However, some architects believe the higher costs associated with linear drains remain an inhibiting factor against their specification, particularly in residential projects.

Nevertheless, Vasiljevich and other architects we interviewed said they favoured linear drains over point drains.

“Practically and aesthetically, linear drains, in my opinion, have more upsides than downsides, but budget is the main driver until the plumbing trades become used to using them,” Vasiljevich said. “Like anything new, Australian trades [charge] high installation costs without looking at what it helps through all the trades.” “On a recent project, the Quantity Surveyor placed a high cost on the supply and

“I definitely prefer linear drains and have used them on two recently completed projects,” architect Sophie Solomon said in an email interview. “We used large format floor tiles so the linear drain was the only option. For both projects, the linear drain was infilled with a matching cut tile so the floor looks quite seamless. They provide a superior finish and practical design solution in a wet area.” “I would recommend point over linear drains when you have a low budget and cannot afford linear,” said Vasiljevich, “but I believe in the next 10 years linear drains will become standard.”

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STORMTECH

STRIPGRATE

SSDC

Stormtech offers an extensive range of linear drains suitable for bathroom applications. The majority come as a uPVC channel and 316 marine grade stainless steel grate, however, tile insert and anodised colour range options are also available. The company also has a wealth of architect and specifier information available on its website including a BIM library (available through Yep Sketch) and a download centre filled with installation guides and drawings.

Stripgrate offer four linear drain models, three of which come in a narrow 38mm width and with either tile or steel profile inserts. The fourth on offer is called Tilegap (pictured) and is a 48mm channel with a centre positioned linear blade. Because of its design and tile overlap, the Tilegap appears to be much smaller than its drainage capability. It comes with a snap-off upstand which allows for either an against-wall or in-floor application without the need to order a separate channel.

SSDC’s Quick Turnaround Drain is the only all Australian made version on the market. It will be delivered to site within three business days which also includes custom placement of spigot outlet. It comes in 304 grade stainless steel and in either 100mm or 75mm wide varieties. SSDC’s Bollinger Series (pictured) can also accommodate a tile insert and comes in a wider 150mm version. All products are certified and conform to ATS5200.040-2005.

ACO

AQUABOCCI

VEITCH

Aco’s Quartz range of shower channels are available in six standard lengths (700, 800, 900, 1000, 1200 and 1400mm), with the option of a centre or end outlet (63mm from end). They are available in a choice of eight grating designs that can be replaced for a new look. Seven of those grating designs also come in a matching pointdrain profile and all come with an option for integrated water-activated LED lights.

Aquabocci claims to manufacture the world’s most versatile drainage systems. They come as a set of grates, channels, end caps, seals, connectors and membrane sheets. Its PVC channels can be measured and cut to length, hole sawed for custom-placed spigot holes and configured into corners. Its Blade series inserts (pictured) are also height adjustable to match any tile or stone thickness.

Veitch provide shower channels in Original, Lowline and DX Series range. The Lowline comes in a depth of 20mm and sits flush with the floor tile while the Original is 35mm and has an under-tile flange. All come in standard lengths of 800, 900, 1200 and 1500mm but can be custom built to lengths of up to 2400mm. Veitch also allows outlets to be custom positioned and all of its products come in either a satin or chrome finish 304 grade stainless steel.

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LINEAR DRAIN INSTALLATION CHECKLIST: • Sufficient drainage: incorrectly sized sub-sill can lead to significant moisture damage in walls and floors

EXAMPLE DETAILS Stormtech 65i25 Vertical Section (T), Plan Section (B)

GRATE FINISH IS 1 OR 2MM LOWER THAN ADJACENT TILE

• Flow rates: most linear drains are designed to convey up to 40L of water per minute. Designers should be mindful of the incidence and frequency of shower flow rates in bathrooms and the risk of potential overflow • Durability: seek materials that are purposebuilt to withstand the harsh Australian elements, and resist shrinkage and expansion. Coastal homes will benefit from threshold products manufactured with 316 marine grade, corrosion-resistant stainless steel that can handle high water flows, harsh chemicals and suspended chloroids • Safety: reduce chances of injury by fitting a linear drain that blends in seamlessly with the floor surface • Standards: threshold drainage must meet design requirements for access and mobility (AS1428.1-2009), and thresholds at doorways, in particular, must have a continuous path of travel and have a maximum rise of 35mm, maximum length of 280mm, maximum gradient of 1:8 and be located within 20mm of the door leaf which it serves. They must also meet requirements in AS3500.2 Sanitary plumbing and drainage ■

