Page 1

compiled by Ernest Nichols on behalf of Bramham Environmental Group Published 2006 - ÂŁ3


2 CONTENTS Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………....3 Short History of Bramham………………………………………………………………………………………...………..4 Walk 1 (3 miles) A circular walk that covers the Bramham Windmill and the Beck……………..7 Walk 2 (3 miles in total) A linear walk into Bramham Park and back……………………………………………..……...10 Walk 3 (4½ or 9 miles) A linear route through Bramham Park to Thorner, walk back or get the bus…………………………………………………………………………………………….…….…..…...13 Walk 4 (6 or 8½ miles) A circular walk through Bramham Park with two alternate finishes…….…..16 Walk 5 (9½ or 10 miles) A circular walk through Bramham Park to Thorner with two alternate finishes. This is really an extension of Walk 3……………………….…..19 Walk 6 (5 miles) A circular walk past the Windmill, down Heygate Lane and back past Headley Hall and down Headley Lane……………………..………………………………23 Walk 7 (8 miles which can be shortened to 6½ if necessary) A circular walk taking in Boston Spa, the Ebor Way, The Wharfe and back via Heygate Lane…………………………………………...26 Walk 8 (10 miles can be shortened to 8½ if necessary) A circular walk which is really an extension of Walk 7 but also taking in Newton Kyme………………………………………………………………….31 Walk 9 (5½ or 11 miles) Walk to Wetherby and back! Or get the bus back if you must…..34 Cycle Ride (10 miles) Circular ride to Compton and back…………………………………………………….38


3

INTRODUCTION The intention from the outset was to write a book of walks that could be taken without the need of a map, and every care has been taken to ensure that the instructions are clear and correct without burdening the reader with too much detail. Some walks are simply an extension of another walk but if appropriate the whole walk has been reproduced to save having to continually refer backwards and forwards. It is accepted that mistakes do occur and apologies are offered in advance to anyone who has felt that a walk has been spoilt by incorrect or insufficient information. All the walks can be identified on the OS Explorer Map 289 and some of you may feel more comfortable taking this along with you. Better still the Village Plan contains a map that covers virtually all the walks apart from the furthest part of the long ones. From the narrative you should easily be able to trace the route. For ease of reference for walkers who may not be familiar with Bramham, all the walks start and finish at the War Memorial in the Village Square. This is also very convenient for the local bus. There are a total of 9 walks varying in length from 3 miles to 11 miles, and also included is a bike ride of 10 miles although an off road bike is recommended. All the routes were walked or ridden in 2005.

Acknowledgement Although I have walked the walks, written the notes and taken the photographs, the book in its present form would not have been possible without Gillian Young, who has spent a tremendous amount of time keeping things in order, including me! Many thanks.

Ernest Nichols


4

A SHORT HISTORY OF BRAMHAM Roman Times

Bramham was important mainly due to its location. In Roman times it sat at the junction of their main north/south and east/ west trading routes. North/south was of course the Great North Road and east/west the direct route from York to Ilkley. Not only was it important because of its location on these trading routes but also because it was situated on a significant limestone ridge which contains some of the best quality building stone not only in the area, but in the country as a whole. There were numerous Roman Villas built in the area using the stone but unfortunately there are few remains. Just how prized this limestone was can be judged by the fact that it was used to build Roman York, York Minster and subsequent repairs, Kings College Cambridge and Westminster. Unfortunately there are few written records for this period, but things change when we move into the Saxon period.

Saxon Times

The oval shaped Churchyard is a permanent reminder of Bramham's Saxon heritage, which was confirmed by the discovery of several Saxon artifacts in the 1930’s. Bramham’s prominence at this time can be judged by the fact that a high value was placed on it in the Domesday Survey of 1086.

The Influence of the Church

There was a long association with Nostel Priory, land being granted to them in 1126, and the village remained under its influence for around 400 years. Bramham’s status can again be judged, as Nostel Priory regarded it as its most valued possession. During this period there were significant structural changes to the Church.

- continued on page 5


5

The Wars of the Roses

During the Wars of the Roses the bloodiest battle ever fought on British soil was at Towton, near Tadcaster, on the 29 th March 1461 when over 30,000 men were killed. Many survivors of the battle took refuge in the surrounding villages and it is believed that some of the dead were buried in a communal grave in All Saints churchyard.

The Civil War

The Civil War ranged over the Bramham area. Fairfax had residences in the vicinity, one being the now Tadcaster Grammar School and Cromwell is reported to have trained his troops on Bramham Moor. The climax to the Civil War came in 1644 at the battle of Marston Moor near Tockwith and Church records at the time show that victims of the battle were buried at All Saints. The records even show their names.

Bramham Moor

Although the main wars were over Bramham was vastly different from what we see today. When looking at the rural scene around the village it is hard to believe that before the 1800’s Bramham Moor was regarded as a wild and desolate place, the haunt of footpads and highwaymen. The dip in Toulston Road on the way to Tadcaster was particularly notorious for highwaymen, so on a dark night with a mist in the hollow, keep your eyes open!

More Settled Times

Bramham was very much a stopping place for travellers on the Great North Road and had many Coaching Inns and also some houses of ill repute. There are still three Inns in the village today. The village continued to grow along with the importance of the A1 and in 1860 its population was just over 1300. Surprisingly this figure was not exceeded until after 1970. The development of Bramham reached its peak in the 1800’s, possibly saved from excessive development by the major landowners in the area. Few villages will have so many large houses close to them and in Victorian times there were no fewer than 70 Gentlemen’s Residences in the area. - continued on page 6


6 From 1840 to 1870 the village had four schools including the prestigious Bramham College which was situated just inside the grounds of Bramham Park.

More Recent Times

The next major change occurred in 1960 when the first by-pass was built and this will have been a significant improvement to the environment even at 1960 traffic levels. With virtually no passing traffic however the shopkeepers will certainly have suffered, as they would have had to rely almost solely on customers from the village. There used to be several shops including a fish and chip shop, all sadly long gone.

Bramham Today

We now jump 45 years, but in all honesty there have been few major changes. Hopefully this will continue and the character of this Historic Village will be preserved.

Further Information

It has been hard to keep the Bramham Story short but hopefully this very small taste of the history of the Village will have intrigued readers enough to want to carry out some research of their own. For those who would like to know more there is a wealth of additional information in the archives, the Church records and The Bramham Web Site www.bramham.org.uk. The web site is not limited to “Things Historical“ but also includes entries for Schools, Sports, Local Trades people and other useful information.

Acknowledgement Although I have carried out some research myself, the vast majority of the historical information has come from the book "Bramham the Village in Times Past". I am very grateful for being allowed to use, all be it a small amount, of the information contained in this very comprehensive historical study of the village. Unfortunately the book is now out of print but there must be numerous copies in the village and well worth trying to locate on e.


7

WALK 1 THIS CAN BE 1½, 2½ OR 3 MILES DEPENDING ON HOW YOU FEEL. CHOICES CAN BE MADE AT TWO DIFFERENT PLACES. A NICE STARTER WALK FOR CHILDREN OR ONE TO WORK UP AN APPETITE FOR, OR RECOVER FROM, SUNDAY LUNCH. With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your left make your way up the village. At the first junction, the road to the right, Town Hill, is a bit more direct but steeper, the one to the left, Low Way, will take you past the Church. (The house on the junction used to be a shop selling general provisions and boots and shoes, it also used to be the Post Office). If you choose the left option, when you reach the Church you can take the left or right hand route round it, Vicarage Lane or Back Lane, as they both end up in the same place. Either way continue going uphill until you come to the junction with Aberford Road. Turn left and at the corner go down Windmill Road. After about 200 yards take the turning to the right, this is Heygate Lane although not signed.

HERE

YOU HAVE A CHOICE.

If you have already had enough or the Sunday Roast may burn you can continue with a quick sprint down Windmill Road for about half a mile to a cottage on the left. You will need to read a bit further to find out where to go from there. Even if you are rushing down Windmill Road do take time at the crest of the hill to look at the view ahead. In the distance the North Yorkshire Moors are to the far right and the Hambleton Hills just to the right. On a clear day you can even see the White Horse at Kilburn, some 25 miles away as the crow flies.


8

WALK 1 -

continued

For those choosing the more scenic route carry on down Heygate Lane. There are usually flocks of Yellow Hammers in the hedges, so watch out for them, you really can’t miss them they are so bright. The next choice comes at the wooden cross road sign about ¾ of a mile down the road. You can turn left here or go onto the next sign to the left. Going onto the next sign adds about ½ a mile to the walk. Whichever route you take you will arrive back on Windmill Road. For the longer route turn left until you come to a cottage on the right where you will meet up with those who have taken the shorter route and also those rushing down the hill for their Sunday Lunch! Pass to the left of the cottage and cross the stream by a fairly wide bridge (this is Carr Beck although the same one that runs through Bramham.) Please remember that this route is not a public right of way but a well used path. The path veers to the left and a less defined path turns left towards the stream. You can, therefore, walk close to the stream or further into the woods. If you approach the stream carefully and quietly you may be lucky enough to spot some small brown trout. Both paths eventually join up, about half a mile, and exit the wood into Clifford Road near the school. Turn left and follow the road back to the Square. If you are a bit bored with the road you can take the second turning on the left, New Road, towards the Church and then take the first turning to the right, Low Way, back to the square.


9

BRAMHAM WINDMILL

Built as a Corn Mill in the late 1600's, it was in use for about 150 years but was damaged in a storm and lost its sails around 1800. Subsequently it has been used as a Water Pumping Station and as a Watch Tower during the Second World War.

To put these dates into perspective:The Great Fire of London was in 1666. Christopher Wren started building St Paul's Cathedral in 1675 and

The building of Castle Howard started in 1699


10

WALK 2 THIS IS A LINEAR WALK OF JUST OVER 1½ MILES EACH WAY WHICH CAN BE EXTENDED TO MAKE :1) 2) 3)

A LINEAR WALK OF 4½ MILES EACH WAY (WALK 3) A CIRCULAR WALK OF 6 OR 8½ MILES (WALK 4) A CIRCULAR WALK OF 9½ OR 10 MILES (WALK 5) THIS WALK IS PARTICULARLY SUITED TO

CHILDREN AS THERE IS QUITE A LOT TO SEE AND LOOK

OUT FOR ON THE WAY.