CAULK BOTTOM EDGE OF CHANNEL WATERPROOFING FIXED TO FLOOR FLANGE CHANNEL

TILE CEMENT

GRATE

SPIGOT

REBATE FOR CHANNEL

STOP END

WATER PROOFING

TILE

SUBSTRATE

FLANGE

TRAP

QUALITY MADE TO MEASURE STEEL WATER TANKS

20 YEAR GUARANTEE FOR TOTAL PEACE OF MIND

1-2mm Australian made using Bluescope Made to measure in our factories in NSW, VIC Tile sits 1-2mm higher than grate. AQUAPLATE® Steel and QLD Australian Standard AS4020 for storage Ability to select fitting locations on tank of drinking water Caulk along channel edgeof fitting sizes available to fit commercial Range or residential tile. and projects All our tanks come with a 10 year before laying tile glue construction warranty and 20 year warranty Delivery direct to tank base or concrete pad against corrosion onsite – we won’t leave the tank on the driveway

Y

STRAL IA AU N

MADE

PROUD L

Using the Size-a-lator, quickly design a water tank – shape, size, colour, fittings and accessories – and get it quoted.

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Cut installation time in half with the Evolution MkIII Pump from Kingspan Water The Evolution MkIII from Kingspan Water comes with a powerful Grundfos Submersible Pump and PM Rain Controller. The Evolution MkIII has the the advantage of dramatically reducing installation time and cost, while improving the appearance of the water tank system.

✆ 1300 736 562 sales.au@kingspan.com

kingspanwater.com.au Residential | Rural | Commercial

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ARCHITECTURAL GRATES + DRAINS

Grate lines. The finest linear grate selection from the people who invented them. Stormtech grates and drainage systems draw a perfect line connecting unmatched durability, superb craftsmanship and world class design. Give your bathroom or courtyard the best grate selection available, or create contemporary transitions from indoors to outdoors with our seamless threshold range. Designed and manufactured in Australia from marine grade stainless steel, Stormtech remains the gold standard for design and sustainability with full Greentag certification.

Bathrooms

Showers

Pools + Surrounds Thresholds

Doortracks

Special Needs Access

View our complete selection on the Stormtech website, and match the perfect drain to your design needs.

Visit us at stormtech.com.au for tools + inspiration.

Telephone 1300 653 403


ADVERTISING FEATURE – PALRAM

AN ARCHITECT’S GUIDE TO SPECIFYING POLYCARBONATE SHEETING

P

OLYCARBONATE SHEETING IS CONTINUING TO GAIN GROUND WITH ARCHITECTS, PARTICULARLY IN LARGE-SCALE APPLICATIONS. ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN A DIVERSE NUMBER OF PROJECTS – RANGING FROM FOOTBALL STADIUMS TO SHOPPING CENTRES – IS ENSURING THE MATERIAL’S INCREASED POPULARITY AMONG ARCHITECTS AND SPECIFIERS.

As a material, polycarbonate sheeting is offering a strong alternative to glass. The chemical composition of polycarbonate sheeting is particularly suited to offering strong heat resistance and a natural UV filter, meaning that polycarbonate sheeting can be used to achieve high-quality thermal insulation. The translucency of the material also means that users can make the most of natural light without having to resort to artificial lighting solutions. For specifiers and architects wishing to implement polycarbonate sheeting in their projects, the material’s insulation properties can be understood by checking its R-values and U-values. R-values measure its resistance to heat flow – the higher the value, the more energy being conserved. On the other hand, the U-value demonstrates the effectiveness of a window in keeping out the heat or cold. Despite the fact that the R-Value is a true indicator of heat flow, it does not give a full picture in terms of the amount of heat felt under a translucent roof. When installing polycarbonate sheeting

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in countries with high temperatures, such as Australia and Asia, this aspect is obviously going to have a huge impact on the users of a building or space. Therefore, the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) is used to demonstrate how much solar radiation passes through the window, as well as the heat absorbed and released inward. These are not the only factors that should be considered when choosing polycarbonate sheeting. The material offers a number of advantageous factors, especially when compared with glass. Polycarbonate sheeting is very light which will reduce the cost of transportation, installation and labour dramatically. The sheeting is also easily formable and versatile, allowing architects and designers to employ it in bespoke designs. Its availability in a range of colours and shades is also of great use in this respect. Finally, polycarbonate is incredibly strong and can withstand massive force – up to 250 times stronger than glass and up to 20 times stronger than tempered glass. This increased strength means that polycarbonate has an

average life span of up to 30 years. Specifiers should check supplier’s warranty – reputable supplier should offer up to 25 years guarantee. Palram is one such supplier. As an industry leader in polycarbonate sheeting solutions, Palram is well equipped to provide Australian architects and designers the most suitable polycarbonate sheeting for their domestic, commercial and industrial projects. The Multiwall Polycarbonate Architectural System, for example, is ideal for long-term application on many types of projects. It offers an advanced multiwall polycarbonate panel system that combines proven design, light transmission, thermal insulation and strength. For specifiers who need a glass-like appearance, Sunglaze is a Solid Polycarbonate Architectural System that offers smart design, elegant appearance, versatility, low maintenance, sustainable performance and free thermal expansion.

Download the full whitepaper here. http://bit.ly/2jkZ7kj

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WHAT MAKES A COOL ROOF

“cool”?


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WHOLE RANGE OF DESIGN ELEMENTS FALL UNDER THE UMBRELLA TERM OF “COOL ROOFS”. ESSENTIALLY, A COOL ROOF IS ONE THAT REFLECTS THE SUNS HEAT AND EMITS ABSORBED RADIATION BACK INTO THE ATMOSPHERE AT A HIGHER RATE THAN STANDARD MATERIALS, LITERALLY STAYING COOLER THAN A STANDARD ROOF. THIS REDUCES THE AMOUNT OF HEAT TRANSFERRED INTO THE BUILDING BELOW, KEEPING IT AT A MORE CONSTANT TEMPERATURE. Cool roofs are one element of passive design which can help keep a building and its occupants comfortable by lessening temperature fluctuations. Incorporating a cool roof into a design in the appropriate climate can make a building “greener” by reducing cooling energy costs, minimise the use or need for installation of air conditioning systems and subsequently reduce utility bills. Cool roofs can also mitigate a community’s Urban Heat Island Effect.

ability of a material to reflect the solar radiation of light, infrared and UV (Solar Reflectance) and the measure of the material’s ability to absorb and re-radiate heat into the atmosphere (Thermal Emittance) is combined into what is known as the Solar Reflectance Index (SRI). SRI is a measure of the constructed surface’s ability to reflect solar heat. The higher the SRI value, the lower its surface temperature and consequently, the heat gain into the building.

UNDERSTANDING COOL ROOFS

THE COLOUR DEBATE

A cool roof can be installed on any building. Some elements are built into materials before construction, and some are applied after, allowing a standard roof to be post-fitted with cool roof technology. Without a cool roof, on a 35°C day, the roof space can become superheated up to 90°C and the temperature of the rooms below can become unbearable, even with insulation. These temperature extremes can have an impact on the durability and the lifespan of the whole roof structure.

The role of colour in a cool roof’s ability to reflect sun comes down to basic physics. Darker coloured roofs made from standard materials will absorb more heat than lighter coloured standard roofs as black materials absorb all wavelengths of light and reflect none while white materials reflect all wavelengths of light and therefore, absorb the least heat.

There are a few terms which come into play when determining the “coolness” of a roof. The

This was demonstrated by a study at James Cook University, which used building simulation to compare the heat gain from light and dark-coloured roof surfaces. The research

found for North Australia, a light-coloured roof has about 30 per cent lower total (air temperature difference and solar-driven) heat gain than a dark-coloured one. A US study by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory went a step further and tested black, white and green (vegetated) roof types to determine the SRI and which was the most cost effective. A roof with a clean, smooth bright white surface was found to have an SRI of 107, the surface of a standard grey roof had an SRI of just 19 and a roof with a clean, smooth “cool colour” surface, such as a cool red tile, had an SRI of 38. White roofs also came out on top for cost and were found to be the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span in the United States. The paper “strongly recommended building code policies that phase out dark-coloured roofs in warm climates to protect against their adverse public health externalities”. While the numbers may vary between climates, the research suggests a lighter coloured roof will absorb less heat than a darker coloured one. So why aren’t all Australian roofs a lighter colour?

AUSTRALIAN TRENDS Trends in the Australian roof domain are dependent on location. Designing for climate is of utmost importance when creating a building where occupants remain thermally


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1 Desert House by Dunn & Hillam Architects incorporates a fly roof with small vents, which prevents the sun from hitting the insulated roof and hot air from gathering in the roof space. Photography by Kilian O’Sullivan 2 Cliff Face House by Fergus Scott Architects and Peter Stutchbury Architecture uses a parasol roof to reportedly great effect. Photography by Michael Nicholson 3 Five of the colours in the Colorbond steel range qualify as solar reflective (light coloured) roofing under the Green Star Communities tool. Image: Colorbond

comfortable with minimal heating or cooling. Your Home recommends using light coloured roof materials in eight out of nine (excluding Alpine) climate zones within Australia. But depending on the geographical location, this is not always well practised.

THE OTHER OPTIONS

Dick Clarke, Director, Envirotecture says that in the top end, pretty much all roofs are white but in southern states, there has been “a misguided tendency for local government to mandate darker colours as a means of getting buildings to blend in to the natural environment”.