With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your right turn left and make your way towards the house with the large horse on the front ( This used to be the Bay Horse Pub ). Turn left up Alms House Hill, yes there did used to be an Alms House. As you climb the hill keep looking back as the view opens up. You then realise just how high the ridge above the village is. Carry on for about ¼ of a mile until you reach a main junction. Aberford Road. Turn right and after about 200 yards look out for a path on the left verge. Take this path and then cross the motorway towards Bowcliffe Hall. Bowcliffe Hall was built in the early 1800’s and one of its more famous owners was Robert Blackburn who was Chairman of the Blackburn Aircraft Company based in Leeds. He is also well remembered as the founder of Scarcroft Golf Club, which has various items of memorabilia in the Club House. Follow the road round and into Bramham Park. As you will probably know Harewood House started a programme of breeding Red Kites and you stand about a 50% chance of seeing one on the walk as some have made their home in Bramham Park. You really cannot miss them as they have a very large forked tail and an adult has a wing span of around five feet. They just seem to drift along with an occasional flap of the wings. Birds of prey are often criticised for killing other birds but the Kites feed mainly on carrion ,so they are quite Eco friendly.


11

WALK 2

— continued

The first large building that you come to is Bramham Biggin (see page 12 for more information ) Follow the signed path to the left passed the farm on the left and carry on through two gates until you come to a T junction, about ž of a mile. By then you should have seen the temple over to your left which is your destination, so just follow the path. If you take this walk around the end of June, dependent on the weather, there should be almost a carpet of wild orchids in front of the Temple. It is really worth having a close look as they are quite special, but picking them totally destroys the plant so take care. Retrace your steps back to Bramham again keeping a look out for the Red Kites.

BRAMHAM PARK TEMPLE


12

BRAMHAM BIGGIN

In medieval times a small Monastery housing monks from Nostel Priory was located on the site as Bramham came very much under the influence of the Priory. The current house has been the home of many famous families including the Gascoigne's and Fairfax's. In the mid 1800’s it was leased to Dr Haigh who extended it substantially to form Bramham College. The college was very popular and attracted the sons of many leading Yorkshire families. The school went into decline after a Cholera epidemic in 1869 and never recovered. The school was demolished in the 1900’s leaving the Biggin once more in its original state.


13

WALK 3 A PLEASANT LINEAR WALK OF AROUND 4½ MILES THROUGH BRAMHAM PARK AND ONTO THORNER. RETRACE YOUR STEPS BACK TO BRAMHAM OR CATCH THE BUS OR IF YOU ARE FEELING ARTICULARLY ENERGETIC HAVE A LOOK AT WALK 5.

Follow Walk 2 to the Temple in Bramham Park, certainly have a look round but then continue along the track following the signs. You really cannot go wrong but just in case !   

First junction go right Second junction go left Third junction go left

At the next junction turn right and walk down the edge of the plantation. After about 300 yards the track turns to the right into the plantation, at this point you go straight ahead with the electricity pylon on your left, on a narrow indistinct path which is not signed. After a few yards you will reach a fence and stile, cross the fence into Mangrill Lane ( not signed ). Almost opposite but slightly to the right you will see a very dilapidated footpath sign ( yes it has been reported to LCC ). Crossing this field should be easy but in July 2005 the farmer had planted oil seed rape across it. Previous walkers had trampled it down to some extent but it was still hard work. LCC have been informed so things may improve !! The route is not that difficult to make out and you should be moving on a slight diagonal to the right of the power lines. The markers on this section are tall poles with yellow tops and therefore very easy to see. Having fought your way to the first marker post things become a lot easier. The path goes straight ahead with the hedge on your left, diagonally right at the next marker again with the hedge on your left. When the hedge finishes you should see the next marker straight ahead, where you turn left.


14

WALK 3

- continued

A few yards on you pass the Trig Point at 110 metres, there are some quite extensive views from here. The markers are very distinct but again just in case !   

Keep the hedge on your left. At the end of hedge the marker is straight ahead across the field. Diagonally across the field to the next marker.

Down the side of the field to the next marker, a bit hidden but at the side of a large tree. This then directs you into Elleker Lane (not signed) and you are now on the ”Leeds Country Way”. Turn right and after about 100 yards left by the side of a housing estate. Straight on, down Kirk Hill and after about 300 yards, on a bend to the right, straight on down a marked Bridleway to the road. Down the road, following it round to the right until you reach a junction where you turn left into the Main Street. About 200 yards on your right is the Village Shop that sells virtually everything including sandwiches. Thorner is a very old village going back to Roman Times and well worth a wander around. At the far end of the village you will find the well known Thorner Ford.

DECISIONS 

NOW HAVE TO BE MADE:-

Retrace your steps back to Bramham. or

Catch the bus back to Bramham, the stop is next to the Village Shop and at the time of writing ran every half hour so you should never have long to wait.

Grit your teeth and continue with Walk 5.

or


15

THORNER FORD

THORNER CHURCH


16

WALK 4 WALK 2 TO MAKE A CIRCULAR BRAMHAM AND THERE ARE TWO ALTERNATIVE FINISHES. THE TOTAL WALK IS 6 MILES ON ALTERNATE 1 AND 8½ MILES ON ALTERNATE 2. NOT RECOMMENDED FOR YOUNG CHILDREN AS THERE IS ABOUT 1½ MILES ON THE ROAD. SIMPLY AN EXTENSION OF

WALK BACK TO

Follow Walk 2 to the temple in Bramham Park and then continue along the track following the signs. You really cannot go wrong, but just in case !   