“These can be hard to achieve in many instances, and many people assume that shifting a little bit of air, such as with one or two small diameter roof vents, will do the same thing,” Clarke says.

“I say misguided, because we should not pretend that we are not building things - we can make buildings which are clearly there, but are harmonious without being exactly the same as the tree next to it,” he explains. Clarke says there is also a misguided belief that light colours create glare for neighbours, but “it is texture that creates glare by means of low angle reflectivity. “I have seen massive glare coming off a neighbour’s new black tiled roof, while an older white metal roof has created none,” he says. For most parts of southern Australia, Clarke reckons an enclosed roof space works well, “as long as there is a complex of multi-layered insulation” which uses foil and some bulk insulation in a complementary way.

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In addition to colour, another option is a parasol roof, which is entirely open on all sides and the ridge too, preventing hot air from gathering in the roof space.

“Sadly, we have a couple of case studies that show it does not: you need to shift a huge volume to get the parasol effect, but a parasol may do more harm in winter than it does good in summer, so it’s not the universal solution either.” Another alternative is using cool roof coatings, which come in light colours, right through to dark greys and browns. By definition, cool roof coatings (or paint) have significantly higher reflectivity and emissivity when compared with normal roof materials and coatings , but in the past some suppliers have found themselves in hot water over their claims. In November, Dulux was hit with a $400,000 fine over the temperature reducing claims it made regarding its roof and wall paint. Dulux promoted its heat-reflective roof paint, Infracool as being able to reduce the interior temperature of the living zones of a house by up to 10 degrees and its Weathershield Heat Reflect wall paint as being able to significantly reduce the interior

temperature of a house. The Court found these claims were false or misleading after Dulux admitted that it did not have any reasonable grounds for making those representations.

PUTTING COOL ROOF PAINT TO THE TEST A study conducted by Melbourne Uni and commissioned by the City of Melbourne tested the use of cool or white roof paints and compared them to normal roof materials and coatings. It found for a typical residential building with insulation in the ceiling, the attic space would be up to 18.5°C cooler with the use of cool roof paints. If the insulation is located under the roof, the cool roof paints have only a minor impact on the temperature of the roof space. A typical commercial and industrial building was found to benefit by approximately three per cent in terms of cooling energy reductions, suggesting many older office style buildings would benefit from the use of these products. The study advised buildings with high cooling loads and minimal insulation will receive significant benefits with the use of cool roof paint, while buildings without a significant cooling load, and with typical insulation levels (e.g. residential buildings) can benefit from these products, but it will be sensitive to roof pitch, shading and the level of ceiling insulation. Regardless of which cool roof method used, it is vital to read up on the evidence backing up a material or technique’s claims, and compare the SRI. n

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THE SLIDING DOOR HARDWARE ARCHITECTS USE [WORDS] NICHOLAS RIDER

SERIES 704 SLIDEMASTER BY ARCHITECTURAL WINDOW SYSTEMS The Series 704 Slidemaster Sliding Door is designed to carry large panels and withstand high wind loads. Doors run on heavy-duty double bogey wheel carriages that can carry panels up to 2500mm in width and 3000mm in height, providing commercial scale to residential projects at a residential price point. One of its major visual features of the 704 sliding door is its flat square frame with flat fillers that close off all unwanted recesses to water, dirt and insects.

VA MONO BY VITROCSA Swiss-born architectural door hardware company, Vitrosca is making a real mark in Australia. It’s VA Mono sliding door system is just one from a suite of products being specified by leading Australian architects for award-winning projects. Marston Architects, Smart Design Studio, Durbach Block Jaggers, SJB and Tobias Partners, are a few firms who’ve used Vitrosca sliding doors for projects recently, with the latter choosing the VA Mono for one in Whale Beach, NSW (pictured above) to award-winning success. “The head and footer tracks are beautifully detailed and able to fit superbly flush into floor and ceiling,” says Nick Tobias, founding principal at Tobias Partners.

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“...Our greatest find has been the Vitrocsa Glazing System.” As Tobias notes, all the VA Mono hardware, including tracks and frames, are recessed and hidden within the floor, walls and ceiling allowing just the glazing to be visible. Available with an unlimited number of tracks, the product can accommodate panels that can be installed in a variety of configurations including sliding, fixed and sliding, corner opening, side opening and centre opening panels. The extrusions of VA Mono are made from high-grade aluminium. Photography by Justin Alexander.

A14 BY CENTOR Suited for both internal and external applications, the A14 allows panels up to 175kg and as large as 3mx4m to slide parallel to each other or on a single track. Permitting panels, shutters and screens to be removed and replaced in seconds, A14’s precision bearings mean finger-tip control over the most substantial openings. Simple side-fastening is possible by screwing directly through the head track, and a number of side and head-fix bracket alternatives are possible.