First junction go right. Second junction go left. Third junction go left.

At the next junction turn right and walk down the edge of the plantation. After about 300 yards the track turns to the right into the plantation, at this point you go straight ahead with the electricity pylon on your left, on a narrow indistinct path which is not signed. After a few yards you will reach a fence and a stile, cross the fence into Mangrill Lane ( not signed). Turn right and follow the track until you reach the main Bramham Road. Turn right and follow the road back to Bramham. On a sharp bend to the right, about ¾ mile, a road goes to the left, Thorner Lane.

AT (1)

THIS POINT YOU CAN MAKE A CHOICE:-

Continue on following the road to the right and after crossing the motorway, turn left to make your way back to the Square. or

(2)

Add another 2½ miles to the walk by turning left, this saves about ½ a mile of road walking.


17

WALK 4

- continued

Turning left, the road ”Thorner Lane” is signed to Rigton and Wothersome, just on the left was the Medieval Village of Wothersome but unfortunately there are no remains. Continue down the road for about ½ a mile where at the end of a plantation on your right you will see a bridle way sign, take this track. Don’t worry when the main track peters out there is still a good path and the next turn off is a good 1½ miles down the track. Eventually you join a main track coming from the left but you keep straight on for about 30 yards where there is a footpath sign on the right, slightly hidden by the hedge. Take this path. The track is well signed and it is more or less a straight route to the motorway. You eventually cross a stile, turn right and walk along the side of the motorway. Over the motorway bridge, there are actually some good all round views albeit a bit noisy. Cross the parking area, turn right, and follow the well marked footpath signs. After about ½ a mile you will see a stile on the left, cross this and follow the path with the hedge on your left. Again the signs are very clear, so just follow them. There are actually numerous tracks across the field where people have wandered about, but keep to the signs and you will eventually exit into a lane. Turn right down the lane passing the School on your left and exit into Clifford Road. Turn right and then take the second turning on the left, New Road , and then the next right down Low Way back to the Square.


18

ALL SAINTS' CHURCH BRAMHAM

This is the oldest building in the village and was built around 1150. Under the influence of Nostell Priory it was enlarged from a small unaisled building with a tower to its current shape with two aisles and a spire. The Lych Gate is very much younger dating from 1902. Its history goes back to Saxon Times, artifacts having been found in the Church yard, which is also the resting place for victims of the Wars of the Roses and the Civil War. Not without its disasters it has survived two lightning strikes and a serious fire. This of necessity is a very short history and for those of you who would like to do a little more research the Church records are full of interesting information.


19

WALK 5 WALK 3 TO MAKE IT A BRAMHAM. THERE ARE TWO ALTERNATIVE FINISHES. THE TOTAL WALK IS 9½ MILES ON ALTERNATE 1 AND 10 MILES ON ALTERNATE 2 REALLY AN EXTENSION OF

CIRCULAR WALK BACK TO

Follow Walk 3 up to the Village Shop in Thorner. Just before the shop is a footpath sign. Take this and continue, passing through two gates, up to the main road. Turn right and then at a sharp bend to the right, about 200 yards, take the path to the left, you are now back on the Leeds Country Way. Just simply follow the path, across two fields, you can’t go wrong, passing Oakland Manor on your left. At the end of the Manor turn right to meet the main road.

HERE

YOU CAN MAKE YOUR CHOICE

:-

Alternate 1 Turn right up the hill to a large grass triangle at a junction, about 300 yards. Keep left and then shortly after the junction take the track to the right, Kennels Lane, ( not signed ). There is a public footpath sign on the right of the track but very overgrown. Straight on, look out for the “ Gallop “ on your left. After about a mile the path turns sharply to the left but carry straight on for a few yards and then turn right down to the stream. Follow the path above the stream, ignoring the right turns down to the stream, until after about ½ a mile there is a significant fork to the right down to a small lake. Follow the track with the lake on your right and climb up to the main road opposite the entrance to Bramham Park.


20

WALK 5

- continued

HERE

YOU HAVE TWO OPTIONS:-

1)

Turn left and follow the road back to Bramham, about 1¼ miles, turning left after crossing the motorway to make your way back to the square.

2)

Turn right, this cuts the road walking from 1¼ to ¾ of a mile but adds about another 2 miles to the walk as you are in effect retracing the outward route through Bramham Park.

After ¾ of a mile on a right hand bend take the track to your left, you are now back on Mangrill Lane. Follow the track with the plantation on your left, and just before the plantation finishes, about ¾ a mile, you will see the stile on you left that you crossed on the outward route. Cross the stile and retrace your steps back to Bramham. Alternate 2 Turn left down the hill ignoring the footpath sign on the left until in about ¼ of a mile you arrive at a white house on your right. Turn right ,signed public footpath to Scarcroft. After a short distance there is a footpath sign on the left, cross over the wall and follow the clear path with a hedge on your right. You really cannot go wrong !! Just follow the path over a stream with some ponds on your left. Emerge from the trees at the corner of a field and follow the path straight ahead with the hedge on your right. Carry on until you join a large track about a ¼ of a mile. Turn right, to the left is the Leeds Country Way. You are on this track for about ½ a mile, and just before reaching the trees ahead you will see some unusual mounds over to your right. This is Pompocali an old Roman settlement. You will be able to look at this later.


21

WALK 5

- continued

Carry on until you reach a bridge over a stream. This is a good spot for a rest and also a great place for children to mess about, as the stream is very safe at this point. Over the bridge and follow the path to the right. Fairly shortly there is a stile on the right which will give you access to Pompocali. There is not much to see but the setting gives a good idea of why they might have chosen it, and also the two small streams running into the main one are in fact springs. Back on the original track, which is actually the course of a Roman Road, follow it up to a wooden gate on Milnar Lane. Straight across, signed public bridleway. Follow the track towards a wood but on the way the views open up and to the left you can even see the White Horse at Kilburn. Into the woods, no turn off, just follow the main track at the edge of the wood until you reach a T junction, in total about a mile. Turn right and after a few yards take the left fork. Just follow the main path and at a corner ignore the small path coming in from the right. Keep on the track to the next junction where the path goes to the right downhill to a lake on your right. Down here and up the other side to exit into Bramham Road opposite the entrance to Bramham Park.

HERE

YOU HAVE TWO OPTIONS:-

1)

Turn left and follow the road back to Bramham, about 1¼ miles, turning left after crossing the motorway to make your way back to the square.

2)

Turn right, this cuts the road walking from 1¼ to ¾ of a mile but adds about another 2 miles to the walk as you are in effect retracing the outward route through Bramham Park.


22

WALK 5

- continued

After 他 of a mile on a right hand bend take the track to your left, you are now back on Mangrill Lane. Follow the track with the plantation on your left, and just before the plantation finishes, about 他 a mile, you will see the stile on your left that you crossed on the outward route. Cross the stile and retrace your steps back to Bramham.

MANGRILL LANE


23

WALK 6 A CIRCULAR WALK OF APPROXIMATELY SOME FAR REACHING VIEWS AND

5

MILES WITH

A BIT OF HISTORY.

With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your left make your way up the village. At the first junction, the road to the right, Town Hill, is a bit more direct but steeper, the one to the left, Low Way, will take you past the Church. (The house on the junction used to be a shop selling general provisions and boots and shoes, it also used to be the Post Office.) If you choose the left option, when you reach the Church you can take the left or right hand route round it, Vicarage Lane or Back Lane, as they both end up in the same place. Either way continue uphill until you come to the junction with Aberford Road. Turn left and at the corner go down Windmill Road. After about 200 yards take the turning to the right, this is Heygate Lane although not signed. Carry on down Heygate Lane. There are usually flocks of Yellow Hammers in the hedges, so watch out for them, you really can’t miss them they are so bright. When you reach the wooden cross road sign about ¾ of a mile down the road you have a choice :If you must, bail out by turning left and complete Walk 1 !! But seriously! You can turn right across the field and into the wood, and then follow the path to the left until you reach the main track again. This field is regularly ploughed and, if it is, a crossing is not recommended in wet weather as the mud is bad enough to suck your boots off! On exiting the wood turn right along the track. This shortens the walk by about ½ a mile.


24

WALK 6

- continued

If you decide against this, carry on down the main track, turn right at the gate and then at the next T junction right, again. On the left you will see a large footpath sign with a stile. The farm to the left is Oglethorpe Hall Farm.

WALKS 7

AND

8

CONTINUE FROM HERE.

Your route is still down the main track which now goes behind the wood that you were contemplating at the X road sign. You can see the exit from the wood. You now start to climb but do take time to look back as the view unfolds. Way to the right are the Yorkshire Moors and just to your right the Hambleton Hills complete with the White Horse. Continue along the track until you reach the main road. This road is interesting to the extent that it was the route of the main Roman road from York to Ilkley. Cross the road into Warren Lane and climb the hill. Again pause at the top to take in the view, it's hard to believe that you are only 64 metres above sea level. To the left is a quarry with quite a history (See page 37 for more information.) It's usually best to avoid roads if possible, but sometimes needs must, and the views make it quite a pleasant stretch. Continue down the road past the houses on the left and then follow the footpath sign to the right, this is Headley lane although not signed. Before turning you will see a sign for Headley Hall. This was originally built in the 16th century and eventually sold to Leeds University School of Agriculture. On land behind the Hall was the Bramham Moor/ Tadcaster aerodrome which operated from 1916 to 1919.


25

WALK 6

- continued

At the end of Headley Lane you arrive at the main Aberford Road. You have three choices to get back to the square :  

Straight across and down Freely Lane Turn left then right and right again Turn right and then take the 2nd or 3rd turning on the left

OGLETHORPE FARM


26

WALK 7 THIS

IS A REALLY GOOD CIRCULAR WALK WITH MANY

CHANGES OF SCENERY AND POINTS OF INTEREST.

TOTAL A WALK OF TO

8

IN

MILES WHICH CAN BE SHORTENED

DEPENDING ON HOW YOU FEEL ON THE DAY.