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THE MOTHER OF ALL ROLLERS BY CIILOCK ENGINEERING

TRIP-FREE FLOOR TRACK BY CLEAR EDGE GLASS SYSTEMS

MULTI-TRACK SLIDING DOOR BY WINTEC SYSTEMS

The Mother of All Rollers has been specially designed to ensure smooth operation underneath weightier panels (up to 300kg). The rollers operate upon a ‘self-levelling’ mechanism; instantly activated when the weight of the door is applied to the roller. Each of the three wheels are encased within its own internal supportive structure meaning the unique mechanism balances the weight of the door evenly and intuitively self-adjusts to accommodate any imperfections along the track.

Dig Design chose Clear Edge Glass’ Trip-Free Floor Track for its Beaconsfield Parade project in St Kilda because it allowed seamless integration of floors both inside and outside, with no trip hazard. The track is designed to allow the glass panels to slide entirely along the track, pivot at the exit point and stack completely to the side. It is also easily adjustable to compensate for new build settling by 10mm up and 10mm down.

Wintec Systems Multi-track sliding door system is a stacking slider which incorporates all sashes within the confines of a singular frame. It is available in three and four track versions with two different sill options – a 67mm high performance and a 46mm low profile. It features a hollow sill with a built-in sill baffle for improved water penetration resistance, reduced air infiltration and enhanced acoustic properties. Sills can also be recessed with drainage underneath.

TOMMASLIDE 300 SERIES BY TOMMA

SINGLE RUN 120 BY BRIO

ALLWEATHER BY COWDROY

Tommaslide 300 is a top hung sliding door system for panels up to 300kg. The system features a quality tested compact aluminium track and precision bearings with machined polymer tyres. Tomma was specified for Kew House in Victoria (pictured) by Canny Architecture and is the sliding door hardware of choice for Edge Custom Architectural Glazing who have been specified by the likes of Rothelowman, Woods Bagot and more.

Designed for interior and exterior sliding shutters, the Single Run 120 system from Brio is widely used in lighter commercial and industrial applications. The system can hold up to 120kg in weight, and uses Brio’s proven four-wheel reinforced nylon outer tyre hanger technology with either chrome or stainless steel high-speed precision bearings. The 120 series cast stainless steel hanger makes this a durable solution for high traffic.

Cowdroy’s Allweather sliding door track system is a top-hung system designed for heavy doors up to a massive 240kg or 2500mm. It includes a robust aluminium enclosed track, concave nylon-tyre wheel assemblies and stainless steel components. Its strength comes from its heavyduty four-wheel carriage and wheel assembly. It also features a concealed door stop and optional wall and side fix brackets. Frameless glass door clamps can also be arranged.

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Continue the investigation Additional product, supplier & contractor information from our projects and features

SHADOW HOUSE

TOORAK HOUSE

CHAMFER HOUSE

PROJECT TEAM Architect: Matt Gibson Architecture + Design mattgibson.com.au

PROJECT TEAM Architect: Wood Marsh Architecture woodmarsh.com.au

PROJECT TEAM Architect: Mihaly Slocombe mihalyslocombe.com.au

Interior Design: Mim Design mimdesign.com.au

Fabrication Consultancy: AR-MA Architecture ar-ma.net

Land Surveyor: Dickson Hearn dicksonhaern.com.au

Builder: Warwick Constructions warwickconstructions.com.au

Fabrication & Installation: Craftmetals

Quantity Surveyor: Jonnar Consulting Services

Building Surveyor: BSGM bsgm.com.au

Roof Contractor: ARC Roofing arcroofing.com.au

Engineer: Clive Steele Partners

Completed: 2015

Landscape Consultant: Ben Scott Garden Design benscott.com.au

Photographer: AR-MA & John Gollings gollings.com.au

Structural Engineer: ZS Consulting zsconsulting.com.au Building Surveyor: Lorenzini Group lorenzinigroup.com.au Builder: Basis Builders basisbuilders.com

Photographer: Shannon McGrath shannonmcgrath.com PRODUCTS Standing seam Anthra Zinc, VM Zinc. External venetian blinds, Warema. Watertank 5000L underground water tank, Tankmasta. Bifold doors, Skyrange.

Photographer: Andrew Latreille andrewlatreille.com PRODUCTS Floors Honed bluestone tiled, CDK Stone finished with MN Stain Stop clear seal, Lithofin. Hycraft Carramar 4m carpet finished with Peat, Godfrey Hirst. Spotted gum timber decking, Nullarbor Timber finished with decking oil (clear), Haymes. Walls Cedar shiplapped timber, Existing finished with decking oil (clear), Haymes. Plasterboard finished with paint finish (white). Pressed edge tiles Ceramic (white), National Tiles. Barestone compressed cellulose reinforced sheet, CSR Cemintel. Ceilings Silvertop Ash shiplapped timber, Radial Timber Sales finished with clear seal Windows Victorian Ash timber frames Quantum seal (translucent black), Quantum. Thermotech double glazing with Engerytech low-e film, Viridian.