With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your right, turn right and walk towards the Garage. Look out for the ramp on your right going down to the stream, this is where cattle were taken to drink. Really nice to see that it has been preserved. Turn right at the Garage down Clifford Road and continue until the school comes into sight. More or less opposite the entrance to the school look out for a gap in the hedge on the right. This route is not signed as it is not a right of way but a well used path. Follow the path through the woods. At a fork you can go straight on but if you take the right fork you can walk quite close to the stream and if you do you may be lucky enough to see some small brown trout. In about ½ mile either route brings you to a fairly wide bridge over the stream. Cross over the stream and exit the woods into Windmill Road. Turn left and at the sharp bend just after the “ Road Narrows “sign take the signed path to the right. After about 300 yards on a bend, go left over a stile, not signed, and follow the path round the edge of the field over the next stile and down to the road, this is Bar Lane. Turn left and just after the bridge over the beck you will see a footpath sign on the right. Over the stile and follow the path close to the stream over a further three stiles. When you see some ponds on the right the route may seem a bit confusing but you are heading towards the farm on the right. Over a small bridge, through the farm yard and into the main road.


27

WALK 7

- continued

Turn left and just after the 30 mph sign look out for a narrow lane on the right, Wharfeside. Although it says private road it is a right of way for walkers. Down this lane to the river. You are now on the Ebor Way, a long distance path from Leeds to York and will follow this for some way. Perhaps this is a good one to try as the next challenge, you can always do a stop over at Bramham on the way. But enough of the next challenge, turn right and follow the path over a stream and after about ½ mile into a wood. The section of river bank between the stream and the woods is a particularly pleasant place for a rest or refreshments. In the woods climb the steps and pass the old water works on the right and straight on under the disused Railway Bridge. Continue to follow the path by the river bank, there is usually a large pebble beach for children to mess about on if the water is not too high. You will then come to a stile leading into a sunken Lane. Although it looks easier, do not be tempted to stay this side of the stile and walk up the field, firstly because its private land and, secondly you will miss the chance of walking a bit of history.

RUDGATE (OLD ROMAN ROAD)


28

WALK 7

- continued

The sunken lane is Rudgate an old Roman road that ran up to Boroughbridge and forded the river at this point. There was a Roman Fort a short distance down stream although there are no remains. Continue up Rudgate until you meet the main road.

WALK 8

CONTINUES FROM HERE

Just before you reach the main road look out for the house on the right that has an unusual wind vane, you will understand its significance fairly shortly. Cross over the road and continue up the lane opposite, still Rudgate. You will soon cross the disused railway cutting, hence the wind vane, what a pity the rail tracks were not seen as potential paths when the lines were closed. The Harland Way from Wetherby to Spofforth gives some idea of what things could have been like. Continue along the road to the X roads at the bottom of the hill and turn right. Along the lane past the Barn conversion on the left and over one of the most elegant stiles that you are ever likely to see. Over the stile continue past the ponds on your left, over another unelegant! stile and past the ponds on your right, to a further stile. Over the stile turn right towards the farm and then left before you reach the barn. There are small signs but a bit decrepit. Follow the path round the edge of the field, you should be able to see the Bramham Windmill by now. Over a stile on the left along the edge of the field and over the next stile. At the next stile you enter a wide track and choices can be made.

TO

SHORTEN THE WALK TURN RIGHT AND THEN LEFT AND COMPLETE

TURN

WALK 6

IN REVERSE.

LEFT TO COMPLETE THE FULL ROUND.


29

WALK 7 - continued Your route is still down the main track and as you start to climb do take time to look back as the view unfolds. Way to the right are the Yorkshire Moors and just to your right the Hambleton Hills complete with the White Horse. Continue along the track until you reach the main road. This road is interesting to the extent that it was the route of the main Roman road from York to Ilkley. Cross the road into Warren Lane and climb the hill. Again pause at the top to take in the view, its hard to believe that you are only 64 metres above sea level. To the left is a quarry with quite a history (see page 37 for more information ). It's usually best to avoid roads if possible, but sometimes needs must, and the views make it quite a pleasant stretch. Continue down the road past the houses on the left and then follow the footpath sign to the right, this is Headley lane although not signed. Before turning you will see a sign for Headley Hall. This was originally built in the 16th century and eventually sold to Leeds University School of Agriculture. On land behind the Hall was the Bramham Moor/ Tadcaster aerodrome which operated from 1916 to 1919. At the end of Headley Lane you arrive at the main Aberford Road. You have three choices to get back to the square :  

Straight across and down Freely Lane. Turn left then right and right again. Turn right and then take the 2nd or 3rd turning on the left.


30

NEWTON KYME HALL

Newton Kyme is a very old village going back to Roman Times but in the Domesday Survey it is noted as the “New Town” to distinguish it from the Old Town, Tadcaster (Calcaria ). The walls of the Castle were five feet thick but there is little left and clearly it did not stand the test of time. The Manor passed to the Fairfax’s in 1602 and they remained in the Hall for 275 years. The original Hall was Medieval but the current one was built in the early 1700’s. The Church is very old, the first vicar being recorded in 1289. It contains the Chapel of the Fairfax’s with its many memorial slabs.


31

WALK 8 AN

EXCELLENT CIRCULAR WALK OF

8½ IF THE FULL MUCH. THIS IS WALK 7 WITH NEWTON KYME WITHOUT DOUBT

BE SHORTENED TO

WALK AS IT INCORPORATES

10

MILES WHICH CAN

ROUND IS A BIT TOO A LOOP THROUGH THE BEST CIRCULAR

A RIVER, HISTORY, OLD

VILLAGES,AND A BIT OF GEOLOGY.

FOLLOW WALK 7

TO WHERE MARKED

REMAINS OF THE CASTLE

Turn left and follow the road to the next left turn, Croft Lane and head for Newton Kyme. At the T junction go straight on towards the Church, and through the gate on the right signed Ebor Way. Before continuing do take time to have a look around the village there really are some beautiful old buildings. The path is easy to follow from here but at the end of the church grounds do not veer to the left but go straight on towards the river. Newton Kyme Hall on the left always seems more like an American Plantation House rather than the usual “Halls” that you see in the area, a really elegant building. When you reach the river turn right and follow the path downstream for about a mile, over a small stream, for some reason protected by two stiles. The twists and turns in the river are very unusual, but don’t be tempted to take a more direct route, the walk by the river is far more pleasant. Going around the bends seems forever but you eventually arrive at an other stream and bridge. Cross the bridge , turn right and make your way up to the main road.


32

WALK 8

- continued

Cross the road and up the access road opposite, signed public footpath, over the route of the old railway track and up the hill. Turn right in front of the house at the top and follow the road round to the left, the views are now starting to open up. The road eventually turns into a track that runs along the side of a wood. As you exit the wood there are some lovely views to the right particularly far reaching on a clear day. You are now on the Limestone Ridge which is famous for providing some of the best building stone in the country. You will pass a quarry shortly, although this one does not produce the top quality Building Limestone. Continue along the track until you come to the road and then turn right. Road walking is usually to be avoided but this is Rudgate, the Old Roman Road, so you are walking a bit of history again. Perhaps its not too hard to visualise the Legions marching along to ford the river and then on to Boroughbridge and Carlisle. Now that is a walk especially with only a pair of sandals on your feet !! Fortunately you do not go that far and soon you will see the X roads at the bottom of the hill, about 他 of a mile, where you turn left. Along the lane past the Barn conversion on the left and over one of the most elegant stiles that you are ever likely to see. Over the stile continue past the ponds on your left, over another un elegant! stile and past the ponds on your right, to a further stile. Over the stile turn right towards the farm and then left before you reach the barn. There are small signs but a bit decrepit. Follow the path round the edge of the field, you should be able to see the Bramham Windmill by now. Over a stile on the left along the edge of the field and over the next stile. At the next stile you enter a wide track and choices can be made.

TO

SHORTEN THE WALK TURN RIGHT AND THEN LEFT AND COMPLETE

TURN

WALK 6

IN REVERSE.

LEFT TO COMPLETE THE FULL ROUND.


33

WALK 8

- continued

Your route is still down the main track and as you start to climb do take time to look back as the view unfolds. Way to the right are the Yorkshire Moors and just to your right the Hambleton Hills complete with the White Horse. Continue along the track until you reach the main road. This road is interesting to the extent that it was the route of the main Roman road from York to Ilkley. Cross the road into Warren Lane and climb the hill. Again pause at the top to take in the view, it's hard to believe that you are only 64 metres above sea level. To the left is a quarry with quite a history (See page 37 for more information ). It's usually best to avoid roads if possible, but sometimes needs must, and the views make it quite a pleasant stretch. Continue down the road past the houses on the left and then follow the footpath sign to the right, this is Headley lane although not signed. Before turning you will see a sign for Headley Hall. This was originally built in the 16th century and eventually sold to Leeds University School of Agriculture. On land behind the Hall was the Bramham Moor/ Tadcaster aerodrome which operated from 1916 to 1919. At the end of Headley Lane you arrive at the main Aberford Road. You have three choices to get back to the square :  

Straight across and down Freely Lane. Turn left then right and right again. Turn right and then take the 2nd or 3rd turning on the left.


34

WALK 9 ALTHOUGH THIS IS A LINEAR WALK OF 5½ MILES TO WETHERBY IT COULD BE CALLED THE “ECO FRIENDLY WALK“. YOU CAN LEAVE YOUR CAR AT HOME DO YOUR SHOPPING IN WETHERBY, ITS AMAZING HOW MUCH A RUCKSACK WILL HOLD, EVEN A SMALL ONE, AND THEN GET THE BUS BACK TO BRAMHAM. YOU COULD BE “SUPER ECO FRIENDLY” AND WALK BACK!!! With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your right, turn right and walk towards the Garage. Look out for the ramp on your right going down to the stream, this is where cattle were taken to drink. Really nice to see that it has been preserved. Turn right at the Garage down Clifford Road and continue until the school comes into sight. More or less opposite the entrance to the school look out for a gap in the hedge on the right. This route is not signed as it is not a right of way but a well used path. Follow the path through the woods. At a fork you can go straight on but if you take the right fork you can walk quite close to the stream, and if you do, you may be lucky enough to see some small brown trout. In about ½ a mile, either route brings you to a fairly wide bridge over the stream. Cross over the stream and exit the woods into Windmill Road. Turn left and at the sharp bend just after the “ Road Narrows “sign take the signed path to the right. After about 300 yards on a bend, go left over a stile, not signed and follow the path round the edge of the field over the next stile and down to the road, this is Bar Lane. Turn left and just after the bridge over the beck you will see a footpath sign on the right. Over the stile and follow the path close to the stream over a further three stiles. When you see some ponds on the right the route may seem a bit confusing but you are heading towards the farm on the right. Over a small bridge, through the farm yard and into the main road.