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LINEAR DRAINS

PERMANENT FORMWORK SYSTEMS

SLIDING DOOR HARDWARE

COOL ROOFS

SUPPLIERS Stormtech architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/stormtech

PERMANENT FORMWORK Dincel architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/dincel-construction-system

SUPPLIERS Architectural Window Systems architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ architectural-window-systems

SUPPLIERS Nutech Paint architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/nutech-paint

Stripgrate architectureanddesign.com.au/ Suppliers/Stripgrate

Ritek architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/ritek-building-solutions

Stainless Steel Drainage & Civil architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ stainless-steel-drainage-civil-pty-ltd

AFS architectureanddesign.com.au/ Suppliers/AFS-Systems-Pty-Ltd-CSR

ACO Drain architectureanddesign.com. au/Suppliers/ACO-Polycrete Aquabocci architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/aquabocc Veitch architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/veitch-stainless-steel

Zego architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/zego Thermacell architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/thermacell Ecoblock architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/eco-block-australia

Vitrocsa Australia architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/vitrocsa-australia

Coolshield International architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ coolshield-international-pty-ltd

Brio architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/brio

Shieldcoat architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/shieldcoat

Centor architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/centor

Globalcote globalcote.com.au

Tomma tomma.com

Solar Cool architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/solar-cool

Ciilock Engineering architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ ciilock-engineering

Astec Paints architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/ astec-paints-australasia-pty-ltd

Cowdroy architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/cowdroy

Regent Paints regentpaints.com.au

Insulbrick insulbrick.com.au CONTRACTORS Misho + Associates misho.com.au Sophie Solomon sophiesolomondesign.com.au

FINISHES Astec architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/astec-paints-australasia-pty-ltd Novatex architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/novatex-products-pty-ltd Dulux Acratex architectureanddesign. com.au/Suppliers/Dulux-AcraTex

Thermaguard thermaguardhrc.com.au Wintec Systems architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/wintec-systems Clear Edge Glass Systems architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/ Clear-Edge-Glass-Systems

Taubmans architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/taubmans

CONTRACTORS Marston Architects marstonarchitects.com.au

Xypex architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/xypex-australia

Smart Design Studio smartdesignstudio.com

Drizoro Maxseal Flex scientificwaterproofingproducts.com.au/ cement-based-coatings/maxseal-flex

Durbach Block Jaggers durbachblockjaggers.com

CONTRACTORS Envirotecture envirotecture.com.au Fergus Scott Architects fergusscottarchitects.com.au Peter Stutchbury Architecture peterstutchbury.com.au Dunn & Hillam Architects dunnhillam.com.au

SJB sjb.com.au CONTRACTORS Lovett Custom Homes lovettcustomhomes.com.au

Tobias Partners tobiaspartners.com Canny Architecture canny.com.au

Cadence & Co cadenceandco.com.au Rothelowman rothelowman.com.au Steele Associates steeleassociates.com.au Woods Bagot woodsbagot.com Reg Lark reglarkarchitect.com.au Dig Design digdesign.net.au Blue Eco Homes blueecohomes.com.au

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ACOUSTICS Design better-sounding spaces in minutes

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COATINGS & FINISHES Fire-rated steel coatings

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DOORS & DOOR HARDWARE Retractable flyscreens

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Fire-rated steel coatings

FLOORS & FLOORING

HEATING Linear gas fireplaces

INSULATION High performance rigid thermoset phenolic insulation

LAMINATES, SOILD SURFACES & VENEERS Custom designed laminate

LANDSCAPING & OUTDOOR Structural framing system for decking, tiles and turf

ROOFING & FITTINGS

SUNCONTROL & SHADES Steel & aluminium slatting, louvres, lattice

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SPECIFY QWICKBUILD® STRUCTURAL FRAMING SYSTEM FOR DECKING, TILES AND TURF 1X SYSTEM / 3X MIX AND MATCH SURFACES The Qwickbuild structural framing system has been developed as a specialist solution for low height decking installations over waterproof membranes, natural ground, concrete slabs and existing tiles or pavers. Qwickbuild is a light-weight yet highly stable, low profile, height adjustable framework providing a proven solution for low height applications. Designed to support hardwood and composite decking, exterior tiles and synthetic turf ranges using hidden interlocking fastenings. The frames are manufactured from corrosion resistant marinegrade, anodized, structural aluminium. Resulting in a straight, rigid, stable structure. Bulky traditional timber frames are replaced with lightweight, durable aluminium modules. Prefabrication of wide-span sub-frames equal fewer footings, slashing costly time on-site. The ranges of commercial and residential profiles are manufactured form part of a complete proprietary system including ventilation grilles, adjustable height pedestals and other accessories. Qwickbuild has been used on a range of exterior projects from commercial roof top decks, apartment complexes, schools and aged care facilities through to simple backyard renovations. Outdure provides a customised design service for all projects including technical advice, concept designs and final detailed structure design and installation details.

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FREEDOM RETRACTABLE SCREENS Freedom Retractable Screens ® are the industry leaders of retrofit retractable fly screens, offering the perfect fusion of style and cutting-edge technology for your home and beyond. Established in Queensland since 1999, Freedom is an Australian manufacturer at the forefront of insect screen technology. With innovative screen solutions for French, bi-fold, sliding stacker doors and pillarless corners, our products are made and defined by style, quality and function. • • • • •

Spans up to 4.5 metres in a single screen and 9 metres in a double Retracts into unobtrusive housing when not in use Excellent wind resistance with our mesh-to-track retention system Exclusive patented brake system 100% Australian designed and manufactured

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EVER ART WOOD® SERIES Beautiful, Japanese made, timber alternative. Covet’s aluminium screens and cladding sets a new benchmark in naturallook timber alternatives. Designed with excellent weather resistance, and performs well to Australian fire standards. Available in a selection of profile sizes, cladding panels, textural surfaces, and unique installation options. +61 3 9398 8128 wecovet.com.au

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NULLIFIRE + WATTYL: A COMPLETE FIRE RATING SUITE For over 40 years, Nullifire has had one unwavering vision: to protect people and buildings from fire. Today we are a market leader in intumescent and fire stopping solutions, not just in Australia, but around the world. And we are proud to have recently partnered with Wattyl Australia whose range of protective top coats are not only compatible with Nullifire’s thin film intumescents, but which enhance the integrity and aesthetics of your steel finishes. Through our exclusive partnership we now offer you access to technical specialists who can help you at all stages of your project: from the specification stage, through design, to supply and finally application. Find out more at www.nullifireaustralia.com.au/arc

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INTRODUCING BEACHCLAD This trending new Cedar Sales product range, in Knotty Grade Western Red Cedar, has a rustic bandsawn face and comes in a range of pre-finished, beach-themed colour washes. Designed to produce the effect of ageweathered or charred timber, BeachClad allows architects and designers to specify rustic, seasoned timber from the outset. BeachClad is available raw, or in one of two statement finishes. Choose from Mist, a silvery grey finish (pictured), or Charred, a dark, warm finish reminiscent of a campfire on the beach. Rustic. Textured. Weathered. Specify BeachClad today.

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NO ORDINARY FIN SYSTEM Fintrax is the patented aluminium linear façade system specifically designed and engineered by Woodform Architectural for large-scale external facades. Typical Fintrax applications are vertical exterior fins to the façade of multistorey carparks or the first six levels of commercial or multiresidential buildings. Size, Shape and Space are the specific elements of Fintrax that enable designers to realise their creative vision. Fintrax profile size options are developed as stackable building blocks that can be combined into virtually any sequence, to allow Freedom of ExpressionTM. A total of 21 ‘building block’ profile extrusions gives you 61 size and shape options to choose from. Fintrax frees you from having to default back to conventional rectangular designs. For more information visit www.woodformarch.com or Freecall 1800 008 828

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DESIGN BETTER-SOUNDING SPACES IN MINUTES • The world’s leading sound modelling app helps you easily design the sound of any room • Listen to any number of sounds inside and outside a virtual room • Simply change the room design and hear the difference immediately • Make perfect acoustic choices and showcase them to clients • An innovative app for your iPad – take it everywhere • Designed by acoustic experts • Very inexpensive – and there’s even a free version • Pro version includes heaps of extra features SoundSoup-Pro and SoundSoup-Free are on the Apple iPad App Store. Download them and try them out – hearing is believing! www.stirfrysoftware.com.au | +61 (0)407 461 100

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SPECIFY POLYSAFE VERONA - OFFERS MORE DECORATIVE CHOICE WHEN IT COMES TO SAFETY FLOORING An innovative and stylish safety flooring, Polysafe Verona from Polyflor is a flooring product with sustainable wet slip resistance. The quartz chip-infused flooring is a vinyl product suitable for areas where spillages are frequent and an issue.

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DTAC STAIR TREADS & EDGING SOLUTIONS DTAC’s range of stair treads and edging have transformed the manner in which you can detail a stair edge, nosing or connection. Completely retrofittable, the DTAC edging series provides a practical approach to prevention and connection. Several designs and finishes are available including solutions for carpeted surfaces.