35

WALK 9

- continued

Turn left and just after the 30 mph sign look out for a narrow lane on the right, Wharfeside. Although it says private road it is a right of way for walkers. Down this lane to the river. Turn left and follow the path upstream. All the walk from here to Wetherby is on the Ebor Way. The small houses that you pass on the right are on the site of the spring, now capped off, from which Boston Spa obtained its Spa status. Just after the houses the path forks but take the right hand one signed Ebor Way. You cross the river by the bridge but if you would like a rest there are a number of benches on the way and a picnic area on the left if you follow the path under the bridge. The weir is quite spectacular because you can get so close to it if you walk a bit further upstream. It adds very little distance to the walk and is well worth the effort. Over the Bridge and straight on past the Pax Inn and the x roads for about ¾ of a mile until you see a sign on the left, marked “Ebor Way Wetherby,” only 2 miles to go !! Although this is simply following the Ebor Way and you really can’t go wrong, a few directions have been included, just in case. Follow the track with no turn offs until you meet the farm road. Carry straight on. Past the farm on your left and on a right hand bend follow the arrow straight ahead. You are now walking fairly close to the river and where there is something similar to a “lay by” on your left you can see down to the river and another weir. It's quite surprising just how high up you are.


36

WALK 9

- continued

Over “almost� a stile, across the fields until you come to Watersole Lane. Cross straight over into Heuthwaite Lane (marked as a path but not named). This really is a lovely grass track which you follow until you meet up with the motorway. Turn right and then left over the motorway and straight ahead into Wetherby. Ignore the "Town Centre" signs but carry straight on, past the Angel Inn on your left and into Main Street. More or less straight across will see you in the Square but if you fancy a sit down by the river, or urgently need to catch the bus, turn left and make your way down to the mini roundabout. Left down to the river or right to the Bus Station, at the time of writing the buses back to Bramham were 5 to and 25 past the hour. A good time for this walk is on a Thursday morning when the market is in full swing in the Square.

WEIR AT BOSTON SPA


37

TADCASTER BUILDING LIMESTONE

The quarry produces some of the most sought after Building Limestone in the country with a history going back to Roman times. The Roman name for Tadcaster was “Calcaria” which means “Place of Limestone” and the stone from the area was used to build Roman York. In Norman times stone was shipped via the Wharfe and Ouse for the building of York Minster and is also used to this day in restoration work. In the Middle Ages it was also exported to London and other places in the south of England. It was used during the construction of King's College Chapel, Cambridge, Westminster Hall and Rochester Castle. The stone is a magnesiun limestone and belongs to the Permian series, which is dated at approximately 250 million years old. The Stone Signs at the entrances to the village came from the quarry.


38

BIKE RIDE THIS IS A CIRCULAR RIDE OF APPROXIMATELY 10 MILES FROM BRAMHAM TO CROMPTON AND BACK. THERE ARE SOME OUTSTANDING VIEWS ON ROUTE AND AT CROMPTON THE PERFECT PICNIC SITE. THE ROUTE IS NOT TOO DIFFICULT AND IS SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN. ALTHOUGH THE OFF ROAD BIT IS ON TRACKS THE BIKE SHOULD HAVE SOME OFF ROAD CAPABILITY.

With your back to the War Memorial and the Red Lion on your right, turn left and ride up the road past the wood yard. At the junction turn right and then left over the motorway towards Thorner. Carry on down Thorner Road until you come to a very sharp left hand bend. Go straight across, but be very wary of traffic rounding the bend, as they drive far too fast on this section, into Thorner Lane. Carry on for about 1½ miles until you see a road junction on the right ( you will arrive at this junction on the return route ). Just before the junction you will see a gateway on the left, usually with a couple of parked cars. There is a tatty sign indicating that this is a bridleway. Down the track, ignore the first bridleway sign on the right and keep on the original track which now starts to run down the side of a field. Turn right at the end of the field, but look out for the track on the right running parallel to the main track, this is used for horse training. No turn offs and carry on to the end where you meet up with the road. Turn right. Keep on this road ignoring the right turn at the first junction. Shortly after this you will exit a small wood and the views start to open up.


39

BIKE RIDE

- continued

At Rigton Farm there is a sharp left then right hand bend, ignore the left turn to Bardsey and carry on to East Rigton and right at the junction. Carry on and ignore the right fork, Bramham Lane, but just after this look out for an old bench on the left. This is a good place for a rest as the view is quite spectacular. At the next X roads straight on to Compton. Keep left in the village down to the village pond, a great spot for lunch. Return to the X roads and turn left. Do not be tempted to take any turn offs but carry on to the road junction opposite where you turned onto the bridleway, just over a mile. Turn left and retrace your route back to Bramham. When you cross over the motorway, to get back to the War Memorial, you can either turn left or turn right and then first left.

COMPTON POND


BRAMHAM WAR MEMORIAL

Printed by Write Design & Print Ltd, Wetherby

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Bramham - Book of Walks  

A Book of Walks around the Village of Bramham - West Yorkshire - England. Compiled by Ernest Nichols.

Bramham - Book of Walks  

A Book of Walks around the Village of Bramham - West Yorkshire - England. Compiled by Ernest Nichols.

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