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ARTIFICIAL UV-RATED GREEN WALL PANELS Green walls are becoming increasingly popular for interior and outdoor use. Artificial green walls are an ideal solution especially in those areas that make living green walls impossible. Evergreen’s hassle free, no maintenance products not only look great but are a fraction of the cost of living walls.

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SLIP RESISTANT AND HYGIENIC ALTRO SAFETY FLOORING Altro’s modern safety flooring meets the highest standards of safety and hygiene. The impervious grout-free surface is slipresistant even when wet and incorporates Altro Easyclean Technology. The Safety Flooring is available in homogenous and heterogenous options.

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SUNPAL® MULTIWALL POLYCARBONATE STANDING-SEAM ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEM SUNPAL Multi is an advanced multiwall polycarbonate panel system that combines proven design, light transmission, thermal insulation and strength. It offers a lightweight, leak-proof design that can withstand very high loads and accommodate expansion and contraction.

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LOPI LINEAR GREENSMART GAS FIREPLACES The Lopi 4415 brings you the very best in home heating and style with its sleek, linear appearance and impressively high heat output. With a glass viewing area of 1060mm, a long row of dancing flames, GreenSmart™ 2 technology and built-in fans, the 4415 is not only an excellent heater but a beautiful focal point in any home.

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LOGIX™ INTEGRATED CEILING SYSTEMS FROM USG BORAL Logix™ Integrated Ceiling Systems from USG Boral offer design freedom and custom ceilings. The systems incorporate a wide range of products from best-in-class suppliers of light fixtures, air diffusers, returns and sprinklers, ensuring an integrated ceiling with superior fit and finish.

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QUICK-STEP PREFINISHED TIMBER FLOORING FROM PREMIUM FLOORS Quick-Step Timber is Australia’s leader in pre-finished timber flooring. It is pre-finished with six coats of hard wearing UV lacquer – SRT Nano, fast and easy to install and maintain, as well as being sold with a Lifetime Structural Warranty and a 25 Year Residential Wear Warranty.

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SPECIFY KINGSPAN KOOLTHERM ® SUPER HIGH PERFORMANCE RIGID THERMOSET PHENOLIC INSULATION The Kingspan Kooltherm® range is an extensive range of super high performance rigid thermoset phenolic insulation for roofs, walls and floors. The range offers some of the most thermally efficient conductivity and thermal performance values available.

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KARNDEAN LOOSELAY FLOORING Karndean LooseLay gives you the intricate designs and grain details you expect from Karndean luxury vinyl, but in a unique format that can be installed quickly and easily in any commercial interior. Featuring an award-winning friction grip backing, the flooring secures firmly to any smooth, clean and dry floor without the need for adhesive.

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GALVIN ENGINEERING PROVIDING SAFE ANTI-LIGATURE OPTIONS FOR MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES

COLORBOND® STEEL AND ALUMINIUM SLATTING, LOUVRES AND LATTICE FROM SUPERIOR SCREENS

Committed to providing market leading tapware and valve designs to suit mental health, rehabilitation and custodial facilities, Galvin Engineering’s Anti-Ligature options range is extensive and high quality.

Superior Screens offer an extensive range of products for privacy, sun control and security solutions. The range extends to include Superior Slatting™, Superior Louvres™, Superior Steel Lattice, Window Screens and Fencing and Gates.

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FLEXIBLE INNOCEIL MODULAR CEILING SYSTEM FROM INNOWOOD AUSTRALIA InnoCeil’s composite timber modular ceiling system is designed to enhance indoor and outdoor applications in commercial and residential settings. The panels achieve a perfectly flat finish or can be shaped into curves that traditional building materials are unable to achieve.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

MINIMALIST DESIGN A RICH PALETTE OF COLOURS – SIGMA50 FLUSH PLATE The Geberit Sigma50 flush plate for Geberit concealed cisterns is available in six different colours. Designed by the lead designer for TAG Heuer the Sigma50 button is elegant, made of high-quality glass and stainless steel.

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CUSTOM DESIGN LAMINATE Wilsonart® Custom Laminate Service offers you the opportunity to uniquely design and create custom laminate for your office space, retail displays, café tables, wall coverings and other areas where company logos or custom work can be used.

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BRADFORD THERMOSEAL ROOF SARKING – A PROTECTIVE SECOND SKIN™ BELOW YOUR ROOF TILES Bradford Thermoseal roof sarking products are installed during construction to form a protective second skin underneath roof tiles. The product helps to protect roof cavities from storm driven rain.

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Infolink | Building Products News, January 2017  
Infolink | Building Products News, January 2017